Author Topic: Overheard on Facebook  (Read 4951025 times)

rockstache

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8350 on: November 23, 2020, 05:10:34 AM »
Our washer gave up about 13 years ago, we had to decide whether to get a washer and dryer or just the washer. We bought just a washer. Since then, I have replaced the belt and a overtemp circuit breaker on the dryer, but it's still doing it's job. It just breaks my heart they don't match, NOT.

I was given someone's castoff dryer and I put it next to my (relatively) new washer. Every visitor who goes into the basement says, "Oh dear, your laundry appliances are not coordinated!" and leaves my house. Not.

The dryer was being given away because the owner's washer wore out and she replaced both the washer and dryer with a new matching set, complete with all the bells and whistles. It turned out the fancy dryer has a steam setting, so she couldn't use it until she called a plumber in to run piping to the dryer.

Until I read this, I had no idea matching washer/dryer sets were even a thing. But if people care so much about that, why don't they just buy a washer/dryer in one?


  I've never seen one of these in the US. I don't think we sell them here, or at least they are very rare.

Imma

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8351 on: November 23, 2020, 05:25:57 AM »
Our washer gave up about 13 years ago, we had to decide whether to get a washer and dryer or just the washer. We bought just a washer. Since then, I have replaced the belt and a overtemp circuit breaker on the dryer, but it's still doing it's job. It just breaks my heart they don't match, NOT.

I was given someone's castoff dryer and I put it next to my (relatively) new washer. Every visitor who goes into the basement says, "Oh dear, your laundry appliances are not coordinated!" and leaves my house. Not.

The dryer was being given away because the owner's washer wore out and she replaced both the washer and dryer with a new matching set, complete with all the bells and whistles. It turned out the fancy dryer has a steam setting, so she couldn't use it until she called a plumber in to run piping to the dryer.

Until I read this, I had no idea matching washer/dryer sets were even a thing. But if people care so much about that, why don't they just buy a washer/dryer in one?


  I've never seen one of these in the US. I don't think we sell them here, or at least they are very rare.

Maybe because people have less space for all those machines in Europe? They're not cheap so most people I know still only have a washing machine.

merula

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8352 on: November 23, 2020, 09:10:50 AM »
The US version of a washer/dryer combo is the kind that has the washer part on the bottom and the dryer part on the top, usually for apartments that want to advertise "in-unit laundry" (https://www.homedepot.com/pep/Whirlpool-White-Thin-Twin-Laundry-Center-with-1-5-cu-ft-Washer-and-3-4-cu-ft-Electric-Vented-Dryer-LTE5243DQ/203576383).

The European version where it's one spinning drum that has both functions, that kind I've never seen in the US, but apparently they do exist because Home Depot is selling them. (https://www.homedepot.com/p/LG-Electronics-2-3-cu-ft-White-Compact-All-in-One-Front-Load-Washer-and-Electric-Ventless-Dryer-Combo-WM3488HW/207024916).

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8353 on: November 23, 2020, 12:35:31 PM »
The US version of a washer/dryer combo is the kind that has the washer part on the bottom and the dryer part on the top, usually for apartments that want to advertise "in-unit laundry" (https://www.homedepot.com/pep/Whirlpool-White-Thin-Twin-Laundry-Center-with-1-5-cu-ft-Washer-and-3-4-cu-ft-Electric-Vented-Dryer-LTE5243DQ/203576383).

The European version where it's one spinning drum that has both functions, that kind I've never seen in the US, but apparently they do exist because Home Depot is selling them. (https://www.homedepot.com/p/LG-Electronics-2-3-cu-ft-White-Compact-All-in-One-Front-Load-Washer-and-Electric-Ventless-Dryer-Combo-WM3488HW/207024916).

Yep, you can get the European version in the US, though it's not widely available. I used to have one. They have a very small drum, and in my experience the dryer doesn't dry all the way no matter what you do, so you still basically have to hang the laundry up for a bit at the end, anyway. (Note that I have used them in Europe, and the ones I've used there don't seem to have that problem.)

Zikoris

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8354 on: November 23, 2020, 12:57:43 PM »
The US version of a washer/dryer combo is the kind that has the washer part on the bottom and the dryer part on the top, usually for apartments that want to advertise "in-unit laundry" (https://www.homedepot.com/pep/Whirlpool-White-Thin-Twin-Laundry-Center-with-1-5-cu-ft-Washer-and-3-4-cu-ft-Electric-Vented-Dryer-LTE5243DQ/203576383).

The European version where it's one spinning drum that has both functions, that kind I've never seen in the US, but apparently they do exist because Home Depot is selling them. (https://www.homedepot.com/p/LG-Electronics-2-3-cu-ft-White-Compact-All-in-One-Front-Load-Washer-and-Electric-Ventless-Dryer-Combo-WM3488HW/207024916).

Yep, you can get the European version in the US, though it's not widely available. I used to have one. They have a very small drum, and in my experience the dryer doesn't dry all the way no matter what you do, so you still basically have to hang the laundry up for a bit at the end, anyway. (Note that I have used them in Europe, and the ones I've used there don't seem to have that problem.)

These are becoming incredibly common in the small condos they build in Vancouver, because they can fit under the kitchen counters and don't need a separate room or closet to put them in. I imagine they'll become more common everywhere as smaller places are built.

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8355 on: November 23, 2020, 02:54:30 PM »
I looked at them briefly when we needed to replace our washer and dryer s year ago. The ratings on Consumer Reports were quite a bit lower than for separate machines that do one function.

Yes, I bought a matching set as my dryer died and my washer had been leaking. I had a repair person out who recommended against repair as the cost of parts + labor was pretty close to the cost of replacement. We had a small space so stacking was the only way to go.

Imma

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8356 on: November 23, 2020, 03:29:33 PM »
The US version of a washer/dryer combo is the kind that has the washer part on the bottom and the dryer part on the top, usually for apartments that want to advertise "in-unit laundry" (https://www.homedepot.com/pep/Whirlpool-White-Thin-Twin-Laundry-Center-with-1-5-cu-ft-Washer-and-3-4-cu-ft-Electric-Vented-Dryer-LTE5243DQ/203576383).

The European version where it's one spinning drum that has both functions, that kind I've never seen in the US, but apparently they do exist because Home Depot is selling them. (https://www.homedepot.com/p/LG-Electronics-2-3-cu-ft-White-Compact-All-in-One-Front-Load-Washer-and-Electric-Ventless-Dryer-Combo-WM3488HW/207024916).

Yep, you can get the European version in the US, though it's not widely available. I used to have one. They have a very small drum, and in my experience the dryer doesn't dry all the way no matter what you do, so you still basically have to hang the laundry up for a bit at the end, anyway. (Note that I have used them in Europe, and the ones I've used there don't seem to have that problem.)

These are becoming incredibly common in the small condos they build in Vancouver, because they can fit under the kitchen counters and don't need a separate room or closet to put them in. I imagine they'll become more common everywhere as smaller places are built.

Yes, mine is under the kitchen counter too! Weird that the ones you can buy there don't work properly. I have used my dryer less than 10 times in 2 years but when I did it worked. In here almost everyone has a washing machine . Sharing a machine with others in the building or using a laundrette is something that most people would consider to be very unhygienic.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8357 on: November 24, 2020, 12:24:11 AM »
The US version of a washer/dryer combo is the kind that has the washer part on the bottom and the dryer part on the top, usually for apartments that want to advertise "in-unit laundry" (https://www.homedepot.com/pep/Whirlpool-White-Thin-Twin-Laundry-Center-with-1-5-cu-ft-Washer-and-3-4-cu-ft-Electric-Vented-Dryer-LTE5243DQ/203576383).

The European version where it's one spinning drum that has both functions, that kind I've never seen in the US, but apparently they do exist because Home Depot is selling them. (https://www.homedepot.com/p/LG-Electronics-2-3-cu-ft-White-Compact-All-in-One-Front-Load-Washer-and-Electric-Ventless-Dryer-Combo-WM3488HW/207024916).

Yep, you can get the European version in the US, though it's not widely available. I used to have one. They have a very small drum, and in my experience the dryer doesn't dry all the way no matter what you do, so you still basically have to hang the laundry up for a bit at the end, anyway. (Note that I have used them in Europe, and the ones I've used there don't seem to have that problem.)

These are becoming incredibly common in the small condos they build in Vancouver, because they can fit under the kitchen counters and don't need a separate room or closet to put them in. I imagine they'll become more common everywhere as smaller places are built.

Why wouldn't they be?  Vancouver is basically europe right?

Paul der Krake

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8358 on: November 24, 2020, 12:51:53 AM »
The US version of a washer/dryer combo is the kind that has the washer part on the bottom and the dryer part on the top, usually for apartments that want to advertise "in-unit laundry" (https://www.homedepot.com/pep/Whirlpool-White-Thin-Twin-Laundry-Center-with-1-5-cu-ft-Washer-and-3-4-cu-ft-Electric-Vented-Dryer-LTE5243DQ/203576383).

The European version where it's one spinning drum that has both functions, that kind I've never seen in the US, but apparently they do exist because Home Depot is selling them. (https://www.homedepot.com/p/LG-Electronics-2-3-cu-ft-White-Compact-All-in-One-Front-Load-Washer-and-Electric-Ventless-Dryer-Combo-WM3488HW/207024916).

Yep, you can get the European version in the US, though it's not widely available. I used to have one. They have a very small drum, and in my experience the dryer doesn't dry all the way no matter what you do, so you still basically have to hang the laundry up for a bit at the end, anyway. (Note that I have used them in Europe, and the ones I've used there don't seem to have that problem.)

These are becoming incredibly common in the small condos they build in Vancouver, because they can fit under the kitchen counters and don't need a separate room or closet to put them in. I imagine they'll become more common everywhere as smaller places are built.

Why wouldn't they be?  Vancouver is basically europe right?
Nope, the Vancouver area is an outpost of Very East Hawaii

Feivel2000

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8359 on: November 24, 2020, 01:17:41 AM »
The US version of a washer/dryer combo is the kind that has the washer part on the bottom and the dryer part on the top, usually for apartments that want to advertise "in-unit laundry" (https://www.homedepot.com/pep/Whirlpool-White-Thin-Twin-Laundry-Center-with-1-5-cu-ft-Washer-and-3-4-cu-ft-Electric-Vented-Dryer-LTE5243DQ/203576383).

The European version where it's one spinning drum that has both functions, that kind I've never seen in the US, but apparently they do exist because Home Depot is selling them. (https://www.homedepot.com/p/LG-Electronics-2-3-cu-ft-White-Compact-All-in-One-Front-Load-Washer-and-Electric-Ventless-Dryer-Combo-WM3488HW/207024916).

Yep, you can get the European version in the US, though it's not widely available. I used to have one. They have a very small drum, and in my experience the dryer doesn't dry all the way no matter what you do, so you still basically have to hang the laundry up for a bit at the end, anyway. (Note that I have used them in Europe, and the ones I've used there don't seem to have that problem.)

These are becoming incredibly common in the small condos they build in Vancouver, because they can fit under the kitchen counters and don't need a separate room or closet to put them in. I imagine they'll become more common everywhere as smaller places are built.

Yes, mine is under the kitchen counter too! Weird that the ones you can buy there don't work properly. I have used my dryer less than 10 times in 2 years but when I did it worked. In here almost everyone has a washing machine . Sharing a machine with others in the building or using a laundrette is something that most people would consider to be very unhygienic.

My washing machine is (almost) broken, to the point I can't risk to leave the flat if it is running. When I am done remodeling my bath, I am going to buy a 2-in-1 device as well.
I don't see myself using the dryer very often, but it is convenient to have the ability. They are more expensive, but not to the point that, over the lifetime of 5-10 years, it is unreasonable. We are talking about ~249€ (washing machine only) VS ~449€ (combination).

merula

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8360 on: November 24, 2020, 06:34:40 AM »
Unfortunately, the whole "reasonably livable small apartment" trend has yet to hit the US.

Sugaree

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8361 on: November 24, 2020, 09:44:44 AM »
We had what was labeled as a "portable washing machine" when the kiddo was small.  It was the dedicated diaper machine and doubled as a diaper pail.  It was great for that and probably would have worked for a single person, but I would be leery of trying to make it work for more than that.   

ChickenStash

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8362 on: November 25, 2020, 08:40:39 AM »
My house has plenty room for a washer and dryer but I always liked the idea of an all-in-one. They seem pricey, though. Looks like the US ones are wired for 120v rather than the 240v most EU countries use so that would might explain the poor drying. 

Cadman

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8363 on: November 25, 2020, 10:33:39 AM »
All-in-one washer/dryers have been available in the US since the 1950's from all the major makers, and really peaked here in the early 60's (I have a couple). The problem was small drum size, low extraction speed and cost and complexity. But the biggest issue is serial throughput. If you're washing a load of laundry, you can't also be drying in parallel. Not a big deal if you wash frequently, but if you wait until the end of the week, you'll be feeding that machine all day long.

Another issue is that these combos use a condensing technique for drying (no venting required) but that extends dry time to HOURS. In the end it's not generally worth the trade-off for most Americans where we have room for separate or stacked units.

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8364 on: November 25, 2020, 10:48:05 AM »
We used to have one in our last kitchen, where we needed the condensing dryer. I ran very small loads (like a week's worth of socks for 2 people) and it dried fine. I would hate to be using now for our household of 6! The biggest problem was finding a repair person who had ever heard of one and was willing to come out. A huge hassle and $$.

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8365 on: November 27, 2020, 07:59:38 AM »
We have had a washer-dryer for several years now and it's amazing with kids. We hang dry most of the time but sometimes you just NEED something to be dry before bedtime. Washing capacity is the same as a regular machine but I think a lot of people don't understand that you can't dry a full load at a time effectively. We use the drying function once a month on average and I love not having to house a whole separate machine but also being able to dry something FAST when required. (Also, it is vented not condensing.) I concur that everyone in the US seems to have gigantic houses and therefore plenty of space for two machines. Culturally over here, the washing machine is usually in the kitchen under the countertop so to have two separate machines removes a whole kitchen cupboard. See: https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/ryanhatesthis/its-time-to-accept-that-british-people-are-right-your

Though if I were building a house, I'd seriously consider putting one in the bathroom. Even though it feels weird. I think it would be really convenient.

Dicey

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8366 on: November 27, 2020, 09:11:35 AM »
One place these all-in-ones are popping up in the US is in large RV's, called Class A's. These behemoths are bigger than many European apartments and even houses. DH and I recently toured a lavish RV park, where the minimum allowable size is 30'. Once inside, we discovered that must be code for "Nothing but fancy deisel powered busses, please." An RV Dealer was having an Open "House" on the property, featuring three such rigs. The prices ranged from $400k to $500k and each of them featured these w/d units. Full size refrigerators, too.

Since this a mustachian blog, I will add that DH and I stumbled on this place during a Random Ramble. We didn't know such a place existed. The lots can cost as much as a new rig and can be improved with permanent structures, including private swimming pools, even though the property has three public pools and a lavish clubhouse. The place has a full-service restaurant, a nine hole golf course and two miles of waterways ( In the Desert!). Of course, that means people have build docks for their fancy-ass pontoon boats.

DH and I are quite FI and could actually "afford" this lifestyle, but why the hell would we choose to massacre our hard earned green soldiers so senselessly? Oh, and the monthly dues were about $550, plus a $1700 minimum monthly spend at the "Country Club". We are still laughing our assets  off, especially at those silly all-in-ones.

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8367 on: November 27, 2020, 09:39:16 AM »
One place these all-in-ones are popping up in the US is in large RV's, called Class A's. These behemoths are bigger than many European apartments and even houses. DH and I recently toured a lavish RV park, where the minimum allowable size is 30'. Once inside, we discovered that must be code for "Nothing but fancy deisel powered busses, please." An RV Dealer was having an Open "House" on the property, featuring three such rigs. The prices ranged from $400k to $500k and each of them featured these w/d units. Full size refrigerators, too.

Since this a mustachian blog, I will add that DH and I stumbled on this place during a Random Ramble. We didn't know such a place existed. The lots can cost as much as a new rig and can be improved with permanent structures, including private swimming pools, even though the property has three public pools and a lavish clubhouse. The place has a full-service restaurant, a nine hole golf course and two miles of waterways ( In the Desert!). Of course, that means people have build docks for their fancy-ass pontoon boats.

DH and I are quite FI and could actually "afford" this lifestyle, but why the hell would we choose to massacre our hard earned green soldiers so senselessly? Oh, and the monthly dues were about $550, plus a $1700 minimum monthly spend at the "Country Club". We are still laughing our assets  off, especially at those silly all-in-ones.

Is the idea that this park would be your "home base" and you would drive the 'rig' on trip as you wanted?

Zaga

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8368 on: November 27, 2020, 09:43:01 AM »
Alan that's pretty much it.  I have a cousin who does this.  Mind, she and her husband retired early, and I think their home base is not as fancy as the one described above. 

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8369 on: November 28, 2020, 08:00:32 AM »
I saw one of these busses on the highway a few days ago. Bus towing a four door Jeep towing a utility trailer carrying ATVs.

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8370 on: November 28, 2020, 08:16:44 AM »
We have had a washer-dryer for several years now and it's amazing with kids. We hang dry most of the time but sometimes you just NEED something to be dry before bedtime. Washing capacity is the same as a regular machine but I think a lot of people don't understand that you can't dry a full load at a time effectively. We use the drying function once a month on average and I love not having to house a whole separate machine but also being able to dry something FAST when required. (Also, it is vented not condensing.) I concur that everyone in the US seems to have gigantic houses and therefore plenty of space for two machines. Culturally over here, the washing machine is usually in the kitchen under the countertop so to have two separate machines removes a whole kitchen cupboard. See: https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/ryanhatesthis/its-time-to-accept-that-british-people-are-right-your

Though if I were building a house, I'd seriously consider putting one in the bathroom. Even though it feels weird. I think it would be really convenient.
Is it actually better to have it in the kitchen or is that just where the washer ends up for lack of any other place to put it?

In this place I have a stackable washer/dryer in the toilet room just off of the kitchen. There is a toilet, a sink, some storage, including a counter top that presumably others would use to fold laundry but we use as a baby changing table. It is convenient but I like being able to close a door to mute the noise of the machines.

MayDay

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8371 on: November 28, 2020, 09:56:49 AM »
We have a basement so no space issues. But I would definitely go for an all in one if we didn't- we hang 90% of laundry and the 10% we do dry, we don't really need a full dryer for.

I have a family friend with an extremely posh NY apartment, on central park. Still small because NY, so she has a washer under her kitchen counter! I have also seen it as a US remodel in larger houses to allow for 1 level living. Most older houses put the washer in the basement, so people move it to the kitchen when they can't do basement stairs anymore.

PDXTabs

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8372 on: November 28, 2020, 10:19:25 AM »
Most flats I see in the UK have the washing machine in the kitchen and no dryer. Air dry with a rack.

Imma

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8373 on: November 28, 2020, 11:06:16 AM »
We have had a washer-dryer for several years now and it's amazing with kids. We hang dry most of the time but sometimes you just NEED something to be dry before bedtime. Washing capacity is the same as a regular machine but I think a lot of people don't understand that you can't dry a full load at a time effectively. We use the drying function once a month on average and I love not having to house a whole separate machine but also being able to dry something FAST when required. (Also, it is vented not condensing.) I concur that everyone in the US seems to have gigantic houses and therefore plenty of space for two machines. Culturally over here, the washing machine is usually in the kitchen under the countertop so to have two separate machines removes a whole kitchen cupboard. See: https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/ryanhatesthis/its-time-to-accept-that-british-people-are-right-your

Though if I were building a house, I'd seriously consider putting one in the bathroom. Even though it feels weird. I think it would be really convenient.
Is it actually better to have it in the kitchen or is that just where the washer ends up for lack of any other place to put it?

In this place I have a stackable washer/dryer in the toilet room just off of the kitchen. There is a toilet, a sink, some storage, including a counter top that presumably others would use to fold laundry but we use as a baby changing table. It is convenient but I like being able to close a door to mute the noise of the machines.

For me personally, I love having it in the kitchen. It's next to the back door so I don't have to carry wet laundry very far. It's also much more convenient for moving/replacement. We have an open kitchen so yes, I do hear the machine, but our first floor is wood so if we had put it there we'd still hear it (the neighbours have theirs on the first floor and we hear it).

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8374 on: November 28, 2020, 11:24:40 AM »
Having a combination laundry room and powder room (toilet and sink) is fairly common, since they both need plumbing.  2 of 4 of the houses I owned, the 2 newer builds, had this, and my apartment has this. 

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8375 on: November 29, 2020, 12:43:57 PM »
Condensing dryers really don't work all that well. Having grown up in Europe, we had one of them and most of the time we just hung laundry up instead. Now, in Canada, I live in an apartment condo with a laundry room that allows for a vented dryer. We have a Miele combination that is basically a free-standing washing machine and a vented dryer screwed to the top of it by way of an accessory part that allows for "stacking" in that manner. The vented dryer wins hands-down. Easier to use, no need for a condensate pump, and after an hour the clothes are dry. But if the washer ever conks out the dryer would be replaced as well. Even if I could get a similar washer, the work in screwing the units together is annoying enough not to screw a 15-year old dryer onto a brand new washer.

European apartments usually have the washer in the kitchen, installed in the same manner as a dishwasher. In that case, a combination unit is the only way to have a dryer. Even in cases where the washer is in the bathroom, there is usually no ability to vent, so a condensing dryer is all that can be installed.

I miss Europe, but I can unequivocally state that the three greatest things about life in North America compared to Europe are as follows (in order of descending importance):

1. Air conditioning
2. Drinking fountains (free water - you take it for granted until you no longer have it and have to pay EUR2.00 for a bottle of Vittel)
3. Dryer vents in every house or apartment

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8376 on: November 29, 2020, 01:47:34 PM »
#2 would be my #1.  Once while backpacking through Slovakia, I actually had a nightmare about being lost in the desert and being parched with thirst.  We hadn't had time to stock up on bottled water before heading to the hostel.  I woke up out of the nightmare and said, "Screw it!"  I (gasp!) filled up my water bottle from the sink and downed a couple of liters.  Everything turned out just fine, but we still had to pay 2 Euros for water with our lunch in Vienna.  There are a lot of things I enjoy about Europe, but buying water, teeny tiny toilets and showers, and line-dried towels I can do without.

Fomerly known as something

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8377 on: November 29, 2020, 04:21:04 PM »
I have noticed that more places in Europe now will serve you tap water for free than say 20 years ago.  Notice I said more, not all.  I mostly do order tap water along with a glass of wine or a beer while dining there now and yes I fill my own bottles from the room’s sink.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8378 on: November 30, 2020, 10:40:32 AM »
We have had a washer-dryer for several years now and it's amazing with kids. We hang dry most of the time but sometimes you just NEED something to be dry before bedtime. Washing capacity is the same as a regular machine but I think a lot of people don't understand that you can't dry a full load at a time effectively. We use the drying function once a month on average and I love not having to house a whole separate machine but also being able to dry something FAST when required. (Also, it is vented not condensing.) I concur that everyone in the US seems to have gigantic houses and therefore plenty of space for two machines. Culturally over here, the washing machine is usually in the kitchen under the countertop so to have two separate machines removes a whole kitchen cupboard. See: https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/ryanhatesthis/its-time-to-accept-that-british-people-are-right-your

Though if I were building a house, I'd seriously consider putting one in the bathroom. Even though it feels weird. I think it would be really convenient.
Is it actually better to have it in the kitchen or is that just where the washer ends up for lack of any other place to put it?

In this place I have a stackable washer/dryer in the toilet room just off of the kitchen. There is a toilet, a sink, some storage, including a counter top that presumably others would use to fold laundry but we use as a baby changing table. It is convenient but I like being able to close a door to mute the noise of the machines.

Well, you'd want to put it near existing plumbing. We don't have basements. Only some houses have a downstairs loo, and it's usually the size of a cupboard - enough room for loo, basin and a person standing there trying not to get crushed by the door closing. I suppose some houses would have enough room to have it in their upstairs bathroom but there wouldn't be enough space to hang the laundry in there as well, so you'd have to cart it somewhere else in the house to dry it.

BUT bear in mind that our kitchens tend to be separate rooms. Some people have knocked through, but usually you would cook the meal in the kitchen and then close the door on it. I don't know what the prevalence of eat-in kitchens vs separate dining spaces is. We've never had enough room to have a table in our kitchen even if we'd wanted to - but my parents did eat every meal in the kitchen until they built an extension, despite also having a dining room. (But the extension also had a utility room!) However, when we were thinking of buying a house we were looking at the low end of the market and again, the kitchen wouldn't have fit a table in so it tended to be living-dining rooms. So you're only hearing the machine noise while you're cooking and possibly while you're actually sat there eating a meal.

I think it must be to do with the age of yer average British house* and the invention of both indoor plumbing per se and fancypants technology like a MACHINE that does your washing FOR YOU rather than sending it to the laundry lady down the street to boil up in her copper and squeeze out with her mangle.

*http://www.historicdoors.co.uk/blog/englands-building-age-infographic/

EricEng

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8379 on: November 30, 2020, 01:16:46 PM »
#2 would be my #1.  Once while backpacking through Slovakia, I actually had a nightmare about being lost in the desert and being parched with thirst.  We hadn't had time to stock up on bottled water before heading to the hostel.  I woke up out of the nightmare and said, "Screw it!"  I (gasp!) filled up my water bottle from the sink and downed a couple of liters.  Everything turned out just fine, but we still had to pay 2 Euros for water with our lunch in Vienna.  There are a lot of things I enjoy about Europe, but buying water, teeny tiny toilets and showers, and line-dried towels I can do without.
Ugh, I hated this traveling in Europe.  They never had drinking fountains anywhere, we might have seen one for two weeks in Germany.  All the restaurants about threw us out if we asked for tap water or they tried to charge 8Euros for a pitcher.  People gave us dirty looks filling up bottles in bathroom sinks.  Coming from having easy free access to water everywhere in the US, this was confusing.  It forced you to be very strategic about planning for water stops or expect to pay 2-3Euro for tiny water bottles everywhere.  At least in US you can get water for $1-2 and it's bigger if you really want a new bottle everytime.  For an environmentally focused people, Europeans like to waste lots of bottles.

I worked a trade show at an airfield in a hot summer in Germany one year.  During the last hour on the last day we gave away all the hundreds of unused leftover water bottles we had been saving for client visits.  We nearly got mobbed and caused a riot.  I've never seen people react so strongly to giving out free water.  Was like opening at a Wal Mart on Black Friday.
« Last Edit: November 30, 2020, 01:19:51 PM by EricEng »

Sibley

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8380 on: November 30, 2020, 01:28:26 PM »
Someone from a European country, can you help explain any of the water related stuff? I don't understand why even getting tap water seems like such a big deal.

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8381 on: November 30, 2020, 01:32:23 PM »
I never had any trouble getting tap water in France. You ask for something like "un carafe d'eau" (a jug of water) IIRC and of the things I received attitude about, that was never one of them.

A couple of times, a waiter even brought us ICE--which we knew better than to ask for--because "American girls like ice." (Other waiters were, of course, suitably horrible and pretended not to know English.)

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8382 on: November 30, 2020, 01:36:13 PM »
I never had any trouble getting tap water in France. You ask for something like "un carafe d'eau" (a jug of water) IIRC and of the things I received attitude about, that was never one of them.

A couple of times, a waiter even brought us ICE--which we knew better than to ask for--because "American girls like ice." (Other waiters were, of course, suitably horrible and pretended not to know English.)

In many places, that isn't tap water, it is filtered water out of a 5 gallon dispenser.

ChickenStash

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8383 on: November 30, 2020, 01:45:17 PM »
I've only been outside the US a few times and I always figured having to buy bottled water was more about being a tourist and avoiding GI issues with the local tap water. Is it really that common outside the US to not have free/easy access to public drinking fountains, water at restaurants, etc?

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8384 on: November 30, 2020, 02:08:55 PM »
I've only been outside the US a few times and I always figured having to buy bottled water was more about being a tourist and avoiding GI issues with the local tap water. Is it really that common outside the US to not have free/easy access to public drinking fountains, water at restaurants, etc?

I think it's more of a profit center for restaurants if they're able to sell a beverage instead of giving it away for free.

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8385 on: November 30, 2020, 02:24:11 PM »
I never had any trouble getting tap water in France. You ask for something like "un carafe d'eau" (a jug of water) IIRC and of the things I received attitude about, that was never one of them.

A couple of times, a waiter even brought us ICE--which we knew better than to ask for--because "American girls like ice." (Other waiters were, of course, suitably horrible and pretended not to know English.)

In many places, that isn't tap water, it is filtered water out of a 5 gallon dispenser.

The important thing from my perspective was that it was free :-).

Imma

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8386 on: November 30, 2020, 03:23:12 PM »
I've only been outside the US a few times and I always figured having to buy bottled water was more about being a tourist and avoiding GI issues with the local tap water. Is it really that common outside the US to not have free/easy access to public drinking fountains, water at restaurants, etc?

I think it's more of a profit center for restaurants if they're able to sell a beverage instead of giving it away for free.

I think that's the reason. I'm in Europe, I think bottled water is a waste, so I just ask for tap water and say I'm willing to pay for it. Restaurants make money mainly from the drinks, not the food.

There are plenty of places these days where you can fill up your water bottle but free water in a cheap restaurant isn't going to be easy to find. When I hear about American portion sizes and free refills I wonder how restaurants make any profit there.

Paul der Krake

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8387 on: November 30, 2020, 03:40:40 PM »
The free refills are for soft drinks fountains. The machine takes syrup and carbonated water as input, and dispenses the drink for a lot cheaper than cans or bottles. The cost to the restaurant is negligible. Most customers get zero or one refill anyway.

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8388 on: November 30, 2020, 03:43:10 PM »
When I hear about American portion sizes and free refills I wonder how restaurants make any profit there.

Easy, we dont pay the people working in restaurants; nor do they get healthcare, sick leave, vacation time or a secure and regular set of work hours.  And most of that applies to the people that grow/raise the ingredients that go into the meals.  #dow30k

SwordGuy

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8389 on: November 30, 2020, 03:48:49 PM »
When I hear about American portion sizes and free refills I wonder how restaurants make any profit there.

Easy, we dont pay the people working in restaurants; nor do they get healthcare, sick leave, vacation time or a secure and regular set of work hours.  And most of that applies to the people that grow/raise the ingredients that go into the meals.  #dow30k

Damn skippy.   You nailed it.   The fact that we have working poor (and a well-known term for it so it's not like no line knows) is a damning indictment on our country and countrymen.

draco44

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8390 on: November 30, 2020, 06:05:49 PM »
#2 would be my #1.  Once while backpacking through Slovakia, I actually had a nightmare about being lost in the desert and being parched with thirst.  We hadn't had time to stock up on bottled water before heading to the hostel.  I woke up out of the nightmare and said, "Screw it!"  I (gasp!) filled up my water bottle from the sink and downed a couple of liters.  Everything turned out just fine, but we still had to pay 2 Euros for water with our lunch in Vienna.  There are a lot of things I enjoy about Europe, but buying water, teeny tiny toilets and showers, and line-dried towels I can do without.
Ugh, I hated this traveling in Europe.  They never had drinking fountains anywhere, we might have seen one for two weeks in Germany.  All the restaurants about threw us out if we asked for tap water or they tried to charge 8Euros for a pitcher.  People gave us dirty looks filling up bottles in bathroom sinks.  Coming from having easy free access to water everywhere in the US, this was confusing.  It forced you to be very strategic about planning for water stops or expect to pay 2-3Euro for tiny water bottles everywhere.  At least in US you can get water for $1-2 and it's bigger if you really want a new bottle everytime.  For an environmentally focused people, Europeans like to waste lots of bottles.

I worked a trade show at an airfield in a hot summer in Germany one year.  During the last hour on the last day we gave away all the hundreds of unused leftover water bottles we had been saving for client visits.  We nearly got mobbed and caused a riot.  I've never seen people react so strongly to giving out free water.  Was like opening at a Wal Mart on Black Friday.

I'm not sure how much extrapolating is useful here, but aside from restaurant folk being annoyed at the loss of a beverage sale, German/Austrian folks I know have mentioned that there is something of a a lingering cultural suspicion over the quality of tap water due to legitimate water quality concerns after the World Wars as well more anciently during the medieval period, when you definitely didn't want to be drinking city water. That may be a generational thing.

And it may not help that tap water is"leitungswasser," or literally pipe/plumbing water. Basically a step up from sewer water. I've heard the claim that it's not good etiquette to serve a guest leitungswasser. But I've also heard other people say they drink tap water, the term has no negative connotation in German, and just is what it is. Also a lot of people just drink less water overall there, and prefer to drink only sparkling water.

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8391 on: November 30, 2020, 06:28:39 PM »
I've only been outside the US a few times and I always figured having to buy bottled water was more about being a tourist and avoiding GI issues with the local tap water. Is it really that common outside the US to not have free/easy access to public drinking fountains, water at restaurants, etc?

Yes. Almost no other countries have public drinking fountains.

As for water at restaurants, you can get that, but depending on the country, potability for someone used to US water is not guaranteed.

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8392 on: November 30, 2020, 07:28:12 PM »
I've only been outside the US a few times and I always figured having to buy bottled water was more about being a tourist and avoiding GI issues with the local tap water. Is it really that common outside the US to not have free/easy access to public drinking fountains, water at restaurants, etc?

I think it's more of a profit center for restaurants if they're able to sell a beverage instead of giving it away for free.

My first ever trip to a German restaurant I asked for a glass of water. It took a couple translations for the waitress to understand I was asking for tap water. She looked at me like I was either crazy or an asshole. I didn't know yet that a typical order of water was out of a glass bottle that you paid for.  I also learned on this trip that metal contaminants in tap water is a common concern. The faucets on our base in Germany all had warnings to run the water for 30 seconds to flush out lead.

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8393 on: December 01, 2020, 05:22:11 AM »
Yes. Almost no other countries have public drinking fountains.

In the UK we used to have public drinking fountains 30-40 years ago but they've largely disappeared. The reasons I think are perception of the possibility of disease transmission via the fountain, cost of upkeep (local authorities have had their income progressively reduced over the last 30 years so most of them can only provide basic services), vandalism and the fact that few people will deign to drink tapwater.

FWIW I don't recall having any particular issues getting drinking water in restaurants in the European countries that I've visited.

As for water at restaurants, you can get that, but depending on the country, potability for someone used to US water is not guaranteed.

Apart from some third world countries I doubt that you'll find many with water quality any worse than that in the US. Certainly Western European countries have water standards which are just as high. Yes, if you go off the beaten track you could find places with suspect water supplies, but it's highly unlikely that urban centres have dangerous water.

The US doesn't have uniformly high quality water supplies. https://www.ewg.org/tapwater/state-of-american-drinking-water.php

Kris

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8394 on: December 01, 2020, 05:42:25 AM »
Yes. Almost no other countries have public drinking fountains.

In the UK we used to have public drinking fountains 30-40 years ago but they've largely disappeared. The reasons I think are perception of the possibility of disease transmission via the fountain, cost of upkeep (local authorities have had their income progressively reduced over the last 30 years so most of them can only provide basic services), vandalism and the fact that few people will deign to drink tapwater.

FWIW I don't recall having any particular issues getting drinking water in restaurants in the European countries that I've visited.

As for water at restaurants, you can get that, but depending on the country, potability for someone used to US water is not guaranteed.

Apart from some third world countries I doubt that you'll find many with water quality any worse than that in the US. Certainly Western European countries have water standards which are just as high. Yes, if you go off the beaten track you could find places with suspect water supplies, but it's highly unlikely that urban centres have dangerous water.

The US doesn't have uniformly high quality water supplies. https://www.ewg.org/tapwater/state-of-american-drinking-water.php

Right, not disputing the second part. I wasn’t talking about Western Europe. And the US has some shameful stories re the current state of its drinking water.

Feivel2000

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8395 on: December 01, 2020, 07:36:17 AM »
I've only been outside the US a few times and I always figured having to buy bottled water was more about being a tourist and avoiding GI issues with the local tap water. Is it really that common outside the US to not have free/easy access to public drinking fountains, water at restaurants, etc?

I think it's more of a profit center for restaurants if they're able to sell a beverage instead of giving it away for free.

My first ever trip to a German restaurant I asked for a glass of water. It took a couple translations for the waitress to understand I was asking for tap water. She looked at me like I was either crazy or an asshole. I didn't know yet that a typical order of water was out of a glass bottle that you paid for.  I also learned on this trip that metal contaminants in tap water is a common concern. The faucets on our base in Germany all had warnings to run the water for 30 seconds to flush out lead.

Yes, if you go to a restaurant, it is very unusual to order tap water and expect it to be free. It's a bit like bringing your own food. But it get's more and more common.

But I am really surprised about the second part. There is no food in Germany that is as much regulated and tested as drinking water. I never heard anyone suggesting that "leitungswasser" is similar to sewer water.
In my lifetime (~35 years) I might have heard once that I should run the water for a while before I can drink it. (In this case, the problem is not the water but the plumbing within the house!) I might have heard this advice as a story from my parents, when they talk about old buildings in the 50th and 60ths...

dcheesi

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8396 on: December 01, 2020, 09:13:36 AM »
Plenty of Americans are hung up on water quality as well. Hence the market for Brita filters, fridges with built in filtered water dispensers, etc. A lot of people won't drink their own tap water, regardless of their local water quality reports.

frugalnacho

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8397 on: December 01, 2020, 09:39:58 AM »
Almost everyone I know drinks bottled water.   Most say it's because the tap water has a gross taste.  They are fucking nuts because I get the same tap water as them and it's perfectly fine.  We have excellent water in the metro detroit area. 

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8398 on: December 01, 2020, 10:29:13 AM »
I'm probably spoiled because I grew up somewhere where the public water supply was spring-fed and tap water tasted fine.  When I moved away to college, I finally understood what people talked about when they said that tap water tastes funny.  I did use a Brita filter on my kitchen tap when I lived there.  I had a boss try to sell me on a whole-house filtration system right before I moved back home (I'm pretty sure it was an MLM).  Now, I work in a place where there are some probably-not-unfounded concerns about the mess Monsanto left behind contaminating the groundwater, so we run all of our drinking water/coffee water through a filter. 

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Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #8399 on: December 01, 2020, 11:22:01 AM »
On the web page of my city it just says "The water is perfectly safe to drink unless we say otherwise". If something funny happens (it can get light brown locally due to work on the main pipes) you get a text message explaining why it looks like it does, but still is perfectly safe to drink. On the very, very rare occation something serious happens, everyone in the affected area gets a text recommending boling water before drinking. Not happenend to me yet, but has been the case locally other places in the city over the years as there are more than one resevior and more than one plant where water is treated.

Few things are as throughly monitored as drinking water quality. Everywhere I go in Europe I drink tap water in the hotel and in the restaurants. If I somewhere more funky far away I tend to drink bottled water.