Author Topic: Overheard on Facebook  (Read 3163096 times)

infogoon

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 839
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7000 on: December 06, 2017, 01:25:51 PM »
That's probably correct, because the young, healthier population will opt out of insurance, since it's already expensive and they'd be subsidizing the older/sicker part of the population.

One of my favorite pastimes at family functions is listening to the Baby Boomers complaining about the ACA, without ever acknowledging (or realizing) how much of it was put in place to help their older, unhealthy generation at the expense of the Millennials and Xers.

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2025
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
    • The Live-In Landlord
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7001 on: December 06, 2017, 02:13:44 PM »
That's probably correct, because the young, healthier population will opt out of insurance, since it's already expensive and they'd be subsidizing the older/sicker part of the population.

One of my favorite pastimes at family functions is listening to the Baby Boomers complaining about the ACA, without ever acknowledging (or realizing) how much of it was put in place to help their older, unhealthy generation at the expense of the Millennials and Xers.

Or to keep them from going broke paying for medical treatment for an aging mother or father.

MrMoogle

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1112
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Huntsville, AL
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7002 on: December 06, 2017, 02:43:31 PM »
That's probably correct, because the young, healthier population will opt out of insurance, since it's already expensive and they'd be subsidizing the older/sicker part of the population.

One of my favorite pastimes at family functions is listening to the Baby Boomers complaining about the ACA, without ever acknowledging (or realizing) how much of it was put in place to help their older, unhealthy generation at the expense of the Millennials and Xers.

Or to keep them from going broke paying for medical treatment for an aging mother or father.
Or forcing them to watch a parent rapidly decline when there is a cure/treatment, just you can't afford it.

Fomerly known as something

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 583
  • Location: Midwest
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7003 on: December 08, 2017, 05:45:37 AM »
It's not just the young and healthy that would forgo purchasing insurance. People that have trouble affording insurance (young people are double screwed here I think) probably look at insurance as "pre-debt" to the medical emergency.

I know there are stories of people paying thousands out of pocket for copays and deductibles. I could absolutely see someone thinking that they're going to be in debt either way and opt for more money now.

Funny, the copay and a sudden change when I had to pay for routine labwork is the reason I give for switching from Blue Cross to a HDHP plan, I figured if I was going to have to pay for it anyway I might as well have a cheaper health insurance.  (I then learned about tax sheltering in my HSA)

RidetheRain

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 356
  • Age: 26
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7004 on: December 08, 2017, 09:56:04 AM »
It's not just the young and healthy that would forgo purchasing insurance. People that have trouble affording insurance (young people are double screwed here I think) probably look at insurance as "pre-debt" to the medical emergency.

I know there are stories of people paying thousands out of pocket for copays and deductibles. I could absolutely see someone thinking that they're going to be in debt either way and opt for more money now.

Funny, the copay and a sudden change when I had to pay for routine labwork is the reason I give for switching from Blue Cross to a HDHP plan, I figured if I was going to have to pay for it anyway I might as well have a cheaper health insurance.  (I then learned about tax sheltering in my HSA)

I have a similar situation. My regular health plan used to have a $500 deductible. My company has a $500 benefit if you have a HDHP with health fund. My typical yearly healthcare is pretty expensive, but with the company assist, lower monthly cost, and tax sheltering I actually come out on top even with health problems with HDHP. If it helps me with a chronic issue I can only imagine how much better they are for actual healthy people.

eljefe-speaks

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 186
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7005 on: December 08, 2017, 02:42:27 PM »
Give or take $100K, yes. 
Your country is beyond hope.

No no no, I am told we are now winning like never before.

Bigger medical bills = FREEDOM!

Bigger deficit = FREEDOM!

Being always slightly worried your might get gunned down in public = FREEDOM!

eljefe-speaks

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 186
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7006 on: December 08, 2017, 02:45:59 PM »
Give or take $100K, yes. 
Your country is beyond hope.

I'm an optimist (realist). We're not beyond hope. Our current form of government may be, our current crop of politicians may be, but if Germany can come back from WWII, then the US can come back from the current shit show.

Most encouraging thing I have read in a loooooong time, thanks.

Kyle Schuant

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 511
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7007 on: December 09, 2017, 01:31:02 AM »
I'm an optimist (realist). We're not beyond hope. Our current form of government may be, our current crop of politicians may be, but if Germany can come back from WWII, then the US can come back from the current shit show.
So what you're saying is that the US will be fine so long as it suffers aerial firebombing of major cities, invasion and 50 years of foreign military occupation and partition?

And this makes you an optimist?

Jacana

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 187
  • Location: Finally far enough outside DC :-)
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7008 on: December 09, 2017, 10:13:41 AM »
That's probably correct, because the young, healthier population will opt out of insurance, since it's already expensive and they'd be subsidizing the older/sicker part of the population.

One of my favorite pastimes at family functions is listening to the Baby Boomers complaining about the ACA, without ever acknowledging (or realizing) how much of it was put in place to help their older, unhealthy generation at the expense of the Millennials and Xers.

My mother, a tail end baby boomer just about to turn 60, has been hearing this crap from her older relatives for a few years now. She has now refined her response to a single zinger: "Oh, so you declined Medicare then?" That usually ends the conversation fast.

barbaz

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 201
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7009 on: December 09, 2017, 10:27:44 AM »
I'm an optimist (realist). We're not beyond hope. Our current form of government may be, our current crop of politicians may be, but if Germany can come back from WWII, then the US can come back from the current shit show.
So what you're saying is that the US will be fine so long as it suffers aerial firebombing of major cities, invasion and 50 years of foreign military occupation and partition?

And this makes you an optimist?
TBH I think it’s easier to recover from that than from the host of problems the US currently has

Rowellen

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 426
  • Location: Australia
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7010 on: December 09, 2017, 02:36:52 PM »
Buy $500 wallet to start saving more?
Posted in a decluttering/minimalist FB group I'm part of.

NoraLenderbee

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1249
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7011 on: December 09, 2017, 03:40:50 PM »
I'm an optimist (realist). We're not beyond hope. Our current form of government may be, our current crop of politicians may be, but if Germany can come back from WWII, then the US can come back from the current shit show.
So what you're saying is that the US will be fine so long as it suffers aerial firebombing of major cities, invasion and 50 years of foreign military occupation and partition?


We just need to cause 40-50 million deaths. That should be easy. 

shelivesthedream

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3897
  • Location: London, UK
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7012 on: December 09, 2017, 04:04:22 PM »
I'm an optimist (realist). We're not beyond hope. Our current form of government may be, our current crop of politicians may be, but if Germany can come back from WWII, then the US can come back from the current shit show.
So what you're saying is that the US will be fine so long as it suffers aerial firebombing of major cities, invasion and 50 years of foreign military occupation and partition?

And this makes you an optimist?

You do realise that's the point? Germany recovered from even all that shit. Therefore the US, which hasn't had to deal with all that, will definitely recover from the current comparatively minor shit.

Sibley

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3203
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Chicago, IL
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7013 on: December 09, 2017, 05:33:21 PM »
I'm an optimist (realist). We're not beyond hope. Our current form of government may be, our current crop of politicians may be, but if Germany can come back from WWII, then the US can come back from the current shit show.
So what you're saying is that the US will be fine so long as it suffers aerial firebombing of major cities, invasion and 50 years of foreign military occupation and partition?

And this makes you an optimist?

You do realise that's the point? Germany recovered from even all that shit. Therefore the US, which hasn't had to deal with all that, will definitely recover from the current comparatively minor shit.

Thank you, shelivesthedream.

I don't think it'll be easy, or pretty. But if a country that was as destroyed as Germany was after WWII- physically, fiscally, culturally - can rebuild, then the US can fix itself. Somehow.

merula

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1116
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7014 on: December 09, 2017, 06:04:19 PM »
I'm an optimist (realist). We're not beyond hope. Our current form of government may be, our current crop of politicians may be, but if Germany can come back from WWII, then the US can come back from the current shit show.
So what you're saying is that the US will be fine so long as it suffers aerial firebombing of major cities, invasion and 50 years of foreign military occupation and partition?

And this makes you an optimist?

You do realise that's the point? Germany recovered from even all that shit. Therefore the US, which hasn't had to deal with all that, will definitely recover from the current comparatively minor shit.

Thank you, shelivesthedream.

I don't think it'll be easy, or pretty. But if a country that was as destroyed as Germany was after WWII- physically, fiscally, culturally - can rebuild, then the US can fix itself. Somehow.

Just as long as we keep in mind that "we can fix this" doesn't mean "we will totally eradicate racism". Germany has made immense progress in this; far more than their neighbors who, it should be noted, were just as racist and anti-Semitic at the beginning of the 20th century. But there are still German racists, there are still Nazis. They are just so marginalized as to not be an issue.

We may also need to split the country in two for 50 years as part of the solution. Which, honestly, I'm fine with, as half the country seems peachy-keen on being ruled by Russia.

Paul der Krake

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4343
  • Age: 10
  • Location: USA
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7015 on: December 09, 2017, 06:30:42 PM »
I'm an optimist (realist). We're not beyond hope. Our current form of government may be, our current crop of politicians may be, but if Germany can come back from WWII, then the US can come back from the current shit show.
So what you're saying is that the US will be fine so long as it suffers aerial firebombing of major cities, invasion and 50 years of foreign military occupation and partition?


We just need to cause 40-50 million deaths. That should be easy.
Invent a device to remotely disable every car in North America.
Wait one week.
Done.

Sibley

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3203
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Chicago, IL
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7016 on: December 09, 2017, 07:23:15 PM »
I'm an optimist (realist). We're not beyond hope. Our current form of government may be, our current crop of politicians may be, but if Germany can come back from WWII, then the US can come back from the current shit show.
So what you're saying is that the US will be fine so long as it suffers aerial firebombing of major cities, invasion and 50 years of foreign military occupation and partition?

And this makes you an optimist?

You do realise that's the point? Germany recovered from even all that shit. Therefore the US, which hasn't had to deal with all that, will definitely recover from the current comparatively minor shit.

Thank you, shelivesthedream.

I don't think it'll be easy, or pretty. But if a country that was as destroyed as Germany was after WWII- physically, fiscally, culturally - can rebuild, then the US can fix itself. Somehow.

Just as long as we keep in mind that "we can fix this" doesn't mean "we will totally eradicate racism". Germany has made immense progress in this; far more than their neighbors who, it should be noted, were just as racist and anti-Semitic at the beginning of the 20th century. But there are still German racists, there are still Nazis. They are just so marginalized as to not be an issue.

We may also need to split the country in two for 50 years as part of the solution. Which, honestly, I'm fine with, as half the country seems peachy-keen on being ruled by Russia.

Racism is only one of our problems, though it is a doozy. And I think we might be lucky to only split into 2 for a while. Honestly, might be 3. Assuming that we're not forced to abandon whole areas due to climate changes. I'm certainly not moving to LA, ever.

SwordGuy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4369
  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
    • Flipping Fayetteville
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7017 on: December 09, 2017, 07:31:39 PM »
Former gf was making 200k-300k/year selling medical devices to hospitals.  I never understood how she added more value than a website. 

Pretty women get into sales meetings with male businesspeople.     




Kyle Schuant

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 511
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7018 on: December 10, 2017, 12:53:14 AM »
Quote
You do realise that's the point? Germany recovered from even all that shit. Therefore the US, which hasn't had to deal with all that, will definitely recover from the current comparatively minor shit.
"All that shit" was the firebombing. The foreign military occupation and partition was a necessary part of the recovery. If they'd just made Germany surrender, then pulled out and walled them off, Germany would still be impoverished and in ruins. As it was, parts of East Germany were never rebuilt and were still ruins at the time of reunification.

If you want to compare the US to Germany, then what you're saying is that only foreign military occupation and partition can improve the US, because the US is too far gone to possibly help itself. Now, I'm inclined to agree with that, but I'm not sure that's the point an American really wants to make.

barbaz

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 201
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7019 on: December 10, 2017, 10:16:12 AM »
Quote
You do realise that's the point? Germany recovered from even all that shit. Therefore the US, which hasn't had to deal with all that, will definitely recover from the current comparatively minor shit.
"All that shit" was the firebombing. The foreign military occupation and partition was a necessary part of the recovery. If they'd just made Germany surrender, then pulled out and walled them off, Germany would still be impoverished and in ruins. As it was, parts of East Germany were never rebuilt and were still ruins at the time of reunification.

If you want to compare the US to Germany, then what you're saying is that only foreign military occupation and partition can improve the US, because the US is too far gone to possibly help itself. Now, I'm inclined to agree with that, but I'm not sure that's the point an American really wants to make.
What helped the recovery were the trade deals, the military occupation was only necessary to prevent wars and have a functioning administration which ... ok, maybe the US needs that, too.

BlueMR2

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1972
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7020 on: December 10, 2017, 01:12:18 PM »
Tis the season for the half year graduates to start posting nonsense on facebook.  "Woooo, just graduated" followed by "My student debt is going to kill me".  Immediately followed by pictures of the brand new (what I could consider mid level) car, upgraded iPhone, and large curved screen HD/4K TV and brand new videogame systems.  Argh.

Sibley

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3203
  • Age: 33
  • Location: Chicago, IL
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7021 on: December 10, 2017, 02:35:02 PM »
Quote
You do realise that's the point? Germany recovered from even all that shit. Therefore the US, which hasn't had to deal with all that, will definitely recover from the current comparatively minor shit.
"All that shit" was the firebombing. The foreign military occupation and partition was a necessary part of the recovery. If they'd just made Germany surrender, then pulled out and walled them off, Germany would still be impoverished and in ruins. As it was, parts of East Germany were never rebuilt and were still ruins at the time of reunification.

If you want to compare the US to Germany, then what you're saying is that only foreign military occupation and partition can improve the US, because the US is too far gone to possibly help itself. Now, I'm inclined to agree with that, but I'm not sure that's the point an American really wants to make.

You're missing my point. The physical damage does not matter. Homes and roads and buildings and everything tangible can be rebuilt fairly easily. What isn't so easy to fix and rebuild are the intangibles - respect, worth, trust.

Germany was utterly destroyed after WWII, and the physical destruction was just the tip of the iceberg. Germans were spit on simply for being German. All of them were considered guilty BECAUSE they were German - regardless if they weren't even born until after the war. That sort of trauma and destruction, of an entire culture, is magnitudes harder to recover from. But they did it. Is Germany perfect? Absolutely not. No one is. But compared to where they were after WWII, it's a breathtaking achievement. Because it's no longer a virtual crime to simply be German.

It's so much harder to regain trust and respect once you've lost it, especially if you trampled on it first. Germany destroyed itself, the rest of the world just helped make the destruction visible. The US is starting down the path of destroying itself - because we're losing the principles that we founded this country on. Whether or not that damage is visible to the human eye is almost irrelevant.

I'm not interested in a debate about who's at fault or when it started - because we're ALL at fault. Any American is at fault, just like all Germans were after WWII. And the simple fact that Germany managed to rebuild itself, it's character and culture, is great hope for the US today. If Germany can come back from WWII, than maybe the US can stop our self-destruction. Maybe we can address our problems. Maybe we can figure out how to listen and understand and work together. Maybe we can figure out that we're all human beings and worthy of respect and compassion, whatever our differences. We have hope, and you can do an awful lot with hope.

former player

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3640
  • Location: Avalon
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7022 on: December 10, 2017, 02:44:12 PM »
Germany recovered the way it did because of massive USA investment through the Marshall Plan. None of which was altruistic - the USA wanted a bulwark against Soviet expansion and got it.

The equivalent for the USA would be China investing in its infrastructure.  I don't suppose anyone thinks that China would be doing that for altruistic reasons.

Just Joe

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2108
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7023 on: December 10, 2017, 08:11:52 PM »
Germany recovered the way it did because of massive USA investment through the Marshall Plan. None of which was altruistic - the USA wanted a bulwark against Soviet expansion and got it.

The equivalent for the USA would be China investing in its infrastructure.  I don't suppose anyone thinks that China would be doing that for altruistic reasons.

I figure with "Made in China" we've paid for the Chinese gov't to modernize and upgrade their entire nation. Plus they were able to learn about all the world's manufacturing processes at the same time. Moving the world's factories there brought China into the 21st century. I hope they'll always be peaceful neighbors to us collectively.

MgoSam

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3630
  • Location: Minnesota
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7024 on: December 11, 2017, 11:48:49 AM »
Germany recovered the way it did because of massive USA investment through the Marshall Plan. None of which was altruistic - the USA wanted a bulwark against Soviet expansion and got it.

The equivalent for the USA would be China investing in its infrastructure.  I don't suppose anyone thinks that China would be doing that for altruistic reasons.

I figure with "Made in China" we've paid for the Chinese gov't to modernize and upgrade their entire nation. Plus they were able to learn about all the world's manufacturing processes at the same time. Moving the world's factories there brought China into the 21st century. I hope they'll always be peaceful neighbors to us collectively.

I do believe China's foreign policy has been far more benevolent than the US'. Then again China has only had significant influence for the past few decades (talking about current times not during the time of Marco Polo), but unless they change they tend to be more laid back when it comes to using their influence. They are happy to create economic ties but are silent when it comes to intervention. For instance they have been largely silent in Sudan while investing a lot of money in that country. Some would call this a failure in leadership while others will argue that they don't meddle in other country's affairs.

Timodeus

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7025 on: December 11, 2017, 03:25:49 PM »
Germany recovered the way it did because of massive USA investment through the Marshall Plan. None of which was altruistic - the USA wanted a bulwark against Soviet expansion and got it.

The equivalent for the USA would be China investing in its infrastructure.  I don't suppose anyone thinks that China would be doing that for altruistic reasons.

I figure with "Made in China" we've paid for the Chinese gov't to modernize and upgrade their entire nation. Plus they were able to learn about all the world's manufacturing processes at the same time. Moving the world's factories there brought China into the 21st century. I hope they'll always be peaceful neighbors to us collectively.

I do believe China's foreign policy has been far more benevolent than the US'. Then again China has only had significant influence for the past few decades (talking about current times not during the time of Marco Polo), but unless they change they tend to be more laid back when it comes to using their influence. They are happy to create economic ties but are silent when it comes to intervention. For instance they have been largely silent in Sudan while investing a lot of money in that country. Some would call this a failure in leadership while others will argue that they don't meddle in other country's affairs.

I don't think that's going to last, just look at the recent case of Zimbabwe. That was a Chinese backed coup. I won't even mention building islands in international territory, because you know...that's totally a laid back thing to do.

I wouldn't say their foreign policy is more benevolent, I'd say it's more stealthy. For the last 20 years the US has been the world's hyperpower, they've been everywhere, especially militarily. What you don't see every night on the news is US aid organizations (governmental and non-governmental), US led international efforts in science, economics, technology, and medicine driving progress across the world. The US also is the main military power keeping dangerous organizations and states in check, and the sea lanes open from pirates. They are the world's police, even if people hate them for it their foreign policy is more benevolent than you may realize. But I reckon that will change in the coming decades, and I doubt China will fill that void, or that they will be so humble when some 3rd world country or government threatens their economic or political self-interest.

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2025
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
    • The Live-In Landlord
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7026 on: December 11, 2017, 03:57:22 PM »
Germany recovered the way it did because of massive USA investment through the Marshall Plan. None of which was altruistic - the USA wanted a bulwark against Soviet expansion and got it.

The equivalent for the USA would be China investing in its infrastructure.  I don't suppose anyone thinks that China would be doing that for altruistic reasons.

I figure with "Made in China" we've paid for the Chinese gov't to modernize and upgrade their entire nation. Plus they were able to learn about all the world's manufacturing processes at the same time. Moving the world's factories there brought China into the 21st century. I hope they'll always be peaceful neighbors to us collectively.

I do believe China's foreign policy has been far more benevolent than the US'. Then again China has only had significant influence for the past few decades (talking about current times not during the time of Marco Polo), but unless they change they tend to be more laid back when it comes to using their influence. They are happy to create economic ties but are silent when it comes to intervention. For instance they have been largely silent in Sudan while investing a lot of money in that country. Some would call this a failure in leadership while others will argue that they don't meddle in other country's affairs.

I don't think that's going to last, just look at the recent case of Zimbabwe. That was a Chinese backed coup. I won't even mention building islands in international territory, because you know...that's totally a laid back thing to do.

I wouldn't say their foreign policy is more benevolent, I'd say it's more stealthy. For the last 20 years the US has been the world's hyperpower, they've been everywhere, especially militarily. What you don't see every night on the news is US aid organizations (governmental and non-governmental), US led international efforts in science, economics, technology, and medicine driving progress across the world. The US also is the main military power keeping dangerous organizations and states in check, and the sea lanes open from pirates. They are the world's police, even if people hate them for it their foreign policy is more benevolent than you may realize. But I reckon that will change in the coming decades, and I doubt China will fill that void, or that they will be so humble when some 3rd world country or government threatens their economic or political self-interest.

I've never heard Chinese foreign policy described as "humble" before. Discreet, at times, or even quiet or subtle... less so now that the economic isolationist policy has been reversed because they've got an economic presence. But a nation with the world's largest standing army is indeed less ostentatious in its foreign policy than might otherwise be expected.

ms

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 79
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7027 on: December 13, 2017, 07:26:49 AM »
On a Buy and Sell page.. that was one expensive snowboarding trip....

Title: Snowboard Equipment (2 complete sets / various items / almost new - used one time only- bought last season) (Price: various)

2 COMPLETE SETS (MEN/WOMEN) - I CAN SELL EACH ITEM OR ALL TOGETHER FOR CAD 990!
IT IS A GOOD DEAL - ALL EQUIPMENT IS ALMOST NEW AND HIGH PERFORMANCE (we used one time only at Blue Mountains and we bought last December). PRICES ARE BELOW MARKET.
SNOWBOARDS + BINDINGS (INSTALLED)
BURTON RIPCORD 3D 54 AND BINDINGS K2
PRICE 320 + tax / SELLING FOR 250
SIMS PRISTINE 51 AND BINDINGS K2
PRICE 385 + tax  / SELLING FOR 290
GOGGLES
SKY PLATON 2 LENS - DAY AND NIGHT
PRICE 109 + tax/ SELLING FOR 70
SKY ACER 2 LENS - DAY AND NIGHT
PRICE 169 + tax / SELLING FOR 110
BOOTS
BURTON (WOMEN SIZE 9)
PRICE 249 + tax / SELLING FOR 175
K2 BLACK (MEN SIZE 10.5)
PRICE 149 + tax / SELLING FOR 100
HELMETS
NINE.10
PRICE 149 + tax / SELLING FOR 85
RIVAL PRO
PRICE 159 + tax / SELLING FOR 90


Just Joe

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2108
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7028 on: December 13, 2017, 04:26:56 PM »
They ate more money than I spent on my mtn bike, kayak and some of my camping gear.

ysette9

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3305
  • Location: Bay Area, CA
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7029 on: December 16, 2017, 02:24:46 PM »
Finally got a “as seen on FB” moment. Former classmate posted a photo of the new Tesla sedan she took delivery of. Granted, she works there, so perhaps there is an employee discount? Someone in the thread asked why not a model 3 instead, but everyone else was very congratulatory.

boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7854
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7030 on: December 18, 2017, 08:16:32 AM »
This time of year - just ultimate consumerism posts coming out

"Looking to hire a gift wrapper, anyone have a child that would like to earn some cash to wrap some gifts for me???"

Buys a bunch of gifts - hires someone to come wrap them

ketchup

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3580
  • Age: 27
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7031 on: December 18, 2017, 08:57:03 AM »
Finally got a “as seen on FB” moment. Former classmate posted a photo of the new Tesla sedan she took delivery of. Granted, she works there, so perhaps there is an employee discount? Someone in the thread asked why not a model 3 instead, but everyone else was very congratulatory.
I'm pretty sure Tesla doesn't offer any discounts ever, including employee discounts.  Everything is either full price or given away for free.

This time of year - just ultimate consumerism posts coming out

"Looking to hire a gift wrapper, anyone have a child that would like to earn some cash to wrap some gifts for me???"

Buys a bunch of gifts - hires someone to come wrap them
Now there's one thing I will never ever pay for.  Wrapping paper.  I'm extremely scrooge-like about gifts, but even if I give someone a gift, wrapping paper will not be involved.  The last Christmas gift I bought was some books for my sister (last year), and the "wrapping paper" was just the Amazon box it was delivered in, unopened.  No ragrets.

Just Joe

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2108
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7032 on: December 18, 2017, 09:08:57 AM »
Heard this one over the weekend.

College student driving older car. School and living accommodations are paid for using a combination of scholarships and their parents.

Car starts to have problems. It is a two decade old car now.

Parents say "you must buy a NEW car and pay for it yourself" (college student is working a job that is min wage or slightly above and part time).

College student balks at the cost. Wants another used car and is glad to pay for it. Has in mind a $5K or less vehicle. Debt averse.

Parent re-iterate it must be new or they might withdraw their financial support for university costs.

Cue weekend of messaging back and forth between them.

Knowing where the college student lives I recognize that being with a car isn't really an option. Mass transit is useless there (wrong hours, wrong route).

Parents in question have finances that run on a knife's edge b/c income=spending. Fair amount of recreational spending I think. An $300 appliance failure a while back was a crisis that required payments to solve.

I'm hopeful for the college student who seems to have a good head on their shoulders.

Details kept vague for privacy. Not my kid, but would be happy to adopt. ;)

ketchup

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3580
  • Age: 27
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7033 on: December 18, 2017, 09:37:52 AM »
Heard this one over the weekend.

College student driving older car. School and living accommodations are paid for using a combination of scholarships and their parents.

Car starts to have problems. It is a two decade old car now.

Parents say "you must buy a NEW car and pay for it yourself" (college student is working a job that is min wage or slightly above and part time).

College student balks at the cost. Wants another used car and is glad to pay for it. Has in mind a $5K or less vehicle. Debt averse.

Parent re-iterate it must be new or they might withdraw their financial support for university costs.

Cue weekend of messaging back and forth between them.

Knowing where the college student lives I recognize that being with a car isn't really an option. Mass transit is useless there (wrong hours, wrong route).

Parents in question have finances that run on a knife's edge b/c income=spending. Fair amount of recreational spending I think. An $300 appliance failure a while back was a crisis that required payments to solve.

I'm hopeful for the college student who seems to have a good head on their shoulders.

Details kept vague for privacy. Not my kid, but would be happy to adopt. ;)
Jeez, that's awful.  Hopefully the kid is able to take the sensible road here...

Just Joe

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2108
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7034 on: December 18, 2017, 09:48:41 AM »
Maybe the college student will teach their parents a few things about budgeting/spending/savings. They recognize alot that could be changed for the better in their parents' budget.

Playing with Fire UK

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2336
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7035 on: December 18, 2017, 11:42:38 PM »
Could the college student be gifted an older car that someone else was finished with? Even if the parents disapprove it would be tough to lay blame on the student.

Just Joe

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2108
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7036 on: December 19, 2017, 07:58:24 AM »
Yes, DW and I have discussed doing exactly that with one of our older cars. We'll see if that is necessary. 

Cookie78

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1858
  • Location: Canada
    • Cookie's Goals
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7037 on: December 19, 2017, 11:11:30 PM »
I always read the 'Overheard on/at' threads with such joy and shock and am thankful, though curious that I never get much negative feedback/options/excuses about financially responsible ways. Well today I actually posted a finance related article and holy fuck! I had no idea some of my good friends were so negative!

The worst part was this: 'there's a whole lot of people who are already living in "clipping every coupon" mode. They don't have the fiscal wiggle room to even get to that first $100k. Plus they may have to sacrifice some quality of life to get to that point (ex: live in a high-crime or poor-school neighbourhood). At that point you really have to ask whether it's even worth trying to chase this particular dream. This sort of investing concept really only works for a small (ie: elite) subset of the population.'

Yikes.

FTR, the article I posted was no big extreme deal
http://www.fourpillarfreedom.com/charlie-munger-the-first-100000-is-a-btch/

zephyr911

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3636
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Northern Alabama
  • I'm just happy to be here. \m/ ^_^ \m/
    • Pinhook Development LLC
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7038 on: December 20, 2017, 05:14:43 AM »
Learned helplessness is the worst.

marcela

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 614
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7039 on: December 20, 2017, 07:54:12 AM »
I always read the 'Overheard on/at' threads with such joy and shock and am thankful, though curious that I never get much negative feedback/options/excuses about financially responsible ways. Well today I actually posted a finance related article and holy fuck! I had no idea some of my good friends were so negative!

The worst part was this: 'there's a whole lot of people who are already living in "clipping every coupon" mode. They don't have the fiscal wiggle room to even get to that first $100k. Plus they may have to sacrifice some quality of life to get to that point (ex: live in a high-crime or poor-school neighbourhood). At that point you really have to ask whether it's even worth trying to chase this particular dream. This sort of investing concept really only works for a small (ie: elite) subset of the population.'

Yikes.

FTR, the article I posted was no big extreme deal
http://www.fourpillarfreedom.com/charlie-munger-the-first-100000-is-a-btch/

I kinda get where your friends are coming from. My parents raised 3 of us on 40k/yr. The thought of being able to save $18k of that is completely out of reach for a lot of people.

Cookie78

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1858
  • Location: Canada
    • Cookie's Goals
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7040 on: December 20, 2017, 01:26:18 PM »
I always read the 'Overheard on/at' threads with such joy and shock and am thankful, though curious that I never get much negative feedback/options/excuses about financially responsible ways. Well today I actually posted a finance related article and holy fuck! I had no idea some of my good friends were so negative!

The worst part was this: 'there's a whole lot of people who are already living in "clipping every coupon" mode. They don't have the fiscal wiggle room to even get to that first $100k. Plus they may have to sacrifice some quality of life to get to that point (ex: live in a high-crime or poor-school neighbourhood). At that point you really have to ask whether it's even worth trying to chase this particular dream. This sort of investing concept really only works for a small (ie: elite) subset of the population.'

Yikes.

FTR, the article I posted was no big extreme deal
http://www.fourpillarfreedom.com/charlie-munger-the-first-100000-is-a-btch/

I kinda get where your friends are coming from. My parents raised 3 of us on 40k/yr. The thought of being able to save $18k of that is completely out of reach for a lot of people.

I get that it's not easy for a lot of people. That's even the point of the article I posted! But to imply that you shouldn't even try seems to negative and defeatist to me. There are some people starting from a position of poverty on this very forum who are trying as much as they can a little bit at a time. If you can't save $18k, save $1.8k, but start somewhere.

After talking to him more after that comment I realized he was viewing saving 100k IN ADDITION to retirement savings as being out of reach for most people, which makes more sense. I just lump 'investments' into the 'retirement investments' bucket in my mind. He views them as separate somehow.

Prairie Stash

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1576
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7041 on: December 21, 2017, 07:13:33 AM »
I always read the 'Overheard on/at' threads with such joy and shock and am thankful, though curious that I never get much negative feedback/options/excuses about financially responsible ways. Well today I actually posted a finance related article and holy fuck! I had no idea some of my good friends were so negative!

The worst part was this: 'there's a whole lot of people who are already living in "clipping every coupon" mode. They don't have the fiscal wiggle room to even get to that first $100k. Plus they may have to sacrifice some quality of life to get to that point (ex: live in a high-crime or poor-school neighbourhood). At that point you really have to ask whether it's even worth trying to chase this particular dream. This sort of investing concept really only works for a small (ie: elite) subset of the population.'

Yikes.

FTR, the article I posted was no big extreme deal
http://www.fourpillarfreedom.com/charlie-munger-the-first-100000-is-a-btch/

I kinda get where your friends are coming from. My parents raised 3 of us on 40k/yr. The thought of being able to save $18k of that is completely out of reach for a lot of people.

I get that it's not easy for a lot of people. That's even the point of the article I posted! But to imply that you shouldn't even try seems to negative and defeatist to me. There are some people starting from a position of poverty on this very forum who are trying as much as they can a little bit at a time. If you can't save $18k, save $1.8k, but start somewhere.

After talking to him more after that comment I realized he was viewing saving 100k IN ADDITION to retirement savings as being out of reach for most people, which makes more sense. I just lump 'investments' into the 'retirement investments' bucket in my mind. He views them as separate somehow.
The glass is half empty - its not easy for a lot of people
The glass is half full - a lot of people can do it if they try

Which do you want to be? Everyone has personal circumstances, do you need to drag others down or can you boost them up?


marcela

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 614
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7042 on: December 21, 2017, 07:23:30 AM »
I always read the 'Overheard on/at' threads with such joy and shock and am thankful, though curious that I never get much negative feedback/options/excuses about financially responsible ways. Well today I actually posted a finance related article and holy fuck! I had no idea some of my good friends were so negative!

The worst part was this: 'there's a whole lot of people who are already living in "clipping every coupon" mode. They don't have the fiscal wiggle room to even get to that first $100k. Plus they may have to sacrifice some quality of life to get to that point (ex: live in a high-crime or poor-school neighbourhood). At that point you really have to ask whether it's even worth trying to chase this particular dream. This sort of investing concept really only works for a small (ie: elite) subset of the population.'

Yikes.

FTR, the article I posted was no big extreme deal
http://www.fourpillarfreedom.com/charlie-munger-the-first-100000-is-a-btch/

I kinda get where your friends are coming from. My parents raised 3 of us on 40k/yr. The thought of being able to save $18k of that is completely out of reach for a lot of people.

I get that it's not easy for a lot of people. That's even the point of the article I posted! But to imply that you shouldn't even try seems to negative and defeatist to me. There are some people starting from a position of poverty on this very forum who are trying as much as they can a little bit at a time. If you can't save $18k, save $1.8k, but start somewhere.

After talking to him more after that comment I realized he was viewing saving 100k IN ADDITION to retirement savings as being out of reach for most people, which makes more sense. I just lump 'investments' into the 'retirement investments' bucket in my mind. He views them as separate somehow.
The glass is half empty - its not easy for a lot of people
The glass is half full - a lot of people can do it if they try

Which do you want to be? Everyone has personal circumstances, do you need to drag others down or can you boost them up?
Glass half empty or half full, we all can agree that not everyone's glasses are the same size. That's what I'm getting at here. Not easy means different things to an engineer making six figures who has the big house and truck and has no idea how to cook vs. the 2 fulltime workers making barely over minimum wage and raising 3 kids.

To me, it's more about meeting people where they're at. If I told you I wanted to pick up running, you wouldn't have me run a marathon the next week. That's what asking someone with no savings to save 18k/yr feels like. I have friends for whom putting aside $100/month is a big deal. Heck, my entire salary didn't go above 18k until I was 25. The idea of saving the equivalent of my entire year's earnings was preposterous.

Prairie Stash

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1576
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7043 on: December 21, 2017, 09:14:48 AM »
I always read the 'Overheard on/at' threads with such joy and shock and am thankful, though curious that I never get much negative feedback/options/excuses about financially responsible ways. Well today I actually posted a finance related article and holy fuck! I had no idea some of my good friends were so negative!

The worst part was this: 'there's a whole lot of people who are already living in "clipping every coupon" mode. They don't have the fiscal wiggle room to even get to that first $100k. Plus they may have to sacrifice some quality of life to get to that point (ex: live in a high-crime or poor-school neighbourhood). At that point you really have to ask whether it's even worth trying to chase this particular dream. This sort of investing concept really only works for a small (ie: elite) subset of the population.'

Yikes.

FTR, the article I posted was no big extreme deal
http://www.fourpillarfreedom.com/charlie-munger-the-first-100000-is-a-btch/

I kinda get where your friends are coming from. My parents raised 3 of us on 40k/yr. The thought of being able to save $18k of that is completely out of reach for a lot of people.

I get that it's not easy for a lot of people. That's even the point of the article I posted! But to imply that you shouldn't even try seems to negative and defeatist to me. There are some people starting from a position of poverty on this very forum who are trying as much as they can a little bit at a time. If you can't save $18k, save $1.8k, but start somewhere.

After talking to him more after that comment I realized he was viewing saving 100k IN ADDITION to retirement savings as being out of reach for most people, which makes more sense. I just lump 'investments' into the 'retirement investments' bucket in my mind. He views them as separate somehow.
The glass is half empty - its not easy for a lot of people
The glass is half full - a lot of people can do it if they try

Which do you want to be? Everyone has personal circumstances, do you need to drag others down or can you boost them up?
Glass half empty or half full, we all can agree that not everyone's glasses are the same size. That's what I'm getting at here. Not easy means different things to an engineer making six figures who has the big house and truck and has no idea how to cook vs. the 2 fulltime workers making barely over minimum wage and raising 3 kids.

To me, it's more about meeting people where they're at. If I told you I wanted to pick up running, you wouldn't have me run a marathon the next week. That's what asking someone with no savings to save 18k/yr feels like. I have friends for whom putting aside $100/month is a big deal. Heck, my entire salary didn't go above 18k until I was 25. The idea of saving the equivalent of my entire year's earnings was preposterous.
You still have a glass. Only a pessimist argues their glass is dirty or small. The optimist is thankful to have a glass.

Instead of meeting people where they're at, I suggest meeting people where they will be. If you wanted to pick up running, I'd meet you at 6 AM  (maybe 7 since I hate mornings) and together we would learn to run a mile. I'd teach you how and encourage you and smile from the finish line as you complete your first marathon. As a pessimist I would tell you to give up since you're old, out of shape and its a waste of time since most people never complete marathons. Then I would post on your facebook page reasons why you shouldn't try if I see you post a link about how marathons help your health.

You get to choose how you view the glass. Is your glass dirty or small or is it enough to get you the glass of water you need as you jog by on the way to completing your first marathon?

sherr

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 527
  • Age: 33
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7044 on: December 21, 2017, 11:15:49 AM »
Glass half empty or half full, we all can agree that not everyone's glasses are the same size. That's what I'm getting at here. Not easy means different things to an engineer making six figures who has the big house and truck and has no idea how to cook vs. the 2 fulltime workers making barely over minimum wage and raising 3 kids.

To me, it's more about meeting people where they're at. If I told you I wanted to pick up running, you wouldn't have me run a marathon the next week. That's what asking someone with no savings to save 18k/yr feels like. I have friends for whom putting aside $100/month is a big deal. Heck, my entire salary didn't go above 18k until I was 25. The idea of saving the equivalent of my entire year's earnings was preposterous.
You still have a glass. Only a pessimist argues their glass is dirty or small. The optimist is thankful to have a glass.

Instead of meeting people where they're at, I suggest meeting people where they will be. If you wanted to pick up running, I'd meet you at 6 AM  (maybe 7 since I hate mornings) and together we would learn to run a mile. I'd teach you how and encourage you and smile from the finish line as you complete your first marathon. As a pessimist I would tell you to give up since you're old, out of shape and its a waste of time since most people never complete marathons. Then I would post on your facebook page reasons why you shouldn't try if I see you post a link about how marathons help your health.

You get to choose how you view the glass. Is your glass dirty or small or is it enough to get you the glass of water you need as you jog by on the way to completing your first marathon?

This is untrue. A realist would point out that their glass is dirty or small. A pessimist would complain that they're probably going to drop and break it tomorrow. You can be both a realist and an optimist at the same time (Yes I have a small glass, but I can still work to fill it!). There is nothing wrong with meeting people where they're at and helping them work up from there, which is actually exactly what you are describing in your running example.

It is also true that often the easiest way to increase your savings rate is to increase your salary (even if that's not very easy at all). Let's be optimistic, but also grounded in reality.

Cookie78

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1858
  • Location: Canada
    • Cookie's Goals
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7045 on: December 21, 2017, 10:09:08 PM »
Glass half empty or half full, we all can agree that not everyone's glasses are the same size. That's what I'm getting at here. Not easy means different things to an engineer making six figures who has the big house and truck and has no idea how to cook vs. the 2 fulltime workers making barely over minimum wage and raising 3 kids.

To me, it's more about meeting people where they're at. If I told you I wanted to pick up running, you wouldn't have me run a marathon the next week. That's what asking someone with no savings to save 18k/yr feels like. I have friends for whom putting aside $100/month is a big deal. Heck, my entire salary didn't go above 18k until I was 25. The idea of saving the equivalent of my entire year's earnings was preposterous.
You still have a glass. Only a pessimist argues their glass is dirty or small. The optimist is thankful to have a glass.

Instead of meeting people where they're at, I suggest meeting people where they will be. If you wanted to pick up running, I'd meet you at 6 AM  (maybe 7 since I hate mornings) and together we would learn to run a mile. I'd teach you how and encourage you and smile from the finish line as you complete your first marathon. As a pessimist I would tell you to give up since you're old, out of shape and its a waste of time since most people never complete marathons. Then I would post on your facebook page reasons why you shouldn't try if I see you post a link about how marathons help your health.

You get to choose how you view the glass. Is your glass dirty or small or is it enough to get you the glass of water you need as you jog by on the way to completing your first marathon?

This is untrue. A realist would point out that their glass is dirty or small. A pessimist would complain that they're probably going to drop and break it tomorrow. You can be both a realist and an optimist at the same time (Yes I have a small glass, but I can still work to fill it!). There is nothing wrong with meeting people where they're at and helping them work up from there, which is actually exactly what you are describing in your running example.

It is also true that often the easiest way to increase your savings rate is to increase your salary (even if that's not very easy at all). Let's be optimistic, but also grounded in reality.

IMO

"Yes I have a small glass, but I can still work to fill it!" is optimistic

But

"At that point you really have to ask whether it's even worth trying to chase this particular dream. This sort of investing concept really only works for a small (ie: elite) subset of the population." is pessimistic

The 'particular dream' is not to save x dollars per year. It's to save the first $100k. If it's extra hard because of circumstances, start small and work your way up.

But to write the dream off as 'elites only' why bother trying is pessimistic

Prairie Stash

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1576
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7046 on: December 22, 2017, 08:23:10 AM »
Glass half empty or half full, we all can agree that not everyone's glasses are the same size. That's what I'm getting at here. Not easy means different things to an engineer making six figures who has the big house and truck and has no idea how to cook vs. the 2 fulltime workers making barely over minimum wage and raising 3 kids.

To me, it's more about meeting people where they're at. If I told you I wanted to pick up running, you wouldn't have me run a marathon the next week. That's what asking someone with no savings to save 18k/yr feels like. I have friends for whom putting aside $100/month is a big deal. Heck, my entire salary didn't go above 18k until I was 25. The idea of saving the equivalent of my entire year's earnings was preposterous.
You still have a glass. Only a pessimist argues their glass is dirty or small. The optimist is thankful to have a glass.

Instead of meeting people where they're at, I suggest meeting people where they will be. If you wanted to pick up running, I'd meet you at 6 AM  (maybe 7 since I hate mornings) and together we would learn to run a mile. I'd teach you how and encourage you and smile from the finish line as you complete your first marathon. As a pessimist I would tell you to give up since you're old, out of shape and its a waste of time since most people never complete marathons. Then I would post on your facebook page reasons why you shouldn't try if I see you post a link about how marathons help your health.

You get to choose how you view the glass. Is your glass dirty or small or is it enough to get you the glass of water you need as you jog by on the way to completing your first marathon?

This is untrue. A realist would point out that their glass is dirty or small. A pessimist would complain that they're probably going to drop and break it tomorrow. You can be both a realist and an optimist at the same time (Yes I have a small glass, but I can still work to fill it!). There is nothing wrong with meeting people where they're at and helping them work up from there, which is actually exactly what you are describing in your running example.

It is also true that often the easiest way to increase your savings rate is to increase your salary (even if that's not very easy at all). Let's be optimistic, but also grounded in reality.
At the ripe old age of 25, most people haven't figured out the size of their metaphorical glass. A realist will point out that a 25 year old person has a lifetime of possibilities before them. New jobs, divorce, education, kids, marriage, etc. All sorts of things can change in the decade following your 25th birthday that will both positively and negatively change your entire world.

Where both are examples fall apart, the glass is not a constant, as illustrated in the running metaphor (couch potato to marathon finisher is an example of people changing). People change, circumstances change. You aren't handed a small glass at the age of 20 that limits your earning potential to the size of the glass. You can change jobs, change careers or...save $100k by grit and tenacity (both words imply its a hard thing to do).

The entire point of the article was to change your circumstances. I think a lot of people missed that part, on the way to a million the first $100k is probably 95% (99%?) of the work.

Pretending that a persons current reality is a constant, that's pessimism. My reality at age 25 was massive debt and a low paying job, my NW was very negative. At 35 my reality was kids, house, good job and savings. Which reality should we refer to? At 25 i had a small dirty glass, at 35 I'm sipping out of a fine Stein overflowing with bavarian beer.

SwordGuy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4369
  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
    • Flipping Fayetteville
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7047 on: December 22, 2017, 07:03:13 PM »
I always read the 'Overheard on/at' threads with such joy and shock and am thankful, though curious that I never get much negative feedback/options/excuses about financially responsible ways. Well today I actually posted a finance related article and holy fuck! I had no idea some of my good friends were so negative!

The worst part was this: 'there's a whole lot of people who are already living in "clipping every coupon" mode. They don't have the fiscal wiggle room to even get to that first $100k. Plus they may have to sacrifice some quality of life to get to that point (ex: live in a high-crime or poor-school neighbourhood). At that point you really have to ask whether it's even worth trying to chase this particular dream. This sort of investing concept really only works for a small (ie: elite) subset of the population.'

Yikes.

FTR, the article I posted was no big extreme deal
http://www.fourpillarfreedom.com/charlie-munger-the-first-100000-is-a-btch/

I'm so glad that you were quoting someone outside the forum, not making that point yourself!

I'm constantly surprised how vehemently people will fight to discredit any idea that's put forth as something that would improve someone's circumstances.   They absolutely, negatively have have **HAVE** to discredit any idea, immediately, without thought or investigation.   No concept of "Hmm.  That worked for someone else.  How could I modify it to work for my circumstances?" is ever considered.  It just has to be turned down and, more importantly, discredited in anyone else's eyes.

Drives me up the friggin' wall.

I don't care if someone chooses to make piss-poor financial decisions and pay the consequences.

But it's just plain evil to teach people they can't possibly succeed when it's been proven that people can.

When people start teaching others to fail, I point out they are wrong.   For repeat offenders I've simply quit trying to be super polite about it.  I don't care if they don't like it or it annoys them.  If one person out there gets the right info to turn their life around, it will have been time well spent.

SwordGuy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4369
  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
    • Flipping Fayetteville
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7048 on: December 22, 2017, 07:08:55 PM »
Investing $200 a month in the market at historical average rates of return, from age 23 to 66, will net well over $550,000 in today's dollars.

So it's hardly impossible for EVERYONE to end up with a nest egg of $100,000 at retirement.


alewpanda

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 314
Re: Overheard on Facebook
« Reply #7049 on: December 23, 2017, 11:55:24 AM »
I have a cousin who is less than a year younger than me, putting her at about 28 years old.  Her new husband is a few years younger and is just finishing his degree in chemistry this semester.  Thankfully, he avoided debt through his degree program, so I'm thinking that once he starts his career, they will be doing moderately ok for themselves.  My cousin's dream has always been to be a mom and provide daycare in the home -- over the years since high school most of her work history is in daycare and entry level jobs at small dollar stores, etc.

Generally speaking, they aren't crazy extravagant...but I know they get some help once in a while from family.  Mostly in the form of large "gifts"....mattress, small car down payment, etc.  They also own a cat (not a terribly expensive pet).  But it blows my mind how often I see "foodie" posts on facebook...and not homemade food.

I have counted up to 5 times in the course of a week that my cousin and husband will post a picture and check in to a local restaurant.  Easily they spend 20+ dollars each time at these places.  According to facebook, my cousin and cousin-in-law that currently work at dollar tree and babysit in the home eat out to the tune of 60.00 -- 120.00 WEEKLY.

Their dining out habit probably costs as much as their (income-controlled) rent.......   *face palm*