Author Topic: How would you word this letter...  (Read 1218 times)

ks135ks

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How would you word this letter...
« on: May 17, 2019, 06:57:08 PM »
Hi all!  My husband just received an offer for a new job that equates to roughly a 50% base pay increase, a 401k company match, an extra week of vacation, etc (woohoo hubby!).  He thinks his current job would counter but the gap is substantial so he is not sure they would match it to keep him.  How would you suggest he word his "heads-up-I-got-a-substantially-better-offer" letter to his current boss?  He wasn't looking actively for a new job, it just appeared.  So he doesn't necessarily want to leave the current job, but he doesn't want to miss this opportunity.

Is there anything you would specifically not say?
Would you include the base salary offered for the new job?  What about the other pluses?
Should he outright ask if his current employer would like to counter the offer?
Should he include that this letter he is sending should be taken as his two weeks notice?
Is there something else we should be thinking of .....

Thanks in advance for any response. 

SwordGuy

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Re: How would you word this letter...
« Reply #1 on: May 17, 2019, 08:03:28 PM »
You may trigger legal safeguards once you turn in your notice, which you wouldn't have if you don't.

Depends on how much you trust his boss and his boss' bosses not to be asswipes, and how badly you would be hurt if you guess wrong.


Papa bear

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Re: How would you word this letter...
« Reply #2 on: May 17, 2019, 08:39:59 PM »
Talk to the current boss. Nothing in writing.  See what they can do before you give a written notice. 


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nessness

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Re: How would you word this letter...
« Reply #3 on: May 17, 2019, 09:02:17 PM »
Talk to the current boss. Nothing in writing.  See what they can do before you give a written notice. 


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Agreed. A conversation (in-person if possible) seems much more appropriate in this situation than a letter.

Rosy

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Re: How would you word this letter...
« Reply #4 on: May 18, 2019, 09:43:05 AM »
Talk to the current boss. Nothing in writing.  See what they can do before you give a written notice. 


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Agreed. A conversation (in-person if possible) seems much more appropriate in this situation than a letter.

Definitely - he needs to have a talk and make it clear that he'd prefer to stay if they match the offer or come up with a good counter offer. Nothing in writing from him, -but - get the counter offer in writing before you decline the first offer.

Roadrunner53

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Re: How would you word this letter...
« Reply #5 on: May 18, 2019, 10:45:27 AM »
Yes, in person conversation would be best but DO NOT reveal the name of the company that is interested in him. Sometimes these companies know people in the organizations and could pressure the company to back off so they can keep the employee without giving a raise.

My hub gave his notice to a company he once worked for and they knew the owners of the company he was going to. Instead of two weeks notice they called that company and asked to keep my hub for a month. They agreed. My hub was furious!

ChickenStash

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Re: How would you word this letter...
« Reply #6 on: May 18, 2019, 01:37:23 PM »
Having been in a similar situation (better hours, 40% pay increase, better/newer tech), if I was serious enough about working at the other company I would just turn in my notice and be done. For 10% or so I might give negotiating a try but, if the jobs are similar, a 50% gap (plus benefits) is massive and indicates the current company isn't all that interested in retaining employees by keeping them near market wages and I'd prefer to work elsewhere. I've known a few folks that were wooed by their existing employer to stay with matching salaries or better projects but it usually didn't work out well in the long run and they wound up leaving in a few years, anyway. Companies (like people) don't really change so if they have a habit of low pay or poor benefits today, they'll likely still have the same problem tomorrow.

In my case, my existing employer offered to match the pay but I still declined. My boss actually apologized for my low salary and said he understood why I left. I once got a 10% raise because my salary was too far below the minimum set by HR for my role - that was the day I stared looking. A funny thing in the interview process for the new job I provided my desired salary range and I based it on my current salary +20% or so and they came back with +40% on the first try. It was nice working for a boss that didn't play games and payed people what they were worth.

ks135ks

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Re: How would you word this letter...
« Reply #7 on: May 18, 2019, 06:58:31 PM »
Thank you all for the replies.  Husband told boss today that he has an offer from outside company.  Boss's reaction was to ask if he was going to a competitor (he's not & he didn't reveal the company) and what his job would be (similar to current but more responsibility - more management related).  He followed these questions with the statement that the company will not counter the offer and they usually tell employee to turn everything in when notice is given and not have them work the final two weeks.  He then proceeded to say that he would have to alert his boss to see how they wanted to proceed.  From what we can gather, direct boss never talked to anyone above him before talking to DH.  DH told boss that if that is the case and no counter is coming then he would submit notice in writing sometime next week and leave it up to them whether they want him to work out his notice.  He is not the type of person to shirk responsibility or go back on his word so he would work just as hard for the company during this final phase as he has throughout.  In fact, he just had his mid cycle review where his boss told him he not only met but exceeded expectations.

Perhaps I am being foolish or naive, but I find it very suspect that current company wouldn't try to keep an employee like DH.  Regardless, this is a great offer and while he's sad to leave current team and company, he's excited to see what comes next with this new company.

Roadrunner53

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Re: How would you word this letter...
« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2019, 08:38:37 PM »
My hub worked with a guy who always said 'you can't trust anybody' and the older I get, I think he is right. Your hub needs to move on, take this job but not trust anyone at his new job either. Just take the money and laugh all the way to the bank.

Papa bear

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Re: How would you word this letter...
« Reply #9 on: May 18, 2019, 09:35:17 PM »
Thank you all for the replies. 

Perhaps I am being foolish or naive, but I find it very suspect that current company wouldn't try to keep an employee like DH.  Regardless, this is a great offer and while he's sad to leave current team and company, he's excited to see what comes next with this new company.

Thatís actually a good policy.  Most people who take a counter offer end up leaving again anyway under 12 months. The problems with a job youíre leaving donít change just because they gave you more money.

I have to council people on this constantly. 

Awesome job for your husband. He deserves it.  Heís getting compensated appropriately now for his worth.


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