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Around the Internet => Continue the Blog Conversation => Topic started by: footenote on May 15, 2013, 04:55:26 PM

Title: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on May 15, 2013, 04:55:26 PM
"The Principle of Constant Optimization" brought to mind: What's your Myers-Briggs type?

I have always been a relentless optimizer (although not in MMM's class!). My INTJ  (Introvert-Intuitive-Thinking-Judging) Myers-Briggs type is described as "constantly thinking about Plan B" and "master-minding" optimal outcomes.

If you're aware of your Myers-Briggs, please share your type and whether do you think those (innate?) tendencies brought you to Mustachian-ism. Are those of us who constantly, naturally optimize blind to the virtues of other personality types / approaches to life? (The INTJ / MMM in me wants to say "Heck no - they need a facepunch!")
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Cecil on May 15, 2013, 05:10:40 PM
I've taken Myers-Briggs maybe a dozen times throughout my life and I have come to the conclusion it's much like a horoscope.

I was a strong INTJ for most of my teenage years, but have since tested as ISTJ, INTP, ESTP, ENTJ, and at least one other, with varying degrees of strength. I've read all the descriptions and can find bits of each that I agree and disagree with.

I can test differently on two different days depending on what kind of mood I'm in, because all the questions are worded in such a way that I agree with both answers. Do I prefer to go to a party or stay at home? Yes, I like both and there are parts of both that I really enjoy. It depends on what I feel like at that specific time.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: BPA on May 15, 2013, 05:16:00 PM
I just retook it out of curiosity and came up with:

ENFJ
Extravert(67%)  iNtuitive(12%)  Feeling(12%)  Judging(1%)

    You have distinctive preference of Extraversion over Introversion (67%)
    You have slight preference of Intuition over Sensing (12%)
    You have slight preference of Feeling over Thinking (12%)
    You have marginal or no preference of Judging over Perceiving (1%)
from http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes2.asp (http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/JTypes2.asp)

So really, it would seem that I'm pretty borderline in three of the four areas.  And could go either way in those three areas depending on the day.

Luckily I get a lot of the extroverted part of my personality satisfied at work or I might be tempted to spend money going out more often.  When I finally retire, I'll need to find inexpensive hobbies to keep me engaged.

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: grantmeaname on May 15, 2013, 06:26:36 PM
If you're aware of your Myers-Briggs, please share your type and whether do you think those (innate?) tendencies brought you to Mustachian-ism. Are those of us who constantly, naturally optimize blind to the virtues of other personality types / approaches to life? (The INTJ / MMM in me wants to say "Heck no - they need a facepunch!")
Myers-Briggs feels as false a categorization to me as biological races -- the way I see it, we're all distributed continuously along any infinite number of trait axes and picking just four of them and then looking for extremes instead of variation along those four. There's just no depth or meaning in it to me as far as explaining differences between individuals' personalities -- and that's before you consider cultural differences and life histories! Like Cecil, I find that I lean slightly more towards one of two equally good answers based on my mood and get reclassified every time I take a test.

EDIT: Not to be a seagull and shit and leave, though. My parents think Myers-Briggs is terrific and explains an awful lot about the world, for example. And I think the central question of the thread -- are certain personality types turned on and off by MMM or mustachianism -- is intersting and worth exploring. For that matter, was anyone else turned off by Jacob and spoken too by MMM like I was?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on May 15, 2013, 06:43:31 PM
Thanks for thoughtful responses!

1) I knew people would say "this categorizes people unfairly / unrealistically" responses. I agree - this isn't a horoscope. For those in the middle an axis (many are), it isn't especially meaningful.

2) Yes, our response changes over time. From what I read (I'm *not* an expert on this), this is normal. As we mature, we tend to moderate over time.

3) So far, noting a tendency among Mustacians toward J. Congruent with MMM-ness, yes?

Let the dialog continue....
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: BPA on May 15, 2013, 06:47:19 PM


EDIT: Not to be a seagull and shit and leave, though. My parents think Myers-Briggs is terrific and explains an awful lot about the world, for example. And I think the central question of the thread -- are certain personality types turned on and off by MMM or mustachianism -- is intersting and worth exploring. For that matter, was anyone else turned off by Jacob and spoken too by MMM like I was?

I find that usually MMM resonates more with me since my lifestyle is more mainstream than Jacob's, but I appreciate Jacob's viewpoints. Even though I am not a fan of Libertarianism, I find the forum there more thought provoking.  It's rare to meet someone who needs a facepunch in that forum.  Maybe Jacob and the gang scare those types off before they even post.  He's definitely more extreme than MMM. 

For me, Jacob returning to work and cutting back on the blogging dovetailed nicely with the introduction of MMM.

What was it about Jacob that turned you off (if you don't mind my asking).



Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Zaga on May 15, 2013, 06:51:44 PM
I just did this recently and came up with INTJ like you.  But both the N and T were marginal, and on reading the descriptions I think I'm actually more of an INFJ.  It's definite on the Introvert, no doubt there.  Also the Judgement is clear.

I'm a food scientist by trade who has just about finished my MBA in Accounting.  I do love me some numbers and spreadsheets!  Although I always round off in my head :-P
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: BPA on May 15, 2013, 06:53:41 PM
Thanks for thoughtful responses!

1) I knew people would say "this categorizes people unfairly / unrealistically" responses. I agree - this isn't a horoscope. For those in the middle an axis (many are), it isn't especially meaningful.

2) Yes, our response changes over time. From what I read (I'm *not* an expert on this), this is normal. As we mature, we tend to moderate over time.

3) So far, noting a tendency among Mustacians toward J. Congruent with MMM-ness, yes?

Let the dialog continue....

You know, it's interesting.  When my anxiety rears its head, I am way more introverted, but it's funny.  I always thought that introverts would have an easier time at being mustachian, but maybe not.  I spend more money because I'm avoiding more people then.  I don't like going to stores grocery shopping and will use the grocery delivery service instead, for example.

Interesting about the J vs P thing.  If you are perceiving experiences, I think you would be more likely to fall for advertising that is trying to sell you an emotional experience regardless if that is a product or a service. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: tooqk4u22 on May 15, 2013, 06:55:26 PM
Myers-Briggs feels as false a categorization to me as biological races -- the way I see it, we're all distributed continuously along any infinite number of trait axes and picking just four of them and then looking for extremes instead of variation along those four. There's just no depth or meaning in it to me as far as explaining differences between individuals' personalities -- and that's before you consider cultural differences and life histories! Like Cecil, I find that I lean slightly more towards one of two equally good answers based on my mood and get reclassified every time I take a test.

I kind of agree, but my view is that the tests are meant to reveal a bias and not an absolute such day to day the categorization can change but if tracked (not that it is really possible) your true personality trait would prevail more frequently.

For that matter, was anyone else turned off by Jacob and spoken too by MMM like I was?

Yes. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: lark on May 15, 2013, 08:01:50 PM
Quote
3) So far, noting a tendency among Mustacians toward J. Congruent with MMM-ness, yes?

I'm an ENFP, but MMM is pretty natural for me. I've never really been wasteful with money and things have never made me happy. The idea of being financially independent and living simply is very appealing to me. I would love to have more time to spend with people I care about and/or to volunteer for causes that I find important.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: totoro on May 15, 2013, 08:07:08 PM
INFJ - sometimes INTJ - always N
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: jenstill on May 15, 2013, 08:35:31 PM
I've taken the Myers-Briggs a few times throughout my adult life and have always come out strongly INTJ. I've yet to find a description in these that I feel does not describe me, so in my case, I think it's accurate. A couple of times, the tester has told me it's one of the rarest combinations which was interesting to me because both of my parents, my brother and my sister also got INTJ results and I understand these classifications are thought to be a person's nature, not due to nurture. Recently, our HR Director at work got Myers-Briggs certified so all employees went through it (whether we had before or not) and several co-workers reported they were told they had a rare combination, which was different from mine. So, maybe they're all rare? Maybe the testers are full of it?

Anyway, to your question: yes, for me, I do think my personality tendencies drew me here and allow me to fully embrace these ideals. One of the characterizations, according to Myers-Briggs, of our type is "It's not MY way, it's THE way". And that resonates with me. I see almost nothing as me being right, or knowing more, or being better than other ideals; I just see most things as only one logical to be ... "THE way". Mustachianism is one of those things. So, I have to constantly, consciously, remind myself that other people hold different beliefs and approaches to life and to not be so judgmental. At least, not out loud.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: olivia on May 15, 2013, 08:46:40 PM
Another INTJ, and the descriptions are like someone is talking about me specifically.  My husband and twin sister's minds were blown when they read them.  I've "met" a lot of INTJs on forums despite it supposedly being a rare type, so I do think there's a definite connection.  Either that or the Myers-Briggs people just want everyone to feel like special snowflakes.  :P 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: EK on May 15, 2013, 09:38:54 PM
Wow... I can't believe all the INTJs here!  I have never met another INTJ in person not once ever.  I read once that it's the rarest female personality type, and one of the rarest overall.  I used to be very strongly INTJ in all categories, but I re-took it recently and the T/F was right on the cusp.  Looking into the description, I see myself as more of an INFJ now really.

Mustachianism certainly fits with the INTJ personality so it makes sense.

I don't think the test is the end-all-be-all of personalities, but there's definitely something to it.  And certainly some personalities are more drawn towards a certain way of living and thinking than others.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on May 15, 2013, 09:51:28 PM
This is a common discussion among early retiree types who want to find out what's "different" about their thinking.  One can look up previous discussions on the ERE and E-R.org forums if interested.  I believe INTJ is rare among the population, but common among the group.  Engineer (and software engineer, obviously) is fairly common.

I don't subscribe to the theory, like grant I find it far too simplistic, and, like Cecil, I've tested various ways, so I can't say what I would fall under for the MB test.

For that matter, was anyone else turned off by Jacob and spoken too by MMM like I was?

Yes.  To me, ERE was too extreme.  Not in the spending, but in the lack of balance, and accessibility (though I'm sure an ERE defender would dispute that, and I'm okay with that).  I have a healthy respect for Jacob and what he did though.

I do like some extremes at that level, however, like Mike over at LackingAmbition.  It is hard for me to define, but definitely more drawn to Mustachianism than ERE, despite the overlaps.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: lhamo on May 15, 2013, 10:10:39 PM
Another INTJ (though the last time I took it I was borderline T/F, which was a shock as in previous tests I'd always been off the charts T).

Today's post totally resonated with me.  I am also a relentless optimizer.  Have some stuff goign on at work that is playing to that aspect of my personality, and I'm grooving on it.  I think as long as there are systems and processes I can be continually tweaking and improving, most jobs are going to be pretty engaging for me.  Put me in a position where I'm told what to do and how to do it and not given that freedom and I probably wouldn't last a week.

lhamo

PS:  I just redid the test on the humanmetrics site and came up INFJ, with the following breakdown

INFJ
Introvert(78%)  iNtuitive(62%)  Feeling(50%)  Judging(89%)
You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (78%)
You have distinctive preference of Intuition over Sensing (62%)
You have moderate preference of Feeling over Thinking (50%)
You have strong preference of Judging over Perceiving (89%)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: secondcor521 on May 15, 2013, 10:27:43 PM
Relevant article from an old website:

http://www.retireearlyhomepage.com/mbti.html

(solid INTJ and firmware engineer)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Nords on May 15, 2013, 11:17:07 PM
INTJ.

We're drawn to Internet forums where we can be introverted at will, as analytical as we please, and as judgmental as we want to be.

Relevant article from an old website:

http://www.retireearlyhomepage.com/mbti.html

(solid INTJ and firmware engineer)
Ah, good, got it already, that was the first link I thought of when I saw this thread.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: spider1204 on May 15, 2013, 11:55:28 PM
INTP

However, I've been becoming more Extraverted and Judging over the past few years.

I do find it to be a much more compelling theory when used to describe a person's particular mental state rather than their personality.  This makes it much more difficult to apply, but accounts better for differences in culture and the fact that people change over time.  Everybody uses functions from all the personality types, the test will reveal your preferred functions at a given point in time but I don't think that makes the test completely useless.

Also, I agree that there are many other axies on which to measure a person's personality, but that's what happens when you throw 7 billion objects into 16 buckets. Classification systems can still be useful even if all the objects in a bucket are only roughly equivalent along a few dimensions.  (Jeez that's abstract, is my N showing?)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: spider1204 on May 16, 2013, 12:09:45 AM
I actually think the largest bias you're going to find is for the N preference, since Intuitives tend to be more future oriented and unconventional.  Also consider that the typical distribution in the population is 75% Sensors, 25% Intuitive and I haven't seen a single S pop up on this thread yet.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: happy on May 16, 2013, 02:45:33 AM
This has come up in threads here before and there's always an abundance of INTJs. Which is nice for the INTJs because we don't meet so many in the outside world.

I think one can get carried away with M-B, but in defence of it: it is about preferences ie our preferred way of responding not absolutes, and people can still operate in the opposite way ( ie an N can still get into details (S) ) if they so desire or really have to, just the natural preference might be one thing. Also, the axis is a spectrum and so yes there will be people close to the middle who don't score strongly in one or other direction. Thats fine, it just means they are well balanced, and can operate one way or another fairly easily.

I'm an INFJ (at least in my 20-30s), who now scores as INTJ. I've rechecked plenty but still score as an INTJ, but only slightly T. Pretty firm in the INJ axes.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: marty998 on May 16, 2013, 04:41:34 AM
Add me to the INTJ list (67, 25, 75, 44). I too have never met one in person before, lest never met anyone who would admit it.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on May 16, 2013, 05:14:34 AM
Wow - I am now connected (albeit in a very "I" way!) to far more INTJs than I had previously met in my entire life.

I respect all the MB-doubters' PsOV. Jung said that as we mature, we should naturally moderate our "go-to" tendencies. So those of you who do not repeatedly test the same way over time and/or get mushy, in-the-middle results are likely quite mature.

I don't peg the axes the way I used to, but I am (sighs) still pretty firmly INTJ. (Hey olivia and Evakatharina - count me as one more MMMer in Team Female INTJ.)

nords and jenstill are spot-on: an anonymous forum on a topic where it's THE way (not MY way) obviously draws INTJs like cats to the sound of a can opener.

Thanks for the history and link, arebelspy. (I value your articulate, patient moderation btw.)

BPA: That's a subtle observation. If your temperment is a minority temperment, focus group-driven advertising and marketing sail right past you. So maybe a naturally skeptical temperment is a lucky booster-shot for getting you to FI-RE.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Jane on May 16, 2013, 06:17:04 AM
I also test as INTJ (another female, which does seem super rare). I don't know if I've ever met another, but it sure does seem like I am a lot different than most of the rest of the female population I've come across. I've actually seen on other message boards, not just here and ERE, that there were a lot of INTJs. Must be something about this form of community and interaction that draws us in. I'm definitely an "I" but the others I'm not as strong on, so I'm not as extreme of an INTJ.

This guy makes it sounds like we're all a bunch of social outcasts with no feelings.
http://intjcentral.com/the-compleat-idiots-guide-to-the-intj/

Some of what it says rang true, but I think some of that is specific to the individual, or maybe they just test stronger on the "NTJ" parts than I do.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: shusherstache on May 16, 2013, 06:46:03 AM
I'm another female INTJ... and I'm working in an organization of extreme extroverts.  I've ended up building a social media community of other introverts at my workplace to prove we're not broken/wrong/weird!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: spider1204 on May 16, 2013, 07:12:43 AM
INTx are supposed to be ~6% of the population, yet they make up 90% of the internet.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Dr.Vibrissae on May 16, 2013, 07:15:12 AM
I'm either INTJ or INTP depending on my mood although according to the test linked above I was INTJ today. The Mr. is an ENFP.

 Charts suggest that 3-4% of the population are INTJ, so it seems I must have met others although it's not really a question I ask or even consider when meeting people.  Since there are 16 possible types, with a normal distribution none would be more than 6.25%.  Also there are only a couple types with an average greater than 10%, so most types a relatively rare, what ever that means.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on May 16, 2013, 07:20:55 AM
INTx are supposed to be ~6% of the population, yet they make up 90% of the internet.

Hmm.. How old are the studies on the percent that the population is, and do they have recent ones by age?  The millenials may be much more likely to be INTx than earlier populations...
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: olivia on May 16, 2013, 07:41:08 AM
To the female INTJs, I met another female INTJ through a different forum and she's one of my best friends!  We've hung out IRL multiple times.  Forums definitely attract our kind. :P
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Spork on May 16, 2013, 08:11:45 AM
Add me to INTJ.  I forget wifey's, but I vaguely thought she was INTJ too.  If not, she's close.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: spider1204 on May 16, 2013, 08:47:03 AM
Quote
Quote
INTx are supposed to be ~6% of the population, yet they make up 90% of the internet.
Hmm.. How old are the studies on the percent that the population is, and do they have recent ones by age?  The millenials may be much more likely to be INTx than earlier populations...

I couldn't figure how old that stats I was looking at were, and couldn't find anything by age either, but that stats were only from the US.  I wouldn't be surprised though if there was a significant difference by age though.  It could be the result of both the culture we're born into as well just the general maturing that everybody does.  Wouldn't be surprised at all if being an INTx is more rewarding now than it used to be in the past, which would make us less likely to moderate our behavior and learn to use some of the other functions.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: NumberCruncher on May 16, 2013, 09:16:13 AM
ISTJ last time I tested ENTJ before that...I can't remember them all, but the last two times I was extroverted, and once I kept getting exactly in between on two measures.

Yeah...I can see bits of truth in every result I've had, but the same way I see bits of truth in astrology (no matter which horoscope sign I read)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on May 16, 2013, 09:21:01 AM
I usually test at IS/INTJ. I too have my doubts as to how easy it is to draw boxes around people especially since you can test in different ways given your environment (internal and external). And other doubts about the application of this information. Is it even useful? I don't personally think so but then again I've already stated my doubts so I'm a bit biased.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: totoro on May 16, 2013, 09:40:18 AM
I think the Meyers-Briggs is fairly accurate for me.  As an aside, my DH and all four of my best friends are INTJ.  As a woman, I think the INTJ is unusual.  Of the other INTJ's I have known, I have always found we have a lot in common and enjoyed their company.  These are the things I tend to appreciate:

1. very very good sense of humor (which probably just means it is like mine)
2. not prone to hystrionic behaviour
3. logical/objective
4. inventive
5. analytical
6. like optimization a lot
7. like problem-solving
8. enjoy small groups rather than large (like me)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: EK on May 16, 2013, 09:45:30 AM
Nothing more to add, but a shoutout to all the INTJ ladies!  We're not so weird after all. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Shandi76 on May 16, 2013, 10:31:00 AM
Another INTJ female here :-)

But I think it depends on the test, and the mood I am in when I take the test. The I and T are not strongly expressed and I have previously tested as ENFJ.

My partner is much more strongly INTJ than me (even though he has great social skills: he just finds being around people draining) and he doesn't believe I can be INTJ because I do sometimes like socialising, and can be empathetic and get emotional on occasion. He is rational about things he deems important, but not about money :-/
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: August West on May 16, 2013, 10:42:44 AM
INTP

don't judge me...
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: nofool on May 16, 2013, 10:52:13 AM
Holy cow, so many INTJ's!

I'm an INFJ, nearly 100% N, F, and J, but just barely more of an I than an E. I feel like such a minority...
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: spider1204 on May 16, 2013, 11:34:27 AM
Quote
INTP

don't judge me...

Js aren't necessarily judgmental, but they make decisions quite differently (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KL11OmS1aIU).
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: KimPossible on May 16, 2013, 12:26:09 PM
Another INTJ female :)

It's so nice to not be the only one....  From what I've read, INTJ females are the rarest subgroup.  I love that I've found my people!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: CNM on May 16, 2013, 01:24:39 PM
I just took the test and it came up with this:

ESFJ
Extravert(1%)  Sensing(1%)  Feeling(12%)  Judging(44%)
You have marginal or no preference of Extraversion over Introversion (1%)
You have marginal or no preference of Sensing over Intuition (1%)
You have slight preference of Feeling over Thinking (12%)
You have moderate preference of Judging over Perceiving (44%)

Seems pretty accurate to me but it's hard to separate my work self from my home self.  I'm a trial lawyer, so sometimes I need to be way extroverted and meeting deadlines is extremely important.  In my personal life, I'm much more laid back.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: SMMcP on May 16, 2013, 01:53:40 PM
Yet another INTJ female here.
I took the Myers - Briggs Type testing 4 years ago during some leadership training at work.  It came out moderately I, clearly N and slight preference for T and J. It is interesting to note that these are termed preferences and not absolutes and that these preferences occur on a scale.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: CeciliaW on May 16, 2013, 02:04:02 PM
ENTJ
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: yolfer on May 16, 2013, 03:06:08 PM
I've always been ENTJ but just did a re-test and got ESTJ for the first time.

I'm blown away by the number of *NTJs!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: jrhampt on May 16, 2013, 03:56:06 PM
INTJ (89/12/75/78).  Most strongly I and J, weakest on N.  I believe I have tested ISTJ at times.  Also female, not that it should matter ;-)

Statistician/programmer.

Edited to add:  I identified with MMM much more strongly than with ERE.  I like to enjoy food, for one thing, so the lentils diet is right out.  Also, I am very much MMM's target audience - high earning professional with initially a lot of waste to cut back on.

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: smalllife on May 16, 2013, 04:08:35 PM
Female INTJ, strong in everything but N (12% according to that test).  I think I've tested as a INTP at times as well, but always strong I and T.

I've had this conversation on multiple forums: always more INTJs than normal, more introverts than extroverts, etc.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: totoro on May 16, 2013, 04:14:34 PM
I do find it quite nice that there are so many INTJ women around.  We are probably less than 1:100.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: ch12 on May 16, 2013, 04:38:40 PM
INTJ is the rarest type for a woman with ENTJ right behind. I'm an IN(t/f)J. I'm really strong on the INJ parts but more iffy on the thinking a feeling. I think that it's right that its more a reflection of your state of mind. It doesn't have a ton of validity, but it's a quick way to describe your personality. The real method of personality measurement is on openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness, and neuroticism, but MBTI did better at commercialization so it wins in the corporate world.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: KulshanGirl on May 16, 2013, 05:29:53 PM
I am a INFJ/ENFJ, I test right on the line for the I/E part.  N and J are solid, and the F is closer to the middle.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: happy on May 16, 2013, 09:44:02 PM
I'm lucky that one of my colleagues that I work with quite closely is a INTJ. She was tickled pink to find out she was a "mastermind" and says its made a huge difference to understand why she always felt different to a lot of the population.

I've spent time on some other forums in the past (not to do with FI/RE) and found them variously tedious, superficial, irritating, boring and manipulative. So I'm pretty sure they weren't populated with INTJs.

 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: icefr on May 16, 2013, 11:15:26 PM
Another INTJ female. I'm a software developer.

I'm not surprised that many of the people here are INTJ :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: norvilion on May 17, 2013, 10:32:19 AM
Wow, results seem rather one sided so far. I've taken the test a few times over my life and each time I've come out pretty strongly INTP.

Often times for me the most appealing aspects of Mustacianism is the general simplification of one's life, with financial gain being a useful side effect. I get a fun little game of seeing how many mood-neutal expenses I can cut and encouragement to try new things when I might have otherwise kept up routine on autopilot. Biggest shift for me has been discovering a love of playing around with cooking (though probably do need to craft a love of doing dishes afterwards too :P)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Dr.Vibrissae on May 17, 2013, 01:04:57 PM
Oddly enough, this came up during a meeting/talk today.  It was said that our field attracts a certain personality, and Myers-Briggs was mentioned.  No one in the room was an extrovert, and one person said, oh you know we're probably a group full of INFJ's, to which another (woman) added well I'm INTJ.  So I guess I know at least one, and FWIW we get along really well.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: NumberJohnny5 on May 17, 2013, 09:14:26 PM
I looked up a site and it described what each letter was for, then you picked what fit you. I picked INTP. Had my wife double-check me, she said the last one should be a J. Then I took the actual test where it asks you questions and you answer them. It indicated I was strongly I and N, moderately T, and slightly J. So...my wife does indeed know me better than I know myself.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Christiana on May 18, 2013, 05:42:19 AM
INTJ/ISTJ.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Chowder on May 18, 2013, 07:02:51 AM
INTJ/P
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: August West on May 18, 2013, 11:15:04 AM
Quote
INTP

don't judge me...

Js aren't necessarily judgmental, but they make decisions quite differently (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KL11OmS1aIU).

...you see....actually......oh nevermind.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: pbkmaine on May 26, 2013, 01:04:36 PM
I seem to be the only ESTP here. The personality type is sometimes described as "the ultimate realist" and that certainly fits. I am frugal because I accept the reality that we all grow old and we had better darned well be prepared for it. On the job I function as an ESTJ. That is fortunate - ESTJs seem to be tailor-made for corporate America. I do agree that this typing has its limitations. I am just about on the line between E and I and function as one or the other depending on the situation. I have no trouble at all speaking to large groups, but do not like parties, except when I host them. I am friendly with many people but have only a few close friends.  I belong to many groups and enjoy them, but am probably happiest reading a good book.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on May 26, 2013, 02:12:17 PM
pbkmaine - You complete us.     

xoxo - #teamINTJ
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: pbkmaine on May 27, 2013, 06:45:46 PM
Footenote: aw shucks!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: oldtoyota on May 27, 2013, 07:12:53 PM
I also find it's like a horoscope. The questions make it obvious what "type" you'll be so it's difficult not to be biased when taking the test.

I've been considered ENTP, ENTJ and INFP/J.

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: totoro on May 27, 2013, 07:19:28 PM
I think footenote is actually infj...
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: kudy on May 27, 2013, 08:52:15 PM
I'm INTJ as well. Someone should create a MB matchmaking website.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: ch12 on May 27, 2013, 09:28:31 PM
I'm INTJ as well. Someone should create a MB matchmaking website.

There are a bunch of websites that use MBTI: http://www.quora.com/Have-any-dating-sites-tried-to-rely-primarily-on-Myers-Briggs-Type-Indicators
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: SpendyMcSpend on May 28, 2013, 07:08:19 PM
INTP here
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Mike on May 28, 2013, 11:06:59 PM
For those who want to learn more about the introvert-extrovert dynamic, I suggest that they read "Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can't Stop Talking".  It's an easy read and really goes into what introverts are truly like and how they try to function in a society that rewards extroverts (the US).

As far as personality types and forums are concerned, it's really not surprising that introverts would dominate here - they tend to thrive in an environment that allows / encourages long-form discussion and plenty of time to think about their answers - particularly when they can do it alone.  If this was converted into a face-to-face discussion group of 20+ people meeting somewhere every week, I'd guess extroverts would become the dominant type.

Regarding the M-B testing, I think the I/E category is by far the most important one as someone expressing strongly one way or the other on that will reveal a lot about their comfort zone socially.  As a strong introvert, I much prefer small groups / one-on-ones and feel very out of place once the group size goes above 5-6 people. 

Oh, and for the record, I am yet another INTJ (and have typed as such since taking this test for the first time about 10 years ago).
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: jfer_rose on May 29, 2013, 05:25:01 AM
I'm a strong INFP here. I will note that you can get different results using the free online Myers-Briggs tests versus the paid official name-brand one. Using the free online test I used to get INFJ but when I took the official test, I was very strongly P.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: rving-carol on May 29, 2013, 11:47:33 AM
I just took the free test - INFJ - my N and J are just slight.  I have and always will be an I but the others have changed over time.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: momo on May 29, 2013, 02:26:26 PM
Solid INFJ and I prefer doing something to actively solve concerns, instead of just thinking.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Frugalady10 on May 29, 2013, 07:25:42 PM
I always find stuff like this interesting. I have to add that Fs are a lot more common to be women an Ts men. Also, "E" personalities are each generally around 10% of the population while "I" personalities are usually less than 5%.  Maybe that is why most of the general public is not into this lifestyle? I am an INFJ woman. I've always felt like a weirdo.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Joet on May 29, 2013, 07:40:24 PM
I've scored INTJ's of various strength since the first time I was subjected to it in college. I suspect I over-select I, but the general rules normally suggest 'try to pick quickly... and honestly'---> which as an INTJ I must add, is really not possible heh

Introvert(89%)  iNtuitive(69%)  Thinking(50%)  Judging(11%)
You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (89%)
You have distinctive preference of Intuition over Sensing (69%)
You have moderate preference of Thinking over Feeling (50%)
You have slight preference of Judging over Perceiving (11%)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: twinge on June 07, 2013, 01:40:25 PM
ENTP or INTP  for me

NTP are pretty strong; I and E hover around the middle.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: TansyPants on June 07, 2013, 04:51:17 PM
INFJ

The J is a bit odd, every other time I've taken this it's come up P. The older I get the closer I and E get.

Introvert(56%)  iNtuitive(75%)  Feeling(38%)  Judging(33%)

    You have moderate preference of Introversion over Extraversion (56%)
    You have distinctive preference of Intuition over Sensing (75%)
    You have moderate preference of Feeling over Thinking (38%)
    You have moderate preference of Judging over Perceiving (33%)


Edit: just told my boyfriend I took this again. His comment, "oh god, i could type you right now. ENTP."
go figure.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: momo on June 07, 2013, 04:56:40 PM
Have others read this article http://management.fortune.cnn.com/2013/05/15/myers-briggs-problems/?iid=obnetwork ?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: WaxOnWaxOff on June 08, 2013, 09:20:55 AM
Solid INFJ and I prefer doing something to actively solve concerns, instead of just thinking.

Ditto to both.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on June 08, 2013, 08:05:22 PM
Have others read this article http://management.fortune.cnn.com/2013/05/15/myers-briggs-problems/?iid=obnetwork ?

That's where most of my concerns come from. It's real easy to draw lines and say these people are on that side and those people are on the other side. Rarely does that distinction actually mean anything.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Grigory on June 08, 2013, 09:14:48 PM
I've gone full circle with MBTI - from gleefully embracing the revelation that I'm an INTJ, to joining a message board dedicated to that type, to becoming its moderator, to quitting it after seeing too much infighting and too little progress (I was known as Night Runner, in case any other expats are here), to accepting it all as something that may have some validity for some people but, like most good things, is overrun by overly enthusiastic dummies. (I've kept my penchant for run-on sentences, though.)

Scientists will always mock MBTI because it's a self-reporting system. Very few are honest with themselves. Fewer yet can accept the results of their honesty. Or, to quote a horrible movie whose only redeeming quality may be this quote, "It's more of a guideline, anyway." ;)

(That didn't stop me from getting the "INTJ" license plate - still can't believe it was available!)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Mustache Fatty on June 09, 2013, 09:23:14 AM
Just to add a little diversity into the mix, I scored as an ESFJ.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: GuitarStv on June 11, 2013, 11:20:01 AM
INTJ myself . . . not surprised to see many of the others here are similar.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: catmustache on July 26, 2013, 12:46:51 PM
Another INTJ female...
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: ender on July 26, 2013, 06:06:37 PM
Another male engineer/software person..

Quote
YOUR TYPE: ENTJ

Extravert 68% ----- 32% Introvert
iNtuitive 79%   ----  21% Sensate
Thinking 83% -----   17% Feeling
Judgemental 78% -----22% Perceptive

Sometimes am INTJ depending on the test, though. Go figure :)




Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: RMD on July 26, 2013, 10:54:07 PM

INTJ female....but I am moderate, slight and marginal in all of them. Basically, it's situational, I think.  I rarely think in total absolutes.

I do need human interaction, though. I didn't think I did until I went to a job where I don't get to work directly with anyone. I feel like I'm going to die some days. But too much "team" kills me, too. I need balance!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MelodysMustache on July 27, 2013, 08:10:18 PM
Yet another INTJ female here.  I think we found the INTJ hiding place.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: psu256 on July 27, 2013, 08:28:46 PM
Female ESTP here - wonder why the S'es are so rare around here. The group of about 40 I was in when I took it only had about 5 N. The S didn't seem rare at all. Now I wonder :)

Oh, and I notice there are very few P's here. There were very few P's in the training class I was in too. And I am an engineer, P's are probably very rare in that population, indeed (as well as E's for that matter lol)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: oldtoyota on July 27, 2013, 10:07:04 PM
I have no trouble at all speaking to large groups, but do not like parties, except when I host them.

Haha. That sounds verrry familiar.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: oldtoyota on July 27, 2013, 10:10:01 PM
Maybe all of the E's are out being extroverted (and so not posting), and the I's are mostly here because we don't have to deal with each other in person. ;-)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: impaire on July 27, 2013, 11:16:33 PM
I'm a strong INFP here. I will note that you can get different results using the free online Myers-Briggs tests versus the paid official name-brand one. Using the free online test I used to get INFJ but when I took the official test, I was very strongly P.

I am also scoring INFP on that online test, and have scored similarly for about 10 years, taking the test in different forms/settings. The P is (and has always been) only a slight preference.

I actually share the concern that the test just divides people between a set of questionable variables (not only arbitrary, but potentially biased in a way I'm not quite comfortable with, given that they stem from Jungian "archetypes"--ugh). On the other hand, discovering the E/I thing helped me come to terms with my introversion at a time when I considered it to be a crippling disability... AND I met my husband via a long chain of coincidence started by another MBTI test (taken for my job years after the first). So my NF side will not let me talk smack about this test :p
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: lifejoy on July 28, 2013, 12:13:57 AM
Solid ENFJ over here! :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: smalliswell on July 28, 2013, 07:58:40 AM
INTJ Female here.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: prosaic on July 28, 2013, 08:25:01 AM
INTJ female here, married to an INTP male.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Osprey on July 28, 2013, 09:25:46 AM
ENFP female and wondering what the heck I'm doing here. Maybe my dedication to mustachianism is that phenominal! ;)
But seriously, my version of constant optimisation is very random, because I enjoy changing things up, but completely directionless. Early retirement resonates with me because I value freedom and flexibility.
I think MBTI has value on an individual level, but not sure that it translates well into larger systems.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: RetiredAt63 on July 28, 2013, 10:20:22 AM
Another INT? here - I used to think INTJ, but now maybe more P than J - or am I now just relaxing as I ease out of the work place? (I wasn't at all sure I was ready for retirement,but as it looms closer I am starting to really appreciate the loss of "I have to"s and deadlines not of my choosing.)  N and T are not that strong either - the I is me for sure, I need my quiet times to recharge ad love living alone.  Hated teaching large classes, really liked being able to work with students one-to-one or in small groups.

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: caligulala on July 28, 2013, 01:32:48 PM
ENFJ female married to an ENFJ male. I'm on the border with E/I. I crossed over to the extrovert side when I started staying home with the kids and spending less time with adults. NFJ are all strong preferences, with my J being off the charts. My husband is an extrovert with a capital E with a mild preference for the NFJ.

I think the F explains why I have such a love/hate relationship with this forum. Sometimes I just want to yell "Shades of grey!" at all of you INTJs.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Osprey on July 29, 2013, 03:50:29 AM
Sometimes I just want to yell "Shades of grey!" at all of you INTJs.

Yep, I hear ya...
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: nktokyo on July 29, 2013, 05:18:45 AM
I just re-did the test for the first time since reading Quiet

INFJ Introvert(33%)  iNtuitive(62%)  Feeling(6%)  Judging(44%)

Much higher scale on the Introvert vs Extrovert than I've ever had, as expected because my key take away was to stop acting extroverted (which I'm good at) and just relax.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on July 29, 2013, 05:33:53 AM
I just re-did the test for the first time since reading Quiet

INFJ Introvert(33%)  iNtuitive(62%)  Feeling(6%)  Judging(44%)

Much higher scale on the Introvert vs Extrovert than I've ever had, as expected because my key take away was to stop acting extroverted (which I'm good at) and just relax.
Oooooh... you're my hero, nk. Over the years I worked on "adapting" my introversion with extroverted behaviors. The behaviors eventually became so auto-pilot that no one believes I'm an introvert. Good advice to "just relax"!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: nktokyo on July 29, 2013, 05:52:49 AM
I just re-did the test for the first time since reading Quiet

INFJ Introvert(33%)  iNtuitive(62%)  Feeling(6%)  Judging(44%)

Much higher scale on the Introvert vs Extrovert than I've ever had, as expected because my key take away was to stop acting extroverted (which I'm good at) and just relax.
Oooooh... you're my hero, nk. Over the years I worked on "adapting" my introversion with extroverted behaviors. The behaviors eventually became so auto-pilot that no one believes I'm an introvert. Good advice to "just relax"!

It was a fascinating book to read. I felt like I was being given permission to just be myself for the first time since middle school. Here's the book (http://"http://www.amazon.com/Quiet-Power-Introverts-World-Talking/dp/0307352153") if anybody is interested. It's become something of a sensation.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: EMP on July 29, 2013, 03:55:29 PM
Sometimes I just want to yell "Shades of grey!" at all of you INTJs.

Yep, I hear ya...

As an INTP, I totally blame that behavior on the J preference.  :P
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: spider1204 on July 29, 2013, 04:40:51 PM
Sometimes I just want to yell "Shades of grey!" at all of you INTJs.

Yep, I hear ya...

As an INTP, I totally blame that behavior on the J preference.  :P

Yep, absolutely, I can argue with INTJ friends but they always think they are right.  Whenever I start to argue something I realize there's no way I can know all the variables, I start to see both sides of the argument, and just conclude that we will never know the answer.  Although sometimes I will continue to argue as if I think I'm right just or the sake of it.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: YoungAndWise on July 30, 2013, 03:11:30 PM
INTP.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Carrie on August 16, 2013, 04:44:06 PM
I'm a female INTJ too -
I'm new here, but I can already tell I'm going to love it.  Nice to meet you all.

I've been on the line between E/I before, but after being married almost 18 years to an I, I've become more of one myself.

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on August 16, 2013, 04:57:50 PM
Carrie - Yep, for whatever reason, there are lots of us female INTJs here. Welcome!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: FunkyStickman on August 16, 2013, 05:02:09 PM
It should be "Optimism" not "Optimization." That kind of annoys the grammar Nazi in me.

I'm ENTP, by the way. :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on August 16, 2013, 05:12:06 PM
It should be "Optimism" not "Optimization." That kind of annoys the grammar Nazi in me.

I'm ENTP, by the way. :)
Welcome fellow Grammar Nazi! MMM's blog post was about constant "Optimization": http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2013/05/15/the-principle-of-constant-optimization/

(And I love me my "Optimism" as well. ; )
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: grantmeaname on August 16, 2013, 05:20:46 PM
(And I love me my "Optimism" as well. ; )

Pew pew! Pewpewpew!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Daleth on August 16, 2013, 06:36:22 PM
Holy cow, so many INTJ's!

I'm an INFJ, nearly 100% N, F, and J, but just barely more of an I than an E. I feel like such a minority...

We can be minorities together! :) I've tested both INFJ and INFP. For me the marginal preference (obviously) is P/J. I'm also not strongly introverted, though that preference is apparently more distinct than the P/J one.

I'm surrounded by INTJ's because I work in a law firm. We all did the M-B test and probably 40%-45% of the lawyers were some form or other of NT!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on August 16, 2013, 07:17:52 PM
(And I love me my "Optimism" as well. ; )

Pew pew! Pewpewpew!
I grew up in OH. Want to be adopted? ; )
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: grantmeaname on August 16, 2013, 07:24:03 PM
I grew up in OH. Want to be adopted? ; )

I don't even no how to answer that. Can I keep my own parents?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on August 16, 2013, 10:19:40 PM
I grew up in OH. Want to be adopted? ; )

I don't even no how to answer that. Can I keep my own parents?

Given that this is probably the first grammar error I've seen you make, I think Freud may have answered for you.

(http://rationalwiki.org/w/images/thumb/1/10/FreudianSlip.jpg/150px-FreudianSlip.jpg)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on August 17, 2013, 05:36:41 AM
arebelspy: I, too, was amused by "I don't even.... NO!!"
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: grantmeaname on August 17, 2013, 06:30:19 AM
It's certainly not the first. Maybe I'll have to pepper them in from now on. Love your Freudian slip.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MsGuided on September 21, 2013, 04:07:03 PM
INFJ here.  For all you skeptics (I'd bet my retirement you are NTs), the MBT types are spot on accurate to human temperament, but problems arise with testing.  Yes, people test inaccurately.  I, for example tested 2x, over the course of 8 years, as an INTJ.  That inaccurate result stemmed from my desire to be more of a thinker (T) than a feeler (F) as well as adaptive behavior. 

Until about 3 years ago, I thought MBT was marginally helpful.  I read the description of INTJ and INFJ and didn't feel I had been pegged or truly identified.  Then, a friend of mine, a fellow INFJ, read a book and met with a coach/counselor who identified her as an INFJ even though she'd tested as an ISTJ. Suddenly, his description of the INFJ and help in identifying her as such, opened the floodgates for her to understand herself.  She, in turn, helped me understand my temperament and it has changed my life dramatically.

Not all types struggle with their temperament (most sensors (S)) are perfectly content and are not in a search for meaning or categorization.  Many N's are curious.  Almost all NFs have a great need for self understanding and self actualization.

It is true that N's are in the minority in the general population and appear to be in the majority on the MMM forums.  That doesn't surprise me at all.  Ns love the world of ideas and concepts.   
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: avonlea on September 21, 2013, 04:53:10 PM
INFJ/ISFJ 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: ender on September 21, 2013, 05:54:39 PM
INFJ here.  For all you skeptics (I'd bet my retirement you are NTs), the MBT types are spot on accurate to human temperament, but problems arise with testing.  Yes, people test inaccurately.  I, for example tested 2x, over the course of 8 years, as an INTJ.  That inaccurate result stemmed from my desire to be more of a thinker (T) than a feeler (F) as well as adaptive behavior. 

Hey now, this INTJ fully appreciates the value in this sort of thing :) A lot of disagreement in my life is a result of S vs N...

You are right, though about testing - I think a lot of people test based on what they want to do or are expected to do rather than what they actually are inclined to do.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: grantmeaname on September 21, 2013, 06:12:44 PM
the MBT types are spot on accurate to human temperament, but problems arise with testing.
1) How do you figure they're spot-on accurate?
2) If they types are spot-on accurate but can't accurately categorize people when they actually need to be applied to them, doesn't that make them not spot-on accurate?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MsGuided on September 22, 2013, 11:55:44 AM
the MBT types are spot on accurate to human temperament, but problems arise with testing.
1) How do you figure they're spot-on accurate?
2) If they types are spot-on accurate but can't accurately categorize people when they actually need to be applied to them, doesn't that make them not spot-on accurate?

Hi grantmemyname, I "figure" they are spot on accurate because since I've gotten proper testing and information I've become a student of the subject and have been amazed by the modern research that supports it as well as its' historical roots.  If you'd like to do some reading on the topic, it's quite fascinating to discover the recognition of four main temperament types stretches back to Greek philosophers and even references in the Bible.  The idea of temperament was well accepted until Freud came along.  Reading Jung also helps see the progression that has become the MBT.  I'd also recommend reading Keirsey, Montgomery and Ray Lincoln for further confirmation of the value and accuracy of this system of identifying temperament.

What I said was that the four main temperaments (SJ, SP, NT, NF) and the sixteen types that are subsets of the types as identified are spot on accurate.  The implementation of identifying people with their types is flawed.  I agree with the idea that that is a problem and needs to be dealt with to be more useful to those seeking to understand themselves and others.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on September 22, 2013, 01:07:45 PM
the MBT types are spot on accurate to human temperament, but problems arise with testing.
1) How do you figure they're spot-on accurate?
2) If they types are spot-on accurate but can't accurately categorize people when they actually need to be applied to them, doesn't that make them not spot-on accurate?

Hi grantmemyname, I "figure" they are spot on accurate because since I've gotten proper testing and information I've become a student of the subject and have been amazed by the modern research that supports it as well as its' historical roots.  If you'd like to do some reading on the topic, it's quite fascinating to discover the recognition of four main temperament types stretches back to Greek philosophers and even references in the Bible.  The idea of temperament was well accepted until Freud came along.  Reading Jung also helps see the progression that has become the MBT.  I'd also recommend reading Keirsey, Montgomery and Ray Lincoln for further confirmation of the value and accuracy of this system of identifying temperament.

What I said was that the four main temperaments (SJ, SP, NT, NF) and the sixteen types that are subsets of the types as identified are spot on accurate.  The implementation of identifying people with their types is flawed.  I agree with the idea that that is a problem and needs to be dealt with to be more useful to those seeking to understand themselves and others.

Astrology also has very historical roots dating back many millennia.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on September 22, 2013, 01:51:36 PM
the MBT types are spot on accurate to human temperament, but problems arise with testing.
1) How do you figure they're spot-on accurate?
2) If they types are spot-on accurate but can't accurately categorize people when they actually need to be applied to them, doesn't that make them not spot-on accurate?

Hi grantmemyname, I "figure" they are spot on accurate because since I've gotten proper testing and information I've become a student of the subject and have been amazed by the modern research that supports it as well as its' historical roots.  If you'd like to do some reading on the topic, it's quite fascinating to discover the recognition of four main temperament types stretches back to Greek philosophers and even references in the Bible.  The idea of temperament was well accepted until Freud came along.  Reading Jung also helps see the progression that has become the MBT.  I'd also recommend reading Keirsey, Montgomery and Ray Lincoln for further confirmation of the value and accuracy of this system of identifying temperament.

What I said was that the four main temperaments (SJ, SP, NT, NF) and the sixteen types that are subsets of the types as identified are spot on accurate.  The implementation of identifying people with their types is flawed.  I agree with the idea that that is a problem and needs to be dealt with to be more useful to those seeking to understand themselves and others.

Astrology also has very historical roots dating back many millennia.

Same with alchemy. And just so I'm clear it's not that putting people into types is flawed, it's how we put them into types which is flawed?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: grantmeaname on September 22, 2013, 07:38:07 PM
That's what I was getting at, I guess. If astrology perfectly describes human behavior when they're not unduly influenced by thetans, and they're often unduly influenced by thetans, astrology isn't really useful.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MsGuided on September 23, 2013, 01:05:00 AM
the MBT types are spot on accurate to human temperament, but problems arise with testing.
1) How do you figure they're spot-on accurate?
2) If they types are spot-on accurate but can't accurately categorize people when they actually need to be applied to them, doesn't that make them not spot-on accurate?

Hi grantmemyname, I "figure" they are spot on accurate because since I've gotten proper testing and information I've become a student of the subject and have been amazed by the modern research that supports it as well as its' historical roots.  If you'd like to do some reading on the topic, it's quite fascinating to discover the recognition of four main temperament types stretches back to Greek philosophers and even references in the Bible.  The idea of temperament was well accepted until Freud came along.  Reading Jung also helps see the progression that has become the MBT.  I'd also recommend reading Keirsey, Montgomery and Ray Lincoln for further confirmation of the value and accuracy of this system of identifying temperament.

What I said was that the four main temperaments (SJ, SP, NT, NF) and the sixteen types that are subsets of the types as identified are spot on accurate.  The implementation of identifying people with their types is flawed.  I agree with the idea that that is a problem and needs to be dealt with to be more useful to those seeking to understand themselves and others.

Astrology also has very historical roots dating back many millennia.

Same with alchemy. And just so I'm clear it's not that putting people into types is flawed, it's how we put them into types which is flawed?

Not sure it's wise to get into the snarky comments here, but I'll try one more time.  My reason for pointing out the historical roots of temperament recognition is that the fact that there are distinct types of people that fit into similar patterns is something that has been recognized by common people,philosophers and writers historically.  Getting at the patterns and similarities common in the four main temperaments is useful for people that want to understand others.  So, to respond to your dismissive response, I'll say that understanding temperament and type is not putting people into types, it's recognizing patterns of behavior, language and preferences common to the temperament and using that as a tool to understand them.  Not everyone is interested in doing that, but I would hope you'd be willing to concede that you recognize that there are certain general similarities (not 100%, but quite notable in number) in people who gravitate to certain occupations or interests. 

Let's use the recent MMM post about who his readers are by the work they do as a stepping off point for discussion.  MM wrote that a large number of respondents appear to be engineers & specifically software engineers.  Have you ever noticed a general pattern in the interests and preferences in engineers in general?  How about social workers?  Do you generally think most engineers and most social workers have some pretty sharp differences in ways of looking at life in their thought processes?  Do you think there might be something very revealing about the fact that a huge majority of MMM readers who responded identified themselves as Intuitives (either NT or NF)? 

I may not have been clear, but I did not mean to say that there is no way to correctly identify people, because there is a good way.  Just that the tests that are out there, when used without a trained administrator that can follow up with confirmation questions about each letter (I or E, N or S, T or F, and J or P) and have the subject respond is a great way to get accurate results but is very rarely used. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Freckles on September 23, 2013, 01:30:26 AM
I did this recently during a staff development at work.  I was ISF...J?  I think that was it.  I was in a group of fellow teachers and they were all E-somethings, save for me and one other, which I found amusing.  We were supposed to partner up with someone with our same letter and read the descriptions.  My partner and I sat there quietly reading while everyone else read it out loud with their partner and discussed every freaking sentence.  Damn noisy group of Es!  My partner and I just smiled at each other once in a while.  Haha.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MsGuided on September 23, 2013, 01:53:17 AM
I did this recently during a staff development at work.  I was ISF...J?  I think that was it.  I was in a group of fellow teachers and they were all E-somethings, save for me and one other, which I found amusing.  We were supposed to partner up with someone with our same letter and read the descriptions.  My partner and I sat there quietly reading while everyone else read it out loud with their partner and discussed every freaking sentence.  Damn noisy group of Es!  My partner and I just smiled at each other once in a while.  Haha.

Love that story, Freckles!  The similarities you discover of others similar to yourself can sometimes be great bonding moments.  As I mentioned in an earlier post, I've gotten really into studying the MBT over the last few years.  I have taken 3 weekend training classes on it.  The fun, revealing thing about each of the three groups at each training class was that ALL of the participants were of two types only:  INFJ (my temperament) and ENFJ.  NFs are a VERY small percentage of the overall population but comprised 100% of these classes. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Silvie on September 23, 2013, 03:05:26 AM
I had never heard of this test, but I took it anyway. This is what came up:

INTJ
Introvert(100%)  iNtuitive(38%)  Thinking(62%)  Judging(67%)

    You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (100%)
    You have moderate preference of Intuition over Sensing (38%)
    You have distinctive preference of Thinking over Feeling (62%)
    You have distinctive preference of Judging over Perceiving (67%)

100% introvert! I already knew I'm an introvert but 100%? Wow!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MsGuided on September 23, 2013, 07:43:03 AM
I had never heard of this test, but I took it anyway. This is what came up:

INTJ
Introvert(100%)  iNtuitive(38%)  Thinking(62%)  Judging(67%)

    You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (100%)
    You have moderate preference of Intuition over Sensing (38%)
    You have distinctive preference of Thinking over Feeling (62%)
    You have distinctive preference of Judging over Perceiving (67%)

100% introvert! I already knew I'm an introvert but 100%? Wow!

100% is really strong.  I think you'll find quite a number of INTJs on this forum.  INTJ aka the MasterMind is a very rare type in the general population.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on September 23, 2013, 08:45:13 AM
Not sure it's wise to get into the snarky comments here, but I'll try one more time.  My reason for pointing out the historical roots of temperament recognition is that the fact that there are distinct types of people that fit into similar patterns is something that has been recognized by common people,philosophers and writers historically.  Getting at the patterns and similarities common in the four main temperaments is useful for people that want to understand others.  So, to respond to your dismissive response, I'll say that understanding temperament and type is not putting people into types, it's recognizing patterns of behavior, language and preferences common to the temperament and using that as a tool to understand them.  Not everyone is interested in doing that, but I would hope you'd be willing to concede that you recognize that there are certain general similarities (not 100%, but quite notable in number) in people who gravitate to certain occupations or interests. 

The response was not dismissive.

The point of bringing up astrology, or alchemy, is that plenty of fine minds in the past thought they had merit as well.  Read whatever "snark" you want into that, but none is intended.  It's just pointing out that your "historical" context of it being around for thousands of years doesn't hold much weight.

Clearly you are quite a fanatic/believer/whatever you want to call it about this topic, having done three weekend trainings on it, but you just may need to accept that others here may not put as much stock in it telling as much insight about a particular individual as you do.  It has nothing to do with not being "interested in doing that," but in believing that this tool isn't the be-all end-all that some claim.

Cool?  :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on September 23, 2013, 10:03:21 AM
Not sure it's wise to get into the snarky comments here, but I'll try one more time.  My reason for pointing out the historical roots of temperament recognition is that the fact that there are distinct types of people that fit into similar patterns is something that has been recognized by common people,philosophers and writers historically.  Getting at the patterns and similarities common in the four main temperaments is useful for people that want to understand others.  So, to respond to your dismissive response, I'll say that understanding temperament and type is not putting people into types, it's recognizing patterns of behavior, language and preferences common to the temperament and using that as a tool to understand them.  Not everyone is interested in doing that, but I would hope you'd be willing to concede that you recognize that there are certain general similarities (not 100%, but quite notable in number) in people who gravitate to certain occupations or interests. 

Let's use the recent MMM post about who his readers are by the work they do as a stepping off point for discussion.  MM wrote that a large number of respondents appear to be engineers & specifically software engineers.  Have you ever noticed a general pattern in the interests and preferences in engineers in general?  How about social workers?  Do you generally think most engineers and most social workers have some pretty sharp differences in ways of looking at life in their thought processes?  Do you think there might be something very revealing about the fact that a huge majority of MMM readers who responded identified themselves as Intuitives (either NT or NF)? 

I may not have been clear, but I did not mean to say that there is no way to correctly identify people, because there is a good way.  Just that the tests that are out there, when used without a trained administrator that can follow up with confirmation questions about each letter (I or E, N or S, T or F, and J or P) and have the subject respond is a great way to get accurate results but is very rarely used.

I'm just a skeptic. You may be able to look at occupations and see the individuals in them as gravitating towards those occupations, while I may look at those people and see people shaped somewhat by their environment, and the truth lying somewhere between those. Regardless of where that truth lies, questioning "established" or historically accurate assumptions, conclusions, and methods is the hallmark of progress. I'm not saying you're wrong I'm just approaching it from a different perspective, you could very well be right and we're all hardwired to be 1 of 16 categories I just don't see any evidence of that regardless of historical agreement from the Bible, the Greeks, and modern philosophers. Just because I disagree doesn't mean I'm dismissing it.

There is an inherent fuzziness to these sorts of tests because they are psychologically based which carries western culture biases. Assuming that these are universal since they are backed up by western psychologists, western history, and frankly western pattern recognition is a huge assumption I'm uncomfortable making. It's cool that you're comfortable with it. It's also cool that I'm not. :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on September 23, 2013, 10:48:49 AM
matchewed - Good points. One additional point of information: Jung, upon whose concepts the MBTI was based, did not believe that humans emerge with hard-wired temperaments that never change. Indeed, he believe that as people mature, they learn more about and come to appreciate the strengths of temperaments they may not have had when younger.

I agree that this is a western-based outlook and that to call it universal would be silly. I'm sure there is a (pick any non-western culture) personality assessment that that culture finds useful and that would be baffling to me.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MsGuided on September 23, 2013, 11:01:48 AM
Not sure it's wise to get into the snarky comments here, but I'll try one more time.  My reason for pointing out the historical roots of temperament recognition is that the fact that there are distinct types of people that fit into similar patterns is something that has been recognized by common people,philosophers and writers historically.  Getting at the patterns and similarities common in the four main temperaments is useful for people that want to understand others.  So, to respond to your dismissive response, I'll say that understanding temperament and type is not putting people into types, it's recognizing patterns of behavior, language and preferences common to the temperament and using that as a tool to understand them.  Not everyone is interested in doing that, but I would hope you'd be willing to concede that you recognize that there are certain general similarities (not 100%, but quite notable in number) in people who gravitate to certain occupations or interests. 

The response was not dismissive.

The point of bringing up astrology, or alchemy, is that plenty of fine minds in the past thought they had merit as well.  Read whatever "snark" you want into that, but none is intended.  It's just pointing out that your "historical" context of it being around for thousands of years doesn't hold much weight.

Clearly you are quite a fanatic/believer/whatever you want to call it about this topic, having done three weekend trainings on it, but you just may need to accept that others here may not put as much stock in it telling as much insight about a particular individual as you do.  It has nothing to do with not being "interested in doing that," but in believing that this tool isn't the be-all end-all that some claim.

Cool?  :)
Arebelspy,
 Cool.:)  I admit you accurately pegged me as a huge believer in the MBT and I read snark into your response where there wasn't any.  Sorry for that.  I'll stop evangelizing about this topic for now. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on September 23, 2013, 05:16:32 PM
No worries.  It's probably just my IESNTFPJ part coming out.  ;)

Thanks for understanding our (skeptical) position on it, and I can see what would make someone inclined towards it.  I'm betting you have a lot of people with strong personalities in your life.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Freckles on September 23, 2013, 06:34:53 PM

Love that story, Freckles!  The similarities you discover of others similar to yourself can sometimes be great bonding moments.  As I mentioned in an earlier post, I've gotten really into studying the MBT over the last few years.  I have taken 3 weekend training classes on it.  The fun, revealing thing about each of the three groups at each training class was that ALL of the participants were of two types only:  INFJ (my temperament) and ENFJ.  NFs are a VERY small percentage of the overall population but comprised 100% of these classes.

Yeah, I immediately felt understood by her and that's a nice feeling.  And I think I probably feel like I know her better than my other co-workers as she's new this school year, and until this activity, I really didn't know her at all.  So that's cool.  Now I know who I want to team up with when we have to work together on things.  :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: HappierAtHome on September 29, 2013, 05:10:42 AM
Another female INTJ here.

We do the Myers-Briggs at team events at work all the time... no one believes me that I'm INTJ because I talk a lot and don't act like their stereotyped idea of an introvert.

Little do they know that I come home exhausted from having to be around people all day, and hang out with my spreadsheets, books, and ISFJ partner.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: dragoncar on September 30, 2013, 02:30:41 PM
I took the test and I'm a lawful good ranger with a +2 AC bonus.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: grantmeaname on September 30, 2013, 02:55:40 PM
Rangers can be any good class in AD&D 2nd, which is the best D&D.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: grantmeaname on September 30, 2013, 03:04:06 PM
I'm possibly a younger 'un then you are, but we got all our D&D rulebooks from Half Price Books so we played a generation old, and then never upgraded even as new sets came out. Honestly, even if I started a campaign today I'd probably have it be AD&D 2nd.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: FunkyStickman on October 03, 2013, 10:53:02 AM
I'm possibly a younger 'un then you are, but we got all our D&D rulebooks from Half Price Books so we played a generation old, and then never upgraded even as new sets came out. Honestly, even if I started a campaign today I'd probably have it be AD&D 2nd.

"Why , back in my day...."

Lol. I used to play, haven't picked up an AD&D book in years, but my kids are almost old enough to learn how to play... I still have my 3rd edition Shadowrun rulebook.

And yeah, I was a 2nd Ed. AD&D guy.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Anatidae V on October 16, 2013, 05:34:19 PM
So, I already know I'm an introvert, because at gatherings I head off to a quiet spot for a few minutes at select intervals, and people just wear me out socially and at work. I took the test, and not sure how accurate, but here goes:
Introvert(78%)  Sensing(12%)  Thinking(25%)  Judging(89%)
You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (78%)
You have slight preference of Sensing over Intuition (12%)
You have moderate preference of Thinking over Feeling (25%)
You have strong preference of Judging over Perceiving (89%)

The strong I and J are not a surprise. I'm currently learning how to do the touchy-feely stuff, so I reckon if you'd asked me a year ago, I would have been stronger T... and I think for this test, 12%S over N is probably a bit meh, but I love the idea of being an "Inspector". Heh. (also, Female for records :) )
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on November 03, 2013, 08:49:31 AM
This makes the MB thing so much more fun.

Star Wars Myers-Briggs (http://www.geekinheels.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/star_wars_mbti.png)

;)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: avonlea on November 03, 2013, 09:01:40 AM
This makes the MB thing so much more fun.

Star Wars Myers-Briggs (http://www.geekinheels.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/star_wars_mbti.png)

;)

Haha!  That's great.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: rocksinmyhead on November 14, 2013, 02:59:58 PM
I think last time I took it I was an ESFJ. The description definitely fits. I guess I'm really common in the "real world" but kind of a weirdo in MMM terms?

I could see how my type might not be as well suited to the Mustachian lifestyle for two reasons: wanting to spend money going out to bars and restaurants with my friends all the time, and wanting to spend money to make other people happy. These are both huge weak spots for me :( But at least I know what to focus on!

Also I love the Star Wars thing, just saw that the other day :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: lovesthesea on November 29, 2013, 01:14:57 PM
The original post asked if there might be something that INTJs are missing because of personality type.  I am almost the opposite of INTJ (ENFP), so I wanted to comment on this because there are some things that stand out to me as I read posts on sites like this.  I think that sometimes INTJs can lose the forest for the trees, so to speak, because of a need to adhere to the "right way" to do things, or follow "the plan" that they've laid out.  (By the way, I have INTJs in my family and my husband is INFJ.)  For instance, I read on here a post from a woman who recently became a millionaire and mentioned that she'd bought new cars and kept them well and for a long time.  Somebody said something like, "Hey, new car buying is not MMM," completely missing the point that the woman said she'd just reached millionaire status.  Who cares if she didn't get there completely MMM style??  What she did obviously worked.  That's what I mean about the forest for the trees.  I think that INTJs might miss opportunities that come from being open to a diversity of ways of doing things, and also from networking with real people.  Their strength seems to be structure, order, routine, optimization, planning.  I think that the liability is that sometimes it can be a little Rain Man-esque when there's a need to switch things mid-stream, invent a new plan on the fly, etc. 

I also wanted to comment on some of the posts that talk about how many INTJs are on here because it's a good fit (can be alone with your computer, for example, and not in a crowd).  I am guessing that there are a lot of personality types that come and go on sites like this, so these people likely aren't voting on this because they've already gleaned what they needed and are now down at the coffee shop talking about it with their investor friends.  If you are a Perceiver, you tend to like change and diversity, so to come and go makes sense.  I know that I get inspired on sites like this, but then start thinking about creating a little monthly group in my community where we can get together and trade ideas and inspirations in person.  My guess is that INTJs use a forum like this as a main source of their inspiration routine.  Thus, it makes sense that many personality types are saving and building their wealth in MMM ways, but just not talking about it online.  To come and go has its liability also, however, because there are things that one probably gets from hanging out here for a long time and regularly.  Thank goodness for archives :)   
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: footenote on November 29, 2013, 03:57:30 PM
The ENFP alliance will die. ... "Good, I can feel your anger. I am defenseless. Take your weapon. Strike me down with all of your hatred and your journey towards the dark side will be complete!"
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: lovesthesea on November 29, 2013, 11:53:03 PM
"I will not fight you father."
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: TinyLightsBelow on December 06, 2013, 02:09:56 PM
INFP here! (I sometimes test into INFJ, but I am functionally a lot more like an INFP - I enjoy structure but have trouble maintaining it.) My partner is an INTP and he has difficulty maintaining Mustachianism despite understanding the advantages of the ideology.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: JessieImproved on December 06, 2013, 03:10:25 PM
An ENTP that's actually learned to admit when she's wrong...if you show me the evidence. :-P
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Charlotte on December 08, 2013, 05:38:51 AM
Another female INTJ here.

We do the Myers-Briggs at team events at work all the time... no one believes me that I'm INTJ because I talk a lot and don't act like their stereotyped idea of an introvert.

Little do they know that I come home exhausted from having to be around people all day, and hang out with my spreadsheets, books, and ISFJ partner.

INTJ (female) also married to an ISFJ. Curiouser and curiouser....
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Daleth on December 08, 2013, 01:09:30 PM
INFP here! (I sometimes test into INFJ, but I am functionally a lot more like an INFP - I enjoy structure but have trouble maintaining it.)

That's me exactly, too! I've tested as both too, but usually INFP. We're like TWINS!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: T-Rex on December 25, 2013, 06:18:43 AM
INFP. Now what?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: CommonCents on December 27, 2013, 09:31:16 AM
ENTP / ENTJ

Strong NT all my life
As a kid, was more middling on E/I, turned stronger E as an adult
Borderline P/J through my life

Assessments on paper or computer, and one "professionally" scored in 2010

More specifically from the 2010 assessment:
Extrovert: Very strong enthusiastic, strong initiating, expressive, gregarious, less strong active (lean a bit reflective)
Intuition: Very strong theoretical, a bit less so strong abstract, conceptual, original, lean (mid-zone) sensing for realistic over imaginative
Thinking: Very strong logical reasonable, strong critical, questioning, less strong tough
Perceiving: Strong pressure prompted, lean (mid-zone) causal, emergent, borderline judging/perceiving on planful v. open-ended and methodical v. emergent.  I vaguely think the interpreted said this is probably situational.

Apparently ENTPs are intuition first, thinking next, feeling, then sensing least
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Big Boots Buddha on January 07, 2014, 09:28:28 PM
ISTJ
Introvert(67%)  Sensing(12%)  Thinking(25%)  Judging(22%)
•You have distinctive preference of Introversion over Extraversion (67%)
•You have slight preference of Sensing over Intuition (12%)
•You have moderate preference of Thinking over Feeling (25%)
•You have slight preference of Judging over Perceiving (22%)


I feel like the Sensing and Intuition could be a coin flip. Really, the only questions I felt an obvious answer to were: Are you an introvert or extrovert. The rest aren't so easily chosen, at least for me.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: tomq04 on February 07, 2014, 03:07:00 PM
ENFP
http://www.keirsey.com/4temps/champion.asp

This is a perfect description of me, I know very few others that think like me.  Champions seem to be good sales people, the strange part is our distinct care about the problem/person we are selling to, so most clients are thrilled to work with me.

I've been absolutely fascinated with this stuff the past few months.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: BuildingFrugalHabits on February 13, 2014, 07:39:16 AM
INFJ here.  For all you skeptics (I'd bet my retirement you are NTs), the MBT types are spot on accurate to human temperament, but problems arise with testing.  Yes, people test inaccurately.  I, for example tested 2x, over the course of 8 years, as an INTJ.  That inaccurate result stemmed from my desire to be more of a thinker (T) than a feeler (F) as well as adaptive behavior. 

Until about 3 years ago, I thought MBT was marginally helpful.  I read the description of INTJ and INFJ and didn't feel I had been pegged or truly identified.  Then, a friend of mine, a fellow INFJ, read a book and met with a coach/counselor who identified her as an INFJ even though she'd tested as an ISTJ. Suddenly, his description of the INFJ and help in identifying her as such, opened the floodgates for her to understand herself.  She, in turn, helped me understand my temperament and it has changed my life dramatically.

Not all types struggle with their temperament (most sensors (S)) are perfectly content and are not in a search for meaning or categorization.  Many N's are curious.  Almost all NFs have a great need for self understanding and self actualization.

It is true that N's are in the minority in the general population and appear to be in the majority on the MMM forums.  That doesn't surprise me at all.  Ns love the world of ideas and concepts.


I just discovered this thread and I've been really enjoying the discussion.  ENFJ here: Extravert(1%)  iNtuitive(75%)  Feeling(25%)  Judging(56%)

Looks like N is my strongest tendency hence the interest in MMM/FIRE etc.  I'm not at all surprised to see so many other N's on here as well. 

I did this test a few years ago as a team building exercise at work and my results were very similar.  When I read the description I feel like it describes me pretty well albeit without a strong preference towards either I or E.  Carrie your remark about NF's looking for self understanding and self actualization hit home as well.  I think these reflective activities can really provide a lot of value for someone interested in personal growth.  Great thread!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Deev on February 14, 2014, 10:19:59 AM
I test somewhere between INTJ and INTP.

I am most definitely INTP, though. I fit the whole "absent-minded professor" stereotype to a tee.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: rockstache on February 14, 2014, 12:03:39 PM
Another female INTJ here. ::waves::

Introvert(67%)  iNtuitive(38%)  Thinking(12%)  Judging(78%)
•You have distinctive preference of Introversion over Extraversion (67%)
•You have moderate preference of Intuition over Sensing (38%)
•You have slight preference of Thinking over Feeling (12%)
•You have strong preference of Judging over Perceiving (78%)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: read books on February 18, 2014, 04:00:13 PM
INTJ - female, not an engineer

From what I remember, averaging out taking free version a few times told me:
 I was moderate,
 N was extremely strong,
T and J were low.

The over-all INTJ description seems fairly accurate.

My response is really about the question in the original post about whether INTJ's with their / our constant drive for optimization are missing the benefits of other lifestyles. I believe that it is common for INTJ -ish people to miss out on things like pleasure and beauty, and the importance of abstract ideas that do not relate to utility. This is not an across the board critique, but considering a few issues that I have seen in a short time following this blog and reading occasional random articles gives me the idea that a lot of people who comment on MMM do miss out on certain things.

For example, I recently read the article about selling silverware antique silverware to be melted down, and the idea seemed to be very widely considered to be a great idea. Although in some cases I think it could be, I suggest that using the solid silverware is a better approach. Eating with solid silverware is a pleasurable experience hat no other metal can deliver in my opinion, and the way in which frequent use ages silverware is beautiful. Are people simply not noticing this? why are people only using theor silverware twice a year? silverware responds well to use. If you sell it, you get a few hundred bucks, or a few thousand. That money is soon gone, probably on something less lasting with less potential to provide beauty and pleasure. The thought of melting down that beautiful old silver makes my rational heart sad.

Maybe silverware isn't your thing, and this is just a example.

But I believe that learning to appreciate experiences like eating with real silverware or using expensive handmade pottery, or buying a provocative or lovely piece of artwork, would enrich the lives of highly logical, analytical/ INTJ /engineer types. I have noticed that people with whom I share rational traits tend to really struggle to appreciate things that don't relate to science and money. Other things are also often used as means rather than appreciated as ends. I hear things like " music is good for kids because it will make them good at math" or "art is a waste of money, " and I think those people are not living a optimized life.

This might just be a curse, but I also hate bad wine and can tell when I'm served it. Sadly, cheap wine is often bad. I also can't stand to drink the same exact wine week after month after year. Even to this, there is a rationale, though: I don't drink much, and if I'm going to out alcohol in my body, I want to enjoy it a lot. I will choose tap water over wine I don't like. Drinking an interesting wine is an experience and a luxury; so is going to a concert to listen to classical music. So is reading a poem or novel, or looking at a sunset-- and those things can be free. My thought, though, is that INTJ oriented people are often extraordinarily narrow minded about what kinds of experiences they are willing to learn to appreciate, regardless of what they can afford and regardless of cost.

My suggestion, for anyone interested, is to set a challenge for yourself to appreciate something that seems useless to you. You can even pick something free :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: happy on February 19, 2014, 05:21:47 AM
I'm not a MB expert but from my reading, both INTJs and INFJs have Se as their inferior function ( which is often subconscious). That is, sensing which is extraverted. So like ESPs where sensing is extraverted, both INFJs and INTJs are drawn to material comforts, novel sensations, aesthetics, and are lovers of fine things and experiences.

So I humbly disagree with you.  INTJs will certainly appreciate beauty. I think your response is a Se reaction. I don't mean this as a personal attack, I'm just trying to explain why I think you posted what you did and why I disagree.

Jacob from ERE certainly is a lover of fine things/experiences, but his T auxilliary has found a logical way of dealing with this. He likes leather coats,  Rolex watches and sailing. He buys second hand and argues that when is he finished with the item he can sell it for close to as much as he paid for it. He crews on other peoples sailboats:free. Seems like he's figured out good compromises to honour both T and Se.

The reason why this is important that the inferior function,  is a kind of Jekyll characteristic, and because its subconcious can cause strife.  When I look back, there are periods of my life when I've flipped into an ESP party mode, overtaken by sensate indulgences such as beautiful possessions and fine dining. Something will bring me back to ground and I look back and go "What was I thinking?". If you are an INTJ or an INFJ, and you are trying to learn frugality, then being aware of the negative potential of unfettered inferior Se is helpful, IMO. I had to spend some time sorting this out for myself since I seemed to be torn in different directions at times.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: minimalistmike on June 15, 2014, 02:30:42 PM
I love Myers-Briggs.  Been fascinated by it for a few years.  I am a solid INFP.  I am amazed at the amount of INTJ's there are on here.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Suit on June 15, 2014, 04:06:21 PM
Yet another INTJ woman here! I've taken the test a number of times and I always come up INTJ. I work as a lawyer and it feeds into my problem solving, organized, and strategist strengths but sometimes dealing with so many people everyday can be exhausting. I completely understand why FIRE appeals to so many INTJs, it uses organization, planning, long term goals, continuous optimization and re-evaluation of expenses and investments.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Lian on June 15, 2014, 08:57:48 PM
Interesting thread - didn't know there was a strong correlation between MMM and INTJ personalities. I've taken the text a few times, and usually test as an INTP - not so many of those here.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: SpeedReader on June 17, 2014, 07:41:41 AM
ENTJ female here.  I never thought much about MB myself, but it was revelatory for someone close to me.  It really helped her grasp that not everyone sees the world from the same perspective. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: begood on July 18, 2014, 04:08:28 PM
ENFJ here, with very balanced N and S -- depending on what job I had, I've also tested ESFJ.

Strong E, strong F, and super strong J. I'm never late for a movie! ;)

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: grantmeaname on July 19, 2014, 09:59:52 AM
BAMF
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Russ on July 19, 2014, 10:43:23 AM
BAMF

YOLO?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Lyssa on July 19, 2014, 02:55:25 PM
+1 female INTJ.

Also I am sceptical both about personality and IQ tests, MB can`t be completely off if a voluntary assembly of strangers on the net gravitate so heavily to one type among 16.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Basenji on July 23, 2014, 05:49:03 AM
BAMF

You are indeed.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: cmoate on July 23, 2014, 06:24:53 AM
I'm an ISTJ.

However the test did say I have little to no preference for introversion over extroversion, the rest are atleast moderate preference. (This is from memory, I did the test a little while ago)

So surprising that so many INTJ's are here though, I couldn't really imagine it before I came to this thread!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Beric01 on July 30, 2014, 04:00:37 PM
INTJ here - tested it straight over the past 4 years when I first heard of it. The concept of course isn't incredibly scientific, but it definitely makes explaining a lot of human actions easier.

My guess is MMM is ENTJ. Has anyone actually see some confirmation from him?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Pooperman on August 28, 2014, 04:52:43 PM
INTJ like 40 or so percent of this forum. We are way over represented. Male if that is important. SO is complete opposite (ESFP). Somehow the little (she's short) hedonist has always been somewhat frugal. Not MMM frugal. It wasn't hard to get her on board because she hates seeing people go through money issues, though she'll let me handle the investing as long as she can be a free spirit. I love the planning and the investing and the optimizing aspects of FIRE. I'm also impossibly bad at doing things if I don't plan enough. I get really lazy with a lack of planning/structure and tend to be bad at making the structure I need unless I put my mind to it as a separate task. FIRE should be about 15 years away for me (24).
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MsRichLife on August 28, 2014, 05:50:01 PM
INTJ is the rarest type for a woman with ENTJ right behind. I'm an IN(t/f)J. I'm really strong on the INJ parts but more iffy on the thinking a feeling.

Me too. INJ are solid. I'm on the border with T and F. I was quite a solid INTJ when I was younger, but recently tested INFJ.

I'm an Aerospace Engineer but currently completing a Masters of Philosophy where I get to sit by myself and think all day. Love it!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Elderwood17 on August 28, 2014, 06:55:37 PM
INTJ/ISTJ male here.  Pretty strong on everything but the S and N which can go either way. 

The MBTI has always fascinated me but this is an amazing number of INTJ s on this site.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: sheepstache on August 28, 2014, 09:44:32 PM
INTP here.  Just kinda watching the thread . . .
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Squirrel away on August 30, 2014, 05:11:45 AM
It doesn't surprise me that there are quite a few INTJ people on this forum.

I'm a female INFJ, it made me laugh when I read INFJs like to exert control by planning, organizing and making decisions as early as possible as it's very accurate.

I just got my husband to do the test and he is ISTP which is named The Mechanic which is weird as that describes his job.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: ajhostet on September 11, 2014, 09:37:09 PM
I was just wondering this!  I am INFP and have been since 18 with small changes.  This means that I have the perfectionist tendency without (for me, at least) the judgment that leads to consistently rational choices.  The "P" is low--1%--so I have tested INTJ before, but not often.  I do the test yearly with my students.

As my friends know, and the type description suggests, I can be wholly engaged in and talented at chosen projects, but also struggle to finish them occasionally.  Details are not my strong suit, which is consistent with the INFP profile.  However, I appreciate MMM's statements regarding personal choice and habit-forming, and definitely believe people can change. While I have heard that it helps to have a partner who complements you if you're more impulsive, I have read many "success stories" from single Mustachians.

How would you suggest re-entering the Mustachian mindset if you've been gone?  I'm in a new place and find myself unusually concerned with what people think, since I have yet to meet a Mustachian.  Any tips as to how to re-integrate Mustachian ways into my life without giving a crap what others think?  Any tips on how to socialize with more spendy expats (I am in Beijing)?  And how much do you think personality has to do with frugality and early retirement--can people succeed at it who are not INTJ? ;-)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Songbird on September 11, 2014, 09:45:53 PM
Another INTJ female here.  I think we have found our niche!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Beric01 on September 11, 2014, 10:00:38 PM
Another INTJ female here.  I think we have found our niche!

IMO we INTJ's are constantly looking to optimize our lives, so Mustachianism is the next logical step.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Daisy on September 11, 2014, 10:08:18 PM
ENTP

It's been a long while since I took this test. From what I remember, my N and P were very strong. I can go either way on the E/I and T/F. I think the older I get, I get more F than T. I wonder what I would test as today.

But my NP is super strong and I don't think will ever change.

Am I in the minority here?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: happy on September 11, 2014, 11:17:02 PM
I was just wondering this!  I am INFP and have been since 18 with small changes.  This means that I have the perfectionist tendency without (for me, at least) the judgment that leads to consistently rational choices.  The "P" is low--1%--so I have tested INTJ before, but not often.  I do the test yearly with my students.

As my friends know, and the type description suggests, I can be wholly engaged in and talented at chosen projects, but also struggle to finish them occasionally.  Details are not my strong suit, which is consistent with the INFP profile.  However, I appreciate MMM's statements regarding personal choice and habit-forming, and definitely believe people can change. While I have heard that it helps to have a partner who complements you if you're more impulsive, I have read many "success stories" from single Mustachians.

How would you suggest re-entering the Mustachian mindset if you've been gone?  I'm in a new place and find myself unusually concerned with what people think, since I have yet to meet a Mustachian.  Any tips as to how to re-integrate Mustachian ways into my life without giving a crap what others think?  Any tips on how to socialize with more spendy expats (I am in Beijing)?  And how much do you think personality has to do with frugality and early retirement--can people succeed at it who are not INTJ? ;-)

Interesting questions ajhostet.
(I am an INF/TJ - I tested as F when younger but now repeatedly test as a T, but only just. )
For me the best mindset is to regard the whole thing as a real life game to see how I can reduce expenses without reducing happiness ( and preferably increasing it). Automate savings if you can and just live on the rest.

Whilst it dovetails nicely with INTJs, I think any personality can do this if they want: MB is about preferences, not absolutes and  one school of thought is that one should try to develop the opposite axis so you become more versatile and balanced FWIW. For example I find  bothering with details such as tracking tedious, but I do it anyway. An S will probably be fine with detailed tracking.

As an INFJ I've always known I am different to most people but tried to blend in - The logic of the T now assists me to be more comfortable in being different.  "I don't have to pretend to be like them, because I'm not and thats OK. If they have a problem with that, that's their problem not mine".

There are a few mustachians in Bejing on the forum - Llamo is (and Expartist I think is in Bejing). Why don't you start a thread on expat life in Bejing and see what comes up
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: JennieOG on September 12, 2014, 05:21:45 AM
I am an INTJ, which according to the test, is rare among women.  I think this personality type must be suited to Mustachianism somehow!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: tomq04 on September 15, 2014, 03:02:08 PM
I am an INTJ, which according to the test, is rare among women.  I think this personality type must be suited to Mustachianism somehow!

I've found it's most forum folks are  INTJ, quest for knowledge and all.  I rarely come across any ENFP's in the online world...i'm unique :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Daisy on September 15, 2014, 07:07:49 PM
I am an INTJ, which according to the test, is rare among women.  I think this personality type must be suited to Mustachianism somehow!

I've found it's most forum folks are  INTJ, quest for knowledge and all.  I rarely come across any ENFP's in the online world...i'm unique :)

Hey there - I am an ENTP, bordering on ENFP. I read both descriptions in your link and I think I fit both!

I like these parts of the description that fit in with FIRE:

ENTP:
Quote
With their innovative, entrepreneurial spirit, Inventors are always on the lookout for a better way, always eyeing new projects, new enterprises, new processes.

Inventors are keenly pragmatic, and often become expert at devising the most effective means to accomplish their ends.

They are the most reluctant of all the types to do things in a particular manner just because that's the way they have been done.

Inventors are usually non-conformists in the workplace, and can succeed in many areas as long as the job does not involve too much humdrum routine.

Inventors display an extraordinary talent for rising to the demands of even the most impossible situations. "It can't be done" is a challenge to an Inventor and elicits a reaction of "I can do it."

ENFP:
Quote
Like the other Idealists, Champions are rather rare, say three or four percent of the population, but even more than the others they consider intense emotional experiences as being vital to a full life.

Fiercely individualistic, Champions strive toward a kind of personal authenticity

I figured I had to stand up for ENTPs and ENFPs since everyone says you have to be an INTJ to go after FIRE. Sigh...

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: aetherie on September 16, 2014, 06:55:39 AM
For example I find  bothering with details such as tracking tedious, but I do it anyway. An S will probably be fine with detailed tracking.

ISFJ here, and I LOVE detailed tracking. To each their own, right?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: sobezen on September 25, 2014, 04:49:35 PM
INFJ here.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: tracylayton on September 25, 2014, 05:06:17 PM
I am a female ISTJ...only on this forum, would so many people know their Myers-Briggs type!!! A large % of the population have probably never heard of it.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: RunningWithScissors on September 26, 2014, 09:36:39 AM
+1 INTJ, female.  See?  I'm special!  Just like everyone else!

Married to a ESFJ, which makes for some very interesting conversations.  I'm an architect ( guess I should be a INTP) and he's a massage therapist.  We actually label ourselves as 'head' and 'heart' based on our different thinking and communication styles.  Traditional gender roles are almost completely reversed in our relationship, but it works for us.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: sheepstache on September 28, 2014, 06:04:40 PM
I am an INTJ, which according to the test, is rare among women.  I think this personality type must be suited to Mustachianism somehow!

I've found it's most forum folks are  INTJ, quest for knowledge and all.  I rarely come across any ENFP's in the online world...i'm unique :)

Huh well according to the Chinese restaurant placemats I'm a rooster and they also quest after knowledge so that makes sense.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Practical Magic on October 05, 2014, 02:00:20 PM
I am an INTJ, which according to the test, is rare among women.  I think this personality type must be suited to Mustachianism somehow!

I'm an INTJ also...very happy to have found my tribe! I scored pretty high as INFJ, but T is stronger especially the older I get (and the less I try to make myself someone I'm not).
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: nyxst on October 07, 2014, 07:49:30 PM
+1 female INTJ..... See? I AM trendy!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: looking for FI on November 07, 2014, 07:32:28 AM
I have consistantly tested ESTJ, maybe that is why I have trouble cutting my "entertainment" budget. I have a strong desire to be involved in outtings with friends/family/co workers.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: One Day on November 09, 2014, 05:24:42 AM
Yet another INJ (nearly even T and F) female. Researcher married to a psychologist, so we balance each other nicely.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Andy_in_Aus on November 09, 2014, 05:33:47 AM
I only discovered this matrix fairly recently,  and scored a solid INTJ.  I've never considered myself an introvert, just anti social (in no small part to people telling me that's what I am).

I guess as humans we crave a label,  but it has given me some pause for thought.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Neustache on November 09, 2014, 05:42:43 AM
I'm an INFP and married to an INTJ.  MMM appeals to my idealism and my desire to get hubby retired very early (I don't work) and it appeals to my husband who loves efficiency. 

And if I can be so lucky to never grace a cubicle again, so be it.  I'd rather be an Aldi's cashier than work a desk job again.  Ugh. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: sabertooth3 on November 12, 2014, 03:35:31 PM
My wife and I are both INTJs, which makes for an interesting dynamic. I'm more into MMM and frugalism (if that's a word...) than she is, but she's also into it a little.

In case folks are interested, a few famous INTJs are: Augustus Caesar, Peter Jennings, Rudy Giuliani, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and Presidents Jefferson, Polk, Kennedy, and Wilson.

I think the INTJ's tencency to be systems thinkers and see a bigger picture fits very well with the idea of FI. The theory is simple yet complex, and we can conceptualize out 10-15 years into the future to see where our actions now take us. Add 2 to the INTJ tribe!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Roots&Wings on November 12, 2014, 04:40:16 PM
Yet another INTJ female.  Fun to be part of the crowd seeking out and applying Mustachianism!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Less on November 12, 2014, 06:33:19 PM
E(33%)N(62%)F(38%)J(1%)

Seems to be quite uncommon in these parts.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: grantmeaname on November 18, 2014, 08:49:28 AM
James Polk and Augustus Caesar took the Myers-Briggs test? I bet they fist-bumped when they realized they got the same type!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: sirspiffy on November 25, 2014, 10:53:19 PM
ENTJ up in this.  What a thoroughly concentrated group of rare types.  If only we could focus the energy and skill into a cohesive mission.  My vote is making the very best beer ever.  Failing that world peace and prosperity should be easy.  I think one precludes the other however, and first things ought to come first. 


"Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has." - Margaret Mead, Cultural Anthropologist
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Lifeblood on November 27, 2014, 05:18:40 PM
INTJ

Introvert(100%)  iNtuitive(62%)  Thinking(12%)  Judging(67%)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Artemis67 on November 30, 2014, 08:50:33 PM
I'm yet another female INTJ, albeit a fine arts/humanities type.

My I, N, and T preferences are all very strong, but my J/P preference is extremely weak, and I've always had to answer a tiebreaker question to get one or the other result. The description of INTJ fits me much better than INTP, however.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: mm1970 on December 10, 2014, 02:16:56 PM
I got another INTJ female here, good for engineering and sciences.

However, I am marginal on the "I" and the "N", and in fact, most times I take the MB test I come up "ESTJ", but marginal on the "ES".

I think part of it is changes in my career - I used to be a hard-charging manager of many. But changes in the landscape of late have seen me be reorganized 5 times to where now I manage nobody (and I'm not even sure what I'm supposed to be doing).

So I have fallen back to working on things that I "know" and am comfortable with - and have been enjoying more solitary time (walks and such).  I think that shows in my answers.

"INTJs are perfectionists, with a seemingly endless capacity for improving upon anything that takes their interest. What prevents them from becoming chronically bogged down in this pursuit of perfection is the pragmatism so characteristic of the type: INTJs apply (often ruthlessly) the criterion "Does it work?" to everything from their own research efforts to the prevailing social norms. This in turn produces an unusual independence of mind, freeing the INTJ from the constraints of authority, convention, or sentiment for its own sake."

I don't really keep trying to improve things - when it's "good enough" I move on.  But if it's NOT good enough, I work on it!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: robotclown on December 11, 2014, 06:03:29 AM
Just took two of them to see if the results were different.  They are, kind of.

I (100) N (50) T (88) J (56)
I (100) N (78) T (57) P (53)

So it's probably one of those.  Definitely one that starts with an I.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: raylit20 on December 12, 2014, 11:21:52 PM
ENTJ male here.

The forums certainly appear to be full of statistical outliers. Very curious...
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: EDSMedS on December 13, 2014, 12:54:38 PM
INTJ!  Woot!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: RelaxedGal on December 16, 2014, 09:24:24 AM
ISFP (http://www.16personalities.com/isfp-personality)
Introverted 57%
Observant 18%
Feeling 28%
Prospecting 21%

Interesting result, as an IT Software Developer I don't really see myself as an artist.  I went in expecting INTJ as it seems everyone else is here.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Bardo on December 17, 2014, 11:57:18 AM
Last time I took it I was borderline INTJ-INTP.  They had me re-take it and then I tipped slightly into the INTP box.  Given the amount of salt with which these things should be taken, both categories seem to be descriptive enough.

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Flynlow on December 22, 2014, 08:06:57 PM
INTP for this guy, and relatively solid based on taking one back in school for a class, then just a few months ago for a workshop at work. 

Not sure what that says about me.  Most people think I'm judging them when I ask "why?" questions alot, my friends all know better thankfully :). 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: DSKla on December 22, 2014, 08:22:26 PM
INTJ male, and my gf is an INTJ female. They're supposed to be rare, but not around here.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: startswithhome on January 04, 2015, 06:29:14 PM
I'm ENTP or ENFP depending on the test.
Husband is one of those reliable, highly agreeable ones. Introverted too. It's a lot of fun in our house.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Decalin on January 10, 2015, 01:00:46 AM
Retook the test because of a comment on MMM

INTJ
Introvert(89%)  iNtuitive(12%)  Thinking(1%)  Judging(67%)
You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (89%)
You have slight preference of Intuition over Sensing (12%)
You have marginal or no preference of Thinking over Feeling (1%)
You have distinct preference of Judging over Perceiving (67%)

Apparently I have found our super secret lair.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: train_writer on January 10, 2015, 05:14:35 AM
Female, ENFP (but almost INFP).

Quite common I guess?

I don't think any personality type is that rare and only shows the extremes in that personality type to be rare.


Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Roots&Wings on January 10, 2015, 07:53:19 AM
Retook the test because of a comment on MMM

INTJ
Introvert(89%)  iNtuitive(12%)  Thinking(1%)  Judging(67%)
You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (89%)
You have slight preference of Intuition over Sensing (12%)
You have marginal or no preference of Thinking over Feeling (1%)
You have distinct preference of Judging over Perceiving (67%)

Apparently I have found our super secret lair.

Are you me?!   Identical percentages :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Decalin on January 10, 2015, 04:35:37 PM
Retook the test because of a comment on MMM

INTJ
Introvert(89%)  iNtuitive(12%)  Thinking(1%)  Judging(67%)
You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (89%)
You have slight preference of Intuition over Sensing (12%)
You have marginal or no preference of Thinking over Feeling (1%)
You have distinct preference of Judging over Perceiving (67%)

Apparently I have found our super secret lair.

Are you me?!   Identical percentages :)

O.O So which one of us is the evil twin?

So do any other INTJs feel like they think in computer code? I remember taking Intro to Programming and just breezing through everything because I apparently think in Python. I'm taking web development on Treehouse right now to possibly do a career move/side hustle.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Pooperman on January 10, 2015, 05:33:59 PM
Retook the test because of a comment on MMM

INTJ
Introvert(89%)  iNtuitive(12%)  Thinking(1%)  Judging(67%)
You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (89%)
You have slight preference of Intuition over Sensing (12%)
You have marginal or no preference of Thinking over Feeling (1%)
You have distinct preference of Judging over Perceiving (67%)

Apparently I have found our super secret lair.

Are you me?!   Identical percentages :)

O.O So which one of us is the evil twin?

So do any other INTJs feel like they think in computer code? I remember taking Intro to Programming and just breezing through everything because I apparently think in Python. I'm taking web development on Treehouse right now to possibly do a career move/side hustle.

When you draw, does it turn out very mechanical?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Davin on January 10, 2015, 07:38:33 PM
I have tested INTJ as well as INTP. I only took the free online tests FWIW. My SO, who is ENTJ, and studied Social Psychology says that makes sense because either way I am a controlling ass! I really do love her honesty.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Roadhog on January 11, 2015, 07:57:46 AM
Female INTJ.   Thinking that my preference for INTJ is also connected to my preference for MMM lifestyle.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Peacefulwarrior on January 11, 2015, 08:35:21 AM
INTJ. Just took the test for the first time. Have no idea what it means.

You have moderate preference of Introversion over Extraversion (56%)
You have strong preference of Intuition over Sensing (88%)
You have moderate preference of Thinking over Feeling (38%)
You have strong preference of Judging over Perceiving (78%)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Decalin on January 14, 2015, 09:24:03 PM
When you draw, does it turn out very mechanical?

No, but I usually go through a ton of sheets of paper due to rampant perfectionism.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MsRichLife on January 15, 2015, 03:16:17 AM
So do any other INTJs feel like they think in computer code? I remember taking Intro to Programming and just breezing through everything because I apparently think in Python. I'm taking web development on Treehouse right now to possibly do a career move/side hustle.

Nope. I'm an Aerospace Engineer and undertook the obligatory programming subjects at Uni, but they weren't a natural fit for me. I;m on the cusp of INFJ though, so find that I'm a lot more about  'big picture' thinking than details. I hate details, which is why I sucked at coding.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: happy on January 15, 2015, 04:59:47 AM
I (INT/FJ) don't think in computer code either, but I thought that was because I'm not an engineer :P
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Ms Independent on January 30, 2015, 08:57:35 AM
Strong ENFP -- very N, very F, very (very) P.

Though I think the ENFP type isn't the most obvious fit, I think I can point out a couple facets of the type that, for me, seem to contribute to my interest in FI:

I'll also say that I'm a magnet for INTJs -- i.e. the software engineer types that seem to make up a large proportion of MMM's readership. I'm even married to an INTJ and managed to get him on board for FI by showing him MMM's blog -- I think he needed to hear it in his native tongue ...
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Neustache on February 01, 2015, 05:08:03 AM
Strong ENFP -- very N, very F, very (very) P.

Though I think the ENFP type isn't the most obvious fit, I think I can point out a couple facets of the type that, for me, seem to contribute to my interest in FI:
  • I mentioned I'm a very strong P -- I like to have all the possibilities at the same time. I need a great deal of freedom -- FI is all about freedom, possibilities, options.
  • ENFPs are creative types -- the FI path (pre and post) provides a lot of opportunities for innovation.

I'll also say that I'm a magnet for INTJs -- i.e. the software engineer types that seem to make up a large proportion of MMM's readership. I'm even married to an INTJ and managed to get him on board for FI by showing him MMM's blog -- I think he needed to hear it in his native tongue ...


Yep, INFP here, and I think you nailed it.  It's not about the wealth, ultimately, it's about FREEDOM.   Plus I've been a SAHM for 6 years, it's not as fun without my husband here to share the freedom with me.  My hubby is an INTJ.  ;-)

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Bardo on February 04, 2015, 10:19:49 AM
They gave the test to everyone in my department.  I initially tested pretty much on the INTJ-INTP border, so I was re-tested and tipped slightly over into INTP.

Interesting to see the number here of groups that supposedly aren't prevalent as a whole.



Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: LadyStache on February 04, 2015, 01:05:15 PM
Can we add a poll to this thread?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: morning owl on February 06, 2015, 07:34:36 AM
Can we add a poll to this thread?

I was just thinking that!

I'm very strongly INFP. I approach FI very differently from the main writers out there, Jacob and MMM. It's about freedom and upholding personal values rather than finding efficiencies for me. I start with the inner personal goals and then have to work backwards to figure out how to implement them. So the efficiencies are necessary for the freedom I want, but that's not a natural tendency for me -- budgeting and watching expenses. Getting better at it, though.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: KD on February 08, 2015, 06:59:13 PM
INFJ.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: clifp on February 08, 2015, 07:11:50 PM
INFJ - sometimes INTJ - always N

INTJ, I was borderline E on the most comprehensive MB test I took when I was late 20s and working.  I think the descriptions are pretty accurate for me and frankly many early retirees.

INTJ is by far the most common MB personality on FIRE forums.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: winterbike on February 12, 2015, 08:52:29 AM
ENTJ male here. Seems like I was born to rule over you peasants! Don't worry though,

(http://s2.quickmeme.com/img/9a/9a13bd78cf9e81b18773653cb6e23cf94036787aaddf95ff03355f342a0dd50f.jpg)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Beric01 on February 12, 2015, 03:55:32 PM
ENTJ male here. Seems like I was born to rule over you peasants! Don't worry though,

(http://s2.quickmeme.com/img/9a/9a13bd78cf9e81b18773653cb6e23cf94036787aaddf95ff03355f342a0dd50f.jpg)

No worries, the INTJ's humbly submit to their ENTJ overlords. While secretly plotting their demise.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Retire-Canada on February 13, 2015, 08:45:53 AM
INTJ - optimize, question, build systems, break systems and rebuild better ones. Introvert so I generate my energy and self-identify without need for others.

It's an ideal personality type for ER stuff.

-- Vik
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Roots&Wings on February 20, 2015, 02:06:22 PM
Apparently INTJ is fairly optimal for earnings too, though the ENTJs beat all:

(http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/TD4dr_Xn416eBYxiiaXa_g--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NQ--/http://globalfinance.zenfs.com/en_us/Finance/US_AFTP_SILICONALLEY_H_LIVE/The_personality_types_that_make-613a119d6e5c243c71b952d69d2ff9f8)

At least according to yahoo finance http://finance.yahoo.com/news/personality-types-most-least-amount-140826566.html
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on February 20, 2015, 08:02:33 PM
Aha!

I should have looked at this before I married my husband.   This explains a lot.   Hmmm,  maybe my artistic daughter just needs to like male ENTJ's to be all set?
(jk,   she is getting tired of my "innovative" constant prompts, though, about how she has to plan to be self sufficient if she wants to be a starving artist!)

Thanks for the Link, I had not seen this yet.  It's a great hoot.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Happy Little Chipmunk on February 20, 2015, 11:54:31 PM
 ENFP
Extravert(1%)  iNtuitive(38%)  Feeling(25%)  Perceiving(11%)

I think my Myers-Briggs is entirely dependent upon what I've been doing most recently. I'll swing around all those categories with relative ease.

As an adult, I've always thought of myself as an extroverted introvert. I'm happy to put on the silly suit and dance around to get people's attention...but only if it is in service to something greater than myself - and then I need to go chill and read a book and have some nice quiet time.

But seriously, real people and their real stories are ever so much more interesting than TV.

And everything I do I judge and optimize. So what is up with that Perceiving score? Maybe because I live with adolescents and am working really hard to accept life as it presents itself and not how I wish it would be? ;-)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on February 21, 2015, 12:05:13 PM
Humor me if you will, but I find "N" is the hardest thing to test for**, given how it relates to nonlinear connect the dots function it is. Therefore, I'm willing to bet that about 50% of the people who test "N" actually turn out to be "S". So far my hypothesis has proved true nearly 100% of the times, so I tend to believe it to be true until proven otherwise. :)


** Based, for instance, on this test, where there are may be three questions that test for "N" vs "S":

http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/jtypes2.asp

Okay, people, the online tests try to come close, but they are not rigorously vetted / tested for test - retest and internal consistency like the official Myers Briggs Forms.   It is very difficult hard to write questions that test / retest across a wide population.

If you want to critically discount MBTI, great.  We can all discuss that, but realize that anyone can put anything on the internet. 

Regarding the article that someone posted, I was fine with the opinion (disagree with its viewpoint though, as 16 personality group types offers a huge amount of variation).  But the claim that 50% test / retest changes is misleading....

According to the MBTI Manual , third ed., 1990 Isabel Meyers et al.   (I have an older copy), the Test - Retest across 4 weeks is close to 90% and up to 97% for each individual letter (Form M) and n=424.  Test - Retest comparing Form G for under and over 9 months, and a population of n=1698 has each letter of retest at 59% (T-F) to 84% (E-I).  Form M has higher reliability, but both are much higher than chance.  Other controlled tests shows that mood did not significantly affect test-rest.

 Over a 50 year time, starting in high school, test respondent (n=39) had 54% remain within one letter of the original.  (Form G and restested on Form M).  Given that MBTI theory allows for people maturing and the early test forms were not intended for people under the age of 18, this is very good for psychometrics results.  (It is a fuzzy soft science, after all). 

Organisms are not hard science and test statically like physics.  Heck, even my hand measurement will change over 6 months, so why should we expect psychometrics to not have variation?  As long as the correlations are strikingly high, across a large sample, then I am good with the statistics that support it.

So,  the MBTI Test- retest reliability is quite high, not perfect, but much much higher than chance.   T-F is the most likely scale to change.  The recent question form "M" is better than the original form "G".   

Oh, and college students show much higher test - retest correlations than high school students, or than lower achieving students, and ethnicity did not have a factor.  So if you took the official Form G or Form M, and are a college grad, your retest consistency is likely very high.

The reason I like MBTI is that it allows for a lot of complexity across populations, has a huge sample base, and has a deep depth of research (statistical) to support it.   All psychometrics at best self selected correlations, not cause and effect, but as a tool for thinking about life and what you want out of it, and why you want / do / say different things than others, it is great!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: 2Birds1Stone on February 26, 2015, 09:44:43 AM
ENTJ, apparently we only make up 2-3% of the population. These boards are heavily INTJ, I'm not that different than most of you, just a lil more extroverted =D
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Marian on February 26, 2015, 10:52:17 AM
INTJ- looks like I'm in the right place!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: TheBuddha on February 26, 2015, 11:17:36 AM
INTP

Introvert(78%)  iNtuitive(50%)  Thinking(62%)  Perceiving(11%)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: valk001 on March 04, 2015, 11:39:18 PM
I have always rated as an INTJ.  I have taken the test a few times over my life and just for giggles, I took the Keirsey test which is (based off of my understanding) is a slightly more detailed version.  That also came back INTJ: Mastermind. 

Link:
http://www.keirsey.com/4temps/mastermind.asp
It is nice to see many similar mindsets.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: swick on March 05, 2015, 12:11:26 AM
I use to think I was a special unique snowflake, nope, turns out my quirks are because I am textbook INFJ
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Retire-Canada on March 05, 2015, 01:47:59 PM
I use to think I was a special unique snowflake, nope, turns out my quirks are because I am textbook INFJ

Quote
INFJs tend to see helping others as their purpose in life, but while people with this personality type can be found engaging rescue efforts and doing charity work, their real passion is to get to the heart of the issue so that people need not be rescued at all.

There are worse things to be... ;)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: markpst on March 10, 2015, 08:49:09 AM
ISTJ

Introverted (64%)
Observant (29%)
Thinking (5%)
Judging (15%)

New to this forum. Age 43, single. $200K in 401k, only started maxing contributions 3 or 4 year ago. $100K in Roth IRA. Just paid off mortgage. $50k in taxable stocks. I am learning a lot from this site!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: swick on March 10, 2015, 09:45:00 AM
I use to think I was a special unique snowflake, nope, turns out my quirks are because I am textbook INFJ

Quote
INFJs tend to see helping others as their purpose in life, but while people with this personality type can be found engaging rescue efforts and doing charity work, their real passion is to get to the heart of the issue so that people need not be rescued at all.

There are worse things to be... ;)

Yeah just wished it paid better in general ;) but hey...forum modding..that's helpin' people learn how to fish, right? :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Ramblin' Ma'am on March 17, 2015, 01:26:40 PM
Female ISTJ. The introversion/sensing parts show only a slight preference, but the thinking/judging parts are strongly expressed.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: swick on March 19, 2015, 11:54:36 AM
ENFP here. So many IxxJ here, explains why so many posters seem borderline-autistic, arrogant and judgmental.

Seems like with the sweeping judgements you just made, you don't fully understand the nuances of the Myers-Brigg classifications.  Or, you are interacting with the people/threads on this forum in a very superficial way.

Spend some time getting to know the regulars around here (the journal section is a great place to start) or perhaps this is not the right community for you.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on March 19, 2015, 12:16:46 PM
ENFP here. So many IxxJ here, explains why so many posters seem borderline-autistic, arrogant and judgmental.

They're the judgmental ones?

(https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/9743562/icon_lol.gif)

Thanks for the laugh!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: KithKanan on March 19, 2015, 04:10:50 PM
ISTP (at least this time).

Heavily I and P while S/N and T/F are borderline and my results vary from test to test.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Kriegsspiel on March 22, 2015, 07:01:27 PM
ENTP or INTP  for me

NTP are pretty strong; I and E hover around the middle.

Hey, same personality!

*high five*
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Daisy on March 22, 2015, 09:22:02 PM
ENTP or INTP  for me

NTP are pretty strong; I and E hover around the middle.

Hey, same personality!

*high five*

I feel left out of this ENTP/INTP high five fest. Virtual high five to you as well.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Kriegsspiel on March 23, 2015, 01:28:24 PM
(https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/5f/d6/ea/5fd6eaa71578f67d5e77d63f9858e6fa.jpg)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: El Gringo on March 23, 2015, 01:38:02 PM
ENFP here! Someone should post a poll.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: IndyPendent on March 23, 2015, 02:05:09 PM
ISFJ here--I'm a little jealous of all you INTJs. In no way, shape, or form do I want to be characterized as C3PO.

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: lhamo on March 28, 2015, 06:18:48 PM
Another INTJ (though the last time I took it I was borderline T/F, which was a shock as in previous tests I'd always been off the charts T).

Today's post totally resonated with me.  I am also a relentless optimizer.  Have some stuff goign on at work that is playing to that aspect of my personality, and I'm grooving on it.  I think as long as there are systems and processes I can be continually tweaking and improving, most jobs are going to be pretty engaging for me.  Put me in a position where I'm told what to do and how to do it and not given that freedom and I probably wouldn't last a week.

lhamo

PS:  I just redid the test on the humanmetrics site and came up INFJ, with the following breakdown

INFJ
Introvert(78%)  iNtuitive(62%)  Feeling(50%)  Judging(89%)
You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (78%)
You have distinctive preference of Intuition over Sensing (62%)
You have moderate preference of Feeling over Thinking (50%)
You have strong preference of Judging over Perceiving (89%)

Interesting.  Nearly 2 years and a lot of painful stuff at work later, I took the test again and still came up INFJ, but with different percentages:

INFJ

Introvert(78%)  iNtuitive(75%)  Feeling(50%)  Judging(78%)

•You have strong preference of Introversion over Extraversion (78%)
•You have distinct preference of Intuition over Sensing (75%)
•You have moderate preference of Feeling over Thinking (50%)
•You have strong preference of Judging over Perceiving (78%)

More intuitive and less judging. 

And what I said above about needing freedom to do my own thing?  Pretty much sums up why the last 18 months has been sooooooo painful -- way to much "here is the system learn it and put your data into it" and not enough room to be creative. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on April 15, 2015, 12:52:28 PM
Relevant article: Why the Myers-Briggs test is totally meaningless (https://www.vox.com/2014/7/15/5881947/myers-briggs-personality-test-meaningless)

Hat tip to Lifehacker (http://lifehacker.com/why-you-shouldnt-trust-the-myers-briggs-test-for-seriou-1697936838), who summarize, saying:
Quote
The Myers-Briggs test is based on personality types developed in the 1940s that have little connection to any real data. More problematic, though, is that it classifies personalities by a binary preference for a particular trait. In reality, however, most people exist on a spectrum between the two and can vary between them from week to week.

It can be amusing to look at, but don't take it too seriously, basically.  Something to keep in mind.  :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Erica/NWEdible on April 15, 2015, 02:24:05 PM
My husband and I, in a meme:

(http://i.imgur.com/FIGaTEL.jpg)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on April 15, 2015, 02:36:59 PM
Haha, love it!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Rubyist on April 15, 2015, 05:38:17 PM
Relevant article: Why the Myers-Briggs test is totally meaningless (https://www.vox.com/2014/7/15/5881947/myers-briggs-personality-test-meaningless)

Good article! I prefer the Five Factor model (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Five_personality_traits), mentioned in the article. The book Snoop by Sam Gosling has an excellent chapter exlaining the Five Factor model and why it's superior to Myers-Briggs.

My Big 5 personality traits self-assessment:
Higher than average: Openness
About average: Agreeableness
Lower than average: Conscientiousness, Extraversion, Neuroticism
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Mirwen on April 15, 2015, 08:23:13 PM
Another INTJ here. Although I'm fairly balanced on J/P.  I've heard Big 5 is more meaningful, but I personally don't like being labeled "highly neurotic."
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: College Stash on June 16, 2015, 09:14:07 AM
ISTJ. Not sure how unusual that is in this community.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Wilson Hall on June 16, 2015, 07:35:22 PM
One more INFJ here.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on June 24, 2015, 09:54:34 PM
  You asked for a poll, and this is the next best thing..!  I tallied it for you.  Please open attachment as I can not figure out how to insert an image. 

Note:  This is for a population of approximately N=178; for:
Of persons on MMM responding with their MBTI type.     (e.g., note that I did not post my type, although I am personally very interested in MBTI.)Tally of as June 22, 2015

"splits"  e.g., INTJ / INFJ were tallied as 1/2 point for each of two types.
Over half of respondants took an on-line test, which do have somewhat to a lot less "precision", but good enough for a fun thread here.


You don't need to read the rest of this, the chart attached is the cool stuff....   but here is my analysis of how the two MBTI approaches would interpret this.

Meyer's Primary Function Analysis -- would review it like this:

Intuition Wins

LOTS of people that like using their Intuition to think about / research / strategize and create NEW IDEAS.  This group does not conform as readily as other types to tradition and collective "norms" for roles.

The results indicate that persons with the dominant function of Introverted Intuition (INJ) are 4-5X present in higher numbers than the standard population.   INTJ / INFJ are 56% of the responses, and both have the same Meyers Dominiant Function, Introverted Intuition, which is essentially pondering new innovative ideas, plans and strategies on one's own (e.g., not talking it over with a group).

ISTJ's are here because they  (and ISFJ's) are terrific with details, maintaining progress, creating / completing lists, and naturally, among the best with Budgets.  ISTJ's are higher participants than standard population because they tend to like organizing money and item details  / data, while ISFJ's prefer details about people, like birthdays and spousal names and likes, so may or may not be here, depending on their values and goals..

ENFP and ENTP are the Extroverted Intuition types -- e.g., often observed talking about out loud about new ideas.  Both very much like exploring new ideas... though these types may not persist on the forum for as many months before moving on.

The INTP's have a dominant of introverted thinking (logical ones, those),  but also have Extraverted Intuition as their secondary functions.

ENFJ's and ENTJ's have Introverted Intuition as their secondary trait, so fit right in with the INTJ and INFJ's, as they, too, like to think (on their own) about new strategies and ways to move ahead.


Keirsey's Temprament Theory would break it down like this:
(% are total of the N=178 population)

NT- Rationals   62%    Strategic.  Knowledge Seeking.  Engineers and Coordinators of Ideas-- e.g. Mastermind (INTJ)
NF - Idealist   26%      Mentoring / Advocacy. Ideas and strategy for People.   
SJ - Guardians   10%      Security, Practical, Frugal.
SP - Artisan   2%      Action.  Doing. Tangible creators  (I think most of these are off doing something..not here...)


I think these results show that the MBTI, which is a SELF-SELECTED personality type tool, is very valuable at predicting what activities people will self-select into. (such as a MMM forum on early retirement and new ways to pursue personal finance).  Yep, this is only one 'case' but wow, the results / statistical significance of this one is very strong.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Erica/NWEdible on June 24, 2015, 10:17:46 PM
Thank you so much!!!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on June 24, 2015, 10:37:48 PM
Whoah.  Thanks for taking the time to compile that.

lol @ 80% INTJ.

As I said in the poll thread on this back in 2013:
Everyone on the internet is a friggin INTJ.

It used to be a rare specimen, apparently.  In the self-selected groups like you find here, it's super common.

That poll just asked if you were an INTJ or not (no other types, just a yes/no, you can click the link above the quote to go to it), and there 75% answered yes, so fits quite well with your results.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on June 24, 2015, 11:03:03 PM
I think many types are on the internet now.  Not just INTJ's.... 

For example,

I don't think many INTJ's would be on my daughter's fan fiction and poetry writers site, which has a large group....
Pinterest would get a LOT of ISFJ's and ESFJ's.
There are some excellent photography / artist sites where people post their work, that may attract more of the SP's that are missing here,  etc. etc.

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Roots&Wings on June 25, 2015, 06:39:13 AM
Isn't the full poll here? http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/myers-briggs-type-indicator/

I had to revise from INTJ to INFJ. Initially was a borderline 1% T (likely due to peer-pressure on this forum!), but have gone over to the F side.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Jon_Snow on June 25, 2015, 10:16:19 AM
I have always found the Myers-Briggs fetish on these forums (especially in the Journals) to be a bit over the top. I am content with who I am and have no desire to be "pegged" by some 4-letter code.

Though I strongly suspect I'm INTJ. ;)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: enigmaT120 on June 26, 2015, 03:21:11 PM
I finally took one of those tests:

Your personality type: “The Logistician” (ISTJ-A)
Strength of individual traits: Introverted: 23%, Observant: 34%, Thinking: 57%, Judging: 11%, Assertive: 82%.
Role: Sentinel
Strategy: Confident Individualism

I still don't see what it's good for. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: expectopatronum on June 26, 2015, 03:40:56 PM
Female ENTJ.

One of my best friends thinks very similarly about money and would love this site. She's INTJ.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Roots&Wings on June 26, 2015, 04:39:33 PM
Though I strongly suspect I'm INTJ. ;)

You never know until you try! I'd never even heard of Myers-Briggs until joining this forum...curiousity piqued, I took a test and enjoyed reading about the various personality traits I previously saw as my own oddball quirks are actually shared by others :)

If you've ever been tested and know your result, please vote.  If not, please don't guess... it's very easy for people to feel that they identify with a certain description, but that doesn't make it so.  You should go through the formal test before drawing conclusions (many people are at least slightly surprised!)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: JLR on June 29, 2015, 04:24:09 AM
ISFJ-T.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Daleth on June 30, 2015, 10:22:45 AM

SP - Artisan   2%      Action.  Doing. Tangible creators  (I think most of these are off doing something..not here...)

They are off snowboarding, or painting their new snowboard.

Or wait, it's summer. So, they are off skateboarding, base jumping or hiking, or repairing or decorating their new equipment related to same.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: dusty on July 04, 2015, 08:29:08 AM
I used to score INTJ for myer-briggs (first test 2012 last test 2014), and it agreed with my logical side, which slotted in with ERE and Mr money mustache thinking but I never felt comfortable relating to the engineers (software programming or otherwise on this site who tested accordingly) - Whilst I like planning. organisation and logic (I have worked in the policing/military world) etc I don't like following through as so many bureaucratical (sp?) rules ensue (it did my head in that societal rules aren't black and white), hence my relief when I tested INTP today.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Daisy on July 05, 2015, 08:30:31 PM
I used to score INTJ for myer-briggs (first test 2012 last test 2014), and it agreed with my logical side, which slotted in with ERE and Mr money mustache thinking but I never felt comfortable relating to the engineers (software programming or otherwise on this site who tested accordingly) - Whilst I like planning. organisation and logic (I have worked in the policing/military world) etc I don't like following through as so many bureaucratical (sp?) rules ensue (it did my head in that societal rules aren't black and white), hence my relief when I tested INTP today.

This is similar to me. I do like the planning and organizing aspects of things. I have more trouble with the follow through. Once I dream up the great idea, I falter in putting it into practice. I start to lose interest in the fine details once I've figured out how to solve a problem.

See my start of the Class of 2015 thread and the fact that I have not chosen a FIRE date yet as a prime example. ;-)

I also start tracking my expenses every year and create a nice new spreadsheet and all, then by mid-year I realize I have stopped tracking expenses and have fallen behind and beat myself up over not updating the spreadsheet.

I am also either INTP or ENTP (depending on my mood). I will *NEVER* be a J - that is for sure. Just gives me the creeps thinking about it...
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on July 07, 2015, 06:29:21 PM
I used to score INTJ for myer-briggs (first test 2012 last test 2014), and it agreed with my logical side, which slotted in with ERE and Mr money mustache thinking but I never felt comfortable relating to the engineers (software programming or otherwise on this site who tested accordingly) - Whilst I like planning. organisation and logic (I have worked in the policing/military world) etc I don't like following through as so many bureaucratical (sp?) rules ensue (it did my head in that societal rules aren't black and white), hence my relief when I tested INTP today.

INTJ's don't typically like bureaucracy either, except as "knowing the rules to strategize around them / break them".   The engineers you indicate are more likely ISTJ's... also a very common type for engineers, who play by the rules very well indeed to get ahead.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on July 07, 2015, 06:33:22 PM
I do like the planning and organizing aspects of things. I have more trouble with the follow through. Once I dream up the great idea, I falter in putting it into practice. I start to lose interest in the fine details once I've figured out how to solve a problem.

I also start tracking my expenses every year and create a nice new spreadsheet and all, then by mid-year I realize I have stopped tracking expenses and have fallen behind and beat myself up over not updating the spreadsheet.

.... I will *NEVER* be a J SJ - that is for sure. Just gives me the creeps thinking about it...

FYI --All J's seem to be great at making lists or plans, but SJ's excel at tracking / crossing them off.   See my edit above...

I am a J and your description fits me!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MoonShadow on July 07, 2015, 06:49:15 PM
I'm an INTP, myself.

It's not my fault, I was made this way.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Carolina on My Mind on July 07, 2015, 07:01:04 PM
My husband and I, in a meme:


This made me snort with laughter (belatedly).  My husband and I are also INTJ + INTP.  (I'm the P.)

Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Mrs. Pomodoro on July 07, 2015, 07:09:53 PM
When I was younger, I switch between INFP and INFJ depending on my mood that day or the test questions asked; seem more of a solid INFP now as I get older. Hubby is an INFJ.

I read it somewhere that INFP and INFJ tend to have low paying jobs but enjoy what they do (teaching, care-taking, etc.) Maybe there's a reason why we're kinda unhappy as well-paid engineers.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: dusty on July 10, 2015, 01:07:41 AM
Daisy, nice to hear I am not alone - I also draw up intricate financial spreadsheets then neglect to enter the data.  Overall; doing the research drawing the spreadsheets and subscribing to ERE has helped me financially I must admit.

Goldielocks thanks for the input which clarifies things - I need to do some more reading on the type and work out whats going on there - I did fire from the hip with my first post.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: GoldenNeko on July 28, 2015, 05:39:03 PM
INFJ here
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Quaglar on August 28, 2015, 03:35:55 PM
ENTP here.

I get too distracted to post frequently :D.  FIRE for intellectual freedom, I never want another adult to tell me what to do ever again.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Kaikou on October 22, 2015, 09:59:13 PM
lifelong INTJ
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Sareybox on October 27, 2015, 11:35:18 AM
After reading this thread I was intrigued & did an online test. Not hugely surprisingly (for this thread) I'm another INTJ, another female INTJ FWIW. Today at work I sent a link around my team & everyone did it at the same time,  3/4 were INTJ! That includes my line manager and the 1 person I manage. A nice bonding moment for us all & it may explain why we're such a kickass team! The other guy was a ENTP.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: seathink on October 28, 2015, 11:38:30 AM
INFP or ENFP - I'm a 50/50 split with introversion and extroversion, strong strong NF, and strong P.

I will second what the others like me will say - MMM means freedom!

I've always been frugal and usually I can work for a year, then quit for a year and do what I want. But be able to quit forever, and at a young age, would be even better!

I alternate between Idealist and Champion, fully realized in my two hobby jobs/loves: Writer and Film Director. I love alone time, but I love being on (my own) set and encouraging actors/crew, creating a memory of an incredible time when we got together and made a movie.

I've been a MMM reader for 4 years, and a lurker for as long, but the only reason I'm active on the forums right now is that I'm working a boring job. :) Otherwise I am running around in the real world.

But, so you know - I was introduced to this site by a female INTJ. :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: moneyandmillennials on November 12, 2015, 12:57:11 AM
ISFJ

although in the F section, I'm compassionate and empathetic.  but also lean slightly toward T, critical and constantly questioning. 

It would be nice to be more T at work.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: FIRE_Buckeye on December 11, 2015, 11:52:23 PM
ISTJ
For those questioning the validity of these tests, it largely depends on where you fall on the spectrum for each. If you're toward the middle, of the spectrum between several categories, the test is probably meaningless. If you score heavily toward one or the other for each letter, chances are it'll nail your personality or aspects of it. First did the assessment in college; then and every time taken since I've been 70%+on each characteristic, with a few being 90+%. Needless to say, it nails my personality.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: csr on December 13, 2015, 12:54:37 PM
Saw this video today: Why the Myers-Briggs test is totally meaningless

https://curiosity.com/paths/why-the-myers-briggs-test-is-totally-meaningless-vox/?utm_source=facebookDisc&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=2015q4fbMyersBriggsDiscMB&sf15763600=1#why-the-myers-briggs-test-is-totally-meaningless-vox
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on December 13, 2015, 05:01:14 PM
Saw this video today: Why the Myers-Briggs test is totally meaningless

https://curiosity.com/paths/why-the-myers-briggs-test-is-totally-meaningless-vox/?utm_source=facebookDisc&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=2015q4fbMyersBriggsDiscMB&sf15763600=1#why-the-myers-briggs-test-is-totally-meaningless-vox

I can't watch the video right now, so can't comment, but here is my common sense, basic question:
If Meyers Briggs is meaningless, then how can so many ISTJ's be self accumulating on this site?

For example, I bet that if we took an astrology  sign poll, we would not see any consistency whatsoever... so, why such a statistical anomaly with MBTI unless there was some foundation to it...?

 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: arebelspy on December 14, 2015, 02:41:40 PM
Just because we share some common personality traits (for example, more engineers than Yahoo! comments has, proportionally) doesn't make those personality traits significant for describing relations to the real world, and by forcibly describing people as X or Y, it pigeonholes real understanding.  People are more complex, and on a spectrum, than "Introvert" or "Extrovert" and the other binary options.

If you can't watch a video, how about an article I posted 8 months ago:
Relevant article: Why the Myers-Briggs test is totally meaningless (https://www.vox.com/2014/7/15/5881947/myers-briggs-personality-test-meaningless)

Hat tip to Lifehacker (http://lifehacker.com/why-you-shouldnt-trust-the-myers-briggs-test-for-seriou-1697936838), who summarize, saying:
Quote
The Myers-Briggs test is based on personality types developed in the 1940s that have little connection to any real data. More problematic, though, is that it classifies personalities by a binary preference for a particular trait. In reality, however, most people exist on a spectrum between the two and can vary between them from week to week.

It can be amusing to look at, but don't take it too seriously, basically.  Something to keep in mind.  :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on December 14, 2015, 02:57:59 PM
Saw this video today: Why the Myers-Briggs test is totally meaningless

https://curiosity.com/paths/why-the-myers-briggs-test-is-totally-meaningless-vox/?utm_source=facebookDisc&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=2015q4fbMyersBriggsDiscMB&sf15763600=1#why-the-myers-briggs-test-is-totally-meaningless-vox

I can't watch the video right now, so can't comment, but here is my common sense, basic question:
If Meyers Briggs is meaningless, then how can so many ISTJ's be self accumulating on this site?

For example, I bet that if we took an astrology  sign poll, we would not see any consistency whatsoever... so, why such a statistical anomaly with MBTI unless there was some foundation to it...?

Astrology is based off of birth date, so it will be fairly evenly distributed for the 12 months or follow some pattern in human birth.

You find people on the internets with their introvert rating because they are alone on a computer taking a test which asks them how they "gain energy" or some form of that phrasing. Well environment influences people, we've known this. So they will tend to score more strong on the introvert side.

We do exist on that spectrum though and it is better to view it that way not only for ourselves but understanding others. You may never know what will get someone to come out of their proverbial shell but that is a clear move from introvert towards extrovert when they do.

It's cute, it's just not particularly real or actually useful. It's touted in company based training for whatever reason (I personally suspect that consultants are always 25 years behind on basic human psychology). That's usually how most people get wind of the concepts.

Also speaking of astrology the write-ups on people who take the test smack of the same vague language so that people will respond to it with the whole "WOW that describes me so well!!!".
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MoonShadow on December 14, 2015, 07:53:20 PM

You find people on the internets with their introvert rating because they are alone on a computer taking a test which asks them how they "gain energy" or some form of that phrasing. Well environment influences people, we've known this. So they will tend to score more strong on the introvert side.


I didn't take my Myers=Briggs online.  I took mine in a psychiatrist's office.  She definitely didn't think that it was bullshit, and it nailed my personality.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on December 14, 2015, 08:15:09 PM

You find people on the internets with their introvert rating because they are alone on a computer taking a test which asks them how they "gain energy" or some form of that phrasing. Well environment influences people, we've known this. So they will tend to score more strong on the introvert side.


I didn't take my Myers=Briggs online.  I took mine in a psychiatrist's office.  She definitely didn't think that it was bullshit, and it nailed my personality.

Cool.  Doesn't invalidate that it was a made up test by not psychiatrists.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on December 15, 2015, 04:02:49 PM
Just because we share some common personality traits (for example, more engineers than Yahoo! comments has, proportionally) doesn't make those personality traits significant for describing relations to the real world, and by forcibly describing people as X or Y, it pigeonholes real understanding.  People are more complex, and on a spectrum, than "Introvert" or "Extrovert" and the other binary options.

If you can't watch a video, how about an article I posted 8 months ago:
Relevant article: Why the Myers-Briggs test is totally meaningless (https://www.vox.com/2014/7/15/5881947/myers-briggs-personality-test-meaningless)

Hat tip to Lifehacker (http://lifehacker.com/why-you-shouldnt-trust-the-myers-briggs-test-for-seriou-1697936838), who summarize, saying:
Quote
The Myers-Briggs test is based on personality types developed in the 1940s that have little connection to any real data. More problematic, though, is that it classifies personalities by a binary preference for a particular trait. In reality, however, most people exist on a spectrum between the two and can vary between them from week to week.

It can be amusing to look at, but don't take it too seriously, basically.  Something to keep in mind.  :)
Thanks, I read the article and still refute it. :-)

As to classifying people, yes we are all special, bu grouping and classifying is what we do for scientific and statistical study and provides a lot of meaning, understanding and value.

Animal kingdoms, human eras, boomers vs millenials, all those medical studies, shoppers habits, all require lumping things or people into groups then contrast and compare then learn.

I agree that any classification system will have internal flaws, by a good system can provide a lot of value. MBTI has shown itself to be much more viable than many other systems.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on December 15, 2015, 04:15:57 PM
Just because we share some common personality traits (for example, more engineers than Yahoo! comments has, proportionally) doesn't make those personality traits significant for describing relations to the real world, and by forcibly describing people as X or Y, it pigeonholes real understanding.  People are more complex, and on a spectrum, than "Introvert" or "Extrovert" and the other binary options.

If you can't watch a video, how about an article I posted 8 months ago:
Relevant article: Why the Myers-Briggs test is totally meaningless (https://www.vox.com/2014/7/15/5881947/myers-briggs-personality-test-meaningless)

Hat tip to Lifehacker (http://lifehacker.com/why-you-shouldnt-trust-the-myers-briggs-test-for-seriou-1697936838), who summarize, saying:
Quote
The Myers-Briggs test is based on personality types developed in the 1940s that have little connection to any real data. More problematic, though, is that it classifies personalities by a binary preference for a particular trait. In reality, however, most people exist on a spectrum between the two and can vary between them from week to week.

It can be amusing to look at, but don't take it too seriously, basically.  Something to keep in mind.  :)
Thanks, I read the article and still refute it. :-)

As to classifying people, yes we are all special, bu grouping and classifying is what we do for scientific and statistical study and provides a lot of meaning, understanding and value.

Animal kingdoms, human eras, boomers vs millenials, all those medical studies, shoppers habits, all require lumping things or people into groups then contrast and compare then learn.

I agree that any classification system will have internal flaws, by a good system can provide a lot of value. MBTI has shown itself to be much more viable than many other systems.

I question viability when its formation was based on no evidence. The mentioning of astrology above is an apt comparison. To call someone an INTJ is just as useful as someone identifying as a Taurus.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MoonShadow on December 15, 2015, 08:43:52 PM

I question viability when its formation was based on no evidence. The mentioning of astrology above is an apt comparison. To call someone an INTJ is just as useful as someone identifying as a Taurus.

The Myers-Briggs wasn't based upon no evidence, it was based upon statistical evidence.  The Myers-Briggs was based upon the same kind of associative statistical science that evolved into what we, today, call "profiling".  The same methods that tell us that the typical serial killer is a single white male in his late 30's with neurotic attachment issues and a childhood trauma.  The science doesn't say that every loner white boy that has traumatic loss as a child will become a serial killer by age 40, nor does it say that a black girl won't.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MoonShadow on December 15, 2015, 08:56:32 PM

You find people on the internets with their introvert rating because they are alone on a computer taking a test which asks them how they "gain energy" or some form of that phrasing. Well environment influences people, we've known this. So they will tend to score more strong on the introvert side.


I didn't take my Myers=Briggs online.  I took mine in a psychiatrist's office.  She definitely didn't think that it was bullshit, and it nailed my personality.

Cool.  Doesn't invalidate that it was a made up test by not psychiatrists.

All tests are "made up", and the fact that actual psychiatrists use it as a valid tool says more than the fact that the two primary developers of the test were not psychiatrists.  The test may yet be dropped by psychiatry; for it's imprecision, for for quackery, or whatever; it is not a hard science after all.  That doesn't mean that credit isn't due, nor that the test is useless at predicting some behaviors.  The Myers-Briggs, and other techniques, are even taught to my homeschooled teenagers (and not by me, at a co-op; by a SAHM with a psychology degree of some form) in her "Who Am I?" course.   The idea being, if they better understand themselves, they might better understand their own behavioral weaknesses, including how they are perceived by others.  This is a very useful skill in any corporate environment.  If it's done nothing else for me, my own typing of INTP has helped me understand how my own quirks are interpreted by others.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on December 16, 2015, 01:35:09 AM
LOL,   there have been some pretty weird ideas in the past by psychologists.   I don't think that we can trust that they are always (or even often?) right.  Perhaps just "usually helpful"...

Psychology is a very new field, relatively speaking, with only a few areas well studied even today.   Look at all the emerging studies on happiness, a pretty new topic for this field, overall.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MoonShadow on December 16, 2015, 01:41:32 AM
LOL,   there have been some pretty weird ideas in the past by psychologists.   I don't think that we can trust that they are always (or even often?) right.  Perhaps just "usually helpful"...

Psychology is a very new field, relatively speaking, with only a few areas well studied even today.   Look at all the emerging studies on happiness, a pretty new topic for this field, overall.

That's true, but in order to discredit a personality test, you aim to discredit an entire profession that uses it?  Despite it's vagueness, even you would have to admit that the Myers-Briggs isn't random.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on December 16, 2015, 05:42:27 AM

You find people on the internets with their introvert rating because they are alone on a computer taking a test which asks them how they "gain energy" or some form of that phrasing. Well environment influences people, we've known this. So they will tend to score more strong on the introvert side.


I didn't take my Myers=Briggs online.  I took mine in a psychiatrist's office.  She definitely didn't think that it was bullshit, and it nailed my personality.

Cool.  Doesn't invalidate that it was a made up test by not psychiatrists.

All tests are "made up", and the fact that actual psychiatrists use it as a valid tool says more than the fact that the two primary developers of the test were not psychiatrists.  The test may yet be dropped by psychiatry; for it's imprecision, for for quackery, or whatever; it is not a hard science after all.  That doesn't mean that credit isn't due, nor that the test is useless at predicting some behaviors.  The Myers-Briggs, and other techniques, are even taught to my homeschooled teenagers (and not by me, at a co-op; by a SAHM with a psychology degree of some form) in her "Who Am I?" course.   The idea being, if they better understand themselves, they might better understand their own behavioral weaknesses, including how they are perceived by others.  This is a very useful skill in any corporate environment.  If it's done nothing else for me, my own typing of INTP has helped me understand how my own quirks are interpreted by others.

But it's not valid. Whether psychology is a hard science or not is irrelevant to the matter. The test is useless at predicting some behaviors. Did you not read the links? Essentially any particular person is really somewhere along a spectrum at any particular point in time, they may not be at the same point depending on their circumstances between tests. So what use is the test (assuming any validity) unless you're taking it to find out where you are at this instant?

What your children are being taught and by whom doesn't matter. They can still be taught things that aren't real or true.

Being typed has little to do with understanding yourself. Understanding yourself requires self awareness and the ability to look at yourself in as objective of a manner as possible. Being assigned arbitrary categories may make you feel like you're fulfilling the first section of that but given you actually are not that arbitrary category but are a mutable collection of feelings and thoughts, in which the identification of and understanding how they arise is truer understanding, means Myers-Briggs is BS.

I'm a bit gung-ho on this matter because it's the equivalent of people saying the sun moves around the earth. Present them evidence otherwise and the response becomes, well it's still useful right? It explains what I see right? Yeah (not really) and yeah; but the pursuit of science (soft or hard [giggity]) is about developing more accurate models to describe the reality we see. The Myers-Briggs is not accurate, it should be abandoned. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/give-and-take/201309/goodbye-mbti-the-fad-won-t-die
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on December 16, 2015, 09:07:35 AM
LOL,   there have been some pretty weird ideas in the past by psychologists.   I don't think that we can trust that they are always (or even often?) right.  Perhaps just "usually helpful"...

Psychology is a very new field, relatively speaking, with only a few areas well studied even today.   Look at all the emerging studies on happiness, a pretty new topic for this field, overall.

That's true, but in order to discredit a personality test, you aim to discredit an entire profession that uses it?  Despite it's vagueness, even you would have to admit that the Myers-Briggs isn't random.

 Moonshadow, just the opposite, that just because a psychologist did not create it does not mean it is hocus  pocus .  In fact, in the 60's and 70's those psychologists were all about correcting abnormal behaviour, so keeping them out of MBTI is a good thing.

Matchweed, I don't think we are a spectrum, for this purpose,  the question is "what do you prefer A or B?" As a method of grouping and sorting. That is pretty clear. It doesn't ask if you like or use both A and B and how much.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on December 16, 2015, 09:20:42 AM
LOL,   there have been some pretty weird ideas in the past by psychologists.   I don't think that we can trust that they are always (or even often?) right.  Perhaps just "usually helpful"...

Psychology is a very new field, relatively speaking, with only a few areas well studied even today.   Look at all the emerging studies on happiness, a pretty new topic for this field, overall.

That's true, but in order to discredit a personality test, you aim to discredit an entire profession that uses it?  Despite it's vagueness, even you would have to admit that the Myers-Briggs isn't random.

 Moonshadow, just the opposite, that just because a psychologist did not create it does not mean it is hocus  pocus .  In fact, in the 60's and 70's those psychologists were all about correcting abnormal behaviour, so keeping them out of MBTI is a good thing.

Matchweed, I don't think we are a spectrum, for this purpose,  the question is "what do you prefer A or B?" As a method of grouping and sorting. That is pretty clear. It doesn't ask if you like or use both A and B and how much.

Cool, thankfully science doesn't care if you think we exist on a spectrum. It knows you do. Like I said above, it doesn't matter if you think the sun orbits the earth. The truth is just the opposite.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MoonShadow on December 16, 2015, 02:15:15 PM

But it's not valid. Whether psychology is a hard science or not is irrelevant to the matter. The test is useless at predicting some behaviors.


Some behaviors, sure.  MBPT is useless at predicting suicidal predisposition, as an example.  That's not what it was designed to do.  It was designed for, and is rather useful for, predicting which members of a corporate work group are most (and least) likely to get along without conflicts.  It's just one tool.  A hammer can't drive screws, don't expect one tool to do too much.

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Did you not read the links? Essentially any particular person is really somewhere along a spectrum at any particular point in time, they may not be at the same point depending on their circumstances between tests. So what use is the test (assuming any validity) unless you're taking it to find out where you are at this instant?


Yes, it's a snapshot in time.  People do change their personalities over time, but most don't change much.  At least not much after maturity.

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What your children are being taught and by whom doesn't matter. They can still be taught things that aren't real or true.
It was a personal anecdote, not a proof.  I was taught many things in school that turned out to be false.  So were you.
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Being typed has little to do with understanding yourself. Understanding yourself requires self awareness and the ability to look at yourself in as objective of a manner as possible. Being assigned arbitrary categories may make you feel like you're fulfilling the first section of that but given you actually are not that arbitrary category but are a mutable collection of feelings and thoughts, in which the identification of and understanding how they arise is truer understanding, means Myers-Briggs is BS.


Myers-Briggs is only "BS" if you don't believe in statistical models.  Myers-Briggs isn't proof of anything; it's based upon statistical correlation, which is not (by itself) evidence.  But if my teenagers take it as a baseline, at least they have somewhere to start.  If their self-awareness grows beyond the MB, great; but even the MB offers more self-awareness than most teenagers (and most adults) ever develop independently.

Quote
I'm a bit gung-ho on this matter because it's the equivalent of people saying the sun moves around the earth.
Your analogy leaves much to be desired.

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The Myers-Briggs is not accurate, it should be abandoned. https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/give-and-take/201309/goodbye-mbti-the-fad-won-t-die

I think you expect too much of it, and when it doesn't live up to your expectations, you reject it's value.  This is very  black & white thinking.  Ironic coming from a person who asserts that the MB is BS because it uses A-B polling to classify a person, and who complains that doesn't accurately reflect the personality spectrum.  Who cares?  Nobody said it would cure cancer.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on December 16, 2015, 02:23:11 PM
Yeah I was pretty sure you didn't read the articles. Thanks for clarifying.

Quote
Being typed has little to do with understanding yourself. Understanding yourself requires self awareness and the ability to look at yourself in as objective of a manner as possible. Being assigned arbitrary categories may make you feel like you're fulfilling the first section of that but given you actually are not that arbitrary category but are a mutable collection of feelings and thoughts, in which the identificatiom of and understanding how they arise is truer understanding, means Myers-Briggs is BS.

Myers-Briggs is only "BS" if you don't believe in statistical models.  Myers-Briggs isn't proof of anything; it's based upon statistical correlation, which is not (by itself) evidence.  But if my teenagers take it as a baseline, at least they have somewhere to start.  If their self-awareness grows beyond the MB, great; but even the MB offers more self-awareness than most teenagers (and most adults) ever develop independently.

What does that even mean? Statistical model. What statistical model exactly? What correlation?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Goldielocks on December 17, 2015, 12:17:34 AM
Yeah I was pretty sure you didn't read the articles. Thanks for clarifying.

Quote
Being typed has little to do with understanding yourself. Understanding yourself requires self awareness and the ability to look at yourself in as objective of a manner as possible. Being assigned arbitrary categories may make you feel like you're fulfilling the first section of that but given you actually are not that arbitrary category but are a mutable collection of feelings and thoughts, in which the identificatiom of and understanding how they arise is truer understanding, means Myers-Briggs is BS.


Really?   MBTI doesn't exist without statistics...   Yes, it starts with a theory of what A-B matches to set up, and from there it is all surveys and data collection to generate statistics.   

The official version cautions against using MBTI for employment filtering (by the student), yet many books and webpages do exactly that.  Why?  They ask thousands of people to complete the official MBTI and their work, and how satisfied they are, and then produce a book or statistical study.   The authors set up those "about INTJ" phrases in different combinations, then ask (statistically) INTJ's for how close they are, that sort of thing.
Myers-Briggs is only "BS" if you don't believe in statistical models.  Myers-Briggs isn't proof of anything; it's based upon statistical correlation, which is not (by itself) evidence.  But if my teenagers take it as a baseline, at least they have somewhere to start.  If their self-awareness grows beyond the MB, great; but even the MB offers more self-awareness than most teenagers (and most adults) ever develop independently.

What does that even mean? Statistical model. What statistical model exactly? What correlation?
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: matchewed on December 18, 2015, 07:53:21 AM
I'm not sure what's your response and what's not so I'll just give a blanket response.

Statistics is the study of data. It actually doesn't care if the data is bad or good. I could give a test asking people their preferences on food and come up with a categorization that people are either meat or dairy/vegetable or bakery items/fish or fruit. That doesn't mean people actually are those things.

MBTI may not exist without it, but it doesn't prove its validity.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: RetiredAt63 on December 27, 2015, 08:41:28 AM
Another blanket response.

Introverts can be social, they can be very social.  They are just not social in the same way extroverts are. Shy people may need to be coaxed out of their shell, but shy does not automatically mean introvert, and introvert does not automatically mean shy.

Added - introverts tend to be more social in small groups and one-to-one interactions, which may be a partial explanation for why we like being on this forum.  Huge noise New Year's Eve parties are only fun in small doses (like once a year), posting on a calm, thoughtful forum is fun all the time.

Birth signs do have some value as information, since they are based on time of birth.  So we can look at them as seasonal indicators - a summer baby has had a different environment than a winter baby - what seasons was the mother experiencing (cold/heat stress, amount of exercise, etc.), what was the weather like when baby was born, what weather was baby exposed to at different ages, etc.  My DD and I were both summer babies, for example, and we were both old enough for long outings in the baby carriage in winter (well bundled up, of course).  If she had been born in January I am not sure either of us would have been up to long walks in February  ;-)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Carlin on February 07, 2017, 09:29:55 AM
I test very strongly INTP. I know it's pretty rare, especially for a girl, so it's awesome to see so many people in that personality "family."  I might have found my people!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Ben Hogan on February 14, 2017, 07:17:34 AM
ISTJ, or maybe I failed the test. oh well, life goes on. :)
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Kl285528 on February 14, 2017, 07:42:15 AM
Usually test INTJ, but always borderline E. However, last time I took it, tested out as an INTP. For sure, at least for me, the descriptions of type ring very true, especially the strong NT way of thinking. I've always liked my type - they've always made more sense to me!
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: EconDiva on August 30, 2017, 08:48:46 PM
Extreme INFP.

I've taken the test like 5 times over several years when younger.

Never had a job I was happy with...have managed to hold down decent jobs despite constantly being bombarded with thoughts of leaving from something different and more fulfilling pretty much every.single.DAY. 

I'm a true dreamer for sure...I spend way too much time dreaming about what it would be like to live a life filled with creativity and freedom (I would say via retirement now that I've since found this forum).  I do struggle with honing in on the details (think BUDGETING) carefully and consistently enough to make the strides I really want and have the ability to make. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MrsStubble on October 10, 2017, 07:40:59 PM
Female INTP.   

All i could think after i took the test like 5 times was "ULTRA RARE!"

Does make it very very difficult at work for me though, I work for a company where all the leadership is extroverted.  Not exactly ideal working conditions for me but I can muster the mandatory happy hours well enough.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Vaulter on October 11, 2017, 12:37:38 PM
INTJ as well.

I hear you, MrsStubble, on the clashes at work. I didn't think about it at the time, but my concerns about one of my prior jobs can easily boil down to my failure to understand the leadership's strong identification with their groupthink. Thankfully, I moved to a position where my individuality/personality style is a better match.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: MrsStubble on October 11, 2017, 07:52:54 PM
Smart.  I know a job change is in my future soon for the same reason. 
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Acastus on November 10, 2017, 01:46:17 PM
I am shocked, SHOCKED, to find so many other INTJ's here on a not-the-normal-way retirement website. My wife is one also. Apparently, we tend to hang out together.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: BookLoverL on November 24, 2017, 02:41:37 PM
I'm an INFP, which I think is possibly why I decided I can't even face being an employee for even a small number of years, and am now plotting to make money through self-employment instead. I've usually been able to stick with a full time job for about 3 months before either burning out, reaching the end of a contract, or getting let go for (generally not stated, but I can tell) just being that little bit too weird. I do much better when I can do my work at home, wearing comfortable clothes, and not worrying about how I'm appearing socially except on special occasions where I might have to go and meet with someone. In general, I've definitely incorporated Mustachian principles into my value system, though, to the point where I had five-figure savings at the time when I decided to go self-employed.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: Chesleygirl on December 01, 2017, 03:17:39 PM
I took the test a while back, all I can remember is that I'm an introvert.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: marty998 on June 27, 2018, 05:05:17 AM
Uh oh.... I have to leave the little INTJ club for now.... I took the test again today and this is rather disturbing... result came back ISTJ!

I figured I was always a lay down misere for INTJ. I guess people change lol.
Title: Re: The Principle of Constant Optimization: What's Your Myers-Briggs?
Post by: dusty on October 17, 2018, 01:47:24 AM
I hear ya Marty - first time I found the test concept 15 odd years ago I was INTJ --- 10 years after that I morphed into INTP,  nowadays im firmly ENFP and loving life.

I sometimes long for the peaceful solitude and certainty of the INTJ/P days but they do say ENFPs are the Extroverted Introverts....