Author Topic: What comes after the ACA?  (Read 1484251 times)

jim555

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6650 on: January 06, 2021, 10:27:34 AM »
With the Democrats taking control of the Senate, I think we can expect the individual mandate penalty to be reinstated very shortly which will make the Supreme Court decision moot anyway.
They could set the penalty to $0.01 or just remove the language entirely.

American GenX

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6651 on: January 06, 2021, 11:50:14 AM »
With the Democrats taking control of the Senate, I think we can expect the individual mandate penalty to be reinstated very shortly which will make the Supreme Court decision moot anyway.
They could set the penalty to $0.01 or just remove the language entirely.

From what I've heard from democrats, it doesn't sound like that's what they are planning to do.  Note the quote from Ossoff in my previous comment.  I haven't even heard Biden mention doing so.  It sounds like they are waiting around to see what SCOTUS does.

WhiteTrashCash

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6652 on: January 06, 2021, 11:59:19 AM »
With the Democrats taking control of the Senate, I think we can expect the individual mandate penalty to be reinstated very shortly which will make the Supreme Court decision moot anyway.
They could set the penalty to $0.01 or just remove the language entirely.

From what I've heard from democrats, it doesn't sound like that's what they are planning to do.  Note the quote from Ossoff in my previous comment.  I haven't even heard Biden mention doing so.  It sounds like they are waiting around to see what SCOTUS does.

The importance of the Individual Mandate is that it encourages healthy people to get insurance through the marketplaces, which helps reduce the cost of insurance.

American GenX

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6653 on: January 06, 2021, 01:02:53 PM »
With the Democrats taking control of the Senate, I think we can expect the individual mandate penalty to be reinstated very shortly which will make the Supreme Court decision moot anyway.
They could set the penalty to $0.01 or just remove the language entirely.

From what I've heard from democrats, it doesn't sound like that's what they are planning to do.  Note the quote from Ossoff in my previous comment.  I haven't even heard Biden mention doing so.  It sounds like they are waiting around to see what SCOTUS does.

The importance of the Individual Mandate is that it encourages healthy people to get insurance through the marketplaces, which helps reduce the cost of insurance.

It really doesn't encourage anyone to do anything when the penalty is $0.  And the ACA continues to function fine with a $0 penalty.  It's just a legal issue because the plaintiffs say it is now unconstitutional with the $0 penalty.  That's been covered up thread.

But that has nothing to do with my comment about the democrats holding off on doing anything until AFTER the Supreme Court rules rather than proactively making a change to render a potential SCOTUS ruling striking down the ACA irrelevant.

MoseyingAlong

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6654 on: January 06, 2021, 01:07:54 PM »

.... And the ACA continues to function fine with a $0 penalty.  ....

Does it really?
I thought a lot of people were upset with the increasing premiums. They will only continue to go up if/when generally healthy people decide not to partake.

Mr. Green

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6655 on: January 06, 2021, 01:54:38 PM »

.... And the ACA continues to function fine with a $0 penalty.  ....

Does it really?
I thought a lot of people were upset with the increasing premiums. They will only continue to go up if/when generally healthy people decide not to partake.
Premiums have actually gone down for a lot of folks, though that is due to the Trump administration's decision to stop reimbursing Cost Sharing Reduction payments. As a workaround, insurers began what is being called "silver loading," or making the cost of silver plans significantly more expensive than even gold plans. Since premium subsidy reimbursements are determined by the Second Lowest Cost Silver Plan, this effectively lowered the premiums of other plans because the subsidies got larger. ACA enrollment has actually increased slightly as a result of this, with many people able to now get health insurance that has $0 premiums.

American GenX

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6656 on: January 06, 2021, 03:33:16 PM »

.... And the ACA continues to function fine with a $0 penalty.  ....

Does it really?
I thought a lot of people were upset with the increasing premiums. They will only continue to go up if/when generally healthy people decide not to partake.

Premiums may go up or down, but the ACA continues to function fine.  As the conservative justice Alito stated:

"At the time of the first case, there was strong reason to believe that the individual mandate was like a part in an airplane that was essential to keep the plane flying, so that if that part was taken out the plane would crash," he asked of Jeffrey Wall, the acting solicitor general.

"But now the part has been taken out and the plane has not crashed," Alito added. "So if we were to decide this case the way you advocate, how would we explain why the individual mandate in its present form is essential to the operation of the act?"


bacchi

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6657 on: January 06, 2021, 03:49:56 PM »
But that has nothing to do with my comment about the democrats holding off on doing anything until AFTER the Supreme Court rules rather than proactively making a change to render a potential SCOTUS ruling striking down the ACA irrelevant.

Waiting until the Court strikes down the inane Texas lawsuit would make it clear that the ACA is here to stay.

If the Court does agree with Texas et al, which is possible but not probable, Congress would have a tough time passing the ACA again with only a 51-50 majority.

It's a calculated risk. I'd rather the Democrats not take it and just pass the one paragraph amendment using budget reconciliation.

rab-bit

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6658 on: January 22, 2021, 10:02:13 AM »
Legislation introduced today to eliminate the subsidy cliff and increase the premium tax credit over all incomes:

https://insurancenewsnet.com/oarticle/reps-gomez-underwood-ohalleran-introduce-legislation-to-lower-health-insurance-premiums
« Last Edit: January 22, 2021, 10:04:56 AM by rab-bit »

American GenX

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6659 on: January 22, 2021, 02:37:42 PM »
Legislation introduced today to eliminate the subsidy cliff and increase the premium tax credit over all incomes:

https://insurancenewsnet.com/oarticle/reps-gomez-underwood-ohalleran-introduce-legislation-to-lower-health-insurance-premiums

It makes more sense than most of the spending proposals I've seen lately.  Whether it goes anywhere is another question.  We don't even know for certain if SCOTUS is going to uphold most of the ACA at this point, although most of us expect that.

dresden

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6660 on: January 24, 2021, 11:11:18 PM »

.... And the ACA continues to function fine with a $0 penalty.  ....

Does it really?
I thought a lot of people were upset with the increasing premiums. They will only continue to go up if/when generally healthy people decide not to partake.
Premiums have actually gone down for a lot of folks, though that is due to the Trump administration's decision to stop reimbursing Cost Sharing Reduction payments. As a workaround, insurers began what is being called "silver loading," or making the cost of silver plans significantly more expensive than even gold plans. Since premium subsidy reimbursements are determined by the Second Lowest Cost Silver Plan, this effectively lowered the premiums of other plans because the subsidies got larger. ACA enrollment has actually increased slightly as a result of this, with many people able to now get health insurance that has $0 premiums.

The low cost silver plans have limited doctor options so I go with a bronze $0 cost plan with the ability to contribute to HSA to adjust my income.  To get a good silver plan it's around $500 per month which is actually a bargain as you have virtually no copays or deductible and great coverage.  If you compare the bronze deductible to the silver cost it's pretty close if just one family member needs alot of medical care.  If more than one needs care silver is definitely the best option.

American GenX

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6661 on: January 25, 2021, 05:28:16 AM »
To get a good silver plan it's around $500 per month which is actually a bargain as you have virtually no copays or deductible and great coverage.

I've seen silver plans for a single person getting the PCT for $200/mo and less, but there are still out of pocket costs from deductible (over $1000) and other costs, even more depending on your income.  The out of pocket cost goes up quickly as your income rises slowly above the low income requirement threshold.

rab-bit

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Re: What comes after the ACA?
« Reply #6662 on: January 25, 2021, 06:53:13 AM »
To get a good silver plan it's around $500 per month which is actually a bargain as you have virtually no copays or deductible and great coverage.

I've seen silver plans for a single person getting the PCT for $200/mo and less, but there are still out of pocket costs from deductible (over $1000) and other costs, even more depending on your income.  The out of pocket cost goes up quickly as your income rises slowly above the low income requirement threshold.

We are staying just below 400% of FPL and went with a high-deductible Bronze plan (for 2 people) at $2 per month, but we could have gotten a Gold plan with a $2000 deductible at $440 per month. The Gold plan was actually less expensive than a Silver plan due to "silver loading".