Author Topic: What's your job title and how much do you earn?  (Read 183766 times)

catccc

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #700 on: September 14, 2018, 03:34:59 PM »
Industry general ledger accounting, mid level (non-supervisor, non-management) in the greater Philadelphia area, $95K + a small bonus (a few grand?).  About 15 years experience, no interest in climbing past my current rank.

Curious if the accountants that posted just before me are supervisors or if I'm underpaid.  I actually I thought I was paid decently for a senior accountant. 
« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 03:37:13 PM by catccc »

CPYay

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #701 on: September 14, 2018, 05:11:28 PM »
@ catccc

You're doing pretty well for a Sr. Accountant. I live in a HCOL area and was making $80K with no additional compensation when I was a Sr.

I'm currently in a supervisory role, albeit for a small and growing company. My team is very small, so my responsibilities are very broad in scope.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2018, 05:13:02 PM by CPYay »

comicguy

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #702 on: September 15, 2018, 04:21:36 AM »
Title: Special Education Teacher
Age: 48
Salary: 66,000
Location: MCOL
Experience:  12 years in district (14 years total)
                   Formally: Owned own business (6 years)
                                 Construction/warehouse (5 years)
                                 Retail Management (4 years)
Education: BS social studies 7-12 and MS Special Education 7-12

Erica

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #703 on: September 15, 2018, 04:57:05 PM »
Title: Supportive Living Supervisor
(transitional housing for those deemed criminally insane. Mental institutions are closing)
Age: 50
Salary: $21K yr
Shift: One 24 hr shift per wk (6-7 hrs asleep in bed at night while on call)
Location: Northern Calif

Husband
Title: Contractor
Age: 56
Salary $18k yr
Work p/t for a little over half the year

Current benefits:
$40 a mo deducted provides us both
100K/50K life insurance
ad&d policy
accident policy
dental policy-2k ea. yr
eye policy
drug plan
health policy, no cost, for myself only

We live cheaply in a small town surrounded by National Forest.  Touristy Town with over 50% vacation homes.
A town known for it's Mtn Biking races is just 30 min away. Our life revolves around cycling, hiking, tai chi, vegetable gardening, having friends over for dinner and vice versa.

« Last Edit: September 16, 2018, 12:23:26 AM by Erica »

effigy98

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #704 on: September 15, 2018, 05:23:58 PM »
Couple years after last update, pay has went up substaintually.... Things are changing in my industry... Cloud developer, broke 500k this year in total comp for the first time between two jobs (1 full time, one side hustle) in this space.

Many companies are tired of hiring tech employees that do not fit their traditional business, they are outsourcing most of their servers and work to major cloud companies.

The cloud companies are paying insane to retain cloud developers as it is a massive land grab right now for the big (5? maybe) companies. If you are looking for something paying insanely well, learn Salesforce, AWS, Azure, or google cloud.
« Last Edit: September 15, 2018, 05:32:22 PM by effigy98 »

Apple_Tango

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #705 on: September 15, 2018, 09:14:41 PM »
As part of my job I get to see the salaries that other people make. WOW the money is incredible in the DC area, that's all I have to say. The most I've seen so far is in the mid six figures with annual bonuses also in the six figure range on top of that. And I have to keep a straight face and not let my jaw hit the floor sometimes. I just think to myself that all I would need to do is have somewhere around 2-5 years of work with that salary and I could retire forever!

GUNDERSON

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #706 on: September 16, 2018, 10:39:47 AM »
Title: Supportive Living Supervisor
(transitional housing for those deemed criminally insane. Mental institutions are closing)
Age: 50
Salary: $21K yr
Shift: One 24 hr shift per wk (6-7 hrs asleep in bed at night while on call)
Location: Northern Calif

this sounds like a fascinating job. Can you say a little more about what it's like?

Goldendog777

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #707 on: September 16, 2018, 02:54:15 PM »
Mortgage Fraud Investigator for large bank
$74,350
Been doing this for 8 years but have been in mortgage doing various jobs, mostly underwriting, for over 20 years and Iím sooo over it!

dacalo

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #708 on: September 17, 2018, 11:22:29 AM »
Industry accounting
$125K plus bonus
Transitioned to accounting in late 20's.

Question for other accountants: I got my CPA in industry. Zero public experience. Lately, most job postings say "public experience required" and this is preventing me from getting interviews for jobs I easily qualify for otherwise. It's too late for me to go public at this point. Any recommendations to overcome this? Or is this just something I'll have to deal with?

You are never late going public, but the question is do you want to? You will most likely have to start as staff, and go through grueling 2-4 years to make your experience/resume meaningful. You will be taking a paycut as well. Yes the experience is very valuable and the pace cannot be compared to industry but the cost/benefit should be considered. If the career path you want to take requires public experience, then you may want to consider LT wise.

Industry general ledger accounting, mid level (non-supervisor, non-management) in the greater Philadelphia area, $95K + a small bonus (a few grand?).  About 15 years experience, no interest in climbing past my current rank.

Curious if the accountants that posted just before me are supervisors or if I'm underpaid.  I actually I thought I was paid decently for a senior accountant.

In management. I would say your salary is pretty decent for GL accounting.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2018, 11:24:47 AM by dacalo »

Proud Foot

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #709 on: September 17, 2018, 12:24:51 PM »
Industry accounting
$125K plus bonus
Transitioned to accounting in late 20's.

Question for other accountants: I got my CPA in industry. Zero public experience. Lately, most job postings say "public experience required" and this is preventing me from getting interviews for jobs I easily qualify for otherwise. It's too late for me to go public at this point. Any recommendations to overcome this? Or is this just something I'll have to deal with?

Outside of making a move to public I would suggest working with a recruiter if you are looking to change jobs. They can help you get past the immediate rejection from HR for not having public experience. How many years accounting experience do you have and do you do much with the annual audit and financial report?

Industry general ledger accounting, mid level (non-supervisor, non-management) in the greater Philadelphia area, $95K + a small bonus (a few grand?).  About 15 years experience, no interest in climbing past my current rank.

Curious if the accountants that posted just before me are supervisors or if I'm underpaid.  I actually I thought I was paid decently for a senior accountant. 

I think that is pretty decent for a senior accountant.  The salary guide for my city shows $70k as the average which translates to around $95k in Philadelphia.

catccc

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #710 on: September 17, 2018, 12:50:11 PM »
Industry accounting
$125K plus bonus
Transitioned to accounting in late 20's.

Question for other accountants: I got my CPA in industry. Zero public experience. Lately, most job postings say "public experience required" and this is preventing me from getting interviews for jobs I easily qualify for otherwise. It's too late for me to go public at this point. Any recommendations to overcome this? Or is this just something I'll have to deal with?

I wonder if you could contact some firms about part time consulting gigs (or part time busy season gigs?) that you might be able to do on the side?  That way you don't need to halt your industry career, but if people ask, you can say you have public experience?

catccc

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #711 on: September 17, 2018, 12:53:48 PM »
You're doing pretty well for a Sr. Accountant. I live in a HCOL area and was making $80K with no additional compensation when I was a Sr.

I'm currently in a supervisory role, albeit for a small and growing company. My team is very small, so my responsibilities are very broad in scope.

In management. I would say your salary is pretty decent for GL accounting.

I think that is pretty decent for a senior accountant.  The salary guide for my city shows $70k as the average which translates to around $95k in Philadelphia.

Okay, thanks all for the feedback, good to know I'm fairly (or perhaps well) compensated!

cheaplynn

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #712 on: September 17, 2018, 01:34:23 PM »
Title: High school teacher
Income: 91k
Age: 36
Experience: 13 years
Qualifications: BA English; MEd Secondary Education; MA English (though, only a Bachelor's in Education is needed to do the job; my additional advanced degrees helped increase my salary significantly.)
Pension: I contribute 3%; district contributes 7%. (That said, the pension is severely underfunded by the state, so that money doesn't feel entirely guaranteed. Also, I'm touchy about the subject because we are majorly vilified for having a pension--it feeds peoples' anti-union, lazy-entitled-teacher rhetoric--but people don't seem to understand that as public employees, we don't qualify for social security benefits.)

Public school teaching salaries vary wildly state by state, even district by district. I work in a huge urban school system (with all of the challenges that one would expect from a city plagued by segregation, poverty, and gun violence), but if I had spent the same amount of time in the school district for the suburbs about 3 miles north of my current school, I'd be making well over 110k. In the rural parts of the state, teachers are making far less. It's an unjust system for students and teachers alike.


CPYay

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #713 on: September 17, 2018, 02:39:32 PM »
You are never late going public, but the question is do you want to? You will most likely have to start as staff, and go through grueling 2-4 years to make your experience/resume meaningful. You will be taking a paycut as well. Yes the experience is very valuable and the pace cannot be compared to industry but the cost/benefit should be considered. If the career path you want to take requires public experience, then you may want to consider LT wise.

Outside of making a move to public I would suggest working with a recruiter if you are looking to change jobs. They can help you get past the immediate rejection from HR for not having public experience. How many years accounting experience do you have and do you do much with the annual audit and financial report?

I wonder if you could contact some firms about part time consulting gigs (or part time busy season gigs?) that you might be able to do on the side?  That way you don't need to halt your industry career, but if people ask, you can say you have public experience?

Thanks all.

I have a family and lifestyle that already requires my current trajectory. Unfortunately, a full-time transition to public doesn't make sense for me. Hindsight is 20/20 :(

I've been in accounting for ~9 years. Definitely have the annual audit and financial reporting experience. I like the idea of part-time/side gigs with public firms if they're open to that. I know there are definitely roles that won't require public experience, but those are hard to come by and I'm still competing with those who do have it. I'm usually good once an interview is scheduled.

beer-man

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #714 on: September 17, 2018, 03:34:30 PM »
Title: High school teacher
Income: 91k
Age: 36
Experience: 13 years
Qualifications: BA English; MEd Secondary Education; MA English (though, only a Bachelor's in Education is needed to do the job; my additional advanced degrees helped increase my salary significantly.)
Pension: I contribute 3%; district contributes 7%. (That said, the pension is severely underfunded by the state, so that money doesn't feel entirely guaranteed. Also, I'm touchy about the subject because we are majorly vilified for having a pension--it feeds peoples' anti-union, lazy-entitled-teacher rhetoric--but people don't seem to understand that as public employees, we don't qualify for social security benefits.)

Public school teaching salaries vary wildly state by state, even district by district. I work in a huge urban school system (with all of the challenges that one would expect from a city plagued by segregation, poverty, and gun violence), but if I had spent the same amount of time in the school district for the suburbs about 3 miles north of my current school, I'd be making well over 110k. In the rural parts of the state, teachers are making far less. It's an unjust system for students and teachers alike.
Wow 91k as a teacher, that’s awesome. With all the time off there are ample opportunities for side gigs too


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Mesmoiselle

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #715 on: September 17, 2018, 04:52:51 PM »
Title: Sonographer, Contract
Experience: 7 years as Staff, 3 as Traveler. All in a hospital.
Age: 31
Income: it'd be $105,000 or more if I worked every week of the year, 33% of that untaxed.  As full time staff in Louisville, KY would have been $66,500/year, all of it taxed. No paid bonuses, PTO,  or vacation. Finally found a Contract company with 5% match of their 401k plan.

Education: I personally became a sonographer via cross training after getting an x Ray licence through a two year certificate program.  I then sat for two exams that equaled one licence. There are specialties and I now have two. You don't get paid more for more specialties but a lot of employers want you to have them anyway or they may be unwilling to hire you. For many years, I didn't even have an associates degree until I voluntarily chose to get one. This opportunity has become more rare.

If you wanted to get into Sonography these days,. It's usually "have an associate degree and some medical experience+ 1-2 year CAAHEP accredited program". The latter of which may or may not give you a bachelor's in US science


« Last Edit: September 17, 2018, 05:08:34 PM by Mesmoiselle »

mizzourah2006

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #716 on: September 18, 2018, 06:01:04 AM »
Couple years after last update, pay has went up substaintually.... Things are changing in my industry... Cloud developer, broke 500k this year in total comp for the first time between two jobs (1 full time, one side hustle) in this space.

Many companies are tired of hiring tech employees that do not fit their traditional business, they are outsourcing most of their servers and work to major cloud companies.

The cloud companies are paying insane to retain cloud developers as it is a massive land grab right now for the big (5? maybe) companies. If you are looking for something paying insanely well, learn Salesforce, AWS, Azure, or google cloud.

What do you mean by learn? I spin up AWS instances for data science project work and then kill them after the project is over. What specifically makes a Cloud developer different than a non-cloud developer? Is it just k owing how to work in them and in Linux in general? Or is there more to it? Genuinely curious.

lexde

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #717 on: September 18, 2018, 06:55:49 AM »
7/6/18:
Attorney in medium cost of living area.
70K + bonuses ($0-750/month; I get maybe 4-6 per year). Up from 65K last year. Second year in.
Also get a 3% safe harbor 401k contribution whether I contribute or not (I do, of course).
9/18/18:
80K base, fewer hours now.

MudDuck

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #718 on: September 18, 2018, 09:05:01 AM »
I have two jobs.

Title: Office Manager
Age: 33
Experience: 10-ish years
Education: Common sense? This is tiny a family business and I didn't need any qualifications for hire.
Compensation: $33K (plus about $16-$20K in benefits)

Title: Staff Nurse (RN)
Age: Still 33!
Experience: <1 year
Education: Associate's Degree (18 months)
Compensation: $26-$28/hour, depending upon shift differential

This popped up again so I figured I'd update.

Title: Staff Nurse (RN)
Age: 35
Experience: 3 years
Education: Associate's Degree (18 months)
Compensation: $38-$40/hour, depending upon shift differential

effigy98

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #719 on: September 18, 2018, 02:16:31 PM »
Couple years after last update, pay has went up substaintually.... Things are changing in my industry... Cloud developer, broke 500k this year in total comp for the first time between two jobs (1 full time, one side hustle) in this space.

Many companies are tired of hiring tech employees that do not fit their traditional business, they are outsourcing most of their servers and work to major cloud companies.

The cloud companies are paying insane to retain cloud developers as it is a massive land grab right now for the big (5? maybe) companies. If you are looking for something paying insanely well, learn Salesforce, AWS, Azure, or google cloud.

What do you mean by learn? I spin up AWS instances for data science project work and then kill them after the project is over. What specifically makes a Cloud developer different than a non-cloud developer? Is it just k owing how to work in them and in Linux in general? Or is there more to it? Genuinely curious.

You should be able to handle security tokens, services, functions, move data around between different endpoints and databases. I am not talking about simply spinning up a VM as that is pretty much the same skill set as a normal developer. You should be able to move something like an inventory management system (web and db) into the cloud and have it scale based on number of users hitting the site. For example, if marketing decides to run a major promotion (or maybe a link is put on the MMM forum) that requires many multiples of normal traffic, your solution should just scale automatically and shrink when not needed and only be billed for server usage without having a team of devs on call to deal with it.

Arbitrage

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #720 on: September 18, 2018, 02:16:59 PM »
Title: High school teacher
Income: 91k
Age: 36
Experience: 13 years
Qualifications: BA English; MEd Secondary Education; MA English (though, only a Bachelor's in Education is needed to do the job; my additional advanced degrees helped increase my salary significantly.)
Pension: I contribute 3%; district contributes 7%. (That said, the pension is severely underfunded by the state, so that money doesn't feel entirely guaranteed. Also, I'm touchy about the subject because we are majorly vilified for having a pension--it feeds peoples' anti-union, lazy-entitled-teacher rhetoric--but people don't seem to understand that as public employees, we don't qualify for social security benefits.)

Public school teaching salaries vary wildly state by state, even district by district. I work in a huge urban school system (with all of the challenges that one would expect from a city plagued by segregation, poverty, and gun violence), but if I had spent the same amount of time in the school district for the suburbs about 3 miles north of my current school, I'd be making well over 110k. In the rural parts of the state, teachers are making far less. It's an unjust system for students and teachers alike.
Wow 91k as a teacher, thatís awesome. With all the time off there are ample opportunities for side gigs too


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

It's very similar to teacher friends of mine where I live; actually at least one of them (similar age and education) is regularly pulling in above that $110k mark, and her workday is only 6.5 hours long with a 183-day work year.  Not to say that their jobs are perfect, but hopefully gives some perspective to those who say 'teachers are underpaid' when the truth is that while many teachers - such as those in various states without powerful unions - are underpaid, but many other teachers are compensated quite well. 

I will admit to being one of those who will openly criticize the teacher pensions, as well as other state/local employee pensions and health care promises, as one of the biggest threats facing this country's economy in the coming years, and even now.  These obligations are taking up ever-increasing shares of local budgets, since they must be paid first, and they're squeezing out other services.  When public services are being cut and/or taxes are being raised, it's often the pension obligations behind it, even though the politicians will always spin it otherwise.  It would be even worse - much worse - if the actuaries were forced to use the rules/assumptions in place for private pensions, rather than assuming that rosy investment returns will save the day.

I don't particularly empathize with the social security argument, either, since those employees aren't paying in to social security - given the choice, I would've certainly taken and invested my social security money.  However, I don't blame the teachers per se, as they're just trying to maximize their own financial situation, and I can't say that I wouldn't do the same.  I do blame the unions and the politicians who got us into this mess, as well as those who fight tooth and nail against any effort to resolve the situations. 

I don't really want to start a flame war, so I apologize if I'm offending with this post.  Again, I don't blame the teachers or other state employees, aside from those who abuse the system or fight to perpetuate it against all logic and reason. 

mizzourah2006

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #721 on: September 18, 2018, 05:01:22 PM »
Couple years after last update, pay has went up substaintually.... Things are changing in my industry... Cloud developer, broke 500k this year in total comp for the first time between two jobs (1 full time, one side hustle) in this space.

Many companies are tired of hiring tech employees that do not fit their traditional business, they are outsourcing most of their servers and work to major cloud companies.

The cloud companies are paying insane to retain cloud developers as it is a massive land grab right now for the big (5? maybe) companies. If you are looking for something paying insanely well, learn Salesforce, AWS, Azure, or google cloud.

What do you mean by learn? I spin up AWS instances for data science project work and then kill them after the project is over. What specifically makes a Cloud developer different than a non-cloud developer? Is it just k owing how to work in them and in Linux in general? Or is there more to it? Genuinely curious.

You should be able to handle security tokens, services, functions, move data around between different endpoints and databases. I am not talking about simply spinning up a VM as that is pretty much the same skill set as a normal developer. You should be able to move something like an inventory management system (web and db) into the cloud and have it scale based on number of users hitting the site. For example, if marketing decides to run a major promotion (or maybe a link is put on the MMM forum) that requires many multiples of normal traffic, your solution should just scale automatically and shrink when not needed and only be billed for server usage without having a team of devs on call to deal with it.

Interesting, thanks for the info, Iím admittedly not a developer, just a stats nerd that learned to program and build ML/DL models. I was under the impression a lot of the AWS instances could auto-scale now. I know weíve been looking at SageMaker and thatís one of the benefits they mention for it. Congrats on the income!

Erica

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #722 on: September 20, 2018, 12:11:29 AM »
GUNDERSON- this sounds like a fascinating job. Can you say a little more about what it's like?

Hi Gunderson. Nice to meet you.
There is a segment of the population which are not just criminally insane (old term), but also diagnosed as developmentally disabled. The official diagnosis is mental retardation. This makes this group eligible for some additional services. They come off as schizophrenic, bi-polar to most, but it's far worse. They are never really in reality due to the retardation. This allows them to do things not necessarily without a conscious, but without the proper understanding of consequences. The magnitude eludes them. They hardly ever, if at all, learn from experience.  It might not be evident at first but the retardation is there. Hence why they are more dangerous. Because they imagine danger where it is nonexistent then act on it hurting innocent people.

I work for a Vendor of the State. It's a private company of around 100 employees.
There are 3 corporate offices in the State
I oversee only 3 people & their 24 hr staff.
Actually one has reduced her staff by 4 hrs a day,
due to new support from her family after I trained them.
Each individual lives in subsidized housing
Since all had 24 hr staff already, spending the night wasn't part of the supervisor duties
unless their staff was absent and we had no one to fill in
Thus I needed to fill in as staff.
Then get a supervisor to back up the other clients
Both clients had emergencies ...yet called me at this clients home
Instead of contacting the other supervisors.
Being within 5 minutes n the same apt complex made all feel more secure
So the phone call was all they needed
"fires" were put out quickly.
70-80% of their criminal behavior was regularly subdued during my shift
The most expedient use of time wasn't a supervisor drive over
But be nearby, in another clients home,
While another supervisor was truly available but has never been called (except by cops)
By the time you'd drive down
Cops would already be on the scene because it escalated quickly
The anxiety and panic can be curbed by meds but not 100%

I am at one of the clients homes at all times
They each live by themselves, in their own apartment with staff
I have a good relationship with all of them.

The lady I am with most of the shift
stole a pickup and drove it into a shopping mall killing 3 people
She spent most of her life in and out of  jail, homeless, or in mental institutions
We spend a few hours watching a Christian movie or reading the bible each shift
She has a strong faith
I get paperwork done later at night between 10-midnight

Each shift, I stop off at the homes counting their lockbox, ensuring bills are paid, house is fairly clean, logs are completed, handle medications, talk to clients about their staff, their day, goals, etc.

She goes to bed at 10:30- 11pm
Won't wake me up until around 7am.
Sometimes I sleep better here than at home
Nice comfy bed, desk, fridge, private bath w/shower.
So there are some very good aspects to the job
yet the pay isn't one of them
.
« Last Edit: September 20, 2018, 12:45:41 AM by Erica »

cheaplynn

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #723 on: October 01, 2018, 01:45:28 PM »
Title: High school teacher
Income: 91k
Age: 36
Experience: 13 years
Qualifications: BA English; MEd Secondary Education; MA English (though, only a Bachelor's in Education is needed to do the job; my additional advanced degrees helped increase my salary significantly.)
Pension: I contribute 3%; district contributes 7%. (That said, the pension is severely underfunded by the state, so that money doesn't feel entirely guaranteed. Also, I'm touchy about the subject because we are majorly vilified for having a pension--it feeds peoples' anti-union, lazy-entitled-teacher rhetoric--but people don't seem to understand that as public employees, we don't qualify for social security benefits.)

Public school teaching salaries vary wildly state by state, even district by district. I work in a huge urban school system (with all of the challenges that one would expect from a city plagued by segregation, poverty, and gun violence), but if I had spent the same amount of time in the school district for the suburbs about 3 miles north of my current school, I'd be making well over 110k. In the rural parts of the state, teachers are making far less. It's an unjust system for students and teachers alike.
Wow 91k as a teacher, thatís awesome. With all the time off there are ample opportunities for side gigs too


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It's very similar to teacher friends of mine where I live; actually at least one of them (similar age and education) is regularly pulling in above that $110k mark, and her workday is only 6.5 hours long with a 183-day work year.  Not to say that their jobs are perfect, but hopefully gives some perspective to those who say 'teachers are underpaid' when the truth is that while many teachers - such as those in various states without powerful unions - are underpaid, but many other teachers are compensated quite well. 

I will admit to being one of those who will openly criticize the teacher pensions, as well as other state/local employee pensions and health care promises, as one of the biggest threats facing this country's economy in the coming years, and even now.  These obligations are taking up ever-increasing shares of local budgets, since they must be paid first, and they're squeezing out other services.  When public services are being cut and/or taxes are being raised, it's often the pension obligations behind it, even though the politicians will always spin it otherwise.  It would be even worse - much worse - if the actuaries were forced to use the rules/assumptions in place for private pensions, rather than assuming that rosy investment returns will save the day.

I don't particularly empathize with the social security argument, either, since those employees aren't paying in to social security - given the choice, I would've certainly taken and invested my social security money.  However, I don't blame the teachers per se, as they're just trying to maximize their own financial situation, and I can't say that I wouldn't do the same.  I do blame the unions and the politicians who got us into this mess, as well as those who fight tooth and nail against any effort to resolve the situations. 

I don't really want to start a flame war, so I apologize if I'm offending with this post.  Again, I don't blame the teachers or other state employees, aside from those who abuse the system or fight to perpetuate it against all logic and reason.

I'm not opposed to differing opinions or discourse on the topic. Like I said, I'm touchy, just because it's been wrapped up with so many other issues--anti-union sentiments, etc. (For us, the 'etc.' is undeniably the fact that my district largely serves poor, black families when the state is otherwise white...AND that the teaching population is also a high percentage of women of color. Not saying that everyone who takes issues with teacher pensions is openly racist or sexist, but it's hard to ignore that the workers who are most openly accused of being "entitled" or "lazy" *just happen to be* black and hispanic women.)

Also, just to clarify: yes, my day is also technically 6.5 hours long. But that doesn't account for the hours of DONATED labor that I am forced to perform every week in order to meet my job demands. The 6.5 hours is the bell-to-bell day, not including our lunch break. I know that we all had that teacher in high school who did the bare minimum, but the reality is that most of us (including myself), show up 30-60 minutes before the start of the day and work at least 2 extra hours on top of our salaried time, on a daily basis. Plus working weekends. There's no other possible way I could do all of my planning, grade all of the papers, make copies, call parents, and individually meet students for tutoring otherwise.

Look, I recognize that none of my explanations will sway the anti-public school/anti-teacher union naysayers out there. But I also think that those people tend to have little regard for a) the work of educators in general, and b) public education in general. So I've found that if someone feels entitled to sh*t on me, my career, and the people I serve... that's their problem. All I can say is that I work f*cking hard to earn every dollar I make.

Cwadda

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #724 on: October 01, 2018, 02:07:11 PM »
Title: High school teacher
Income: 91k
Age: 36
Experience: 13 years
Qualifications: BA English; MEd Secondary Education; MA English (though, only a Bachelor's in Education is needed to do the job; my additional advanced degrees helped increase my salary significantly.)
Pension: I contribute 3%; district contributes 7%. (That said, the pension is severely underfunded by the state, so that money doesn't feel entirely guaranteed. Also, I'm touchy about the subject because we are majorly vilified for having a pension--it feeds peoples' anti-union, lazy-entitled-teacher rhetoric--but people don't seem to understand that as public employees, we don't qualify for social security benefits.)

Public school teaching salaries vary wildly state by state, even district by district. I work in a huge urban school system (with all of the challenges that one would expect from a city plagued by segregation, poverty, and gun violence), but if I had spent the same amount of time in the school district for the suburbs about 3 miles north of my current school, I'd be making well over 110k. In the rural parts of the state, teachers are making far less. It's an unjust system for students and teachers alike.
Wow 91k as a teacher, thatís awesome. With all the time off there are ample opportunities for side gigs too


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It's very similar to teacher friends of mine where I live; actually at least one of them (similar age and education) is regularly pulling in above that $110k mark, and her workday is only 6.5 hours long with a 183-day work year.  Not to say that their jobs are perfect, but hopefully gives some perspective to those who say 'teachers are underpaid' when the truth is that while many teachers - such as those in various states without powerful unions - are underpaid, but many other teachers are compensated quite well. 

I will admit to being one of those who will openly criticize the teacher pensions, as well as other state/local employee pensions and health care promises, as one of the biggest threats facing this country's economy in the coming years, and even now.  These obligations are taking up ever-increasing shares of local budgets, since they must be paid first, and they're squeezing out other services.  When public services are being cut and/or taxes are being raised, it's often the pension obligations behind it, even though the politicians will always spin it otherwise.  It would be even worse - much worse - if the actuaries were forced to use the rules/assumptions in place for private pensions, rather than assuming that rosy investment returns will save the day.

I don't particularly empathize with the social security argument, either, since those employees aren't paying in to social security - given the choice, I would've certainly taken and invested my social security money.  However, I don't blame the teachers per se, as they're just trying to maximize their own financial situation, and I can't say that I wouldn't do the same.  I do blame the unions and the politicians who got us into this mess, as well as those who fight tooth and nail against any effort to resolve the situations. 

I don't really want to start a flame war, so I apologize if I'm offending with this post.  Again, I don't blame the teachers or other state employees, aside from those who abuse the system or fight to perpetuate it against all logic and reason.

I'm not opposed to differing opinions or discourse on the topic. Like I said, I'm touchy, just because it's been wrapped up with so many other issues--anti-union sentiments, etc. (For us, the 'etc.' is undeniably the fact that my district largely serves poor, black families when the state is otherwise white...AND that the teaching population is also a high percentage of women of color. Not saying that everyone who takes issues with teacher pensions is openly racist or sexist, but it's hard to ignore that the workers who are most openly accused of being "entitled" or "lazy" *just happen to be* black and hispanic women.)

Also, just to clarify: yes, my day is also technically 6.5 hours long. But that doesn't account for the hours of DONATED labor that I am forced to perform every week in order to meet my job demands. The 6.5 hours is the bell-to-bell day, not including our lunch break. I know that we all had that teacher in high school who did the bare minimum, but the reality is that most of us (including myself), show up 30-60 minutes before the start of the day and work at least 2 extra hours on top of our salaried time, on a daily basis. Plus working weekends. There's no other possible way I could do all of my planning, grade all of the papers, make copies, call parents, and individually meet students for tutoring otherwise.

Look, I recognize that none of my explanations will sway the anti-public school/anti-teacher union naysayers out there. But I also think that those people tend to have little regard for a) the work of educators in general, and b) public education in general. So I've found that if someone feels entitled to sh*t on me, my career, and the people I serve... that's their problem. All I can say is that I work f*cking hard to earn every dollar I make.

Public education is one of the most important factors in society. I believe in investing in public education to inspire the next generation and to create a brighter future. Teachers are some of the most influential people in kids' lives, and the influence sticks for life. I remember each and everyone of my teachers from K-12.

I'm always so surprised to see people harp on public education spending (especially with the amount of military spending going on).

Public university spending on the other hand...ho ho well that's a different story these days.

At any rate, thank you for doing what you do as an educator!

mm1970

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #725 on: October 01, 2018, 02:27:08 PM »
Quote
Look, I recognize that none of my explanations will sway the anti-public school/anti-teacher union naysayers out there. But I also think that those people tend to have little regard for a) the work of educators in general, and b) public education in general. So I've found that if someone feels entitled to sh*t on me, my career, and the people I serve... that's their problem. All I can say is that I work f*cking hard to earn every dollar I make.

I understand the general concern people have for public employee pensions - only because many of them are mishandled, and underfunded.  This of course causes problems with other services and increasing taxes.  This varies greatly location to location.

But the anti-teacher rants - I honestly have to think that the vast majority of complainers haven't stepped foot in a classroom or at a school in ... forever?  If ever?  Every time I read about a 6.5 hour work day, I laugh.

Most of my experience is with elementary (my oldest just hit junior high) - school starts at 8:30 am, and the teachers are required to be there by 8 am at the latest.  School ends at 3:20 pm, nobody leaves then.  It's hardly a 6.5 hour work day.  Most of the time when I pick up my kids at 5:15, there are at least 3 or 4 teachers still there.  That doesn't count the committees they are on (PTA board, school site council, plus after school volunteering like the flag football team, track team or soccer team).  Don't forget science night and back to school night!  We haven't even started grading or preparing or professional development.  (I have lost count of the number of curriculum changes in the last 7 years.)

Even in junior high - this year I was perusing the school board agenda and noticed that one of my kid's teachers is going to be temporarily reassigned from a 1x employee to a 1.5x employee.  This year they doubled the # of honors classes without adding a teacher.  SO ... she gets to teach 2 honors classes, and they are 2.5 hours per day EACH.  That's straight up 5 hours of class time, and I'm sure those aren't her only classes.

beer-man

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #726 on: October 01, 2018, 11:33:13 PM »
Title: High school teacher
Income: 91k
Age: 36
Experience: 13 years
Qualifications: BA English; MEd Secondary Education; MA English (though, only a Bachelor's in Education is needed to do the job; my additional advanced degrees helped increase my salary significantly.)
Pension: I contribute 3%; district contributes 7%. (That said, the pension is severely underfunded by the state, so that money doesn't feel entirely guaranteed. Also, I'm touchy about the subject because we are majorly vilified for having a pension--it feeds peoples' anti-union, lazy-entitled-teacher rhetoric--but people don't seem to understand that as public employees, we don't qualify for social security benefits.)

Public school teaching salaries vary wildly state by state, even district by district. I work in a huge urban school system (with all of the challenges that one would expect from a city plagued by segregation, poverty, and gun violence), but if I had spent the same amount of time in the school district for the suburbs about 3 miles north of my current school, I'd be making well over 110k. In the rural parts of the state, teachers are making far less. It's an unjust system for students and teachers alike.
Wow 91k as a teacher, that’s awesome. With all the time off there are ample opportunities for side gigs too


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

It's very similar to teacher friends of mine where I live; actually at least one of them (similar age and education) is regularly pulling in above that $110k mark, and her workday is only 6.5 hours long with a 183-day work year.  Not to say that their jobs are perfect, but hopefully gives some perspective to those who say 'teachers are underpaid' when the truth is that while many teachers - such as those in various states without powerful unions - are underpaid, but many other teachers are compensated quite well. 

I will admit to being one of those who will openly criticize the teacher pensions, as well as other state/local employee pensions and health care promises, as one of the biggest threats facing this country's economy in the coming years, and even now.  These obligations are taking up ever-increasing shares of local budgets, since they must be paid first, and they're squeezing out other services.  When public services are being cut and/or taxes are being raised, it's often the pension obligations behind it, even though the politicians will always spin it otherwise.  It would be even worse - much worse - if the actuaries were forced to use the rules/assumptions in place for private pensions, rather than assuming that rosy investment returns will save the day.

I don't particularly empathize with the social security argument, either, since those employees aren't paying in to social security - given the choice, I would've certainly taken and invested my social security money.  However, I don't blame the teachers per se, as they're just trying to maximize their own financial situation, and I can't say that I wouldn't do the same.  I do blame the unions and the politicians who got us into this mess, as well as those who fight tooth and nail against any effort to resolve the situations. 

I don't really want to start a flame war, so I apologize if I'm offending with this post.  Again, I don't blame the teachers or other state employees, aside from those who abuse the system or fight to perpetuate it against all logic and reason.

I'm not opposed to differing opinions or discourse on the topic. Like I said, I'm touchy, just because it's been wrapped up with so many other issues--anti-union sentiments, etc. (For us, the 'etc.' is undeniably the fact that my district largely serves poor, black families when the state is otherwise white...AND that the teaching population is also a high percentage of women of color. Not saying that everyone who takes issues with teacher pensions is openly racist or sexist, but it's hard to ignore that the workers who are most openly accused of being "entitled" or "lazy" *just happen to be* black and hispanic women.)

Also, just to clarify: yes, my day is also technically 6.5 hours long. But that doesn't account for the hours of DONATED labor that I am forced to perform every week in order to meet my job demands. The 6.5 hours is the bell-to-bell day, not including our lunch break. I know that we all had that teacher in high school who did the bare minimum, but the reality is that most of us (including myself), show up 30-60 minutes before the start of the day and work at least 2 extra hours on top of our salaried time, on a daily basis. Plus working weekends. There's no other possible way I could do all of my planning, grade all of the papers, make copies, call parents, and individually meet students for tutoring otherwise.

Look, I recognize that none of my explanations will sway the anti-public school/anti-teacher union naysayers out there. But I also think that those people tend to have little regard for a) the work of educators in general, and b) public education in general. So I've found that if someone feels entitled to sh*t on me, my career, and the people I serve... that's their problem. All I can say is that I work f*cking hard to earn every dollar I make.
180 work days per year, 6.5-8hr days 90k a year, paid for pension.  I hope you are working your ass off cause that is quite the golden ticket that is slowly bankrupting the state


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cheaplynn

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #727 on: October 02, 2018, 07:19:44 AM »
A. I am, thank you very much, anonymous stranger who probably doesn't even live in the same state as me. I hope you're searching the forums for every other public employee and also taking THEM to task for choosing their profession.
B. Funny - I thought this community was all about supporting people in their quest for making money and financial independence. But making money isn't kosher when I'm a state employee? Or, god forbid, a teacher? Mmkay.
C. It's a strange society that dislikes it when the educators of their children are well compensated in exchange for experience and education.

mountain mustache

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #728 on: October 02, 2018, 07:33:45 AM »
I work in the outdoor industry doing purchasing/buying, and make around $35k a year, no benefits. It's been a fun role in a flexible job that allows me to race and train, and have fun a lot. But, the financial instability is beginning to wear on me, so I'm hoping to get a "real" job in the next few years. I live in a tiny town, with HCOL, and it's hard to save a lot on what I make. And, this is the most I've ever made in 6 years of working in the outdoor industry! I'm hoping to get a Master's degree next year, and move towards a path of Public Health, or Physiology.

meatgrinder

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #729 on: October 02, 2018, 01:54:52 PM »
Title: Prod Management Snr Manager
Income: 300k (Base + Bonus) - Planned retire in 2020 once all current RSUs vest
Age: 38
Experience: 14 years
Qualifications: business degree

use2betrix

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #730 on: October 02, 2018, 02:29:54 PM »
A. I am, thank you very much, anonymous stranger who probably doesn't even live in the same state as me. I hope you're searching the forums for every other public employee and also taking THEM to task for choosing their profession.
B. Funny - I thought this community was all about supporting people in their quest for making money and financial independence. But making money isn't kosher when I'm a state employee? Or, god forbid, a teacher? Mmkay.
C. It's a strange society that dislikes it when the educators of their children are well compensated in exchange for experience and education.

I was thinking along the same lines. Very weird opinion for someone to have, not to mention to be clearly so bothered by it.

mountain mustache

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #731 on: October 02, 2018, 03:50:53 PM »
A. I am, thank you very much, anonymous stranger who probably doesn't even live in the same state as me. I hope you're searching the forums for every other public employee and also taking THEM to task for choosing their profession.
B. Funny - I thought this community was all about supporting people in their quest for making money and financial independence. But making money isn't kosher when I'm a state employee? Or, god forbid, a teacher? Mmkay.
C. It's a strange society that dislikes it when the educators of their children are well compensated in exchange for experience and education.

I was thinking along the same lines. Very weird opinion for someone to have, not to mention to be clearly so bothered by it.

I don't understand why someone has a problem with a teacher making 90k when there are folks on this thread making 300-400k doing software. The amount of time, energy, effort, and all the BS that teachers deal with on a daily basis...you couldn't pay me enough! I really don't like working with kids, or their parents, so anyone willing to do the job of educating them deserves a very large paycheck IMO.

mathlete

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #732 on: October 02, 2018, 04:10:55 PM »
180 work days per year, 6.5-8hr days 90k a year, paid for pension.  I hope you are working your ass off cause that is quite the golden ticket that is slowly bankrupting the state


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Pssshhhhhh. Get a load of this guy.

Roboturner

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #733 on: October 02, 2018, 04:21:43 PM »


Mrs. S

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #734 on: October 02, 2018, 04:46:40 PM »
Mid level architect here making over 20k depending on exchange rate. I am up for a raise and hoping for something around 8-10%.
That's not really very high inflation is quite a bit here in India

L2

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #735 on: October 30, 2018, 02:05:59 PM »
Job Title: Tax Manager - Regional Public Accounting
Age: 26
Experience: ~ 4 years
Salary: 78k, expecting an annual raise to ~82k in November.
Other: 3% 401k match, profit-sharing, but I just started here a few months ago so I have no idea what to expect.

I'm located in Ohio and started out my career at a much larger firm. Took a promotion and 22% raise to come to the new place. A ton more flexibility is also a plus. Its sort of unfortunate, but it seems the only way to really get market rate is to jump ship, at least in accounting.
Age: 27
Experience: ~ 5 years
Salary: $83,352

Still Being

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #736 on: October 30, 2018, 02:07:32 PM »
Job Title: Tax Manager - Regional Public Accounting
Age: 26
Experience: ~ 4 years
Salary: 78k, expecting an annual raise to ~82k in November.
Other: 3% 401k match, profit-sharing, but I just started here a few months ago so I have no idea what to expect.

I'm located in Ohio and started out my career at a much larger firm. Took a promotion and 22% raise to come to the new place. A ton more flexibility is also a plus. Its sort of unfortunate, but it seems the only way to really get market rate is to jump ship, at least in accounting.
Age: 27
Experience: ~ 5 years
Salary: $83,352

Similar trajectory!

I was 26 when I switched, got a 22% bump. Went from Big 4 to regional. Much better life and even better raises per year.

2Birds1Stone

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #737 on: October 30, 2018, 02:34:30 PM »
Title: Account Executive
Salary: $47k base salary + $50k incentive comp @ quota (Going to hit ~$112k total for FY16)
Experience: 1 year
Age:28
Education:Some college

Title: Account Executive
Salary: $130k base salary + $80k incentive comp @ quota
Experience: 4 years
Age: 31
Education: Some college + 4 years of OTJ training :)

tedman

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #738 on: October 31, 2018, 12:08:45 PM »
A. I am, thank you very much, anonymous stranger who probably doesn't even live in the same state as me. I hope you're searching the forums for every other public employee and also taking THEM to task for choosing their profession.
B. Funny - I thought this community was all about supporting people in their quest for making money and financial independence. But making money isn't kosher when I'm a state employee? Or, god forbid, a teacher? Mmkay.
C. It's a strange society that dislikes it when the educators of their children are well compensated in exchange for experience and education.

I just want to say, I'm pissed about this but from the other direction. Why don't we all have these sorts of pay rates? Yes a select few make gobs and gobs of money but generally it's easy to intimidate people into working for way less than they are worth. Somehow people have been convinced to fight each other and not the causes for this ridiculous notion that getting paid that amount, which only happens at higher levels of personal education and responsibility. So her equivalent pay is 125,000 + benefits, doing a semi demanding job (seems way demanding to me compared to my job as an accountant).

Back on track.
Title: Accountant, never worked for a public firm, don't care to.
Salary: 70k.
Experience: 2.5 years, switched tracks after losing my job in 2010 with the Great Recession and went back to school, was a senior manager at a small (75)company.
Age: 34
Education: half of a tech degree, dropped out then worked, back to school (accounting), now half to an MBA, CPA eventually when I have time.

I'm hoping to meld my extensive management experience and accounting knowledge into CFO at a smaller company.

sodonewithit

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #739 on: November 01, 2018, 09:43:29 AM »
Software Specialist II $99K

Kinda proud and ashamed at the same time.

Mgmny

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #740 on: November 01, 2018, 10:39:13 AM »
Software Specialist II $99K

Kinda proud and ashamed at the same time.

Why ashamed?

Adam Zapple

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #741 on: November 01, 2018, 04:22:13 PM »
Fire Lieutenant (firefighter).  Base pay just under $100K.  Can make an extra $0 - $60K depending on how much overtime I want to work.  Usually take home around $120k.  I pay 6.5% toward my pension, city contributes anywhere from 6-10% depending on what politician is in charge.  I live in a high cost of living area. 

Can get retiree medical if I stay past 55 years of age but probably will not hang around that long.  It's a young man's (or woman's) game.

Experience -16yrs
« Last Edit: November 01, 2018, 04:23:48 PM by Adam Zapple »

I-Ranger

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #742 on: November 01, 2018, 04:59:18 PM »
Title: Pharmacist (hospital)
Salary: $120k/yr
Experience: 1 yr
Age: 42

I live in an insanely LCOL area (rural MN), so l am able to save 75-80% of my salary while living comfortably. I got no complaints. :)
« Last Edit: November 01, 2018, 05:03:47 PM by I-Ranger »

BeMurda

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #743 on: November 02, 2018, 09:18:16 AM »
Teachers in Canada, or at least where I am at, all start at around $70k and many are in the $90-$100k range. Of course that's CAD. I think it makes sense to pay teachers a good wage. They are raising the next generation to be critical thinkers. The last thing we need is teachers too distracted by financial problems to do a good job with this important task. At the end of the day, compensation for employment is a rather arbitrary thing, in case you hadn't noticed.

I work two jobs which I generally enjoy, though not always haha.

Job 1: legal policy academic (research position, 1 year contracts or less, not teaching full courses. For this job I have a JD and MBA)
$80k + 11% matching pension
good benefits
have to pay EI even though I don't think I qualify for it which annoys me

Job 2: real estate agent
$90-$130k gross
~$20k claimed expenses, ~$8-9k of which are expenses I would incur anyway.

Spouse: Petroleum engineer, various roles
$144,500
6% matching savings plan
good benefits
DB pension
But currently this is a life-controlling job, not healthy.

We are in a good spot approaching $1m net worth at age 31, mostly due to incomes rather than moustachianism.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2018, 09:24:52 AM by BeMurda »

JetBlast

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #744 on: November 02, 2018, 10:54:28 AM »
I guess itís time for an update.

Title: First Officer at MegaAirline
Experience: 2nd year with company, 12th in industry

Probably end up around $130k with profit sharing this year. Next year around $160k. I could make about $20k more if I switched to a larger aircraft, but would be lower on seniority for those aircraft.  I wouldnít always get the days off I want and Iíd fly a bunch of redeyes. I also receive a 16% contribution to my 401k.

bbates728

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #745 on: November 02, 2018, 11:02:54 AM »
Me: Cost Analyst in a HCOL, 2 years experience, Master's degree, CPA - $63k
Wife: Middle School Teacher, 4 years experience - $57k+incentives for OT (trainings and required department head meetings)
« Last Edit: November 02, 2018, 01:17:03 PM by bbates728 »

aceyou

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #746 on: November 02, 2018, 12:28:12 PM »
Title: HS Teacher / Varsity Coach

Years Experience: 13

Education: Masters

Salary: $72,000 (67k for teaching + 5k for coaching)....minus 7% of my salary that gets deducted to fund my pension

Additional Compensation: I get paid $6100/year to not take health insurance...we take my wife's insurance. 

Extra Benefits: Pension - After 30 years, I'll get 45% of the average of my top 3 years teaching. 
   Side Note #1: A very large percentage of this is self funded from a career of having 7% of my paychecks deducted. 
   Side Note #2: I was given the option to buy 5 years, which means I wrote the state a check and in return I get a pension after 25 years instead of 30.  Since time is the most valuable thing a person can buy IMO, my wife and I both jumped at the chance. 
   Side Note #3: For my wife, who is under a slightly different plan (but also in education), she actually has 10% deducted from her paychecks. 

Location: Probably would be considered a low to medium cost of living area.  Eh, probably LCOL, it's easy to live on a little.

Common Question I get: Do you think teachers are overpaid/underpaid? 

My Answer:  It depends.  There are about 3 million teachers in the United States.  Many are underpaid, many are fairly compensated, maybe a minuscule percentage are overpaid.  Me personally?  I put myself in the fairly paid camp.  I'm in a good paying district where I'm treated with respect by administration as well as the community.  Through my position as a teacher and coach, I'm viewed in my town as a community leader.  I'm work VERY hard, but I do meaningful work and get fair compensation to do so.  I'll be likely retired at age 48 with my finances in order.  That's a lot to be thankful and grateful for. 

Proud Foot

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #747 on: November 02, 2018, 01:54:51 PM »
Title: Corporate Controller

Age: 29

Salary: $82,000

Experience: 6 years

Education: B.S. in Finance, CPA

I guess I will update this since its been three years.

Same title and education. 9 years experience. Salary: $91,500

moonpalace

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #748 on: November 02, 2018, 02:22:38 PM »
Gov't attorney, supervising 8 other attorneys.
Years of experience: 12
Salary: $99k, good benefits, no pension but good match and access to 457 plan

haflander

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #749 on: November 02, 2018, 02:38:01 PM »
Medical Editor
4 years experience
70,000
Double BA, English and History

Work for an agency. Clients are big pharma companies launching new drug campaigns, targeted customers are practicing doctors.

Degrees in liberal arts can be lucrative if combined with experience in a different/hot/tech field. Personally, I worked all throughout college for an academic firm, helping grad students and professors write theses, dissertations, and journal article submissions. That was mostly in psych and medical fields, and started me on the path to my current gig.

Oh, and I started at 35,000 in 1/2015. Job hopping about once a year enabled me to double my salary in only 3 years. If I stayed at the first place, I'd be making 45-50 right now. The best part is that I don't even look for jobs...recruiters just call me and offer me more $. Each job I've taken has resulted in more $ and less work somehow. I know this (and espy the salary growth) isn't sustainable, but I definitely acknowledge my good fortune and privilege.