Author Topic: What's your job title and how much do you earn?  (Read 121097 times)

Eyestache

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #550 on: December 10, 2016, 12:34:29 PM »
Optometrist 110k
26yo just graduated, working 35-40hrs per week working most Saturdays and every other sunday. Salarys vary widely due mostly to location. I'm in a city where docs want to live so decreased demand could make a lot more working in the boonies.

Four years doctorate program after college many people have ~200k debt graduating. I am "lucky"? to only have 100k on student debt.

abby1234519

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #551 on: December 12, 2016, 04:19:00 AM »
Compliance and Quality Auditor (not qualified) 22k (£)

My earnings are very low however fine for the rent I pay. Just unable to save.
28yo graduated with an Eng Lit degree - would need a finance degree and extra qualifications to increase salary. I can get the qualifications I need through work if I can prove a business case but for every course I take, I have to stay for 2 years or pay course cost back. Fine by me I love my job.

28k student loans paid back at about £30 a month from salary. I have plans to increase my salary but it's going to cost me! Need to do a masters and take various internal auditing qualifications

fire_by_50

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #552 on: December 13, 2016, 10:05:46 AM »
I will be graduating next semester, but as far as the job I have lined up:

Age: 22
Title: Network Engineer
Experience: New Graduate
Degree: Information Systems
Base Salary: $62,000
Bonus: up to 5% annually
Benefits: standard (401k match 4%, health, dental, ESPP)

I've been able to stay out of debt throughout the past four years by living at home (low COL area) and applying for scholarships. I always had a mustachian mindset even before I knew about this website which also helped me achieve the goal of nearing graduation debt-free.

TakeStock

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #553 on: June 20, 2017, 02:05:50 AM »
Title: Managing Director (Tech Company)
Total: $600k (Singapore Dollars)
Experience: 11 years for the company, made MD 2 years ago.
Age: 35

Vegasgirl

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #554 on: June 20, 2017, 05:06:47 AM »
Me: Management & Budget Specialist III - $105,000/yr (local gov't)

Husband: Senior Systems Architect - $175,000/yr (aviation engineering)


anonymouscow

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #555 on: June 20, 2017, 06:18:18 AM »
I am a little shocked at how much some jobs make.  I had no idea salaries were so high in so many fields.

People are probably more likely to post when they make a lot of money vs not as much.

Median household income is 52k/yr in the US?

It seems most people reporting here beat that by a large margin for just one income.

I do not make much money.


doublethinkmoney

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #556 on: June 20, 2017, 06:35:44 AM »
Title: Fiber Network Tech (aka phone/internet/cable installer )

Age:32

Experience: 11 years

Education: 4 year degree but no college necessary

Compensation: $58k base but with OT usually $70-80k also get great benefits with 401k match and a pension.

I got this job while going to college and since the benefits were so good and pay, I decided to stay. Now looking for a desk job where I can utilize my network experience.


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doublethinkmoney

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #557 on: June 20, 2017, 06:40:50 AM »
Job Title: UPS Driver
Salary: $96,000.00 + ( benefits, pension)
Years’ experience: 4 years
  This one definitely surprised me as well.
It's a good union job. The pay and benefits are going to be significantly better than the same job at FedEx (non union). This is the benefit of a check and balance system between the company and employees, everyone gets a cut and you get long term employees.


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Roboturner

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #558 on: June 20, 2017, 11:05:41 AM »
One downside a lot of the big tech companies tend to use and abuse their engineers.

My brother works as a software eng. He said it's just kind of common practice to job hop every year or two, part of the reason SE's can get paid so much. So 'use and abuse' seems like the culture?
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tyrannostache

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #559 on: June 20, 2017, 12:36:58 PM »
Job: Grant Writer for large nonprofit
Salary: $45-48K in low-moderate COL area
Years experience: 3-4

Great benefits including loads of vacation (4 weeks total), 401k match, flexible schedule and work from home when I need it.

I could definitely be making more in a different field, but I love my work, my colleagues, and the flexibility the job offers while I have small kids.
« Last Edit: June 20, 2017, 12:38:48 PM by tyrannostache »

dcamnc

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #560 on: June 20, 2017, 12:51:41 PM »
Police Sergeant in a medium sized city.
65k, very generous overall benefits, and defined benefit pension starting at 50
11 yeas experience
No degree, but two thick three-ring binders full of law enforcement class certs. (I'm always taking a class)
65k isn't a ton, but everything is paid off, including new car and condo. My total bills are only about 1k a month.

Raenia

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #561 on: June 20, 2017, 12:57:04 PM »
Job Title: Analyst (actual job is Analytical Chemist, Pharmaceutical R&D)
Salary: ~56k/yr
Experience: 5 yrs
Education: BA

starguru

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #562 on: June 20, 2017, 02:49:08 PM »
Police Sergeant in a medium sized city.
65k, very generous overall benefits, and defined benefit pension starting at 50
11 yeas experience
No degree, but two thick three-ring binders full of law enforcement class certs. (I'm always taking a class)
65k isn't a ton, but everything is paid off, including new car and condo. My total bills are only about 1k a month.
What type of pension comes with that job?


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CanuckExpat

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #563 on: June 20, 2017, 03:02:43 PM »
Job: Grant Writer for large nonprofit
Salary: $45-48K in low-moderate COL area
Years experience: 3-4

Great benefits including loads of vacation (4 weeks total), 401k match, flexible schedule and work from home when I need it.

I could definitely be making more in a different field, but I love my work, my colleagues, and the flexibility the job offers while I have small kids.

I'm curious to learn more about this. Is this a job at many non profits, do you need domain expertise, and can it be done on a part-time/contract basis?

I've worked on the other side, research at non-profits, funded by grants that someone else has written. It was a good environment as you mentioned.
Retired, or just homeless and jobless.
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Cwadda

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #564 on: June 20, 2017, 03:13:33 PM »
Job: Sales/Government Contracting @ a startup scientific instrument company
Salary: $33k/yr
Benefits: Small SEP IRA match, 7 days of paid vacation
Age: Almost 23
Experience: B.S. in Geology & Environmental Science. 2-3 years of experience.

I feel like I could earn more with my skills but I like working for a small company (2 employees) and personally being able to take it in several directions

MinnieAG

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #565 on: June 20, 2017, 04:54:39 PM »
Title: Regional Sales Representative
Salary: $62,500 + car (and gas, insurance, etc.) + commission (varies... I'll earn ~$2500 this fiscal)
Experience: 1 year
Age: 22
Education: Bachelor's in marketing

Ocinfo

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #566 on: June 20, 2017, 05:27:39 PM »
I am a little shocked at how much some jobs make.  I had no idea salaries were so high in so many fields.

People are probably more likely to post when they make a lot of money vs not as much.

Median household income is 52k/yr in the US?

It seems most people reporting here beat that by a large margin for just one income.

I do not make much money.

I was honestly surprised by how low some of the salaries were. This is not meant to be mean but is likely because I've adapted to HCOLA salary norms. I also firmly believe there is a lot of money out there for anyone that wants to go after it.

Title: Lead Systems Engineer (Aerospace, not IT)
Education: Masters
Age: 31
Experience: 10 years
Salary: $145k with total comp around $175k

Job has allowed me to travel around the world and, most weeks, is only 40 hours. Basically hit the jackpot with my employer somehow getting high pay, extremely flexible schedule, and interesting work. Have had offers that would have been over $200k but turned down due to needing way more hours per week.

Started life in the bottom quintile of income and are now solidly top few % in individual and household income. My hometown has a median household income in the low $30k range.



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VolcanicArts

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #567 on: June 20, 2017, 11:25:48 PM »
Just to add my two cents, I think on a relative scale that high earning jobs are not as great of a ROI as people perceive them to be. A good example would be to compare a UPS driver who had very little education with a surgeon. Assuming the UPS driver made 22 dollars an hour starting off and saved MMM style with the average 7% return on investment he could make similar amounts compared to the surgeon in a 40 year time period as he would be starting off with little to no debt, and an extra 13 years to compound that the surgeon had to spend studying. It should also be noted the surgeon would graduate with about 250k in the hole, even assuming he paid this off in a year, the UPS driver would still have a significant final amount. I plugged this into the compound interest calculator using a starting net worth of 0 for both. The UPS driver saves 24000 per year x 40 years and ends up with 5.8 million dollars. The surgeon we would say makes 350k per year, for simplicity let's just say after taxes he brings home 250k net. He also saves 50% and earns 7%, however he has to start 14 years later so he would compound 125k at 7% x 26 years which becomes 9.2 million at the same age as the UPS driver. So the surgeon ends up with a few million more, but this is comparing basically a super high paying field to a super low paying field, so the spread would be even less with a medium paying field that required a lot of time and debt to obtain. This also doesn't factor in risk, raises the UPS driver might receive, and the lower ROI based on the amount of time spent to make a few million more, for example, the UPS driver could casually work 40 hrs per week and enjoy life in his youth, while the surgeon might have had to average greater than 60 hrs a week including school time and other activities for those 40 years to end up with only a few million more. Any thoughts on this? I've brought this concept up with friends before and many have proposed that very few if any people are smart enough and motivated enough to be like the UPS driver and save 50% of income from the start and never stop, as well as have the investment savvy to generate passive income, but I'm sure someone has done this.

JLee

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #568 on: June 20, 2017, 11:44:01 PM »
Just to add my two cents, I think on a relative scale that high earning jobs are not as great of a ROI as people perceive them to be. A good example would be to compare a UPS driver who had very little education with a surgeon. Assuming the UPS driver made 22 dollars an hour starting off and saved MMM style with the average 7% return on investment he could make similar amounts compared to the surgeon in a 40 year time period as he would be starting off with little to no debt, and an extra 13 years to compound that the surgeon had to spend studying. It should also be noted the surgeon would graduate with about 250k in the hole, even assuming he paid this off in a year, the UPS driver would still have a significant final amount. I plugged this into the compound interest calculator using a starting net worth of 0 for both. The UPS driver saves 24000 per year x 40 years and ends up with 5.8 million dollars. The surgeon we would say makes 350k per year, for simplicity let's just say after taxes he brings home 250k net. He also saves 50% and earns 7%, however he has to start 14 years later so he would compound 125k at 7% x 26 years which becomes 9.2 million at the same age as the UPS driver. So the surgeon ends up with a few million more, but this is comparing basically a super high paying field to a super low paying field, so the spread would be even less with a medium paying field that required a lot of time and debt to obtain. This also doesn't factor in risk, raises the UPS driver might receive, and the lower ROI based on the amount of time spent to make a few million more, for example, the UPS driver could casually work 40 hrs per week and enjoy life in his youth, while the surgeon might have had to average greater than 60 hrs a week including school time and other activities for those 40 years to end up with only a few million more. Any thoughts on this? I've brought this concept up with friends before and many have proposed that very few if any people are smart enough and motivated enough to be like the UPS driver and save 50% of income from the start and never stop, as well as have the investment savvy to generate passive income, but I'm sure someone has done this.

How are you coming up with this 13 year figure, and why would we assume the surgeon can pay off $250k in medical school in one year but then can only save $125k/year afterwards?

gerardc

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #569 on: June 21, 2017, 12:34:34 AM »
Just to add my two cents, I think on a relative scale that high earning jobs are not as great of a ROI as people perceive them to be. A good example would be to compare a UPS driver who had very little education with a surgeon. Assuming the UPS driver made 22 dollars an hour starting off and saved MMM style with the average 7% return on investment he could make similar amounts compared to the surgeon in a 40 year time period as he would be starting off with little to no debt, and an extra 13 years to compound that the surgeon had to spend studying. It should also be noted the surgeon would graduate with about 250k in the hole, even assuming he paid this off in a year, the UPS driver would still have a significant final amount. I plugged this into the compound interest calculator using a starting net worth of 0 for both. The UPS driver saves 24000 per year x 40 years and ends up with 5.8 million dollars. The surgeon we would say makes 350k per year, for simplicity let's just say after taxes he brings home 250k net. He also saves 50% and earns 7%, however he has to start 14 years later so he would compound 125k at 7% x 26 years which becomes 9.2 million at the same age as the UPS driver. So the surgeon ends up with a few million more, but this is comparing basically a super high paying field to a super low paying field, so the spread would be even less with a medium paying field that required a lot of time and debt to obtain. This also doesn't factor in risk, raises the UPS driver might receive, and the lower ROI based on the amount of time spent to make a few million more, for example, the UPS driver could casually work 40 hrs per week and enjoy life in his youth, while the surgeon might have had to average greater than 60 hrs a week including school time and other activities for those 40 years to end up with only a few million more. Any thoughts on this? I've brought this concept up with friends before and many have proposed that very few if any people are smart enough and motivated enough to be like the UPS driver and save 50% of income from the start and never stop, as well as have the investment savvy to generate passive income, but I'm sure someone has done this.

The surgeon also spends $125k per year vs the driver at ~$45k (after taxes and savings). The devil is in the details.

In general I'd say you're right: it's a job market, so if something is more valuable per unit effort it will get snatched up quickly.

dcamnc

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #570 on: June 21, 2017, 04:46:20 AM »
Police Sergeant in a medium sized city.
65k, very generous overall benefits, and defined benefit pension starting at 50
11 yeas experience
No degree, but two thick three-ring binders full of law enforcement class certs. (I'm always taking a class)
65k isn't a ton, but everything is paid off, including new car and condo. My total bills are only about 1k a month.
What type of pension comes with that job?


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I'm not the poster but most fed, state, county and city Public Safety/LEO jobs still have traditional defined benefit pensions and many allow you to get your full pension benefit starting at age 50 once you have enough years vested. I have a state LEO/Public Safety DB Pension that you can.get at age 50 with 5 years vested.

ETA: in a lot of these jobs (or some other government jobs) you only pay into your pension and not SS so wont earn.any SS benefits. Also any SS you might get from another job you paid into SS, your benefit will be reduced because of the pension.

We get a pension based on time in the system (vesting) and/or overall age. The pension payout is based on your 4 highest income years + time served. The initial pension money is taken from our salary, 6%. I came in a little later, so I will go out on age instead of time served. I'll be eligible at 50 with a slight reduction, or 55 with full benefits + a generous separation allowance. We do pay into SS, so I'll get that (hopefully). We also get an extra 5% free, put into our pretax 401k, just for being LEO.

Mgmny

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #571 on: June 21, 2017, 05:22:26 AM »
Just to add my two cents, I think on a relative scale that high earning jobs are not as great of a ROI as people perceive them to be. A good example would be to compare a UPS driver who had very little education with a surgeon. Assuming the UPS driver made 22 dollars an hour starting off and saved MMM style with the average 7% return on investment he could make similar amounts compared to the surgeon in a 40 year time period as he would be starting off with little to no debt, and an extra 13 years to compound that the surgeon had to spend studying. It should also be noted the surgeon would graduate with about 250k in the hole, even assuming he paid this off in a year, the UPS driver would still have a significant final amount. I plugged this into the compound interest calculator using a starting net worth of 0 for both. The UPS driver saves 24000 per year x 40 years and ends up with 5.8 million dollars. The surgeon we would say makes 350k per year, for simplicity let's just say after taxes he brings home 250k net. He also saves 50% and earns 7%, however he has to start 14 years later so he would compound 125k at 7% x 26 years which becomes 9.2 million at the same age as the UPS driver. So the surgeon ends up with a few million more, but this is comparing basically a super high paying field to a super low paying field, so the spread would be even less with a medium paying field that required a lot of time and debt to obtain. This also doesn't factor in risk, raises the UPS driver might receive, and the lower ROI based on the amount of time spent to make a few million more, for example, the UPS driver could casually work 40 hrs per week and enjoy life in his youth, while the surgeon might have had to average greater than 60 hrs a week including school time and other activities for those 40 years to end up with only a few million more. Any thoughts on this? I've brought this concept up with friends before and many have proposed that very few if any people are smart enough and motivated enough to be like the UPS driver and save 50% of income from the start and never stop, as well as have the investment savvy to generate passive income, but I'm sure someone has done this.

How are you coming up with this 13 year figure, and why would we assume the surgeon can pay off $250k in medical school in one year but then can only save $125k/year afterwards?

4 years Bachelor
4 years med school
1 year transition
3-5 residency
1++++ fellowship

That's 13-15 years before making the "real money"

anonymouscow

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #572 on: June 21, 2017, 07:20:14 AM »
I am a little shocked at how much some jobs make.  I had no idea salaries were so high in so many fields.

People are probably more likely to post when they make a lot of money vs not as much.

Median household income is 52k/yr in the US?

It seems most people reporting here beat that by a large margin for just one income.

I do not make much money.

I was honestly surprised by how low some of the salaries were. This is not meant to be mean but is likely because I've adapted to HCOLA salary norms. I also firmly believe there is a lot of money out there for anyone that wants to go after it.

Title: Lead Systems Engineer (Aerospace, not IT)
Education: Masters
Age: 31
Experience: 10 years
Salary: $145k with total comp around $175k

Job has allowed me to travel around the world and, most weeks, is only 40 hours. Basically hit the jackpot with my employer somehow getting high pay, extremely flexible schedule, and interesting work. Have had offers that would have been over $200k but turned down due to needing way more hours per week.

Started life in the bottom quintile of income and are now solidly top few % in individual and household income. My hometown has a median household income in the low $30k range.



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I do not think it is mean, but I think it is unreasonable.

I am a firm believer that everyone creates their own destiny, however I also believe everyone's situation is different.

The fact is the majority of people are not making 145k a year, they are also not able to save 50% of their income.

Wallerstein

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #573 on: June 21, 2017, 07:23:25 AM »
Job Title: Engineering Technician
Salary: 55k/yr
Experience: 1 year (interned with current employer while completing AS degree)
Education: AS in Engineering

Government contract so I'm told salaries are inflated about 20% compared to non-contract employers in the same area. This is a LCOL area so this kind of money is pretty good for a family of four.

Also, completed a BS in Engineering with the help of employee tuition reimbursement so should get a salary bump and job title change soon.

Mgmny

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #574 on: June 21, 2017, 07:33:11 AM »
Job Title: Program Manager (contractor)
Salary: $55/hour (usually 40 hours per week)
Experience: 3 years (2 years implementation consultant, 1 year project/program management)
Education: BA in Chemistry and 1 year medical school

meatface

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #575 on: June 21, 2017, 08:12:42 AM »
Job title: Manager of random shit at a small medical device company (I'm actually not quite sure what my official title is)
Salary: $110,000/yr

afuera

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #576 on: June 21, 2017, 09:21:59 AM »
Job Title: Production Engineer
Salary: $107K/yr + Yearly Profit Sharting + 6% 401K match + Pension + Free HDHP w/ HSA contributions.  Total comp probably around ~135K.
Experience: 3 years at current company (1st job out of college), 2 relevant part-time jobs and 1 relevant internship while in college.
Education: BS in Chemical Engineering.

I worked my ass of in college to become one of the top in my class and get relevant work experience.  I treated interviewing/applying for jobs as seriously as any of my actual courses, spending countless hours researching companies and creating unique cover letters/resumes for each of my top choices.  I was able to capitalize on a few key opportunities I was given because I was prepared and am very fortunate to be where I'm at today.  Most of my tuition was covered through a sports scholarship and engineering scholarships which combined with an extremely affordable college gives a kickass ROI on my degree (graduated w/ ~12K of student loans). Couldn't have done any of it without the support and encouragement of my awesome parents. 
"The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it" - Henry David Thoreau

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mm1970

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #577 on: June 21, 2017, 11:45:56 AM »
Job Title: Production Engineer
Salary: $107K/yr + Yearly Profit Sharting + 6% 401K match + Pension + Free HDHP w/ HSA contributions.  Total comp probably around ~135K.
Experience: 3 years at current company (1st job out of college), 2 relevant part-time jobs and 1 relevant internship while in college.
Education: BS in Chemical Engineering.

I worked my ass of in college to become one of the top in my class and get relevant work experience.  I treated interviewing/applying for jobs as seriously as any of my actual courses, spending countless hours researching companies and creating unique cover letters/resumes for each of my top choices.  I was able to capitalize on a few key opportunities I was given because I was prepared and am very fortunate to be where I'm at today.  Most of my tuition was covered through a sports scholarship and engineering scholarships which combined with an extremely affordable college gives a kickass ROI on my degree (graduated w/ ~12K of student loans). Couldn't have done any of it without the support and encouragement of my awesome parents.
sigh

I really need to stop reading this thred

JLee

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #578 on: June 21, 2017, 11:57:13 AM »
Just to add my two cents, I think on a relative scale that high earning jobs are not as great of a ROI as people perceive them to be. A good example would be to compare a UPS driver who had very little education with a surgeon. Assuming the UPS driver made 22 dollars an hour starting off and saved MMM style with the average 7% return on investment he could make similar amounts compared to the surgeon in a 40 year time period as he would be starting off with little to no debt, and an extra 13 years to compound that the surgeon had to spend studying. It should also be noted the surgeon would graduate with about 250k in the hole, even assuming he paid this off in a year, the UPS driver would still have a significant final amount. I plugged this into the compound interest calculator using a starting net worth of 0 for both. The UPS driver saves 24000 per year x 40 years and ends up with 5.8 million dollars. The surgeon we would say makes 350k per year, for simplicity let's just say after taxes he brings home 250k net. He also saves 50% and earns 7%, however he has to start 14 years later so he would compound 125k at 7% x 26 years which becomes 9.2 million at the same age as the UPS driver. So the surgeon ends up with a few million more, but this is comparing basically a super high paying field to a super low paying field, so the spread would be even less with a medium paying field that required a lot of time and debt to obtain. This also doesn't factor in risk, raises the UPS driver might receive, and the lower ROI based on the amount of time spent to make a few million more, for example, the UPS driver could casually work 40 hrs per week and enjoy life in his youth, while the surgeon might have had to average greater than 60 hrs a week including school time and other activities for those 40 years to end up with only a few million more. Any thoughts on this? I've brought this concept up with friends before and many have proposed that very few if any people are smart enough and motivated enough to be like the UPS driver and save 50% of income from the start and never stop, as well as have the investment savvy to generate passive income, but I'm sure someone has done this.

How are you coming up with this 13 year figure, and why would we assume the surgeon can pay off $250k in medical school in one year but then can only save $125k/year afterwards?

4 years Bachelor
4 years med school
1 year transition
3-5 residency
1++++ fellowship

That's 13-15 years before making the "real money"

Fair enough, though residency isn't unpaid and a transition year (to my knowledge) is not necessary.  That would cause an 8 year delay before a salary (higher than the UPS driver in the above example), with another 5-7 years before making 7x what the UPS driver does.

It's still a long road, but I don't think the break even point would be as far out as initially claimed, at least not if both people have similar MMM behaviors. Expecting the UPS driver to save $24k/year, or 52% of their gross income (using 7% as an estimated effective tax rate, this provides a spend of $1546/month), while expecting the doctor to save 50% of their net income (this means there's a spend rate of $10,416/month) provides a skewed picture.

For example, if the doctor dropped their spending to a mere three times that of the UPS driver and invested the difference, this would add $5,778/mo to investment contributions. This alone adds $5 million in 26 years.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2017, 12:08:42 PM by JLee »

VolcanicArts

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #579 on: June 21, 2017, 12:22:27 PM »
Just to add my two cents, I think on a relative scale that high earning jobs are not as great of a ROI as people perceive them to be. A good example would be to compare a UPS driver who had very little education with a surgeon. Assuming the UPS driver made 22 dollars an hour starting off and saved MMM style with the average 7% return on investment he could make similar amounts compared to the surgeon in a 40 year time period as he would be starting off with little to no debt, and an extra 13 years to compound that the surgeon had to spend studying. It should also be noted the surgeon would graduate with about 250k in the hole, even assuming he paid this off in a year, the UPS driver would still have a significant final amount. I plugged this into the compound interest calculator using a starting net worth of 0 for both. The UPS driver saves 24000 per year x 40 years and ends up with 5.8 million dollars. The surgeon we would say makes 350k per year, for simplicity let's just say after taxes he brings home 250k net. He also saves 50% and earns 7%, however he has to start 14 years later so he would compound 125k at 7% x 26 years which becomes 9.2 million at the same age as the UPS driver. So the surgeon ends up with a few million more, but this is comparing basically a super high paying field to a super low paying field, so the spread would be even less with a medium paying field that required a lot of time and debt to obtain. This also doesn't factor in risk, raises the UPS driver might receive, and the lower ROI based on the amount of time spent to make a few million more, for example, the UPS driver could casually work 40 hrs per week and enjoy life in his youth, while the surgeon might have had to average greater than 60 hrs a week including school time and other activities for those 40 years to end up with only a few million more. Any thoughts on this? I've brought this concept up with friends before and many have proposed that very few if any people are smart enough and motivated enough to be like the UPS driver and save 50% of income from the start and never stop, as well as have the investment savvy to generate passive income, but I'm sure someone has done this.

How are you coming up with this 13 year figure, and why would we assume the surgeon can pay off $250k in medical school in one year but then can only save $125k/year afterwards?

4 years Bachelor
4 years med school
1 year transition
3-5 residency
1++++ fellowship

That's 13-15 years before making the "real money"

Fair enough, though residency isn't unpaid and a transition year (to my knowledge) is not necessary.  That would cause an 8 year delay before a salary (higher than the UPS driver in the above example), with another 5-7 years before making 7x what the UPS driver does.

It's still a long road, but I don't think the break even point would be as far out as initially claimed, at least not if both people have similar MMM behaviors. Expecting the UPS driver to save $24k/year, or 52% of their gross income (using 7% as an estimated effective tax rate, this provides a spend of $1546/month), while expecting the doctor to save 50% of their net income (this means there's a spend rate of $10,416/month) provides a skewed picture.

For example, if the doctor dropped their spending to a mere three times that of the UPS driver and invested the difference, this would add $5,778/mo to investment contributions. This alone adds $5 million in 26 years.

It would still not be significantly different in 40 years. You could assume the surgeon made some money (about 50 to 60k) in residency, and that's how I calculated them being able to pay off the 250k loan in a year of work, assuming they saved some to pay off the loan and the rest to live off of, go to interviews, pay for exams etc. Also another poster pointed out that UPS drivers actually make much more than the example I gave and receive a pension, so it is likely the spread would be much smaller over a 40 year period. I believe they stated they made96k with a pension and 4 years of work experience, using that pay scale in my original example it seems the UPS driver would actually beat the surgeon. I was wondering what barriers of entry there were to become a driver, what is a starting hourly rate, how much pension do they receive, does it require any debt, schooling or time commitment etc. if we had all of this information we could more accurately recalculate a 40 year scenario and I think the driver would come out ahead. It's not the job title or prestige, it's how smart you work and how much you save.

VolcanicArts

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #580 on: June 21, 2017, 12:25:26 PM »
Job Title: UPS Driver
Salary: $96,000.00 + ( benefits, pension)
Years’ experience: 4 years
  This one definitely surprised me as well.
It's a good union job. The pay and benefits are going to be significantly better than the same job at FedEx (non union). This is the benefit of a check and balance system between the company and employees, everyone gets a cut and you get long term employees.


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Here is the original post

JLee

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #581 on: June 21, 2017, 12:28:12 PM »
Just to add my two cents, I think on a relative scale that high earning jobs are not as great of a ROI as people perceive them to be. A good example would be to compare a UPS driver who had very little education with a surgeon. Assuming the UPS driver made 22 dollars an hour starting off and saved MMM style with the average 7% return on investment he could make similar amounts compared to the surgeon in a 40 year time period as he would be starting off with little to no debt, and an extra 13 years to compound that the surgeon had to spend studying. It should also be noted the surgeon would graduate with about 250k in the hole, even assuming he paid this off in a year, the UPS driver would still have a significant final amount. I plugged this into the compound interest calculator using a starting net worth of 0 for both. The UPS driver saves 24000 per year x 40 years and ends up with 5.8 million dollars. The surgeon we would say makes 350k per year, for simplicity let's just say after taxes he brings home 250k net. He also saves 50% and earns 7%, however he has to start 14 years later so he would compound 125k at 7% x 26 years which becomes 9.2 million at the same age as the UPS driver. So the surgeon ends up with a few million more, but this is comparing basically a super high paying field to a super low paying field, so the spread would be even less with a medium paying field that required a lot of time and debt to obtain. This also doesn't factor in risk, raises the UPS driver might receive, and the lower ROI based on the amount of time spent to make a few million more, for example, the UPS driver could casually work 40 hrs per week and enjoy life in his youth, while the surgeon might have had to average greater than 60 hrs a week including school time and other activities for those 40 years to end up with only a few million more. Any thoughts on this? I've brought this concept up with friends before and many have proposed that very few if any people are smart enough and motivated enough to be like the UPS driver and save 50% of income from the start and never stop, as well as have the investment savvy to generate passive income, but I'm sure someone has done this.

How are you coming up with this 13 year figure, and why would we assume the surgeon can pay off $250k in medical school in one year but then can only save $125k/year afterwards?

4 years Bachelor
4 years med school
1 year transition
3-5 residency
1++++ fellowship

That's 13-15 years before making the "real money"

Fair enough, though residency isn't unpaid and a transition year (to my knowledge) is not necessary.  That would cause an 8 year delay before a salary (higher than the UPS driver in the above example), with another 5-7 years before making 7x what the UPS driver does.

It's still a long road, but I don't think the break even point would be as far out as initially claimed, at least not if both people have similar MMM behaviors. Expecting the UPS driver to save $24k/year, or 52% of their gross income (using 7% as an estimated effective tax rate, this provides a spend of $1546/month), while expecting the doctor to save 50% of their net income (this means there's a spend rate of $10,416/month) provides a skewed picture.

For example, if the doctor dropped their spending to a mere three times that of the UPS driver and invested the difference, this would add $5,778/mo to investment contributions. This alone adds $5 million in 26 years.

It would still not be significantly different in 40 years. You could assume the surgeon made some money (about 50 to 60k) in residency, and that's how I calculated them being able to pay off the 250k loan in a year of work, assuming they saved some to pay off the loan and the rest to live off of, go to interviews, pay for exams etc. Also another poster pointed out that UPS drivers actually make much more than the example I gave and receive a pension, so it is likely the spread would be much smaller over a 40 year period. I believe they stated they made96k with a pension and 4 years of work experience, using that pay scale in my original example it seems the UPS driver would actually beat the surgeon. I was wondering what barriers of entry there were to become a driver, what is a starting hourly rate, how much pension do they receive, does it require any debt, schooling or time commitment etc. if we had all of this information we could more accurately recalculate a 40 year scenario and I think the driver would come out ahead. It's not the job title or prestige, it's how smart you work and how much you save.

If the surgeon spends over $10,000 a month, sure. Knock that spend down to the $1500/mo you claimed the $22/hr guy would be living on and see how the numbers come out. :P

afuera

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #582 on: June 21, 2017, 02:16:22 PM »
Job Title: Production Engineer
Salary: $107K/yr + Yearly Profit Sharting + 6% 401K match + Pension + Free HDHP w/ HSA contributions.  Total comp probably around ~135K.
Experience: 3 years at current company (1st job out of college), 2 relevant part-time jobs and 1 relevant internship while in college.
Education: BS in Chemical Engineering.

I worked my ass of in college to become one of the top in my class and get relevant work experience.  I treated interviewing/applying for jobs as seriously as any of my actual courses, spending countless hours researching companies and creating unique cover letters/resumes for each of my top choices.  I was able to capitalize on a few key opportunities I was given because I was prepared and am very fortunate to be where I'm at today.  Most of my tuition was covered through a sports scholarship and engineering scholarships which combined with an extremely affordable college gives a kickass ROI on my degree (graduated w/ ~12K of student loans). Couldn't have done any of it without the support and encouragement of my awesome parents.
sigh

I really need to stop reading this thred

I'm not sure I understand what you mean?
"The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it" - Henry David Thoreau

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arebelspy

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #583 on: June 21, 2017, 03:24:12 PM »
Job Title: Production Engineer
Salary: $107K/yr + Yearly Profit Sharting + 6% 401K match + Pension + Free HDHP w/ HSA contributions.  Total comp probably around ~135K.
Experience: 3 years at current company (1st job out of college), 2 relevant part-time jobs and 1 relevant internship while in college.
Education: BS in Chemical Engineering.

I worked my ass of in college to become one of the top in my class and get relevant work experience.  I treated interviewing/applying for jobs as seriously as any of my actual courses, spending countless hours researching companies and creating unique cover letters/resumes for each of my top choices.  I was able to capitalize on a few key opportunities I was given because I was prepared and am very fortunate to be where I'm at today.  Most of my tuition was covered through a sports scholarship and engineering scholarships which combined with an extremely affordable college gives a kickass ROI on my degree (graduated w/ ~12K of student loans). Couldn't have done any of it without the support and encouragement of my awesome parents.
sigh

I really need to stop reading this thred

I'm not sure I understand what you mean?

I could interpret this a number of ways, but the thing that got to me about your post was the amount of justification you gave for starting on third base.

/shrug

It's not worth worrying about.  :)
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with a kid.
If you want to know more about me, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (occasionally) blog at AdventuringAlong.com.
You can also read my forum "Journal."

afuera

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #584 on: June 21, 2017, 03:39:27 PM »
Job Title: Production Engineer
Salary: $107K/yr + Yearly Profit Sharting + 6% 401K match + Pension + Free HDHP w/ HSA contributions.  Total comp probably around ~135K.
Experience: 3 years at current company (1st job out of college), 2 relevant part-time jobs and 1 relevant internship while in college.
Education: BS in Chemical Engineering.

I worked my ass of in college to become one of the top in my class and get relevant work experience.  I treated interviewing/applying for jobs as seriously as any of my actual courses, spending countless hours researching companies and creating unique cover letters/resumes for each of my top choices.  I was able to capitalize on a few key opportunities I was given because I was prepared and am very fortunate to be where I'm at today.  Most of my tuition was covered through a sports scholarship and engineering scholarships which combined with an extremely affordable college gives a kickass ROI on my degree (graduated w/ ~12K of student loans). Couldn't have done any of it without the support and encouragement of my awesome parents.
sigh

I really need to stop reading this thred

I'm not sure I understand what you mean?

I could interpret this a number of ways, but the thing that got to me about your post was the amount of justification you gave for starting on third base.

/shrug

It's not worth worrying about.  :)

I get that.  I feel like a lot of times when I share my situation on this forum the default response from others is that I must be very lucky or had some crazy advantage that other middle class folks didn't.  I thought this time I would give a little background on the hard work and effort it took to get where I am.  I definitely realize that I was born with a lot of advantages that others weren't but that doesn't mean I didn't work a lot harder than others in similar circumstances in order to accomplish the things that I have.
"The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it" - Henry David Thoreau

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Projected FIRE date: 2025
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jscott2135

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #585 on: June 22, 2017, 09:59:49 AM »
I'm a SHAM now but as  PM in the Pharma world I made 65k + 5-6k bonus annually (that was with no degree back in 2011, I'm sure it'd be 80k+ now)

Hubby is a QA Director, also in the Pharma world and he makes 160k + 40k bonus (Bachelors in Science field, 15yrs+ industry experience)
« Last Edit: June 22, 2017, 10:02:24 AM by jscott2135 »
We need more people speaking out. This country is not overrun with rebels and free thinkers. It's overrun with sheep and conformists.

Unique User

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #586 on: June 22, 2017, 01:00:14 PM »
We're both at late in life new careers as we spent 14 years having fun without making much money in a resort area. 

Me - Staffing Manager for large life sciences company
$99k plus bonus (average $8-$12k), 5% 401k match, 4 weeks vacation, good benefits, work from home so very flexible but often stressful
BA Liberal Arts
8 years experience, but I'm 47

DH - Territory Manager for large CPG company
$75k plus bonus (average $8-$10k), 9% 401k match, company car, with unlimited use, 3 weeks vacation, good benefits, work from home/on the road, but very low stress
No degree
8 years experience, but he's 52

Jessamine

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #587 on: June 22, 2017, 01:26:04 PM »
Job Title: Program Clinical Data Manager at large pharma
Salary: $102k + bonus (~12%)
Experience: 9 years (over 4 companies w/ increasing responsibilities)
Education: BS in Biology

mm1970

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #588 on: June 22, 2017, 01:37:18 PM »
Job Title: Production Engineer
Salary: $107K/yr + Yearly Profit Sharting + 6% 401K match + Pension + Free HDHP w/ HSA contributions.  Total comp probably around ~135K.
Experience: 3 years at current company (1st job out of college), 2 relevant part-time jobs and 1 relevant internship while in college.
Education: BS in Chemical Engineering.

I worked my ass of in college to become one of the top in my class and get relevant work experience.  I treated interviewing/applying for jobs as seriously as any of my actual courses, spending countless hours researching companies and creating unique cover letters/resumes for each of my top choices.  I was able to capitalize on a few key opportunities I was given because I was prepared and am very fortunate to be where I'm at today.  Most of my tuition was covered through a sports scholarship and engineering scholarships which combined with an extremely affordable college gives a kickass ROI on my degree (graduated w/ ~12K of student loans). Couldn't have done any of it without the support and encouragement of my awesome parents.
sigh

I really need to stop reading this thred

I'm not sure I understand what you mean?

I could interpret this a number of ways, but the thing that got to me about your post was the amount of justification you gave for starting on third base.

/shrug

It's not worth worrying about.  :)
That, a bit, yes.

But mostly, fuck me.  I'm a chemical engineer, went to a top 10-engineering school, "worked my ass off" and graduated 5th in my class in said engineering school.  (And left with only $11k of loans, thanks to scholarships, the biggest one being ROTC).  (So I can toot my own horn, 5th in my class is pretty good when you figure the 2+ extra classes a semester for ROTC, plus general ROTC extra requirements, OH and I had a part time job 5/8 semesters so that I could also afford to EAT.)

Oh, but I'm not a dude and my salary SUUUUUCKS. Higher than the person posting, above, but just barely.  Did I mention that I have 25 YEARS of work experience?  Part of this is my company and their pay scale, yes, but rest assured that the -ahem- men that we've hired in the last 6 years have gotten market rate.  I've done pretty well coming to terms with it as it is (location, company limitations, etc.) but I really need to avoid this thread.

SustainableStache

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #589 on: June 22, 2017, 01:48:51 PM »
Job Title: Land Protection Specialist at large nonprofit
Salary: $50k + 8% 401k match + free transit pass + 20 days vacation + 15 sick days + 35 hour work week
Education: BA and JD

afuera

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #590 on: June 22, 2017, 01:54:27 PM »
Job Title: Production Engineer
Salary: $107K/yr + Yearly Profit Sharting + 6% 401K match + Pension + Free HDHP w/ HSA contributions.  Total comp probably around ~135K.
Experience: 3 years at current company (1st job out of college), 2 relevant part-time jobs and 1 relevant internship while in college.
Education: BS in Chemical Engineering.

I worked my ass of in college to become one of the top in my class and get relevant work experience.  I treated interviewing/applying for jobs as seriously as any of my actual courses, spending countless hours researching companies and creating unique cover letters/resumes for each of my top choices.  I was able to capitalize on a few key opportunities I was given because I was prepared and am very fortunate to be where I'm at today.  Most of my tuition was covered through a sports scholarship and engineering scholarships which combined with an extremely affordable college gives a kickass ROI on my degree (graduated w/ ~12K of student loans). Couldn't have done any of it without the support and encouragement of my awesome parents.
sigh

I really need to stop reading this thred

I'm not sure I understand what you mean?

I could interpret this a number of ways, but the thing that got to me about your post was the amount of justification you gave for starting on third base.

/shrug

It's not worth worrying about.  :)
That, a bit, yes.

But mostly, fuck me.  I'm a chemical engineer, went to a top 10-engineering school, "worked my ass off" and graduated 5th in my class in said engineering school.  (And left with only $11k of loans, thanks to scholarships, the biggest one being ROTC).  (So I can toot my own horn, 5th in my class is pretty good when you figure the 2+ extra classes a semester for ROTC, plus general ROTC extra requirements, OH and I had a part time job 5/8 semesters so that I could also afford to EAT.)

Oh, but I'm not a dude and my salary SUUUUUCKS. Higher than the person posting, above, but just barely.  Did I mention that I have 25 YEARS of work experience?  Part of this is my company and their pay scale, yes, but rest assured that the -ahem- men that we've hired in the last 6 years have gotten market rate.  I've done pretty well coming to terms with it as it is (location, company limitations, etc.) but I really need to avoid this thread.

ummm I'm not a dude either...
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Cwadda

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #591 on: June 22, 2017, 02:05:30 PM »
Quote
Oh, but I'm not a dude and my salary SUUUUUCKS. Higher than the person posting, above, but just barely.  Did I mention that I have 25 YEARS of work experience?  Part of this is my company and their pay scale, yes, but rest assured that the -ahem- men that we've hired in the last 6 years have gotten market rate.  I've done pretty well coming to terms with it as it is (location, company limitations, etc.) but I really need to avoid this thread.
You're much better off than the majority of the women in this world who are marginalized and those that will have zero chance of getting an education. Which isn't to say your company isn't at fault for pay inequality. Just wanted to throw that out there, just another way of looking at things.

Mgmny

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #592 on: June 22, 2017, 02:13:22 PM »

Oh, but I'm not a dude and my salary SUUUUUCKS. Higher than the person posting, above, but just barely.  Did I mention that I have 25 YEARS of work experience?  Part of this is my company and their pay scale, yes, but rest assured that the -ahem- men that we've hired in the last 6 years have gotten market rate.  I've done pretty well coming to terms with it as it is (location, company limitations, etc.) but I really need to avoid this thread.

You should quit and get a different job if you want a higher salary. Also, there is a great resource, "She Negotiates" that can help you too. Victoria Pynchon is really good at her job, and may be able to help you too!

tyrannostache

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #593 on: June 22, 2017, 02:49:04 PM »
Job: Grant Writer for large nonprofit
Salary: $45-48K in low-moderate COL area
Years experience: 3-4

Great benefits including loads of vacation (4 weeks total), 401k match, flexible schedule and work from home when I need it.

I could definitely be making more in a different field, but I love my work, my colleagues, and the flexibility the job offers while I have small kids.

I'm curious to learn more about this. Is this a job at many non profits, do you need domain expertise, and can it be done on a part-time/contract basis?

I've worked on the other side, research at non-profits, funded by grants that someone else has written. It was a good environment as you mentioned.

It's a fairly common position, especially for larger nonprofit organizations. In smaller organizations, I think it's usually folded into more general development/philanthropy positions.

Domain expertise: this will vary. I came to the field sort of serendipitously. I wouldn't have considered grant writing if I hadn't run across a grant writer job posting for my favorite organization at a time when I was looking for a career transition. I had worked for the organization as a summer intern/technician in the past. I also had writing and communications experience, had landed a few private grants for my own work, and had edited some federal grant applications.

Contracting/Part Time: I frequently see postings for part-time grant writers, and it's certainly possible to do it on a contract basis. As a side gig, I'm starting to cultivate some freelance contracts--it turns out to be one of the more lucrative freelance writing fields out there.

If you want to learn more about grant writing, check out the Foundation Center. They have some free and low-cost online courses that give a good introduction. Keep in mind that there's a world of difference between writing for government grants and writing for private foundations. Government grants require some pretty advanced accounting/legal/bureaucracy-wrangling expertise--my org has a whole separate set of specialists who deal with reviewing and administering gov't funds. I still contribute to writing gov't grants, but my involvement is blessedly minimal.

Feel free to message me if you have more questions.

mm1970

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #594 on: June 22, 2017, 02:57:15 PM »
Job Title: Production Engineer
Salary: $107K/yr + Yearly Profit Sharting + 6% 401K match + Pension + Free HDHP w/ HSA contributions.  Total comp probably around ~135K.
Experience: 3 years at current company (1st job out of college), 2 relevant part-time jobs and 1 relevant internship while in college.
Education: BS in Chemical Engineering.

I worked my ass of in college to become one of the top in my class and get relevant work experience.  I treated interviewing/applying for jobs as seriously as any of my actual courses, spending countless hours researching companies and creating unique cover letters/resumes for each of my top choices.  I was able to capitalize on a few key opportunities I was given because I was prepared and am very fortunate to be where I'm at today.  Most of my tuition was covered through a sports scholarship and engineering scholarships which combined with an extremely affordable college gives a kickass ROI on my degree (graduated w/ ~12K of student loans). Couldn't have done any of it without the support and encouragement of my awesome parents.
sigh

I really need to stop reading this thred

I'm not sure I understand what you mean?

I could interpret this a number of ways, but the thing that got to me about your post was the amount of justification you gave for starting on third base.

/shrug

It's not worth worrying about.  :)
That, a bit, yes.

But mostly, fuck me.  I'm a chemical engineer, went to a top 10-engineering school, "worked my ass off" and graduated 5th in my class in said engineering school.  (And left with only $11k of loans, thanks to scholarships, the biggest one being ROTC).  (So I can toot my own horn, 5th in my class is pretty good when you figure the 2+ extra classes a semester for ROTC, plus general ROTC extra requirements, OH and I had a part time job 5/8 semesters so that I could also afford to EAT.)

Oh, but I'm not a dude and my salary SUUUUUCKS. Higher than the person posting, above, but just barely.  Did I mention that I have 25 YEARS of work experience?  Part of this is my company and their pay scale, yes, but rest assured that the -ahem- men that we've hired in the last 6 years have gotten market rate.  I've done pretty well coming to terms with it as it is (location, company limitations, etc.) but I really need to avoid this thread.

ummm I'm not a dude either...
Wasn't suggesting you were, just noting a bit about my own particular company's ... um... methods?  Choices? Anyway.  Like I said, I just need to avoid this thread for my own sanity!

Roots&Wings

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #595 on: June 22, 2017, 03:09:10 PM »
DH - Territory Manager for large CPG company
$75k plus bonus (average $8-$10k), 9% 401k match, company car, with unlimited use, 3 weeks vacation, good benefits, work from home/on the road, but very low stress
No degree
8 years experience, but he's 52

Thanks for mentioning this! Can you elaborate on this role? Or what background your husband had to get in the door?

Trying to find options for a friend who's great with people, but no degree.

mm1970

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #596 on: June 22, 2017, 03:09:32 PM »

Oh, but I'm not a dude and my salary SUUUUUCKS. Higher than the person posting, above, but just barely.  Did I mention that I have 25 YEARS of work experience?  Part of this is my company and their pay scale, yes, but rest assured that the -ahem- men that we've hired in the last 6 years have gotten market rate.  I've done pretty well coming to terms with it as it is (location, company limitations, etc.) but I really need to avoid this thread.

You should quit and get a different job if you want a higher salary. Also, there is a great resource, "She Negotiates" that can help you too. Victoria Pynchon is really good at her job, and may be able to help you too!

Ah yes.  Well, to be honest, I have looked, and interviewed - a bit.   Haven't spent a lot of time at it (and none in the last 3 years).  I've got some limitations, namely - I live in a "not large" city and there are not that many jobs/ companies here that do what I do.  Probably about 5-10, which is still a decent number though.   Probably 3-6 of them pay more than my company, and the rest are well known to pay a lot less.  The limitations of "I'm not moving" (not that I'm not willing to move, but my spouse makes 50% more than I do, so...we aren't going to be moving for my job) make it a tough one.  None of the companies are very large, so the job openings are few and far between.

In any event, I've tried negotiating here (no luck - and in this case, it's not just me, my fellow male coworkers have the same problem.  New hires get market rate, longer term employees get screwed.  It's also like that in similar companies in town.  It's why changing jobs gets you more money.)  Instead, I have negotiated an awful lot of flexibility.  This exchange, along with not reading this thread, has made things "okay".  (And also being grateful for what I have.  I don't want people to think I'm a money grubbing jealous person - a lot of people might look at me and think "rich person problems", but I am very sensitive to the pay gap, having experienced it.  And still experiencing it.  I refuse to pretend that it is okay, because it is NOT.)

Right now I'm riding it out a bit.  I have friends in town from a prior company - we all scattered when that company went out of business.  The vast majority of them are still in the same companies that they went to 17 years ago when we went out of business. So I ask myself "why is that?  Are their companies just amazingly awesome and they love it and get paid well?  Or is it that they have a different attitude about life?  Like they have ENOUGH and it's enough for them to have a job?"  I did actually ask one of my former coworkers that, and he did say that it's mostly the first with a bit of the second. Which is why I've worked on re-framing my attitude and accepting flexibility in exchange for money.  Even though I'd rather have the money.

gerardc

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #597 on: June 22, 2017, 08:42:58 PM »
We're both at late in life new careers as we spent 14 years having fun without making much money in a resort area

Care to elaborate about this part?

nara

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #598 on: June 22, 2017, 09:08:45 PM »
Job Title: Board Certified Behavior Analyst (Masters degree + post-grad certificate in applied behavior analysis+ internship and certification exam)
Salary: I am paid $125/hour through insurance. I own my agency so our income is approx $180k.
Years’ experience: 15

Unique User

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Re: What's your job title and how much do you earn?
« Reply #599 on: June 23, 2017, 06:12:10 AM »
DH - Territory Manager for large CPG company
$75k plus bonus (average $8-$10k), 9% 401k match, company car, with unlimited use, 3 weeks vacation, good benefits, work from home/on the road, but very low stress
No degree
8 years experience, but he's 52

Thanks for mentioning this! Can you elaborate on this role? Or what background your husband had to get in the door?

Trying to find options for a friend who's great with people, but no degree.

He's a former Chef (no degree, but did a European apprenticeship) and his previous job was similar in that he worked with the big food distributors (Sysco, US Foods).  He started at his previous job doing manual labor and moved up.  I'll send you a PM on his previous employer, they hire a lot of people without degrees.  He was glad to get out of there, but it was a good place to get experience.