Author Topic: Tiny Houses  (Read 11201 times)

CatamaranSailor

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Tiny Houses
« on: October 16, 2014, 08:21:37 AM »
This past weekend, I watched a live presentation by Andrew Morrison http://tinyhousebuild.com/about-us/ at a TED event about his work with tiny houses (he actually lives in one as well). I have to admit I was very impressed. The house certainly doesn't look or feel like 215 square feet! That and the fact he built it for cash and has no mortgage seriously has me thinking! There has also been a huge shift in the attitude of code officials and zoning committees when it comes to small houses, especially in smaller towns that are interested in attracting new residents. Walsenburg Colorado just approved tiny houses for residential lots. I'm curious what other MMMers think about the tiny house movement. Fad? Ultimate way to save money? I'm not sure I'd want to cram 16 kids into one...but a piece of land with lots of outdoor living space...I could totally see it working well!

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2014, 09:28:56 AM »
I live in one with my boyfriend. It's the ultimate way to save money. Like a manufactured home, it will depreciate to zero in time, but in the mean time, it cost us $15000 so far to build, and we'll likely sink another $5000 in it before we're done. We rent a place to park it. The result is that we pay less than a quarter of the going rent for a studio in our area. Also, when you live in 140 square ft. Acquiring stuff  becomes extremely unattractive.

In cheeper areas of the country it might not make as much sense, but here in the greater Bay Area, it's awesome.

hybrid

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2014, 09:56:30 AM »
I find the whole notion very romantic. I've seen this home before and love, love, love it. But I would probably hate, hate, hate it after a month though.

What I would ideally like to do is try one for a month and see how it worked out. I could see this being a great way to see the country, like an RV.

highcountry

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2014, 10:02:16 AM »
I actually think it would be a really bad idea to buy one for travel. Ours has all sorts of Simpson ties in the walls and we have towed it about 200 miles, but they are really meant to be parked. The trailer makes it moveable but mostly tiny houses are on wheels to get around the size restrictions in building codes. If you want to travel with it frequently look for something built like a vardo instead. They are cheeper to build, lighter to tow, and will hold up to travel better.

Also, unless it is built by a licensed rv manufacturer or only temporarily anchored to the trailer, tiny houses are uninsurable on the road.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 10:05:44 AM by learning »

Glenstache

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2014, 10:05:00 AM »
I built one as my un-mustachian second home in the mountains (200 sqft). Friends fondly call it the Shedteau (portmanteau of Shed and Chateau). I was able to build it myself with cash. It is very inexpensive to maintain and provides a very comfortable space. I think the simplicity and necessary lack of clutter is wonderful and has prompted me to reduce my clutter at "home" significantly. I don't think it is for everyone, though.

Edit: I consider the tiny house movement to include all small houses, regardless of if they are on a trailer. I guess that is the difference between tiny house and Tiny House.

Additional edit: word of the day: portmanteau.
« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 10:44:50 AM by Glenstache »

carozy

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2014, 10:22:26 AM »
I love the idea and am dreaming about one for my future.  I really like the idea of not having a mortgage and not spending years and years and years to pay off one.

I think some of the designs are very cute.  Right now I'm living with most of my stuff in my parent's garage (a temporary arrangement for a few months) and I think I could do well in a tiny house, without a lot of stuff.  I've already forgotten over half of my stuff in the garage and if it all burned up in a fire I wouldn't even remember all the stuff that would be missing.

The only problem I have right now is my location.  I work in San Francisco and I'm not sure where I would put it.  I'd have to buy land for it I guess, or rent land/space for it and it would have to work out as far as commuting, not being too rural, etc.  I could always work somewhere else but for right now it's just a nice dream.  :)

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2014, 10:28:02 AM »

I built one as my un-mustachian second home in the mountains (200 sqft). Friends fondly call it the Shedteau (concatenation of Shed and Chateau). I was able to build it myself with cash. It is very inexpensive to maintain and provides a very comfortable space. I think the simplicity and necessary lack of clutter is wonderful and has prompted me to reduce my clutter at "home" significantly. I don't think it is for everyone, though.

Edit: I consider the tiny house movement to include all small houses, regardless of if they are on a trailer. I guess that is the difference between tiny house and Tiny House.

Your Shedteau sounds amazing :)

hybrid

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2014, 10:32:23 AM »
I actually think it would be a really bad idea to buy one for travel. Ours has all sorts of Simpson ties in the walls and we have towed it about 200 miles, but they are really meant to be parked. The trailer makes it moveable but mostly tiny houses are on wheels to get around the size restrictions in building codes. If you want to travel with it frequently look for something built like a vardo instead. They are cheeper to build, lighter to tow, and will hold up to travel better.

Also, unless it is built by a licensed rv manufacturer or only temporarily anchored to the trailer, tiny houses are uninsurable on the road.

See! I already hate it! JK, I still think it is mondo cool....

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2014, 10:32:47 AM »
The Shedteau!   I'm going to remember that one....love it

Sid Hoffman

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2014, 10:39:51 AM »
Friends fondly call it the Shedteau (concatenation of Shed and Chateau).

Side note, but that's called a portmanteau when you combine parts of two unique words to make a new one.  Concatenation is when you combine two FULL words, for example a ball made of snow is a snowball.  Since Shedteau drops letters from Chateau, it is a portmanteau.  For bonus points, pronounce portmanteau with a snooty French accent to impress your friends.  :)

Glenstache

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #10 on: October 16, 2014, 10:43:42 AM »
Those thinking of doing it themselves may enjoy this:

https://picasaweb.google.com/glenswallace/Shedteau?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJynwua1scS0_wE&feat=directlink

Album hasn't been updated in a while to show recent improvements, but you'll get the idea.

The Architect

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #11 on: October 16, 2014, 10:49:38 AM »
If you're going to make the jump to tiny, I'd instead recommend building a small house that can be easily expanded. If all your important core stuff is in the middle part (bathroom, kitchen hookups, utility room), adding fluff rooms around that isn't so hard (bedrooms, living/dining/family rooms, garage). Using radiant floor, mini-split, or baseboard (or other point-of-use system; just not central) heating and AC would make it a snap to expand if you needed to.

Also, you'll need to think of everything in your place as serving multiple purposes. That couch? It needs to store stuff or be easily moved out of the way and collapsed. So does your bed. And all tables. Walls are an extravagance in wasted floor space, use curtains or shelves instead. Etc. etc. High ceilings also help, as you can then loft like crazy and effectively get double the s.f. of the footprint.

Richie Poor

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #12 on: October 16, 2014, 11:05:14 AM »
My wife and I have been fantasizing about a tiny home but it may not be practical for us until retirement. We would like to have a few kids and not only might it get a little crowded, if you don't have a permanent structure can you still have an actual address and enroll your kids in school.

I also worry about city codes. Government regulations love killing great ideas that save money and resources. There will be some spots outside big cities that embrace the movement and some that screw over early adopters.

Also stopping me right now is that my current 1400 sq ft. house in Dallas only cost me 110k. After building the house, buying land, getting well water, buying a solar setup, and building a shed to keep useful things the bill may get close to 80k. So I wouldn't be saving six figures like some people can in more expensive markets. But as I get closer to retirement and know what my future family will look like I plan to make the tiny house leap.

Richie Poor

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #13 on: October 16, 2014, 11:10:26 AM »
If you like the idea of tiny houses but don't think your knees can handle a loft, check out this design.

http://www.tinyhousedesign.com/minim-house/

solon

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #14 on: October 16, 2014, 11:16:36 AM »
Those thinking of doing it themselves may enjoy this:

https://picasaweb.google.com/glenswallace/Shedteau?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJynwua1scS0_wE&feat=directlink

Album hasn't been updated in a while to show recent improvements, but you'll get the idea.

I LOVE the scenery! What part of the world are you in?

$200k

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #15 on: October 16, 2014, 11:38:15 AM »
I live in one with my boyfriend. It's the ultimate way to save money. Like a manufactured home, it will depreciate to zero in time, but in the mean time, it cost us $15000 so far to build, and we'll likely sink another $5000 in it before we're done. We rent a place to park it. The result is that we pay less than a quarter of the going rent for a studio in our area. Also, when you live in 140 square ft. Acquiring stuff  becomes extremely unattractive.

In cheeper areas of the country it might not make as much sense, but here in the greater Bay Area, it's awesome.

Learning, where in the greater Bay Area are you located?  I've some coastal ideas in mind.

Bob W

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #16 on: October 16, 2014, 12:00:50 PM »
Tiny houses are the greatest housing idea ever!   I think they should really be called well designed appropriately sized houses. * 

Since housing represents the largest budget item for most folks, I think appropriately sized houses are very Mustachian, even though MMM has chosen to follow a different path. (more power to him)



*Disclaimer - I live in a 3000 sq house with a 900 sq ft basement that I rarely visit.

highcountry

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #17 on: October 16, 2014, 12:20:54 PM »

Learning, where in the greater Bay Area are you located?  I've some coastal ideas in mind.

Sonoma County.  If you want a more specific answer, PM me.

« Last Edit: October 16, 2014, 12:22:34 PM by learning »

Glenstache

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2014, 02:00:04 PM »
I LOVE the scenery! What part of the world are you in?

Cabin is just up the hill from Lake Wenatchee in the Cascade Mountains of Washington state.

The Architect

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #19 on: October 16, 2014, 03:48:42 PM »
Did some research. A very small unit is essentially a hotel room. Something like this:



With a kitchen added (either as an expansion or using a wall inside the unit currently used for something else) would take up +/- 350 s.f., including some extra for the walls; and it's ADA compliant!* Building it with 12'-0" or higher ceiling would give you loft opportunities as well.

*Which basically means you can rob space like crazy (if you're not in a wheelchair) to use for other stuff.

Ynari

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #20 on: October 17, 2014, 04:33:19 AM »
hOMe (in the OP) is the house that got me addicted to the idea of a tiny house!

My boy and I are very experience-orientated (travel, activity, etc.) and find the minimalist lifestyle very attractive.  He's also in love with the fact that we could build it ourselves, and I love that it's relatively little cost!

Like Mustachianism, I think tiny houses challenge notions of "normal" and any amount of Tiny House thought can be incorporated into a larger home.  Smaller square footage and Mustachianism have melded together in my mind - the Tiny House movement just makes me realize that I can go even smaller without sacrificing my quality of life.

We have dreams of an off-grid home in Colorado someday.

Some cities (There's one in Texas?) are beginning to embrace small houses, so trailers and addresses aren't as much of a problem there.

so.mpls

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #21 on: October 17, 2014, 08:17:48 AM »
Those thinking of doing it themselves may enjoy this:

https://picasaweb.google.com/glenswallace/Shedteau?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJynwua1scS0_wE&feat=directlink

Album hasn't been updated in a while to show recent improvements, but you'll get the idea.

Wow, beautiful place.  I'd love to build something like this as a primary residence once I'm FIRE. What do you do for electricity/plumbing if you don't mind me asking?

DeepEllumStache

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #22 on: October 17, 2014, 08:21:41 AM »
Those thinking of doing it themselves may enjoy this:

https://picasaweb.google.com/glenswallace/Shedteau?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCJynwua1scS0_wE&feat=directlink

Album hasn't been updated in a while to show recent improvements, but you'll get the idea.

The Shedteau is awesome!

farmstache

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #23 on: October 17, 2014, 08:27:07 AM »
Beautiful Shedteau!

We're looking to build one of these in our maybe-future-er-home in the mountain/jungle. We don't have a lake, but we do have a pretty great river. I'll make it a little larger because my ageing parents wouldn't be up to climbing to the loft every night when they visit, but the concept is pretty much of a tiny house. :)

megaschnauzer

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #24 on: October 17, 2014, 09:17:32 AM »
i love the tiny house concept although i would have mine and the spouse would have hers and then another to keep all of our crap in. so i wonder if it's more mustachian to buy an airstream trailer. they cost a lot but i think they hold there value pretty well. i guess parking a trailer vs a tiny house might depend on your lot zoning.

AgileTurtle

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #25 on: October 17, 2014, 09:21:36 AM »
I dont see what the hype is about. They do not retain any value and no room to store things
I guess the retaining value part is debatable and may not be super important
But the storage of things to me is. I buy food and regularly used things in bulk to save money and be prepared for disasters. Having to buy small amounts of food all the time is way more expensive. Also where do you keep tools and other DIY stuff? Where does family go when they come over, or can you never have guests over?
I can see it working for some but I dont see much of an upside to it.

trishume

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #26 on: October 17, 2014, 09:42:25 AM »
I'm seriously considering getting a tiny house as my first home after graduating from university. I'll have been living in small cheap student housing for the last 5 years so a tiny home will actually be an upgrade. By never owning a larger home, I won't have to worry about hedonic adaptation making me "need" a larger living space.

A significant part of the allure is that I could probably design and build it myself. I have some cool ideas for fancy things to have in a custom house and it would be nice to take a break between graduating and starting work to build myself a tiny house to live in.

For example, I think it would be cool if the ceiling was made of large rectangular solid wooden panels that could actually be lowered by cable winches. You could store big things on top of them when they are lowered (like power tools, maybe even a spare bed), and then winch them into the ceiling when you aren't using them. That would solve the problem of tiny houses generally not having enough room for large space-consuming hobby things like power tools, web servers and bulk supplies (@AgileTurtle).

I'm also interested in the idea of combining a Soylent diet with a tiny house, since one of the largest things in most tiny houses is the kitchen. Eating Soylent would free up that area for more living space.

Bob W

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #27 on: October 17, 2014, 10:16:48 AM »
I dont see what the hype is about. They do not retain any value and no room to store things
I guess the retaining value part is debatable and may not be super important
But the storage of things to me is. I buy food and regularly used things in bulk to save money and be prepared for disasters. Having to buy small amounts of food all the time is way more expensive. Also where do you keep tools and other DIY stuff? Where does family go when they come over, or can you never have guests over?
I can see it working for some but I dont see much of an upside to it.

For food storage you build a separate 50 sq walk in freezer if you like.  If you build it yourself and find a used condenser you could do it for about $500.

For misc storage you build a storage shed for about $6 a sq ft.  Build as big a one as you like.

For guests you put on a covered patio addition and use used sliding glass doors as the walls.  You can build these for $15 sq foot.  Make it as big as you like.  Put a nice propane fireplace in if you like. 

My thinking with a tiny home is also to focus on design such that it is naturally solar heated most of the time and also requires no AC.    If you make it a very tight space with very high R values.  If you do this, you can use a solar/battery system for all your power and supplement with a fancy ceramic fireplace heater. 

You should also consider a water reclamation system so that no well or city hook up is needed. 

Compost toilets are nice as well.   With those you would require no septic system or sewage hook up.


The Architect

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2014, 10:27:41 AM »
For example, I think it would be cool if the ceiling was made of large rectangular solid wooden panels that could actually be lowered by cable winches. You could store big things on top of them when they are lowered (like power tools, maybe even a spare bed), and then winch them into the ceiling when you aren't using them. That would solve the problem of tiny houses generally not having enough room for large space-consuming hobby things like power tools, web servers and bulk supplies (@AgileTurtle).

Those kinds of things interest me greatly. The trouble is that it's largely more efficient to store stuff in, say, an open attic on shelving, unless you're making your ceiling extra-deep and have a bunch of airspace instead of insulation up there. But things like a storage-couch, pop-up tables, (interior) shelf-walls, and multi-use furniture that aren't typical construction are worth considering.

I'm also interested in the idea of combining a Soylent diet with a tiny house, since one of the largest things in most tiny houses is the kitchen. Eating Soylent would free up that area for more living space.

I'm dubious about this. I don't know much about soylent-diets, but having no kitchen sounds sketch. You could easily have a 1-basin medium-large sink for multiple purposes (dish washing, food prep, hand washing out of the restroom, etc.), no dishwasher, a small refrigerator/freezer, and a small (possibly semi-portable) cooktop/oven and have a fully functional kitchen inside of an otherwise tiny house without wasting space - something like 16 sq.ft. could fit that kitchen with full-sized appliances. Your work surface could also be your multi-use table/floor/desk. Then you're not trapped into a tiny space with no cooking ability if you learn that you can't survive on soylent.

For guests you put on a covered patio addition and use used sliding glass doors as the walls.  You can build these for $15 sq foot.  Make it as big as you like.  Put a nice propane fireplace in if you like.

Patios are a great idea for adding cheap living space! If you just enclose all your 'critical' stuff (bath, kitchen, bedroom), you could live the large-house life and barely notice in the right climate or with the right living-environment plan.

My thinking with a tiny home is also to focus on design such that it is naturally solar heated most of the time and also requires no AC.    If you make it a very tight space with very high R values.  If you do this, you can use a solar/battery system for all your power and supplement with a fancy ceramic fireplace heater.   

With houses this small, you heat them with body heat. A grown man counts for 300 BTU/hr, women/children are 200-250. No need for heaters of any kind, though having one is a probably good idea in  colder climates.

v10viperbox

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #29 on: October 17, 2014, 10:33:31 AM »
At least out here in San Diego, find a lot that you can build on legally is the issue with a small house. I LOVE the idea and am thinking of building a ~210sqf office with a small kitchen and loft in my backyard to test my ideas out.

Also and it needs to be said that finding land outside of a minor metropolitan area is easy and cheap. If you are still working and need to be in town the land cost is almost always going to be 50-90% of the cost of the venture.  I have been having problems getting enough storage space in 210sqf which is what I could fit on a trailer and move around. Once you get into the 400sqf cabin size with some external storage if feels like its much more doable with two people.

If your close to FIRE with your current lifestyle though and can do the small house thing it could cut decades off working. Or do the small house thing and FIRE significantly earlier with less cash on hand. If I could talk my wife into it we would be FIRE three or four times over in a small house outside if we did not live on the coast.


Ynari

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #30 on: October 17, 2014, 11:23:46 AM »
Storage in a tiny house is IMO dependent on two things - clever storage options and putting thought into your possessions.

We've been thinking about lots of clever storage (magnetic wall/ceiling spice and food containers containers, in-floor storage, plus the usual multi-use furniture and built-in wall cabinets.)  We've also been thinking about what we actually need - for instance, we definitely do not need the 3 sets of sheets for different sized beds currently stashed behind the dresser.

The kitchen in hOMe http://tinyhousebuild.com is actually pretty large - normal size refrigerator and everything. Their house actually seems downright luxurious to me.  They have an extra loft for guests, and a space for a dual washer/dryer.  (Though, their daughter has her own detached room. It's not a full tiny house, I believe, more just an extension of their primary home.)  Their blog is pretty great, too.

v10viperbox

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #31 on: October 17, 2014, 11:38:36 AM »
I guess for me its where do I put my tools, you are effectively homesteading unless you are on the grid and septic which is a serious cost to the construction.

You don;t need one but if you are on acreage having a bobcat and a way to get around is a given and your storage shed is going to end up being bigger then your home by a factor of 3 or 4.

Bob W

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #32 on: October 17, 2014, 11:44:37 AM »
For example, I think it would be cool if the ceiling was made of large rectangular solid wooden panels that could actually be lowered by cable winches. You could store big things on top of them when they are lowered (like power tools, maybe even a spare bed), and then winch them into the ceiling when you aren't using them. That would solve the problem of tiny houses generally not having enough room for large space-consuming hobby things like power tools, web servers and bulk supplies (@AgileTurtle).

Those kinds of things interest me greatly. The trouble is that it's largely more efficient to store stuff in, say, an open attic on shelving, unless you're making your ceiling extra-deep and have a bunch of airspace instead of insulation up there. But things like a storage-couch, pop-up tables, (interior) shelf-walls, and multi-use furniture that aren't typical construction are worth considering.

I'm also interested in the idea of combining a Soylent diet with a tiny house, since one of the largest things in most tiny houses is the kitchen. Eating Soylent would free up that area for more living space.

I'm dubious about this. I don't know much about soylent-diets, but having no kitchen sounds sketch. You could easily have a 1-basin medium-large sink for multiple purposes (dish washing, food prep, hand washing out of the restroom, etc.), no dishwasher, a small refrigerator/freezer, and a small (possibly semi-portable) cooktop/oven and have a fully functional kitchen inside of an otherwise tiny house without wasting space - something like 16 sq.ft. could fit that kitchen with full-sized appliances. Your work surface could also be your multi-use table/floor/desk. Then you're not trapped into a tiny space with no cooking ability if you learn that you can't survive on soylent.

For guests you put on a covered patio addition and use used sliding glass doors as the walls.  You can build these for $15 sq foot.  Make it as big as you like.  Put a nice propane fireplace in if you like.

Patios are a great idea for adding cheap living space! If you just enclose all your 'critical' stuff (bath, kitchen, bedroom), you could live the large-house life and barely notice in the right climate or with the right living-environment plan.

My thinking with a tiny home is also to focus on design such that it is naturally solar heated most of the time and also requires no AC.    If you make it a very tight space with very high R values.  If you do this, you can use a solar/battery system for all your power and supplement with a fancy ceramic fireplace heater.   

With houses this small, you heat them with body heat. A grown man counts for 300 BTU/hr, women/children are 200-250. No need for heaters of any kind, though having one is a probably good idea in  colder climates.

Those are great stats on the per person BTUs! lol  Although, it still requires decent air loss prevention and R values in cold climates like mine. 

If I'm looking at my math right 300 BTUs is equal to a 1,000 watt space heater.  That really is very impressive. 

So the bigger issue might be the perceived cooling need in the summer.   I could see a small home getting by on maybe 3 large solar panels with a battery system.   Nice!

These houses would be so easy to be off grid,  even in a city.  Add the water recover system and you have a zero utility bill.   Zero is a very good number.

Anyone know how much money one needs to save in order afford a zero utility bill for life?  lol

Stellar

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #33 on: October 17, 2014, 08:09:25 PM »
My partner in crime is obsessed with tiny houses.  I'm all for it - but not here in Houston, TX.  The summers are pretty brutal so it's very difficult to take advantage of outdoor living space. 

When I lived in Colorado (up St. Vrain Canyon in Riverside) I did not have air conditioning and left my windows open most of the time - as well as worked from the porch.  Even in the nasty dry heat, it was manageable.

Glenstache

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #34 on: October 17, 2014, 10:42:50 PM »
Wow, beautiful place.  I'd love to build something like this as a primary residence once I'm FIRE. What do you do for electricity/plumbing if you don't mind me asking?

Have well for water supply. Composting toilet. Electricity is ridiculously cheap due to PUD-operated hydroelectric, so just hooked into that. Payback time on solar was going to be too long to be practical in this application. With the design temperature (75 inside and 2F outside) and given construction the max heating load is only 1300W. This is an outlier condition for design purposes, but small spaces are easy to heat. Also have conduit run for PUD-owned fiber optic if I ever use it more and need to have the option to use it as a part-time office. The current use doesn't justify the expense of internet... and it is really nice having a place to go that is relatively unplugged.

sly

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #35 on: October 18, 2014, 07:00:56 AM »
If you like the idea of tiny houses but don't think your knees can handle a loft, check out this design.

http://www.tinyhousedesign.com/minim-house/

love it, I wonder what the price for a ready made unit will be though. That info is not yet available on the website.

That's kinda of my problem with most tiny houses. There is simply no way I'm paying 150K for a 210sqft house.

madgeylou

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Re: Tiny Houses
« Reply #36 on: October 18, 2014, 07:18:27 AM »
If you like the idea of tiny houses but don't think your knees can handle a loft, check out this design.

http://www.tinyhousedesign.com/minim-house/

love it, I wonder what the price for a ready made unit will be though. That info is not yet available on the website.

That's kinda of my problem with most tiny houses. There is simply no way I'm paying 150K for a 210sqft house.

As I recall tip his dude spent about $30k on his house, and a lot of that was because he built with SIPs which I guess are both more expensive and more efficient.