Author Topic: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job  (Read 14018 times)

GardenerB

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 13
Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« on: October 02, 2017, 09:58:34 PM »
I'm sure this topic has been discussed here on a few threads.  Just wanted to get some feedback/opinions from those who have done this- maybe shed some light on things that came about from quitting that I haven't thought of.  Good/bad/neutral.

I am finally taking control of my tech/cubicle farm job situation and have planned an exit.  Basically our tech co. outsources everything and I've become a Senior Email Engineer - all quantity no quality.  Rather than working on 2-3 cool Engineering projects per year I have to oversee/review 10-15 crappy ones all with outsourcing partners.

Rather than stew and ruminate, I've decided on an exit date for summer next year.  Will give me time to make sure my co-workers are autonomous and my departure a bit easier.  I have also really had it with my area of tech after 25 years - maybe LIVINGAFI "Litany of hate" sums it up best - highly recommended entry in his blog.  The fun part has been replaced with politics, administrative minutiae, paperwork, processes.  It's been a great 25 years and the pay is/was always very good.  It's only in the last 2-3 years (after turning 45), that I realized I wanted to make a major change.  Rather than try a small startup approach I have decided to get out of tech altogether.

I will have 1 to 1.5 years' worth of savings (cover expenses), and sort of cheating since my wife is still earning a lot and enjoying her line of work.  At the same time we are moving away from a very HCOL area to a middle-cost area (where there will not be any tech cube farms anyway!)  Same size house but will be mortgage free.  Plan is to free up time for both of us so that, rather than both of us working 10 hours per day and barely having time for family/friends/relaxing, she would continue her home business, I would help her for the next year so that she frees up time, then after 1 year see how things balance out.  We both have retirement stashes covered for the 4% SWR rule, and she has a DB pension on top of that.

Anyone else quit a high-paying job and make the 'leap'?  Comments on things that came about - good/bad/neutral?  Hard to bounce this off people since typically you get the 'you're lucky to have any job' - 'if you have a good job suck it up and keep it' - 'my Puritanical work ethic blah blah blah'.

I may regret giving up the money, maybe not.  And I don't know what lies ahead after the 1.5 years of savings runs out.  But I want to try the change and not just remain on autopilot for the money.

GB

nalor511

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 28
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2017, 10:19:42 PM »
Yes I did, don't miss it at all. Miss the people a little, but not that much really. Thought I would do some consulting or something eventually, but have not. Stay busy with hobbies, books, finance, pets, family, and have not looked back

DeanHedlund

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 116
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2017, 10:38:37 PM »
I am in the process of.
Longer horizon though, 2020.

We are not what we earned.
Life is worth living, additional Tesla X doesn't balance out the un-living.

EarthSurfer

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
  • Location: 5280
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2017, 07:06:56 AM »
Quote
I may regret giving up the money, maybe not.  And I don't know what lies ahead after the 1.5 years of savings runs out.  But I want to try the change and not just remain on autopilot for the money.

As someone who has been always focused on savings rate and watching investments grow, the loss of the income stream and watching my investment account growth flatten out took some adjustment. My net worth still grows, but not at the previous meteoritic rate.

The rest of your post clearly shows you are 'toast.' Get out before they realize you are about to escape. As with most of us who are known for being good at our jobs, your employer will try to find a way to keep you involved at some level. You will have to decide if that is what you want. I have used a ~400 hour per year consult gig with my former employer a good bridge to living on the income from my investments. I get paid a relatively insane hourly rate to maintain legacy systems I designed 5-10 years ago.

The most pleasant changes since leaving the office life have been relational. Tech & startup culture have a ruthlessness and hurriedness that often permeates those involved. The income and wealth isolated me from how difficult life is for most people.

I like the 'new me' a lot better: Kinder, gentler with time to connect with people.

Greystache

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 165
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2017, 07:22:49 AM »
Run, don't walk to the neatest exit. I quit my aerospace engineering job over two years ago and i can honestly say that the last two years have been the best of my life.  I went from spending 40-50 hrs per week doing things I didn't like to almost none today. I did have a little anxiety going from the accumulation phase to the draw down phase, but it was just an interesting problem to solve. My net worth after 2+ years of retirement is greater than when I pulled the trigger.  The single worst part of early retirement has been dealing with health care. Fortunately, DW and I are healthy, but the system is a total PITA and seems to be getting worse.

TempusFugit

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 288
  • Location: In my own head, usually
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2017, 07:51:45 AM »
I'm in a very similar situation.  I'm 47 and after 25 years of the tech world I'm kind of over it.  Especially with all of the outsourcing changes that have occurred at my company in the past 4 years.  Dealing with a language barrier over a bad phone line at odd hours to accommodate that model is frustrating.

In my case, I've set a tentative 2022 FIRE date, but that is based on my current spending.  Now I'm working to reduce my spending so I can hopefully move that date up to 2020. The markets will have the final say, I think. 

ZiziPB

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3242
  • Location: The Other Side
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2017, 08:06:36 AM »
I'm not in tech, but have decided to quit a very well paying job in early spring of next year.  I'm currently focusing on simplifying my life.  Turning off the spigot that allowed my NW to grow at a meteoric speed for the last few years will not be easy but I'm making good progress in learning to live slower, to want less stuff and less stress.  I've started to downsize and I'm getting rid of all excess from my life.  Hopefully, by the time I FIRE I will be in a good place and will feel totally comfortable with what I have.  Because I certainly have enough!

Liberty Stache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 692
  • Location: Boston, Massachusetts
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2017, 08:17:52 AM »
...
I will have 1 to 1.5 years' worth of savings (cover expenses)...
my wife is still earning a lot and enjoying her line of work...
Same size house but will be mortgage free...
We both have retirement stashes covered for the 4% SWR rule...
she has a DB pension on top of that...

I wouldn't even wait 9 months. If you care about your coworkers/boss/company enough to wait 9 months, why not just provide in your resignation letter a statement around providing the standard 2 weeks transition at the very least but no more than 2-3 months for transition if the company desires more than the standard 2 weeks. Trust me when I say that the corporate world will keep turning without you.

hubcity

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 10
  • Age: 48
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #8 on: October 03, 2017, 09:23:48 AM »
Wow, mid to late 40s must be the magic number for people in tech.  I'm 47.  I am (was?) a software developer.  I quit my job a little more than a year ago (Aug '16).  At the time I told others (and myself) that I was going to take a short break, and then be picky about choosing my next job.

The reason that I said I was going to look for another job is because I really do enjoy software development.  But in my recent projects my job was more bureaucracy than it was development.  My WR is <3.5%, so I really don't have to go back to work unless I want to.  I thought that I would want to after a short break.

It has been more than a year and I haven't looked for a job.  My time off has been filled with travel and exercise, which have been great, and serving on my condo board, which has not been the most fun I've ever had.  But I haven't been bored.  I have spent some time on personal software projects, but not nearly as much as I had anticipated.

If you do take a break and are like me, you may not be in a big a hurry to get back to it.


bacchi

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3060
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2017, 10:03:32 AM »
Quote
I may regret giving up the money, maybe not.  And I don't know what lies ahead after the 1.5 years of savings runs out.  But I want to try the change and not just remain on autopilot for the money.

As someone who has been always focused on savings rate and watching investments grow, the loss of the income stream and watching my investment account growth flatten out took some adjustment. My net worth still grows, but not at the previous meteoritic rate.

I quit completely a year ago and just started pulling from my investments, after drawing down cash. It's definitely harder than I thought it would be.


ditheca

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 188
  • Age: 35
  • Location: ST GEORGE, UT
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #10 on: October 03, 2017, 10:11:35 AM »
I think maybe it's going to take him 9 months to save up the money to pull off the move?  Sounds like FIRE might be a recent goal.  Definitely sounds right for you though!

Take your Puritan work ethic, and go do something better with your life!  There are more ways to contribute to society than slaving for a corporation.  Our immediate plan after FIRE is to do missionary work in LCOL countries for a couple years.  Should give us a nice jump-start!

Daisy

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #11 on: October 03, 2017, 11:08:57 AM »
I just FIREd last week from the tech world myself. The micro managing in the Agile software world was driving me nuts, among other things.

I may stay involved in tech by participating in STEM education efforts or helping my area attract tech and innovation, but I seriously doubt I would ever work for a megacorp again. Times would have to be quite dire for me to ever do that again.

In the immediate future i will be more focused on health and travel and immersing myself in my non tech interests that I have ignored for far too long.

JayKay

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 59
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #12 on: October 03, 2017, 12:33:42 PM »
Chiming in here since we're so similar in many ways, though I've done some of the things in different order than you.

Wife has a small WAH business that's new and I've been developing software nearly since I was out of diapers.  A layoff and exasperation prompted a move from HCOL SV to the east cost with an average COL.  That was supposed to be the start of my hiatus, but recruiters caught wind of me and within a few months, I was marched back to the cube farm.  One year later, I'm still there, but other than adding to my NW, it doesn't do much for me.

Even with the lower COL, though, I'm still not comfortable with my housing situation and feel that we overbought because the prices seemed so low.  We have a mortgage (by choice) but the other costs, like utility bills and the neverending time spent on lawn maintenance are becoming a burden too.  So, we're going to be doing another big purge, put our place on the market and downsize specifically to a low-maintenance place.  At that point, I'll free myself up and we can travel for longer periods of time.  By then, I'm hoping that DW's biz will be making reasonable cash and she can work from wherever we decide to go.

My advice is to have something to do when you get there, otherwise you'll get bored and be back in a job too soon.  In the words of John Fogerty:

Quote
Papa said "Son, don't let the men getcha and do what they done to me.  'Cos they'll getcha!"

Good luck

DoubleDown

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1994
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2017, 12:41:51 PM »
I also retired at 47 after losing passion for my career. It's been great, I definitely don't regret the decision. Like others, there was some trepidation about giving up the high pay and benefits and going from accumulation to withdrawals. But when you're done, you're done. Plus I was starting to dislike the marginal employee I was becoming. When you no longer like the work you're doing, it's inevitable you're going to become less effective, and I didn't feel it was fair to my coworkers or employers that I wasn't living up to my potential because my heart just wasn't in it any longer.

effigy98

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 248
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #14 on: October 03, 2017, 01:50:38 PM »
Wow this is a good thread for us still slogging it thru mega corp tech, thank you for those who have escaped and posted. Living FI is one of the best blogs for describing tech hell. They want to keep "growing" my career which means politics all day instead of development work. The pay is hard to say no to even if I start hating my job more and more (I rather build stuff then sell all day). If I can stick it out just 3 more years I can hit my FIRE number, but if I move, there is a good chance I have to work several more years extra, but I am am REALLY looking foward to moving out of soul sucking office space land.

moof

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 471
  • Location: Beaver Town Orygun
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #15 on: October 03, 2017, 03:06:36 PM »
Find a new job and give 2 weeks notice.  It is not your responsibility to worry about how your exit affects the company.  Only stick around if there are golden handcuffs (stock options, etc) that you really want to avail yourself of.  Do your best to line up your new job before quitting, it is a lot easier to explain to a new place than if you look like you just quit (red flag to HR).  You can easily negotiate a month or two long gap to get a good trip in before starting the new place.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2017, 03:08:09 PM by moof »

GardenerB

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 13
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #16 on: October 03, 2017, 10:06:22 PM »
Thanks for all the comments and feedback.  I have read other similar threads and knew this is quite common.

As for the age aspect- not just for techies specifically but I also read a lot of the "Happiness U-curve of life" articles (latest from the Atlantic).  Basically not uncommon from 45-55 to go through a major shift and then hopefully come out with something more meaningful at the end.  More time less money more quality.  Head was down and money was rolling in - mortgage, savings, retirement etc. Now those are mostly covered and it's time to get back some of my own time.

Some other replies - I sort of have the medical side covered.  Wife still working and she has good benefits (and we are in Canada).  Practical aspects of remaining at work till July/Aug next year are for stock, bonus, retirement fund matching (approx. 20-30% of full years' salary).  That and having a good 1.5 years' worth of expense coverage saved.

Time for someone keen to take over, as one poster said - not fair for co-workers and company if I am not in it or motivated, and someone else could be.

Financial Ascensionist

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 108
  • Location: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2017, 08:54:59 AM »
I have left my very generously paid tech job and a small fortune in unvested stocks in the process when I FIREd four mouths ago.  I don't regret it at all.  I would obviously have more money had I stayed, but it turns out that my spreadsheets were right and that I had enough to fully fund my desired lifestyle so having more was not going to be a major enabler.  Time is something that you will never get back so jump on the occasion and start enjoying your life fully as soon as you can.

alleykat

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 430
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #18 on: October 04, 2017, 10:44:26 AM »
I have left my very generously paid tech job and a small fortune in unvested stocks in the process when I FIREd four mouths ago.  I don't regret it at all.  I would obviously have more money had I stayed, but it turns out that my spreadsheets were right and that I had enough to fully fund my desired lifestyle so having more was not going to be a major enabler.  Time is something that you will never get back so jump on the occasion and start enjoying your life fully as soon as you can.


Posts like this inspire me. While I have a few more years before I can even consider FIRE,  I often think if I will be able to pull the trigger because after working for a lifetime, I am now making decent money and the one more year will come into play. However, I am struggling at work now so unless the work situation changes, I think I will be more than ready to cut the strings.

SachaFiscal

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 242
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #19 on: October 04, 2017, 08:17:42 PM »
I left my tech job a few months ago.  I was making more money than I ever thought I would and getting bonuses and stock.  I was well respected by my peers and it was quite a surprise to everyone when I left.  But I was waking up in the middle of the night in a panic that I would die before experiencing retirement.  I also couldn't stand all the BS of working for a corporation. @Daisy I know what you mean about Agile scrum.  If I had to go to another daily standup I was gonna shoot myself. Also I was kind of bored with the type of tech I was in (embedded SW development).  I had been doing it too long and didn't see any other options for me there without a big struggle to leave my department.  I thought that once I left my job I would start learning some new software skills but so far I haven't been motivated to do it yet.

I'm going through an adjustment period.  Somedays I feel great. I get out and have new experiences. I meet new people and have interesting conversations. I read articles and am inspired.  I pick up my guitar and learn to play a new song.
 But somedays I feel a bit aimless and struggle to motivate myself.  I watch a lot of streaming shows and movies on those days.  I can also get a bit depressed when I don't interact with other humans during the day.  I get stuck in my head and worry I'll become a couch potato.  And yet I would still choose that life over going back to my old job...haha.

One thing I've noticed is that I need to have a sense of accomplishment during my day and a sense of purpose in order to feel happy.  Or if I meet up with friends and hang out, that does the trick too.

Daisy

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #20 on: October 04, 2017, 08:59:49 PM »
I left my tech job a few months ago.  I was making more money than I ever thought I would and getting bonuses and stock.  I was well respected by my peers and it was quite a surprise to everyone when I left.  But I was waking up in the middle of the night in a panic that I would die before experiencing retirement.  I also couldn't stand all the BS of working for a corporation. @Daisy I know what you mean about Agile scrum.  If I had to go to another daily standup I was gonna shoot myself. Also I was kind of bored with the type of tech I was in (embedded SW development).  I had been doing it too long and didn't see any other options for me there without a big struggle to leave my department.  I thought that once I left my job I would start learning some new software skills but so far I haven't been motivated to do it yet.

I'm going through an adjustment period.  Somedays I feel great. I get out and have new experiences. I meet new people and have interesting conversations. I read articles and am inspired.  I pick up my guitar and learn to play a new song.
 But somedays I feel a bit aimless and struggle to motivate myself.  I watch a lot of streaming shows and movies on those days.  I can also get a bit depressed when I don't interact with other humans during the day.  I get stuck in my head and worry I'll become a couch potato.  And yet I would still choose that life over going back to my old job...haha.

One thing I've noticed is that I need to have a sense of accomplishment during my day and a sense of purpose in order to feel happy.  Or if I meet up with friends and hang out, that does the trick too.

Glad to hear we agree on Agile.

I read some of your past posts because your username sounded familiar from the FIRE 2017 thread. It's funny because there are so many posters on this forum that sometimes it takes a shout out from someone in their post to realize that you have always enjoyed posts from this particular person.

We do seem to have a lot in common. I ended up in embedded software as well, not sure how I got there, with a bit of impostor syndrome. I always knew I'd get out at some point and do something different with my life. Well, that time is now. I am now a fresh 3 days into FIRE. I won't get to decompress too much since I am leaving for a 3 week trip next week. Maybe the decompression will happen then.

I also used to play guitar when younger and may pick it up soon. I received a new guitar as a gift a few years ago and have barely touched it. I hope to pick it up soon in FIRE.

I also read you were into alternative medicine in one of your other posts. So am I. I've thought of studying it, but I don't really want to practice it and be stuck in the medical service industry with fixed hours, not now at least. But the subject interests me greatly as I have benefitted much from it. There is a lot of "physics" involved in alternative medicine which interests me a lot.

One thing we differ in is that I am not a vegan, but I do like to eat in a vegan way a lot of the time. But I am still a meat and egg eater.

I also like the beach a lot, but in another state on another coast from you. So I do know you are not me, but close.

nemesis

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 146
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2017, 12:14:41 AM »
Man this stuff hits so damn close to home it ain't funny.  I think it might be nice to FIRE and start a second career doing something more people related and rewarding.

Linda_Norway

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3363
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2017, 02:15:14 AM »
I understand your choice very well, GardenerB. I have also worked in the software branch for 2 decades and seen the outsourcing process. Many good developers have turned into architects to specify solutions that are to be implemented by programmers in eastern Europe or India. I have seen them becoming less and less happy in their job. Luckily for my company is that we still hire programmers to do programming. Although my company is currently planning to build a new generation system that we are supposed to outsource development on. And then our programmers will also turn into architects or programmers of the additional, not by the new system covered software.

I also hate daily scrum. Now I managed to get assigned a task that does not involve the other people on the scrum team (different software system), so I am allowed to not appear on the meetings for some weeks.

If I understand you correctly, you will not be FI when you quit your job. You'll just have a lot of FU money. So maybe you'll need to find some other job in the future. My DH was once without a job and found himself a simpler version in his area of expertise. He used to work as a group manager/office manager, but went back working as an advisor only. That was a relaxed job for him, but also very little challenging. After doing that for 2 years he got pretty bored doing that, combined with the company going into an oil depression and firing a lot of other employees. So he grabbed the opportunity to change position to a more interesting one when it came along.
Something else is that he after FIRE plans to do some of this hands-on advising work as a part-time seasonal job. But that will be much more on his own conditions, like choosing his projects.

SachaFiscal

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 242
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2017, 09:07:34 AM »
I left my tech job a few months ago.  I was making more money than I ever thought I would and getting bonuses and stock.  I was well respected by my peers and it was quite a surprise to everyone when I left.  But I was waking up in the middle of the night in a panic that I would die before experiencing retirement.  I also couldn't stand all the BS of working for a corporation. @Daisy I know what you mean about Agile scrum.  If I had to go to another daily standup I was gonna shoot myself. Also I was kind of bored with the type of tech I was in (embedded SW development).  I had been doing it too long and didn't see any other options for me there without a big struggle to leave my department.  I thought that once I left my job I would start learning some new software skills but so far I haven't been motivated to do it yet.

I'm going through an adjustment period.  Somedays I feel great. I get out and have new experiences. I meet new people and have interesting conversations. I read articles and am inspired.  I pick up my guitar and learn to play a new song.
 But somedays I feel a bit aimless and struggle to motivate myself.  I watch a lot of streaming shows and movies on those days.  I can also get a bit depressed when I don't interact with other humans during the day.  I get stuck in my head and worry I'll become a couch potato.  And yet I would still choose that life over going back to my old job...haha.

One thing I've noticed is that I need to have a sense of accomplishment during my day and a sense of purpose in order to feel happy.  Or if I meet up with friends and hang out, that does the trick too.

Glad to hear we agree on Agile.

I read some of your past posts because your username sounded familiar from the FIRE 2017 thread. It's funny because there are so many posters on this forum that sometimes it takes a shout out from someone in their post to realize that you have always enjoyed posts from this particular person.

We do seem to have a lot in common. I ended up in embedded software as well, not sure how I got there, with a bit of impostor syndrome. I always knew I'd get out at some point and do something different with my life. Well, that time is now. I am now a fresh 3 days into FIRE. I won't get to decompress too much since I am leaving for a 3 week trip next week. Maybe the decompression will happen then.

I also used to play guitar when younger and may pick it up soon. I received a new guitar as a gift a few years ago and have barely touched it. I hope to pick it up soon in FIRE.

I also read you were into alternative medicine in one of your other posts. So am I. I've thought of studying it, but I don't really want to practice it and be stuck in the medical service industry with fixed hours, not now at least. But the subject interests me greatly as I have benefitted much from it. There is a lot of "physics" involved in alternative medicine which interests me a lot.

One thing we differ in is that I am not a vegan, but I do like to eat in a vegan way a lot of the time. But I am still a meat and egg eater.

I also like the beach a lot, but in another state on another coast from you. So I do know you are not me, but close.

Wow! Kindred spirit.  I'll send you a PM :)

starguru

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 717
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2017, 09:52:13 AM »
I have left my very generously paid tech job and a small fortune in unvested stocks in the process when I FIREd four mouths ago.  I don't regret it at all.  I would obviously have more money had I stayed, but it turns out that my spreadsheets were right and that I had enough to fully fund my desired lifestyle so having more was not going to be a major enabler.  Time is something that you will never get back so jump on the occasion and start enjoying your life fully as soon as you can.
I’m curious how much you left on the table.  I just turned 40 and figure 45-50 would be the time to get out. 

But I like my job.  Work life balance is good.  The work itself can be very rewarding.   Pay is phenomenal. 

I just can’t see Microsoft outsourcing windows or its office suite,  or google outsourcing anything it does.   


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Bird In Hand

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 419
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #25 on: October 05, 2017, 11:53:46 AM »
Iím curious how much you left on the table.  I just turned 40 and figure 45-50 would be the time to get out. 

But I like my job.  Work life balance is good.  The work itself can be very rewarding.   Pay is phenomenal. 

I'm with you.  Enjoyable job, good work/life balance (for a full-time job at any rate), etc.  Ok, my pay isn't phenomenal, but it's very good, especially for work that I like doing.

Technically I could stop saving, let the stash grow, and after a couple years (early/mid 40's) I could work part-time until pulling the plug around age 50.  But for now the enjoyable job + good pay makes it easy to stick around.  There are also a couple golden handcuffs that could keep me working longer (part time) if I still enjoy my work at that point.

GardenerB

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 13
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #26 on: October 16, 2017, 09:05:19 PM »
Just saying thanks again for the comments here.

I have a pretty basic plan - save for the next 8-9 months to hit 1.5 years of living expenses.  Staying past July allows for keeping certain bonuses.

Appreciate the one comment there- that they like who they are better after quitting.  That's been a major point for me.  I tell people this has been my selfish phase - all about money only.  No time for volunteer stuff, no time to help at kid's school, no time to help partner with their time or work, etc.  Hopefully that can all change.  More time less money.  I am also keen to save money in terms of making things last or repairing things versus replacing (like Jacob on Early Retirement Extreme).  The money saved on things I can do myself will never replace the sheer dollar value of my current work but the satisfaction of having the time to do things will help.

Maybe I'll try a follow-up post in a year or 2 - or maybe that's been done/posted to death already?

At any rate - curious to see how it goes.  Just got to plow through the next 8-9 months!

TheMadRussian

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 28
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2017, 11:08:55 PM »
Well this thread hits really close to home. Few thoughts...

1) Agile. Not entirely a bunch of bullshit, but kind of a bunch of bullshit. If you're old enough to have seen how things were done before the relentless drudgery of daily Scrum stand-ups, demos, sprint planning, blah, blah, blah...you realize there are lots of other ways to succeed or fail. From my experience at three different companies, Agile works well to correct totally out-of-control processes or situations where there is zero oversight. But pretty much any methodology would do that...even waterfall. And I've seen it provide an initial spike of output from the energy and excitement that comes with its introduction at all three places. But people can't sustain those never-ending mini-deadlines and slow the f*** down pretty quick.

2) 43 here. Also at a tech megacorp in the BA and pretty burned out. Must be the time of life when this happens for a lot of people...and also must be why you just don't see that many people older than 45 in tech. When I was younger, I used to think it was because of age discrimination...which there is to an extent. But I suspect a lot of people simply walk away for various reasons, none of which need to be covered on a MMM forum. ;)

3) Anyone here consider contracting as a way to make it to the FI finish line? I still have a few years and that option is at the top of my mind right now to provide a little more flexibility in my life, but more importantly, to give some respite from office politics.

Linda_Norway

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3363
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2017, 01:48:02 AM »
3) Anyone here consider contracting as a way to make it to the FI finish line? I still have a few years and that option is at the top of my mind right now to provide a little more flexibility in my life, but more importantly, to give some respite from office politics.

My DH has considered this, as he is also doing consultancy work for his boss. He could just as well work as a consultant directly towards the customers, if he wanted to do the marketing bit himself. But he figured that you do get a lot of benefits from working for a bigger company, like health insurance (in our case that means faster help), insurances for becoming disabled, etc. He now intends to downgrade his position from being responsible group leader to just doing the technical consulting thing, the more fun part of the job, and work only 50-70%. Or first find a cheaper place to live, and get employed directly by one of the customers and work internally on call.

NaturallyHappier

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 129
  • Age: 52
  • Location: Near Philadelphia, PA
  • FIRED 3/10/2017
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #29 on: October 17, 2017, 07:43:31 PM »
I completed my final programming contract in March of this year.  I am now FIRE.  I can relate to this thread.  We should start a support group.  FIRE-IT.  I don't think it is any accident that that many here are from IT.  I still enjoy programming, just not all the BS that goes with it.

gerardc

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 725
  • Age: 34
  • Location: SF bay area
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #30 on: October 17, 2017, 08:04:21 PM »
See my thread here:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/it-high-earner-rush-to-fire-or-semi-retire/

In short, I was itching to "retire" when my stash was $300-400k but I stuck it out and I'm glad I did. Not too long after, my stash is now $700k, I got promoted, the job is getting a lot easier, I get paid more, I have more vacation... I *almost* don't need to FIRE now. I was miserable back then but my job just got almost bearable now. I almost quit, but glad I gave it a little more time. Things get better with time. I make ~$320k/year now

I wanted to do part-time or consultancy business, which I may still do later when my stash is $1M, but if the money is good, I see no point quitting way before that; you may not enjoy that particular PT work for many many years...

Schaefer Light

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1058
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #31 on: October 18, 2017, 09:01:29 AM »
See my thread here:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/it-high-earner-rush-to-fire-or-semi-retire/

In short, I was itching to "retire" when my stash was $300-400k but I stuck it out and I'm glad I did. Not too long after, my stash is now $700k, I got promoted, the job is getting a lot easier, I get paid more, I have more vacation... I *almost* don't need to FIRE now. I was miserable back then but my job just got almost bearable now. I almost quit, but glad I gave it a little more time. Things get better with time. I make ~$320k/year now

I wanted to do part-time or consultancy business, which I may still do later when my stash is $1M, but if the money is good, I see no point quitting way before that; you may not enjoy that particular PT work for many many years...

It sounds like you made it through what Seth Godin called "The Dip".  I'm glad you made the right choice.

BFGirl

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 706
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #32 on: October 18, 2017, 12:38:39 PM »
Man this stuff hits so damn close to home it ain't funny.  I think it might be nice to FIRE and start a second career doing something more people related and rewarding.

After 25 years of a "people" centered career, I am hoping to move into tech (software support) to get away from the drain of dealing with society's problems which can't be solved.

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5806
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #33 on: October 18, 2017, 02:48:20 PM »
I'm sure this topic has been discussed here on a few threads.  Just wanted to get some feedback/opinions from those who have done this- maybe shed some light on things that came about from quitting that I haven't thought of.  Good/bad/neutral.

I am finally taking control of my tech/cubicle farm job situation and have planned an exit.  Basically our tech co. outsources everything and I've become a Senior Email Engineer - all quantity no quality.  Rather than working on 2-3 cool Engineering projects per year I have to oversee/review 10-15 crappy ones all with outsourcing partners.

Rather than stew and ruminate, I've decided on an exit date for summer next year.  Will give me time to make sure my co-workers are autonomous and my departure a bit easier.  I have also really had it with my area of tech after 25 years - maybe LIVINGAFI "Litany of hate" sums it up best - highly recommended entry in his blog.  The fun part has been replaced with politics, administrative minutiae, paperwork, processes.  It's been a great 25 years and the pay is/was always very good.  It's only in the last 2-3 years (after turning 45), that I realized I wanted to make a major change.  Rather than try a small startup approach I have decided to get out of tech altogether.

I will have 1 to 1.5 years' worth of savings (cover expenses), and sort of cheating since my wife is still earning a lot and enjoying her line of work.  At the same time we are moving away from a very HCOL area to a middle-cost area (where there will not be any tech cube farms anyway!)  Same size house but will be mortgage free.  Plan is to free up time for both of us so that, rather than both of us working 10 hours per day and barely having time for family/friends/relaxing, she would continue her home business, I would help her for the next year so that she frees up time, then after 1 year see how things balance out.  We both have retirement stashes covered for the 4% SWR rule, and she has a DB pension on top of that.

Anyone else quit a high-paying job and make the 'leap'?  Comments on things that came about - good/bad/neutral?  Hard to bounce this off people since typically you get the 'you're lucky to have any job' - 'if you have a good job suck it up and keep it' - 'my Puritanical work ethic blah blah blah'.

I may regret giving up the money, maybe not.  And I don't know what lies ahead after the 1.5 years of savings runs out.  But I want to try the change and not just remain on autopilot for the money.

GB
I think about it all the time.  Especially now, a couple of years after 45.  We've had layoffs and outsourcing - and now I find myself doing a little tech work and overseeing a bunch of other people's details and projects.  And I kind of hate it.  And, the pay sort of sucks.  Combine a startup not making any money with three rounds of layoffs and being a woman (the only one in my building) ... blah.

I do get the "you are lucky to have a job" from many...mostly people who have been in the first few rounds of layoffs or are my age and older.  It's particularly hard in this small town to get hired after 50, and being a woman in engineering doesn't help either.

Sometimes I think I should just really look hard for a new job...if I could get back to *real* engineering for the same pay, I'd be stoked.

Linda_Norway

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3363
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #34 on: October 18, 2017, 05:08:15 PM »
I think about it all the time.  Especially now, a couple of years after 45.  We've had layoffs and outsourcing - and now I find myself doing a little tech work and overseeing a bunch of other people's details and projects.  And I kind of hate it.  And, the pay sort of sucks.  Combine a startup not making any money with three rounds of layoffs and being a woman (the only one in my building) ... blah.

I do get the "you are lucky to have a job" from many...mostly people who have been in the first few rounds of layoffs or are my age and older.  It's particularly hard in this small town to get hired after 50, and being a woman in engineering doesn't help either.

Sometimes I think I should just really look hard for a new job...if I could get back to *real* engineering for the same pay, I'd be stoked.

Women can be attractive to software companies who already have hired a women. Then they might hire more women to make it a better working climate for the women.

It sucks to work at a company that fires people. The motivation of all employees goes down and there is a strange atmosphere. Try to get out there if you can.

gerardc

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 725
  • Age: 34
  • Location: SF bay area
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #35 on: October 18, 2017, 10:40:25 PM »
It sounds like you made it through what Seth Godin called "The Dip".  I'm glad you made the right choice.
Interesting, I just read the Amazon preview of that book. I think I was using the idea of FIRE too early as a way to cope with the pain of blasting through that dip, but I wasn't ready for it yet, and it just distracted me. That's one issue with obsessing with this site before FIRE, that you need to be patient and once you're ready, you'll know. Anything else from that book worth reading? That seems like a rather light idea for a whole book, albeit interesting (although many popular books do that).


After 25 years of a "people" centered career, I am hoping to move into tech (software support) to get away from the drain of dealing with society's problems which can't be solved.

Get ready for the drain of dealing with software problems that can't be solved :D

Linda_Norway

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3363
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #36 on: October 19, 2017, 12:48:55 AM »
See my thread here:
https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/it-high-earner-rush-to-fire-or-semi-retire/

In short, I was itching to "retire" when my stash was $300-400k but I stuck it out and I'm glad I did. Not too long after, my stash is now $700k, I got promoted, the job is getting a lot easier, I get paid more, I have more vacation... I *almost* don't need to FIRE now. I was miserable back then but my job just got almost bearable now. I almost quit, but glad I gave it a little more time. Things get better with time. I make ~$320k/year now

I wanted to do part-time or consultancy business, which I may still do later when my stash is $1M, but if the money is good, I see no point quitting way before that; you may not enjoy that particular PT work for many many years...

Congrats on the better job and better pay. You will now reach FIRE much quicker.

I think you are right that by thinking that FIRE is close, we might forgot to focus on improving our current jobs. For all that have to work for several years, it is vital to make this period bearable so that we don't die mentally.

Schaefer Light

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1058
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #37 on: October 19, 2017, 06:13:13 AM »
It sounds like you made it through what Seth Godin called "The Dip".  I'm glad you made the right choice.
Interesting, I just read the Amazon preview of that book. I think I was using the idea of FIRE too early as a way to cope with the pain of blasting through that dip, but I wasn't ready for it yet, and it just distracted me. That's one issue with obsessing with this site before FIRE, that you need to be patient and once you're ready, you'll know. Anything else from that book worth reading? That seems like a rather light idea for a whole book, albeit interesting (although many popular books do that).

It's a very short book, and I agree that it's a light idea for a book.  I wasn't a huge fan.

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5806
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #38 on: October 19, 2017, 09:13:30 AM »
I think about it all the time.  Especially now, a couple of years after 45.  We've had layoffs and outsourcing - and now I find myself doing a little tech work and overseeing a bunch of other people's details and projects.  And I kind of hate it.  And, the pay sort of sucks.  Combine a startup not making any money with three rounds of layoffs and being a woman (the only one in my building) ... blah.

I do get the "you are lucky to have a job" from many...mostly people who have been in the first few rounds of layoffs or are my age and older.  It's particularly hard in this small town to get hired after 50, and being a woman in engineering doesn't help either.

Sometimes I think I should just really look hard for a new job...if I could get back to *real* engineering for the same pay, I'd be stoked.

Women can be attractive to software companies who already have hired a women. Then they might hire more women to make it a better working climate for the women.

It sucks to work at a company that fires people. The motivation of all employees goes down and there is a strange atmosphere. Try to get out there if you can.
I would totally go into software if I could program my way out of a paper bag.  There are a lot of new software companies in town.

My husband's company (which is fantastic) does a lot of programming work/ proprietary software.  Maybe when I'm no longer in the trenches I'll learn to program more than the tiny bit of sql, Access, and jmp scripting that I do now.

Mr. Green

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1741
  • Age: 35
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #39 on: October 19, 2017, 09:26:54 AM »
I quit my tech job twice in the last two years. Went back the first time because I was freaked out by the transition from saving to drawdown. It's definitely taking some getting used to. Healthcare is a big concern. Make sure you have a plan for you time after quitting. That has been the biggest source of stress and second guessing for me.

gerardc

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 725
  • Age: 34
  • Location: SF bay area
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #40 on: October 19, 2017, 07:27:06 PM »
I quit my tech job twice in the last two years. Went back the first time because I was freaked out by the transition from saving to drawdown. It's definitely taking some getting used to. Healthcare is a big concern. Make sure you have a plan for you time after quitting. That has been the biggest source of stress and second guessing for me.

How much was your stash when you quit the first time and the second time?

It seems a transition period (part-time) would address the psychological side, even if just $10k/year that can ease your mind, and keep a foot in the door, occupy some of your time, etc.

Mr. Green

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1741
  • Age: 35
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #41 on: October 20, 2017, 07:53:12 AM »
I quit my tech job twice in the last two years. Went back the first time because I was freaked out by the transition from saving to drawdown. It's definitely taking some getting used to. Healthcare is a big concern. Make sure you have a plan for you time after quitting. That has been the biggest source of stress and second guessing for me.

How much was your stash when you quit the first time and the second time?

It seems a transition period (part-time) would address the psychological side, even if just $10k/year that can ease your mind, and keep a foot in the door, occupy some of your time, etc.
Our stash was about $1.1 million last summer. It was about $1.5 million this past summer, thanks to the extra boost from returning to work and some property appreciation (we're selling).

I did actually transition to being half time in January and ran that out to June but I just couldn't sustain it. I'd lost any desire to do the job. I'm considering taking up a part-time job now just to occupy myself a bit and provide a little cash. I think it will help ease me into the transition. It's definitely been hard going from saving 200k a year to nothing. All in good time. I've learned a lot of patience in 2017.

dresden

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 36
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #42 on: October 22, 2017, 04:40:39 PM »
Caring is tough.  Iíve seen so many people ďretire in placeĒ over the years, but itís not something I would ever do.  It also makes my job tougher because I want to do a great job and want my company to see the value in what I do.  Iíve seen people skate by 10 years being useless.

I had a really tough year working over 60 hrs / week for several months while recovering from bad car accident injuries.  I am going part time rather than quitting, but I also like the people I work with and for.   The extra work couldnít be avoided and the whole team is in the same boat as me. I am 51 and not quite ready for FIRE mentally or financially, but the part time work can really help me bridge the gap for the next 9 years before my pension starts.

SugarMountain

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 561
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #43 on: October 24, 2017, 03:03:20 PM »
Oh man, this thread hits home. I've clawed my way to middle management at a mega software corp. The last couple of years have gotten progressively more stressful and less enjoyable, with the last 6 months among the most stressful of my career.

GardenerB

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 13
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #44 on: October 24, 2017, 07:59:07 PM »
I still struggle with the one side of 'you should be thankful to even have a job - and a well-paying one' versus the other side of 'life's too short to spend all your time working at something you hate'.

The fun stuff used to be 80-90% of the work.  Now 95% of the work is simply being an administrator (hence my 'Senior Email Engineer' self-designation).  It's no wonder I take so much more enjoyment creating anything else outside work (gardening, construction/carpentry, fixing/building etc.)  Digging a darn hole for a plant is never interrupted every 1.5 minutes by an email ("hey - how's that hole-digging coming along?"  "Behind a bit?  Sounds like we should have a meeting"  "I'll loop some more managers into the hole-digging delay meeting, then Skype/OCS/IM you if you don't answer my emails within 8 seconds")

I am jealous of anyone at my work who can sit and work on a problem/project/issue for an hour or more straight.  That is work, no matter what it is (hole digging or designing something or solving a problem).

I think after I decompress (or decompose?) I'll do all I can to get my focus back and learn to think clearly again.  It's not worth making the money if your head is scattered - but then that darn 'lucky to have a job' guy kicks in again.

Linda_Norway

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3363
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #45 on: October 25, 2017, 12:07:27 AM »
I still struggle with the one side of 'you should be thankful to even have a job - and a well-paying one' versus the other side of 'life's too short to spend all your time working at something you hate'.

The fun stuff used to be 80-90% of the work.  Now 95% of the work is simply being an administrator (hence my 'Senior Email Engineer' self-designation).  It's no wonder I take so much more enjoyment creating anything else outside work (gardening, construction/carpentry, fixing/building etc.)  Digging a darn hole for a plant is never interrupted every 1.5 minutes by an email ("hey - how's that hole-digging coming along?"  "Behind a bit?  Sounds like we should have a meeting"  "I'll loop some more managers into the hole-digging delay meeting, then Skype/OCS/IM you if you don't answer my emails within 8 seconds")

I am jealous of anyone at my work who can sit and work on a problem/project/issue for an hour or more straight.  That is work, no matter what it is (hole digging or designing something or solving a problem).

<...>

Thanks for explaining our day to day job in the software industry. Mine is exactly so.

One of my colleagues had a serious burnout with anxiety issues. After a year with sickleave he is back, but says he functions best if he has just got a few well defined tasks to work with and not so many distractions all day. My thought was that the is not only him. We all would work so much more effectively without the numerous distractions all day long.
And even though we use the "SCRUM, but..." method where a scrum master is supposed to shield the workers from distractions, this does of course not work in practice.

My DH is talking about perhaps working 50% in our current jobs for a transition to FIRE. I would then rather work in some fun job, instead of a stressful job. DH thinks our current jobs pay much more and are therefore a better alternative. Here we disagree a bit. Maybe, I'd rather work fulltime until FI and then really quit and only do small fun jobs, while DH can do what he wants and sidegig in his current field of expertise.

99to1percent

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 30
    • https://99to1percent.com
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #46 on: October 27, 2017, 11:20:33 AM »
Yes, it's doable.  If you get bored later on, try some consulting/contracting and/or do your own thing.  That's part of the reason, we are able to bring in $400K+/yr with little stress.

SugarMountain

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 561
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #47 on: November 02, 2017, 11:57:47 AM »
I still struggle with the one side of 'you should be thankful to even have a job - and a well-paying one' versus the other side of 'life's too short to spend all your time working at something you hate'.

The fun stuff used to be 80-90% of the work.  Now 95% of the work is simply being an administrator (hence my 'Senior Email Engineer' self-designation).  It's no wonder I take so much more enjoyment creating anything else outside work (gardening, construction/carpentry, fixing/building etc.)  Digging a darn hole for a plant is never interrupted every 1.5 minutes by an email ("hey - how's that hole-digging coming along?"  "Behind a bit?  Sounds like we should have a meeting"  "I'll loop some more managers into the hole-digging delay meeting, then Skype/OCS/IM you if you don't answer my emails within 8 seconds")

I am jealous of anyone at my work who can sit and work on a problem/project/issue for an hour or more straight.  That is work, no matter what it is (hole digging or designing something or solving a problem).

<...>

Thanks for explaining our day to day job in the software industry. Mine is exactly so.

One of my colleagues had a serious burnout with anxiety issues. After a year with sickleave he is back, but says he functions best if he has just got a few well defined tasks to work with and not so many distractions all day. My thought was that the is not only him. We all would work so much more effectively without the numerous distractions all day long.
And even though we use the "SCRUM, but..." method where a scrum master is supposed to shield the workers from distractions, this does of course not work in practice.

My DH is talking about perhaps working 50% in our current jobs for a transition to FIRE. I would then rather work in some fun job, instead of a stressful job. DH thinks our current jobs pay much more and are therefore a better alternative. Here we disagree a bit. Maybe, I'd rather work fulltime until FI and then really quit and only do small fun jobs, while DH can do what he wants and sidegig in his current field of expertise.

Don't forget the fun meetings, which are all concalls, often at weird times because everyone is scattered across the globe.  And because they are concalls & webconferences, everybody is "multi-tasking", i.e. posting on MMM, so they are ineffective and inefficient.

GardenerB

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 13
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #48 on: June 13, 2018, 10:30:00 PM »
Well pulled the plug recently and last day is first week of July.

Made the savings targets and managed to live comfortably on much-reduced income as practice for last 9 months.  Got the usual responses from coworkers in that you are either retired and rich or going to another company.  No other replies as if there is no other possible reason to leave a job.  Cannot be bothered to explain to this type of mindset.

On to the next venture soon.  Looking forward to lack of email decompression.

albireo13

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 431
  • Location: New England
Re: Thoughts on quitting high-paying tech job
« Reply #49 on: June 14, 2018, 06:02:39 AM »
Wow, this sounds like me except I am an old fart at 62yo.  I have OMY syndrome and plan to pull the plug Q1 of 2020.  Not really RE but, oh well.

  I am a HW R&D electrical engineer at MegaCorp, specializing in analog design.  2 years ago the Agile approach, with daily scrums, was foisted upon us but ... it didn't take.   : )
Over the years management has been pursuing different ways of micromanaging.  The beauracracy and paperwork has become insane.
Most of it is generating CYA paperwork which never gets read.  It has become mind numbing working there ... check your brain at the door when you arrive in the morning!

Still, I get paid well so, I rationalize it by telling myself that I am being paid very well for sitting in yet another useless meeting while the oxygen in the room is being depleted by the meeting organizer chirping away.    LOL

  The part I have a hard time with is that 90% of my work is adding nothing to improve the product or to make a difference to the customer.   It's not about working on "fun stuff" to me.  It's about working on stuff that makes a difference.

   More and more, work is being outsourced and the job is becoming spec-management and email traffic cop work.   My current project has the development team split up across continents.  My team is on the USA east coast ... part of the team is on the west coast ... and the other part of the team is in Asia.   It makes for ridiculous meeting schedules.
Answering basic issue questions used to take an hour and a walk down the hall.  Now, it takes at 1-2 days, due to language barriers and time zones. 
 It sure looks good on paper, with a lower bottom-line development cost but, the inefficiencies are astounding.  However, this doesn't show up in the cost sheet.  If schedules are slipping, we just need to work harder and put in extra hours !!!!

    A few years ago I looked into changing to a smaller high-tech company.   Now, I think I'm "cooked" and all done with high tech and the corporate world in general.
Too many knuckleheads, mostly in management and at the high level.   It's funny ....  MegaCorp cannot tolerate knuckleheads at the worker-bee level.  You have to be productive and accountable to too many people.  Bad decision making is not tolerated.
The knuckleheads are either let go or they tend to move up the food chain to other positions in the organization where being a knucklehead is either an asset or has no bearing on their work.

   In any case, at this point in my life and career  I'd rather get a cabin in the woods, run a wood-stove shoppe, grow a long beard, and sit on my porch .... gnawing on turnips and swearing at passers-by!    LOL   
"Now where did I put my shotgun filled with rock salt???"