Author Topic: The reason I'm here.  (Read 8262 times)

strider3700

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 516
  • Location: northern BC
The reason I'm here.
« on: January 31, 2013, 01:50:43 PM »

It's from this page
http://iamexec.com/blog/countdown-of-life-how-much-time-do-you-have-left-infographic which appears to be an ad for cleaning services. But still I think it gets the point across very well.
   

August West

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 33
  • Age: 46
  • Location: Boise, Idaho
  • stop wasting your money
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #1 on: January 31, 2013, 02:35:12 PM »
hmmmmm....it looks like cutting back on working may pay off better than reducing my tooth brushing and showering.

GoStumpy

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 243
    • YNAB = The ultimate budgeting software
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2013, 02:53:20 PM »
More of a reason to enjoy work & household chores :)

jpo

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 518
  • Age: 33
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2013, 02:55:06 PM »
This is going on the cubicle wall next to Lacking Ambition's traps.

Honest Abe

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 376
  • Emancipate Yourself from Mental Slavery
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2013, 06:07:47 PM »
You left out the 2 years I spent playing World of Warcraft

strider3700

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 516
  • Location: northern BC
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2013, 06:17:31 PM »
playing blackops online last night one of the stats that flashes by at the bottom while loading is that people have spent 165,000 man years playing that game...  I'm sure WOW is way over that by now.

Jamesqf

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4047
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #6 on: January 31, 2013, 06:24:33 PM »
More of a reason to enjoy work & household chores :)

Exactly!  If I didn't enjoy doing what I do for work (well, most of it - nothing's perfect), I wouldn't be doing it.  It's the mental equivalent of hiking, biking, skiing, and all the other physical things I do instead of conserving my energy by sitting on the couch in front of a TV.  Likewise, I enjoy cooking & eating, working in the yard, because "...such gardens are not made By singing:-" Oh, how beautiful," and sitting in the shade".

marty998

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6947
  • Location: Sydney, Oz
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #7 on: January 31, 2013, 06:55:41 PM »
It's actually quite upsetting to read something like that. But inspiring that our goal here is to cut into that 91000 hours of working (age 20 - 65 perhaps?)

If you can finish at 35 or 40 then the difference to your net free time is enormous.

Le Dérisoire

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 107
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #8 on: January 31, 2013, 07:36:39 PM »
I stopped showering after seeing this image.

kudy

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 945
  • Age: 37
  • Location: RV Traveling the U.S.
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #9 on: January 31, 2013, 08:18:57 PM »
I hate stuff like this, because it marginalizes the joys of everyday life. This infographic assumes I wasn't really living during the tasks that added up to years counting down to the 9 they seem to think somehow matter more than the rest. Some of it is trivial, but who's to say my mental state while brushing my teeth isn't thrilling? Why is caring for children and loved ones considered a non-living chore? Isn't that where many people find their most joy? Am I not supposed to enjoy learning? Is eating so bad that it's just wasted time, or do people ritualize and indulge in eating and cooking because really it's awesome? I strive to stay in the moment, and enjoy life as it happens. I hope to always remember that even if some part of the day can be considered mundane, it can still be enjoyed, and your mind is always free to explore while folding the laundry or driving your car. Even my dreams last night were pretty wild, so I'm not counting off those 9.5 hours of restful awesome sleep just because I wasn't conscious.

This infographic may have *some* good intentions, but it really seems to be nonsense, marginalizing a life in order to sell a service.

It's not crazy to optimize your life - it's actually fun, and some of the more mundane things (especially working a job you don't really enjoy) can be slashed dramatically, but I find the mental exercise of finding the value in life engaging.

Jamesqf

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4047
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #10 on: February 01, 2013, 11:09:37 AM »
It's actually quite upsetting to read something like that. But inspiring that our goal here is to cut into that 91000 hours of working (age 20 - 65 perhaps?)

If you can finish at 35 or 40 then the difference to your net free time is enormous.

Your goal, perhaps, but not mine.  I have my reasons for seeking FI, but early retirement is not one of them.  I hope to be working - that is, doing something productive from which I derive income - well into my 80s or 90s, and even beyond.

I see what happens to too many people who retire.  For instance my neighbor, who retired a couple of years ago at 65, spend his time sitting in front of the TV sucking down beers, and now looks about as old as my other neighbor, who's 97 and was working up to a year or so ago.

Le Dérisoire

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 107
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #11 on: February 01, 2013, 12:16:14 PM »
well into my 80s or 90s, and even beyond.

Are you a cyborg?

William

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 195
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Nebraska
    • First Quarter Finance
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #12 on: February 01, 2013, 04:18:04 PM »
Well as MMM would say, life is great!  I don't see myself as only having nine years to pursue my passion!  I enjoy doing most of the "time wasters" listed.  Looks like I will be using my full 78 years and two months.  Hopefully even more!

Edit: I actually enjoy doing everything listed!  Maybe that's why I don't need to spend much money on "entertainment" because I am so interested in what I'm actually doing in my life.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2013, 04:20:14 PM by William »

Jamesqf

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4047
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #13 on: February 01, 2013, 04:23:26 PM »
well into my 80s or 90s, and even beyond.

Are you a cyborg?

No, just a human who's never bought into the "slow down, take it easy, act your age, maybe you ought to think about retiring/giving up the hiking/biking/skiing/horse riding/whatever" BS that too many people have tried to feed me over the years.  I'd rather wear out than rot from disuse, like so many people I see.

William

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 195
  • Age: 30
  • Location: Nebraska
    • First Quarter Finance
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #14 on: February 01, 2013, 04:36:50 PM »
I understand and respect what you're saying.  My four grandparents are still alive.  All had similar health when they all started retiring.  One on them has never fully retired.  He is the oldest at 92 and he is mentally and physically far better off than the other three.  The other three are watching tv, forgetting to take their pills, and honestly it is very sad.  I think fulfilling work gives you a reason to wake up in the morning and no one should ever underestimate the power of purpose.

velocistar237

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1422
  • Location: Metro Boston
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #15 on: February 01, 2013, 06:38:06 PM »
This is going on the cubicle wall next to Lacking Ambition's traps.

Originally from here:
http://buttersafe.com/2011/01/27/traps/

Jamesqf

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4047
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #16 on: February 01, 2013, 10:02:32 PM »
I think fulfilling work gives you a reason to wake up in the morning and no one should ever underestimate the power of purpose.

Yeah, and then there's the whole "use it or lose it" aspect.  Keep your body and your mind active, and they'll both work better and last longer than if you let them idle away.

This is my major point of disagreement with the MMM blog, the idea that retirement - and especially early retirement - is a goal to strive for, instead of a horrible fate to be avoided at all costs.  Of course I'm a bit prejudiced, since I am (if I ever told the truth about my age, and wasn't self-employed) closer than most to the point at which the specter of forced retirement begins to loom.

At the same time, we don't want to overdo working, as so many people in this country (the US) seem to.  All too often, it's a matter of either too much or none at all; a choice between putting in 80+ hour weeks, or hitting the unemployment lines.  Myself, I aim for a 30/30 average: work about 30 hours a week, for 30 weeks of the year.

Purple

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 37
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #17 on: February 02, 2013, 01:29:07 PM »
I love your 30/30 objective James.

Over the past decade I have done every version of no work, part time, full time and work-life juggle imaginable. Mostly this has been to optimise as far as possible in early childhood years.

In my experience, I reckon 30/30 would be right on in terms of the best blend - it is a flexible enough target to allow for intense bursts of dedicated effort (I find that a lack of flow can be a problem with a 2-3 day per week arrangement), but also enough time to invest thoroughly in all aspects of life and also to have other adventures.

Good one.

Ozstache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 861
  • Age: 52
  • Location: Oztralia
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2013, 01:51:48 PM »
I could do the 30 hour a week bit in my current line of work, but the 30 weeks bit would cause a problem as my organisation wants nothing less than a "show up every week of the year (sans normal annual holidays) for work" effort. You guys are fortunate to have been able to secure such arrangements.

Kenoryn

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 76
  • Location: Ontario, Canada
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #19 on: February 02, 2013, 01:59:32 PM »
This is my major point of disagreement with the MMM blog, the idea that retirement - and especially early retirement - is a goal to strive for, instead of a horrible fate to be avoided at all costs.  Of course I'm a bit prejudiced, since I am (if I ever told the truth about my age, and wasn't self-employed) closer than most to the point at which the specter of forced retirement begins to loom.

James, why on earth would early retirement mean you stop doing ANYTHING? you cited things like hiking, skiing, horseback riding, biking - those are not part of what most people do 9-5. Nor would be volunteering, renovating your house, travelling, learning new skills, creating art or furniture or whatever you like to create, playing music, spending time with friends, teaching others, etc. There's no reason early retirement would mean you abruptly give up all those things and start to spend all your time in front of your TV! (Unless that's what you already do with your free time.) "Early retirement" isn't retiring from life, it's just retiring from being forced to sit in a particular place doing a particular thing during a particular timeframe, (e.g., sitting on your ass in a cubicle typing from 9-5, five days a week) all decided by someone else, in exchange for the paycheque you need to continue living and doing the other things you love. If you  happen to LOVE sitting in a cubicle typing, or whatever else your job might be, you're free to do that after retirement, too! And perhaps you could even do it for free for a worthy cause rather than to make someone else money.

amyable

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 295
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #20 on: February 02, 2013, 04:35:19 PM »
I hate stuff like this, because it marginalizes the joys of everyday life.

I agree--while there are days when my job annoys me (mostly the paperwork), most of the time I find my work extremely inspiring.  And, who are these people who find eating to be a bothersome chore?  Cooking and eating are two of my favorite activities.  Most of my "laughing, playing and crying" have happened over some type of food or beverage.

Jamesqf

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4047
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2013, 10:45:18 AM »
James, why on earth would early retirement mean you stop doing ANYTHING? you cited things like hiking, skiing, horseback riding, biking - those are not part of what most people do 9-5. Nor would be volunteering, renovating your house, travelling, learning new skills, creating art or furniture or whatever you like to create, playing music, spending time with friends, teaching others, etc. There's no reason early retirement would mean you abruptly give up all those things and start to spend all your time in front of your TV! (Unless that's what you already do with your free time.) "Early retirement" isn't retiring from life, it's just retiring from being forced to sit in a particular place doing a particular thing during a particular timeframe, (e.g., sitting on your ass in a cubicle typing from 9-5, five days a week) all decided by someone else, in exchange for the paycheque you need to continue living and doing the other things you love. If you  happen to LOVE sitting in a cubicle typing, or whatever else your job might be, you're free to do that after retirement, too! And perhaps you could even do it for free for a worthy cause rather than to make someone else money.

Sorry, but for the vast majority, retirement as practiced in this society is retiring from life.  Sitting in front of the TV, or playing golf all day, that's what the pro-retirement lobby is selling.

Now I don't entirely disagree with your comments on sitting in a cubicle 9-5 (or 7 am to 10 pm), but that just illustrates how poorly most people's work life is organized.  It's the old "two wrongs don't make a right" thing.  And besides, those 14 hour days in the cubicle often involve solving interesting problems and pushing back the frontiers of knowledge a bit, so they have their own enjoyment.  The paycheck is nice, but it's as much as a token that my work is valuable than for the money itself.

Kenoryn

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 76
  • Location: Ontario, Canada
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2013, 01:19:31 PM »
Sorry, but for the vast majority, retirement as practiced in this society is retiring from life.  Sitting in front of the TV, or playing golf all day, that's what the pro-retirement lobby is selling.

Now I don't entirely disagree with your comments on sitting in a cubicle 9-5 (or 7 am to 10 pm), but that just illustrates how poorly most people's work life is organized.  It's the old "two wrongs don't make a right" thing.  And besides, those 14 hour days in the cubicle often involve solving interesting problems and pushing back the frontiers of knowledge a bit, so they have their own enjoyment.  The paycheck is nice, but it's as much as a token that my work is valuable than for the money itself.

Well, to each his own. But TV-watching retirement certainly isn't the idea that MMM is selling. Frankly, the people who can't come up with anything better to do than watch TV after retirement were probably boring people before retirement, as well. It wasn't the retirement that did that to them.

Ultimately, retirement comes down to the freedom to choose. If what you choose is to spend 14 hours in a cubicle, that's up to you. Still, there are all kinds of worthy organizations out there who are desperate for capable people to lend a hand, but can't afford to pay them, and the early-retired cubicle lovers could be continuing to contribute valuable things to whatever causes they believe in, as much or as little as they want. Seems like a good deal to me!

Jamesqf

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4047
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2013, 08:34:29 PM »
Well, to each his own. But TV-watching retirement certainly isn't the idea that MMM is selling.

But as I sometimes point out, MMM is not exactly retired by the common definition.  He has a construction business, plus a sideline writing what is apparently a profitable blog.  Indeed, by his definition I'd probably qualify as retired, too, since I've arranged my work life so that I work from home, and pretty much on my own schedule.  If I want to take off afternoons for skiing (as I have been lately), and work from say 6-11 pm, no problem.


Phoebe

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 222
  • Location: Wisconsin
    • Phoebe's Journey
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #24 on: February 03, 2013, 08:44:11 PM »
Quote
I'd rather wear out than rot from disuse

I totally agree with this.  My dad is a great example....he rides horses (has been thrown many times but keeps getting back up), does contstruction work, hunts and fishes, and enjoys life.  Many people tell him to stop doing some of these things (given his age, the fact that he had a congenital heart condition that required open heart surgery but is now fixed), but the fact is that he would be giving up part of who he is.

parkersharon32

  • Guest
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #25 on: February 03, 2013, 11:35:19 PM »
It’s a nice info graphic. Thanks for sharing.

DoubleDown

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2057
Re: The reason I'm here.
« Reply #26 on: February 04, 2013, 09:42:50 AM »
Frankly, the people who can't come up with anything better to do than watch TV after retirement were probably boring people before retirement, as well. It wasn't the retirement that did that to them.

This is very true, and reminds me of the simple (but overlooked) advice given to guys looking to be successful with the ladies, but it turns out they have nothing interesting to offer or say: If you want to "be" interesting, do interesting things!