Author Topic: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?  (Read 3112 times)

evme

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Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« on: August 07, 2021, 11:32:03 PM »
I need to replace my old refrigerator that died. The space in my kitchen for the fridge is small so I need something not very wide and saw this Samsung fridge that would fit. Only problem is I've heard/read bad things about Samsung refrigerators. Anyone have experience with them good or bad?

https://www.bestbuy.com/site/reviews/samsung-17-5-cu-ft-3-door-french-door-counter-depth-refrigerator-with-wifi-and-twin-cooling-plus-fingerprint-resistant-stainless-steel/6443500

SAR

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #1 on: August 08, 2021, 12:44:12 AM »
Short answer: YES!

I bought a samsung fridge about 7-8 years ago. It had electronic control modules, and they fail.

They send out repair guys who replace those modules under warranty, but then they fail again within days. I had that happen 3 times, from memory.

Bought from Sears and was able to return, but it was a massive PITA as Sears does not like to take returns. I ended up on the phone several times and for over 3 hours total. The trick is to get to the right person, and they have several people you will encounter first who seem like they are the right person, but they are not.

After that I had to figure out a replacement brand. The Sears rep couldn't recommend a specific brand or model, but I was able to ask in code: "What would be a brand/model that most people in my situation would end up getting"? Ended up with a Kenmore Elite (I had to check), and it has not skipped a beat.

Never again for me with either Samsung or Sears (did they go out of business? I hope so, it would be deserved)

gooki

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2021, 03:46:33 AM »
Avoid.

bklyncyclist

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2021, 04:46:58 AM »
Avoid.
Bought a high end Samsung refrigerator/dishwasher/stove combo.
A terrible mistake.
Never again buying ANYTHING Samsung.

Cranky

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #4 on: August 08, 2021, 05:35:05 AM »
I bought a Samsung fridge maybe 10 years ago now? It was on sale and the floor model and it fit my space. It has needed no repairs at all.

nereo

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #5 on: August 08, 2021, 05:47:28 AM »
Consumer Reports data show Samsung appliances (across all categories) ranked 20th for repair history out of 28 brands.  The repair history of their french-door refrigerators are Ďfairí (the second-to-last rating in a five-point scale).  That said, weíve had two samsung refrigerators in the last two homes and each had exactly one problem (which was the same - the drain clip needed to be replaced to prevent a thaw/defrost cycle).

Also: this is the MMM forums. Refrigerators are perhaps the greatest value in the used market. I come across nearly-new stainless refrigerators for around $200 on CL and Marketplace almost every week. Before you drop over $1400 after tax consider if thereís a better use for that extra $1k+ in your life.

reeshau

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #6 on: August 08, 2021, 06:41:09 AM »
Just to register the positive experience, I have owned 2 different Samsung refrigerators, in 2 different houses, and not had any problems.  The first one we had for 4 years before moving.  The second one we have had for just over a year.

I'd second the idea to look at used fridges, particularly now.  We were lucky to get ours last year; the first 4 places we worked with, both national chains and local appliance specialists, said we would have a four month wait for a factory delivery.  This year, the worst I heard of was someone promised a September 2022 delivery for an order this month.  (not Samsung)  it also seems like fridges often get moved out when people remodel their kitchens, not because of some physical defect.  We will be remodeling late next year, and will be replacing our counter-depth fridge with a full-depth one.

Dave1442397

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #7 on: August 08, 2021, 06:49:49 AM »
I wouldn't buy another Samsung fridge. We have a side-by-side that we bought in 2010, so we're lucky in that it's still working.

Four years ago, it started feeling warmer and warmer inside the fridge, and I thought it might need major repairs. I did some research and found a YouTube video on how to fix the problem, which involved taking all the shelves out, removing the interior panel behind the shelves, and then spending an hour or so with a hairdryer melting off the iceberg that had formed back there. I've had to do that once more since then.

Anecdotally, I see local FB posts of people complaining that local service people won't even come look at their Samsung fridges, and the wait list for an approved service vendor is months long.

I would just go with what Consumer Reports recommends. Last time I looked, I believe Whirlpool came out on top.

Check to see who actually owns the appliance company you're looking at. The Sears Kenmore appliances cam be manufactured by quite a few companies, including Samsung.

https://applianceassistant.com/New-Appliances/Who-Made-What.php

OtherJen

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #8 on: August 08, 2021, 07:57:01 AM »
We're replacing our Samsung fridge after 17 years because we can't get repair parts for it and the repair would cost more than it's worth. Given it's age, we opted to put the cash towards a new model. We hadn't had any problems with it previously. Only reason why we didn't go with another Samsung is because there weren't any models available in our price and size ranges.

iluvzbeach

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2021, 10:27:52 AM »
Overall weíve had a poor experience with Samsung products. Our current house was new when we bought it and the builder had installed Samsung appliances (stove, oven, microwave and dishwasher), so we bought a Samsung refrigerator to match. Yes, Iím a bit OCD in that way. While we havenít had an issue with any of these appliances in the 5 1/2 years weíve had them, Iím just not happy with the overall quality. The ďbuttonsĒ on the panels are hard to push, the drawers on the dishwasher donít slide easily, the fridge is noisy, etc. Iíd love to replace them with better quality but I am mustachian enough to not spend money to replace something that works.

My really poor experience with Samsung was back in 2006 or 2007 when plasma TVs were still a thing (and pre-MMM days) and I spent $2500 on a piano black Samsung plasma TV. It is the only time I ever bought an extended service warranty and I was sure glad I did as 18 months in the damn thing completely died. BestBuy tried to repair it once and then said to use the extended warranty to buy a new TV. I asked the repairman which brands he recommended and he told me he couldnít officially recommend one but that he could say the ones he least frequently performed repairs for were Sony. So, I used the store credit to buy a Sony LCD and it last until just a year or two ago. We replaced it with another Sony. I realize Sony doesnít make major kitchen appliances but thatís my story for staying away from Samsung when at all possible.

I prefer Whirlpool or Frigidaire, maybe even Maytag or KitchenAid (I think they are all related), kitchen appliances. If I was totally loaded Iíd probably do Wolf or Viking, but Iím not, so Iíll stick with the less expensive but still decent stuff.

seattlecyclone

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2021, 10:33:02 AM »
I've had two Samsung refrigerators. The first one came with my house. The fridge was likely several years old at that point. They made the absolutely boneheaded decision to put the temperature control panel on the outside of the fridge right at toddler eye level. The buttons made a kid-pleasing beeping sound, so they were of course a popular plaything and we therefore needed to check from time to time to make sure the settings were still reasonable. The front of the cheese drawer was cracked when we got it, and so were two of the shelves in the door. At one point the cracks in the bottom door shelf got so bad that I had to shore it up with some thin pieces of wood. That repair bought us several months before the plastic bits holding up the shelf gave way. No way to repair that without replacing the whole door. That's when we decided to replace it.

We lucked into a free fridge from friends who had just purchased a house that they intended to gut and remodel. They didn't really want to store it in the interim, and it wouldn't have looked right in their carefully designed new kitchen anyway, so we took it off their hands. Unluckily, it was another Samsung, basically the same as the one we had just jettisoned. It seems like in between manufacturing the two fridges they realized their mistake with the temperature controls. Instead of moving them to a different location they added a child lock button, so that's something at least. So far all the plastic bits inside the fridge are mostly intact, but the middle shelf on the door is showing a baby crack, so we'll see how much longer it lasts.

So far the main mechanical cooling functions of both fridges have been perfectly reliable, but I still probably wouldn't be inclined to buy a new Samsung fridge.

Loretta

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #11 on: August 08, 2021, 10:46:47 AM »
My Samsung TV only lasted 4 years, so I am not a fan. 

Dicey

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #12 on: August 08, 2021, 11:13:00 AM »
Avoid. Hard stop.

Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #13 on: August 08, 2021, 12:32:01 PM »
Dang. Didn't know Samsung had such a bad rep for refrigerators. We've had ours for basically 10 years, and it's only needed one minor fix to it. Hopefully we're an exception.

kina

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #14 on: August 08, 2021, 12:36:51 PM »
Based on the experience of my SIL who is on her 4th (5th?) icemaker fix in under 2 years, yes, you should avoid Samsung.

If you simply must get a Samsung, by all means get an extended warranty.

Duke03

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #15 on: August 08, 2021, 02:57:10 PM »
DO NOT BUY ANY SAMSUNG APPLIANCE ESPECIALLY A REFIGERATOR!!!!!!

OtherJen

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #16 on: August 08, 2021, 03:20:42 PM »
I had forgotten that our TV is also a Samsung. It's at least 15 years old. A couple of buttons on the remote control don't work so well, but that's the only problem we've had.

I wonder why we've had much better than average luck.

Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #17 on: August 08, 2021, 03:59:33 PM »
I had forgotten that our TV is also a Samsung. It's at least 15 years old. A couple of buttons on the remote control don't work so well, but that's the only problem we've had.

I wonder why we've had much better than average luck.

I've never heard anything one way or the other about refrigerators until now. However, I have heard positive things about Samsung TV's (and ours are and have done great), and I'm thinking the "don't buy any Samsung electronics" is based more on kitchen appliances than TV's.

franklin4

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #18 on: August 08, 2021, 04:08:33 PM »
I had an LG dishwasher (but I think Samsung is very similar repairwise) in a rental and the tenant said it wasn't washing very well. It seemed to me the spray was weak. I figured some part was failing and a repair would be easy but the appliance repairman I've worked with for years said he couldn't work on it because the manufacturer did not share troubleshooting info or part numbers or anything. I asked if he could suggest someone else who could work on it - his response was "look for the firm with the least awful online reviews." Reviews for the factory authorized repair companies (there weren't many) were all terrible. So I took the dishwasher to the dump and bought a Whirlpool.

I don't know that Samsung appliances are any less reliable than other brands but if it's a nightmare to get it fixed that's pretty important!

Papa bear

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #19 on: August 08, 2021, 04:16:28 PM »
Iíd like to add an exclamation point or +1 to every one of these.  AVOID SAMSUNG LIKE THE PLAGUE.

They are bad products and they donít stand behind them.  Fixes to problems are better off searched on YouTube with macgyvered solutions. 2/3 fridges in the family have been bad.  Whirlpool products would be my suggestion, as they have held up at 15+ rentals and other homes.   


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Dicey

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #20 on: August 08, 2021, 04:19:26 PM »
Samsung: All sizzle, no substance. Completely unmustachian, IMO.

wxdevil

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #21 on: August 08, 2021, 04:23:54 PM »
Four years ago, it started feeling warmer and warmer inside the fridge, and I thought it might need major repairs. I did some research and found a YouTube video on how to fix the problem, which involved taking all the shelves out, removing the interior panel behind the shelves, and then spending an hour or so with a hairdryer melting off the iceberg that had formed back there. I've had to do that once more since then.

https://applianceassistant.com/New-Appliances/Who-Made-What.php

I have that exact same problem with mine. I have to do this every 6-12 months on average, but my fridge is still alive. Also had some ice maker issues but I've since been able to fix it. Unfortunately, I inherited the fridge when I bought the house, but I would NEVER buy one after this.

SquashingDebt

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #22 on: August 09, 2021, 05:19:25 AM »
We just bought a Samsung refrigerator in June... my partner specifically wanted that brand because it's done well for him appliance-wise in the past.  I guess we'll see how it does for us!  These replies are not encouraging, haha.

exige

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #23 on: August 09, 2021, 08:04:01 AM »
Avoid!

seattlecyclone

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #24 on: August 09, 2021, 09:52:15 AM »
I forgot to mention... Our first Samsung fridge had a layer of ice gradually build up on the bottom of the freezer. This must have been condensation from somewhere because there was no water connection to the appliance. Every month or two the bottom drawer in the freezer would stop closing all the way and that was my cue to take out the drawer and use a screwdriver to pry up the big ice chunk underneath.

nereo

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #25 on: August 09, 2021, 10:07:58 AM »
I forgot to mention... Our first Samsung fridge had a layer of ice gradually build up on the bottom of the freezer. This must have been condensation from somewhere because there was no water connection to the appliance. Every month or two the bottom drawer in the freezer would stop closing all the way and that was my cue to take out the drawer and use a screwdriver to pry up the big ice chunk underneath.

A couple people have posted this, and it's a known problem with a lot of Samsung refrigerators (including two of my own). It's caused by the drain clip being too short, and the condensation plug icing over.  That's the bad news.

The good news is there is a cheap and easy fix (though still annoying).  First you have to completely defrost your fridge, which - given the insulation along the back panel - can take a couple of days. Then remove the back panel (it's just a series of screws), find the defrosting coil and then add a longer metal wire which extends down into the drain hole.  This prevents future freeze-ups as the defrosting coil heats the wire, which then melts any ice that builds up in the drain hole.

Stupid design flaw, easy fix, now several years later and I've had no issues with either unit.

Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #26 on: August 09, 2021, 03:31:13 PM »
I forgot to mention... Our first Samsung fridge had a layer of ice gradually build up on the bottom of the freezer. This must have been condensation from somewhere because there was no water connection to the appliance. Every month or two the bottom drawer in the freezer would stop closing all the way and that was my cue to take out the drawer and use a screwdriver to pry up the big ice chunk underneath.

A couple people have posted this, and it's a known problem with a lot of Samsung refrigerators (including two of my own). It's caused by the drain clip being too short, and the condensation plug icing over.  That's the bad news.

The good news is there is a cheap and easy fix (though still annoying).  First you have to completely defrost your fridge, which - given the insulation along the back panel - can take a couple of days. Then remove the back panel (it's just a series of screws), find the defrosting coil and then add a longer metal wire which extends down into the drain hole.  This prevents future freeze-ups as the defrosting coil heats the wire, which then melts any ice that builds up in the drain hole.

Stupid design flaw, easy fix, now several years later and I've had no issues with either unit.

I'll second this in its entirety. It's been the only problem I've had in roughly 10 years (ridiculous though it was that it was there in the first place), and once fixed, it has caused no more issues.

Arbitrage

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #27 on: August 10, 2021, 07:53:36 AM »
We bought a Samsung fridge when we refreshed our kitchen appliances a few years ago.  Other appliances were Whirlpool; the Samsung was purchased because it was an oddly sized space and that was the only French door fridge that would fit the space.  Mostly we were very pleased with the fridge; the sole problem was a plastic bracket that broke and required replacement.  Can't say whether it was faulty or poor design.  One other annoyance was the difficulty in cleaning some of the shelves in the event of a spill, as liquid could seep into areas that could not be cleaned without destroying the shelf. 

We moved a few months ago, and inherited a high-end fancy Samsung fridge.  Lots of broken shelves inside that needed replacement, but the previous owners damaged nearly everything in the house, so I can't say if that can be blamed on Samsung.  The ice maker is also completely frosted up and nonfunctional, which is another project on my to-do list. 

Not sure if the anecdotes are helpful or not, but overall they've been ok.  I wouldn't seek out another one, but I wouldn't avoid like the plague either.

BigEasyStache

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #28 on: August 10, 2021, 08:12:27 AM »
I put all new appliances in my kitchen over the past 2 years, all Samsung.  The fridge was first.  It's a pretty high end bought from Home Depot.  Has water/ice on the French freezer door, deli pull out draw in the middle, freezer on the bottom.  No problems so far and I really like the deli draw because it's just above freezing temp.  The unit is very, very quiet also.  I replaced an old miserable Sub Zero (that came with the house).  I would never, never recommend a Sub Z.  I would have no problem recommending the Samsung fridge based on my experience.

The other appliances are Stove/Range, dishwasher and microwave.  All over a year, not issues so far.

My beer fridge in the garage is a 25 year old Amana, still going strong.

Louisville

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #29 on: August 10, 2021, 08:21:34 AM »
For about the past 10 years, we've been all Samsung all the time. Two different houses. Stoves, friges, washers/dryer, dishwasher, TVs.
Never had a complaint, look great, and all still working like champs.

Cadman

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #30 on: August 10, 2021, 08:23:50 AM »
As one who associates with those in the appliance field, I would absolutely avoid Samsung. Hard Stop. In fact, there's a class action lawsuit in the works, and a FB group has sprung up with over 76,000 members specifically regarding dissatisfaction with their fridges.

exige

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #31 on: August 10, 2021, 08:29:45 AM »
As one who associates with those in the appliance field, I would absolutely avoid Samsung. Hard Stop. In fact, there's a class action lawsuit in the works, and a FB group has sprung up with over 76,000 members specifically regarding dissatisfaction with their fridges.


 I should find this group haha

reeshau

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #32 on: August 10, 2021, 09:56:55 AM »
As one who associates with those in the appliance field, I would absolutely avoid Samsung. Hard Stop. In fact, there's a class action lawsuit in the works, and a FB group has sprung up with over 76,000 members specifically regarding dissatisfaction with their fridges.

Not to excuse Samsung, but it appears Whirlpool recently settled their own class action on drain tube problems.

https://topclassactions.com/lawsuit-settlements/consumer-products/appliances/906971-whirlpool-agrees-21m-leaky-refrigerator-class-action-settlement/

Even Apple has its haters:
https://www.theverge.com/2021/4/1/22360781/apple-flexgate-stage-light-class-action-lawsuit-defective-cable

I don't think you will find a major manufacturer today that doesn't have a group of dissatisfied people.  This is all mass production, and there will be "acceptable" levels of defects, given the economics of eliminating all of them.  It is a fair thing to do your research, and Consumer Reports is one of the best places in the world to do so.  But if you are hunting for the unicorn that will guarantee satisfaction, such a beast does not exist.  It's always a roll of the dice to some extent.  And given the supply chain strains of the last two years, my professional opinion as a manufacturing engineer is that defects over the life of products will rise, for those built in 2020 and 2021.


Duke03

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #33 on: August 10, 2021, 10:08:52 AM »
To anyone that does have a Samsung fridge and it's freezing up in the back, there is a fix to the problem that I have found.  You have to remove all the shelving and the back panel on the inside of the fridge that will expose the cooling coils. It's simple trust me. The reason they freeze up is that dumb Samsung put the defroster at the very top of the coil. It's attached with black sticky tape.  Remove the tape and place the heating element at the very bottom of the coil.  It will never freeze up again and you won't have that annoying sound of the fan hitting the ice that is built up on the coil. 

On the crappy ice maker design unfortunately there is not a fix.  The only thing that will work is you have to keep emptying the ice bin to keep it from filling up.  Once it's full and it stays full for over 3 days it will cause the ice maker to freeze and than it all stops working..

achvfi

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #34 on: August 10, 2021, 10:14:54 AM »
I had bad experience. Avoid Samsung refrigerator.

SavinMaven

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #35 on: August 10, 2021, 04:37:59 PM »
Avoid

geekette

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #36 on: August 10, 2021, 05:02:42 PM »
I forgot to mention... Our first Samsung fridge had a layer of ice gradually build up on the bottom of the freezer. This must have been condensation from somewhere because there was no water connection to the appliance. Every month or two the bottom drawer in the freezer would stop closing all the way and that was my cue to take out the drawer and use a screwdriver to pry up the big ice chunk underneath.

A couple people have posted this, and it's a known problem with a lot of Samsung refrigerators (including two of my own). It's caused by the drain clip being too short, and the condensation plug icing over.  That's the bad news.

The good news is there is a cheap and easy fix (though still annoying).  First you have to completely defrost your fridge, which - given the insulation along the back panel - can take a couple of days. Then remove the back panel (it's just a series of screws), find the defrosting coil and then add a longer metal wire which extends down into the drain hole.  This prevents future freeze-ups as the defrosting coil heats the wire, which then melts any ice that builds up in the drain hole.

Stupid design flaw, easy fix, now several years later and I've had no issues with either unit.

I'll second this in its entirety. It's been the only problem I've had in roughly 10 years (ridiculous though it was that it was there in the first place), and once fixed, it has caused no more issues.

We have the same known problem, but ours is a 10 year old Samsung French Door bottom freezer, and the condensation freezes under the deli drawer.  Our problem is that we can't seem to pull the fridge out (yes, we know about the feet).  The pantry is on one side of the fridge and we just can't wiggle the fridge out, even after emptying it. 

So every few weeks I pull out the drawer and sweep away the ice.  :: shrug ::

Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #37 on: August 10, 2021, 05:32:57 PM »
I forgot to mention... Our first Samsung fridge had a layer of ice gradually build up on the bottom of the freezer. This must have been condensation from somewhere because there was no water connection to the appliance. Every month or two the bottom drawer in the freezer would stop closing all the way and that was my cue to take out the drawer and use a screwdriver to pry up the big ice chunk underneath.

A couple people have posted this, and it's a known problem with a lot of Samsung refrigerators (including two of my own). It's caused by the drain clip being too short, and the condensation plug icing over.  That's the bad news.

The good news is there is a cheap and easy fix (though still annoying).  First you have to completely defrost your fridge, which - given the insulation along the back panel - can take a couple of days. Then remove the back panel (it's just a series of screws), find the defrosting coil and then add a longer metal wire which extends down into the drain hole.  This prevents future freeze-ups as the defrosting coil heats the wire, which then melts any ice that builds up in the drain hole.

Stupid design flaw, easy fix, now several years later and I've had no issues with either unit.

I'll second this in its entirety. It's been the only problem I've had in roughly 10 years (ridiculous though it was that it was there in the first place), and once fixed, it has caused no more issues.

We have the same known problem, but ours is a 10 year old Samsung French Door bottom freezer, and the condensation freezes under the deli drawer.  Our problem is that we can't seem to pull the fridge out (yes, we know about the feet).  The pantry is on one side of the fridge and we just can't wiggle the fridge out, even after emptying it. 

So every few weeks I pull out the drawer and sweep away the ice.  :: shrug ::

We did that for years before DW jumped on the problem, researched it, bought the part, and made the fix. I'm kind of lazy about stuff like that that can be worked around, but she rocks :-)!

geekette

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #38 on: August 10, 2021, 05:33:44 PM »
Please have her come over and help us move the fridge ;-)

evme

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #39 on: August 10, 2021, 06:08:40 PM »
And given the supply chain strains of the last two years, my professional opinion as a manufacturing engineer is that defects over the life of products will rise, for those built in 2020 and 2021.

So you're saying those products built specifically since COVID hit are likely to have more defects in general? Why is that?

lutorm

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #40 on: August 10, 2021, 06:30:31 PM »
Also: this is the MMM forums. Refrigerators are perhaps the greatest value in the used market. I come across nearly-new stainless refrigerators for around $200 on CL and Marketplace almost every week. Before you drop over $1400 after tax consider if thereís a better use for that extra $1k+ in your life.
I've always heard the opposite -- that the efficiency of refrigerators has been going up so fast that it's practically always a net win to buy a new rather than a 10-yr old used model because they use so much less energy.

mies

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #41 on: August 10, 2021, 06:53:04 PM »
I'm going to add to the chorus. Avoid them. I bought a side by side with an ice maker and water dispenser in 2010 and the freezer failed in 2013. My buddy also had a Samsung refrigerator where the freezer failed.

I bought a plain Whirlpool to replace it and It has run like a champion. Fewer features means fewer things to fail.

reeshau

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #42 on: August 10, 2021, 07:18:18 PM »
And given the supply chain strains of the last two years, my professional opinion as a manufacturing engineer is that defects over the life of products will rise, for those built in 2020 and 2021.

So you're saying those products built specifically since COVID hit are likely to have more defects in general? Why is that?

1)  Workplaces everywhere are having difficulty staffing entry-level positions, so people are working understaffed, which may mean unfamiliar jobs, lack of training or lots of overtime driving fatigue.  All of which increase the likelihood of errors.

2) Global, just-in-time supply chains have been severely disrupted, so alternatives have had to be deployed: alternative suppliers, alternative materials or parts, alternative transportation.  All of this is untested: like unintended new product launches, for everything, all at once.  And the speed necessary to adjust will particularly impact engineering timelines: think accelerated FDA approvals, but instead for certifying motors, hinges, and electronics for use.

One benefit of JIT manufacturing was quality.  Things were repeated many times, so defects are made easier to spot.  And the small inventory meant any new defect found would have a smaller impact, whether with work-in-process inventory or finished goods.

All that is out the window, now.  It's improvise or shut down.

nereo

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #43 on: August 10, 2021, 07:21:18 PM »
Also: this is the MMM forums. Refrigerators are perhaps the greatest value in the used market. I come across nearly-new stainless refrigerators for around $200 on CL and Marketplace almost every week. Before you drop over $1400 after tax consider if thereís a better use for that extra $1k+ in your life.
I've always heard the opposite -- that the efficiency of refrigerators has been going up so fast that it's practically always a net win to buy a new rather than a 10-yr old used model because they use so much less energy.

What about my comment makes you think Iím talking about 10 year old refrigerators?

Malcat

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #44 on: August 10, 2021, 10:53:06 PM »
Also: this is the MMM forums. Refrigerators are perhaps the greatest value in the used market. I come across nearly-new stainless refrigerators for around $200 on CL and Marketplace almost every week. Before you drop over $1400 after tax consider if thereís a better use for that extra $1k+ in your life.
I've always heard the opposite -- that the efficiency of refrigerators has been going up so fast that it's practically always a net win to buy a new rather than a 10-yr old used model because they use so much less energy.

What about my comment makes you think Iím talking about 10 year old refrigerators?

Exactly. I've never purchased a new appliance, people are always getting rid of practically new ones. I can't tell you how many people get rid of excellent appliances that are in houses they buy when they immediately gut the kitchen and replace all of the appliances.

It's crazy. I honestly don't know why people in major urban centers ever buy new appliances. I got my last fridge for $400.


evme

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #45 on: August 10, 2021, 11:21:06 PM »
And given the supply chain strains of the last two years, my professional opinion as a manufacturing engineer is that defects over the life of products will rise, for those built in 2020 and 2021.

So you're saying those products built specifically since COVID hit are likely to have more defects in general? Why is that?

1)  Workplaces everywhere are having difficulty staffing entry-level positions, so people are working understaffed, which may mean unfamiliar jobs, lack of training or lots of overtime driving fatigue.  All of which increase the likelihood of errors.

2) Global, just-in-time supply chains have been severely disrupted, so alternatives have had to be deployed: alternative suppliers, alternative materials or parts, alternative transportation.  All of this is untested: like unintended new product launches, for everything, all at once.  And the speed necessary to adjust will particularly impact engineering timelines: think accelerated FDA approvals, but instead for certifying motors, hinges, and electronics for use.

One benefit of JIT manufacturing was quality.  Things were repeated many times, so defects are made easier to spot.  And the small inventory meant any new defect found would have a smaller impact, whether with work-in-process inventory or finished goods.

All that is out the window, now.  It's improvise or shut down.

Makes sense, thanks.

mathlete

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #46 on: August 11, 2021, 09:04:46 AM »
Avoid Samsung appliances in general. My home came with all Samsung kitchen appliances. In 7 years I've replaced the microwave and the dishwasher. The stove had a heating element go out, which I just live with. The fridge is okay... for now.

I know appliances breakdown and have problems sometimes, but I went in on a washer and a dryer from Kenmore with some roommates back in 2008. When we moved out and went our separate ways, I bought out everyone of their share in the appliances. Three moves and 13 years later, they still work.

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #47 on: August 11, 2021, 01:58:48 PM »
Also: this is the MMM forums. Refrigerators are perhaps the greatest value in the used market. I come across nearly-new stainless refrigerators for around $200 on CL and Marketplace almost every week. Before you drop over $1400 after tax consider if thereís a better use for that extra $1k+ in your life.
I've always heard the opposite -- that the efficiency of refrigerators has been going up so fast that it's practically always a net win to buy a new rather than a 10-yr old used model because they use so much less energy.

What about my comment makes you think Iím talking about 10 year old refrigerators?

Exactly. I've never purchased a new appliance, people are always getting rid of practically new ones. I can't tell you how many people get rid of excellent appliances that are in houses they buy when they immediately gut the kitchen and replace all of the appliances.

It's crazy. I honestly don't know why people in major urban centers ever buy new appliances. I got my last fridge for $400.

Because frankly, the prospect of renting a truck and hauling a refrigerator up/down stairs and not actually having any recourse if it doesnít work is not all that attractive?

Malcat

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #48 on: August 11, 2021, 03:33:42 PM »
Also: this is the MMM forums. Refrigerators are perhaps the greatest value in the used market. I come across nearly-new stainless refrigerators for around $200 on CL and Marketplace almost every week. Before you drop over $1400 after tax consider if thereís a better use for that extra $1k+ in your life.
I've always heard the opposite -- that the efficiency of refrigerators has been going up so fast that it's practically always a net win to buy a new rather than a 10-yr old used model because they use so much less energy.

What about my comment makes you think Iím talking about 10 year old refrigerators?

Exactly. I've never purchased a new appliance, people are always getting rid of practically new ones. I can't tell you how many people get rid of excellent appliances that are in houses they buy when they immediately gut the kitchen and replace all of the appliances.

It's crazy. I honestly don't know why people in major urban centers ever buy new appliances. I got my last fridge for $400.

Because frankly, the prospect of renting a truck and hauling a refrigerator up/down stairs and not actually having any recourse if it doesnít work is not all that attractive?

I have a delivery guy who charges $40-60 for simple deliveries, and I included that in the price.

Sure, there's a risk of losing money, but with the several thousand I've saved over the years in appliances, I've always been willing to risk a lemon along the way, which did happen, I had a stove that needed a control panel replaced about a year after I bought it.

nereo

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Re: Samsung refrigerators -- should I avoid?
« Reply #49 on: August 11, 2021, 05:52:12 PM »
Also: this is the MMM forums. Refrigerators are perhaps the greatest value in the used market. I come across nearly-new stainless refrigerators for around $200 on CL and Marketplace almost every week. Before you drop over $1400 after tax consider if thereís a better use for that extra $1k+ in your life.
I've always heard the opposite -- that the efficiency of refrigerators has been going up so fast that it's practically always a net win to buy a new rather than a 10-yr old used model because they use so much less energy.

What about my comment makes you think Iím talking about 10 year old refrigerators?

Exactly. I've never purchased a new appliance, people are always getting rid of practically new ones. I can't tell you how many people get rid of excellent appliances that are in houses they buy when they immediately gut the kitchen and replace all of the appliances.

It's crazy. I honestly don't know why people in major urban centers ever buy new appliances. I got my last fridge for $400.

Because frankly, the prospect of renting a truck and hauling a refrigerator up/down stairs and not actually having any recourse if it doesnít work is not all that attractive?

I just canít see paying 5x (or more) the price.  As for not working, meh - everything appliance Iíve ever bought the sellers have been more than willing to plug it in and show that it works, and most private sellers donít seem too keen on screwing someone else when you see where they live. 

Some people love brick and mortar stores because it gives them a sense of security that they can return it, but it seems most make you jump through a bunch of hoops. Often it seems to involve scheduling a technician to come to your house to Ďdiagnoseí the problem (typically within an ill defined 4-6 hour repair window), potentially a second visit to either fix or remove the appliance, and then a third to get the new appliance in.  Or you are still stuck lugging the broken one back to the store.  And the fight over whether you go through the store you purchased or the manufacturer that made it.

As MalCat said, there are numerous delivery services that will move heavy appliances for a flat fee.