Author Topic: Retire here not there: Colorado  (Read 7641 times)

soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3380
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
    • My Journal
Retire here not there: Colorado
« on: April 24, 2014, 08:17:06 AM »
There are seemingly alot of these articles written and I always seem to enjoy them. Having said that , Colorado in the name I felt it fitting to post on MMM.  Be my second choice to NC currently.

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/retire-here-not-there-colorado-2014-04-24

NinetyFour

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5802
  • Location: Southwestern US
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2014, 08:24:07 AM »
Glad to see that my area of the state (southwestern corner) got a nice mention.  IMO, it's by far the best part of the state.  Grand Junction is not at all my cup of tea.  And I'm so glad I am far far away from the Denver-Boulder-Colorado Springs area--just too many people and cars and pollution for me.  Durango has made so many top ten lists lately that I'm afraid the secret is out.  Lots of folks from CA retire to Durango.

MrFancypants

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2014, 08:25:18 AM »
You and I are of the same mind, although I have NC above Colorado because I'm more familiar with it.  Right now my wife and I have our eye on north Georgia.

cashcrop

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 28
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2014, 08:41:02 AM »
why retire where it is winter all the way into may(ish)? 

to me, warmer weather lends itself to frugal lifestyle more than the brutal cold in CO. 

soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3380
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
    • My Journal
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2014, 08:41:36 AM »
You and I are of the same mind, although I have NC above Colorado because I'm more familiar with it.  Right now my wife and I have our eye on north Georgia.




No were actually in agreement. I have NC #1 than CO third gets tricky. Probably Washington or TX but by Austin. Gotta a few years before we can move so we will see.

brewer12345

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1386
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2014, 09:12:54 AM »
You don't want to move here.  Its cold in the winter, very hot in the summer.  We have rattlesnakes, fracking, coal mines, molybdenum and gold mines, air pollution, water shortages, increasingly expensive housing.  You really want to go somewhere else.

MrFancypants

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2014, 09:19:01 AM »
No were actually in agreement. I have NC #1 than CO third gets tricky. Probably Washington or TX but by Austin. Gotta a few years before we can move so we will see.

Austin is nice.  Clean town, lots of stuff to do.  I think the worst I can say is that the housing prices might be inflating due to a recent influx of tech jobs.

soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3380
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
    • My Journal
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2014, 09:23:08 AM »
You don't want to move here.  Its cold in the winter, very hot in the summer.  We have rattlesnakes, fracking, coal mines, molybdenum and gold mines, air pollution, water shortages, increasingly expensive housing.  You really want to go somewhere else.


So i take it you don't work for the States Tourism  ? haha






No were actually in agreement. I have NC #1 than CO third gets tricky. Probably Washington or TX but by Austin. Gotta a few years before we can move so we will see.

Austin is nice.  Clean town, lots of stuff to do.  I think the worst I can say is that the housing prices might be inflating due to a recent influx of tech jobs.



Thats what I have been reading lately as well

NinetyFour

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5802
  • Location: Southwestern US
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2014, 09:40:51 AM »
You don't want to move here.  Its cold in the winter, very hot in the summer.  We have rattlesnakes, fracking, coal mines, molybdenum and gold mines, air pollution, water shortages, increasingly expensive housing.  You really want to go somewhere else.

Yep.  And we have waaaayyyy too many mountains and rivers and open space.  Makes me stressed out when I have to choose where to mountain bike and hike and camp.  Soooo many choices.  There's a whole system of trails 4 blocks from my house.  Ack!

But seriously, cashcrop, no it's not brutal cold here in CO.  It can be at times, but not for sustained periods.  The Great Lakes region and the Northeast seem to get winters much worse than ours.  I can usually be riding my road bike in December on dry pavement while my friend are up in the mountains (25 minutes away) skiing.  Perfect!  (Sorry, Brewer.  I know what you are trying to do.  :)  )

Ftao93

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 216
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #9 on: April 24, 2014, 11:12:16 AM »

But seriously, cashcrop, no it's not brutal cold here in CO.  It can be at times, but not for sustained periods.  The Great Lakes region and the Northeast seem to get winters much worse than ours.  I can usually be riding my road bike in December on dry pavement while my friend are up in the mountains (25 minutes away) skiing.  Perfect!  (Sorry, Brewer.  I know what you are trying to do.  :)  )

Depending on where you live of course, the cold in CO is pretty 'meh' most of the time.  Every few years we'll get mountains of snow that shut down the city for a day or two, but then no one is doing anything so it's fun!   'Winter' as I think of it is mostly Jan-March.  Sure, you can get really cold days in Oct, but you can also have 60 degree days in December, so....

Though I like to slip away from the Metro areas sometimes, it's not too hard.  Go 45 min in nearly any direction, and you have much fewer humans.

Jamesqf

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4047
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #10 on: April 24, 2014, 11:18:11 AM »
why retire where it is winter all the way into may(ish)? 

to me, warmer weather lends itself to frugal lifestyle more than the brutal cold in CO.

Because some of us actually enjoy cold weather?  And think heat is far more brutal than cold?

NinetyFour

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5802
  • Location: Southwestern US
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #11 on: April 24, 2014, 11:35:37 AM »
why retire where it is winter all the way into may(ish)? 

to me, warmer weather lends itself to frugal lifestyle more than the brutal cold in CO.

Because some of us actually enjoy cold weather?  And think heat is far more brutal than cold?

I agree with Jamesqf.  Even some parts of CO (like Grand Junction) are FAR too hot for me.  Up there, most people "need" AC.  Here, higher up, closer to the mountains, not so much.

LucyBIT

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 99
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #12 on: April 24, 2014, 12:48:19 PM »
Even some parts of CO (like Grand Junction) are FAR too hot for me.  Up there, most people "need" AC.  Here, higher up, closer to the mountains, not so much.

+1

Opening the windows at night to blow out all the hot air only works if the outside air cools down at night. And it does that here.

fiveoh

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 372
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #13 on: April 24, 2014, 12:54:33 PM »
Spend a few weeks in July, in Austin, before you put it on your list.   

soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3380
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
    • My Journal
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #14 on: April 24, 2014, 01:00:21 PM »
Spend a few weeks in July, in Austin, before you put it on your list.   



Yea I bet it gets mighty hot. My sister is moving there so I will probably get that opportunity! haha 

yyc-phil

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 975
  • Location: Yellowknife NWT
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2014, 01:25:54 PM »
You guys in the USA have so many different options for cheap retirement that we don't have in Canada. Here, the only decent place to retire, with decent year-round weather, is on the southern part of Vancouver Island. After spending my whole life in the Arctic, I'd take a snowy CO winter anytime. But as I don't want to sit idle in retirement and would likely want to work a little, moving to the USA is an almost impossible proposition for me.

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8065
  • Registered member
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2014, 01:58:34 PM »
You know, I've tried looking at a lot of "cheaper" locations than the SF bay area.  None of the places I've seriously considered offered significant discounts compared to, say, being 1-2 hours outside SF.  Significant meaning a couple years of extra work/savings.

You guys in the USA have so many different options for cheap retirement that we don't have in Canada. Here, the only decent place to retire, with decent year-round weather, is on the southern part of Vancouver Island. After spending my whole life in the Arctic, I'd take a snowy CO winter anytime. But as I don't want to sit idle in retirement and would likely want to work a little, moving to the USA is an almost impossible proposition for me.

Why don't you spend the winter months here and work summer months in Canada?  I think you can stay for 6 months (not sure if that is per year or what?).  There's also the possibility of a Canadian Retiree Visa in the coming years (if immigration reform ever happens).

« Last Edit: April 24, 2014, 02:01:07 PM by dragoncar »

Jon_Snow

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4371
  • Location: An Island in the Salish Sea (or Baja)
  • Kingfisher and Red-breasted Nuthatch whisperer...
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2014, 02:36:17 PM »
You guys in the USA have so many different options for cheap retirement that we don't have in Canada. Here, the only decent place to retire, with decent year-round weather, is on the southern part of Vancouver Island. After spending my whole life in the Arctic, I'd take a snowy CO winter anytime. But as I don't want to sit idle in retirement and would likely want to work a little, moving to the USA is an almost impossible proposition for me.

Ykphil, I agree that Americans have a litany of options compared to us. We are forced to leave our country completely to escape winter.

Yeah, southwest B.C. is "decent" if you consider regular monsoons acceptable - thats why we intend to flee quite regularly down to the Baja when my hands start to get "pruney". Ideally, we would like to spend 8 months in the B.C. Gulf Islands (we have ten acres on one of the smaller islands) and 4 months down in the Baja (own condo there). Mexico can be extremely cheap if you become armed with local knowledge - unknowing tourists can, and do, spend a ton unnecessarily.

My wife and I grew up by the ocean, specifically the Pacific - we feel strangely uncomfortable when we are away from the coast for long periods of time. All of our hobbies and passions seem to be related in some way to the sea.

Ykphil, any idea of where you might end up when you make the move south to B.C.? I think I read in one of your posts that you want to do this.

yyc-phil

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 975
  • Location: Yellowknife NWT
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #18 on: April 24, 2014, 02:50:37 PM »
You guys in the USA have so many different options for cheap retirement that we don't have in Canada. Here, the only decent place to retire, with decent year-round weather, is on the southern part of Vancouver Island. After spending my whole life in the Arctic, I'd take a snowy CO winter anytime. But as I don't want to sit idle in retirement and would likely want to work a little, moving to the USA is an almost impossible proposition for me.

Ykphil, I agree that Americans have a litany of options compared to us. We are forced to leave our country completely to escape winter.

Yeah, southwest B.C. is "decent" if you consider regular monsoons acceptable - thats why we intend to flee quite regularly down to the Baja when my hands start to get "pruney". Ideally, we would like to spend 8 months in the B.C. Gulf Islands (we have ten acres on one of the smaller islands) and 4 months down in the Baja (own condo there). Mexico can be extremely cheap if you become armed with local knowledge - unknowing tourists can, and do, spend a ton unnecessarily.

My wife and I grew up by the ocean, specifically the Pacific - we feel strangely uncomfortable when we are away from the coast for long periods of time. All of our hobbies and passions seem to be related in some way to the sea.

Ykphil, any idea of where you might end up when you make the move south to B.C.? I think I read in one of your posts that you want to do this.

Hi Jon,
Ten acres on a gulf island! I'd love to find that much space within my budget! We are actually looking at getting a small lot on Gabriola (we could only find half an acre in our price range), in the next few months, and eventually build a small house (under 400 sq.ft), with the plan of living there starting in the fall of 2016: 6-9 months of the year in BC, and South (Baja, Yucatan are on our list), East (Taiwan, Okinawa, Vietnam) or Southern Europe in winter. Like you, we need to be near the ocean. Being Mediterranean myself and my wife Okinawan, we have been away from the sea for too long and can't imagine our lives too far from it for much longer.

furrychickens

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7480
  • Age: 34
  • Location: SE WI
  • Homeschooling and homestesding since 2013
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #19 on: April 25, 2014, 07:21:00 AM »
I have family in the Denver/Boulder area, but I helped design a house in Pagosa Springs, which I believe is SW part of the state. Their lot was beautiful.

cashcrop

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 28
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #20 on: April 25, 2014, 07:56:50 AM »
i'd retire in a warmer climate to save money and be healthier.

we can grow more food  (save $$ and good for health).
we can walk more and drive less (save $$ and good for health).
we can bike more and drive less (save $$ and good for health).
we can eat out more - pack a meal, go to local park to eat, we love doing this.
we can heat our house less and btw we currently live in MD and use no A/C ever.  will not live in MD in retirement.  actually won't live in US in retirement, but that is besided the point.

i lived in colorado springs for 6 months and when it snowed in early may, 4 inches in town, 16 inches 7 miles outside of town, it was time to go, spring and summer arrives late in colorado and fall arrives early so not for me.

we do not like to be cooped up in the house during winter months with little to do outside that is remotely comfortable.

living in colorado would make retirement miserable for us.

lexie2000

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 222
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #21 on: April 25, 2014, 08:11:51 AM »
Just wondering how old the folks are that say they wouldn't mind the weather in CO as retirees?   Even though the winters are not as brutal as in other areas of the country, the cold gets a lot more difficult to handle as one ages.   We have relatives that didn't mind the weather there when they were younger, but escaped as retirees.  One packed up and moved to Nevada and the other is a snowbird in the winter.  They leave CO and go to Arizona in October and return to CO in May.

Vilgan

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 452
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #22 on: April 25, 2014, 08:21:24 AM »
Given MMM's location, I understand why CO is popular but Austin and places like NC/Georgia are mentioned more than the Pacific NW? Really? :)

I've lived all over the US and been to almost every state, and I think the Pac NW and CO are easily at the top of the list. If you hate snow, then you skip CO and if you hate occasional light rain then you skip Oregon/Washington. Seattle is expensive, but many locations away from the metro are fine and have fabulous weather, amazing access to nature, and mild weather all year long.

Some benefits include:

1) It is amazingly gorgeous all year long. No periods where everything dies due to lack of rain like some states.
2) Mild winters. Varies a bit by exactly where you live but it rarely gets below freezing. I don't think it has ever been below 0 in Seattle. While the east coast was hammered by snow storms this winter our "rough" winter was 2 stretches where it got into the high teens for a few days.
3) AMAZING summers. Rarely gets hot, and if it does it won't be muggy. The last few summers have been months of 75 to 84 degree weather with clear skies and angels singing in the background.
4) Spring/Fall also gorgeous, just with a bit more rain than summer :)
5) 293492342 amazing places to go hiking, skiing, go to the coast, whatever.
6) Mild climate means minimal heating/cooling bills. I think we spend 20$ a month on average on electric, and that's with being super lazy about turning things off, leaving computers and Tivo on 24/7, etc.
7) Great access to fresh/organic vegetables and fruit. Cherries here do NOT taste like cherries that you get in parts of the country that have to ship them in. I thought I was nostalgic until we moved back and suddenly the cherries were 5x as yummy like I remembered
8) Awesome seafood if you live near the coast, especially the Washington coast.
9) Neighborhoods where you can walk/bike everywhere are a lot easier to find and bike paths are valued and available in many locations.
10) Average person seems more educated than some other places I've lived.

It isn't perfect, but having lived on the east coast, the midwest, CA, various areas in the middle of the country (TX, OK, MS), etc it is a really awesome place to live.

Jon_Snow

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4371
  • Location: An Island in the Salish Sea (or Baja)
  • Kingfisher and Red-breasted Nuthatch whisperer...
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #23 on: April 25, 2014, 09:35:03 AM »
Vilgan, you don't have to sell me on the Pacific NW (or Pacific SW for us Canadians).

The rainy winters do help propagate the most incredible summer beauty going... things might start to get a bit crispy towards the end of August, but overall, the summers are lush and green - and the daily temperatures are perfect, like you said. The winter can be gloomy as hell though.

And then you have the proximity to the bountiful Georgia Strait/Puget Sound. I can launch a small boat from our beach and catch various species of salmon... then you have the bottom-fish - lingcod, rockfish, greenling, halibut. Then, at low tide, you can get some oysters and clams. Or grab a crab trap and drop it to the bottom to get some Dungeness or Red Rock crab.

Then, back at the beach, while you are admiring your catch, a pod of 20 orcas may swim by.

This is what awaits me in early retirement. Getting antsy.



Wolf_Stache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 921
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Portland
    • Flower's Fang
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #24 on: April 25, 2014, 10:30:42 AM »
Vilgan, you don't have to sell me on the Pacific NW (or Pacific SW for us Canadians).

The rainy winters do help propagate the most incredible summer beauty going... things might start to get a bit crispy towards the end of August, but overall, the summers are lush and green - and the daily temperatures are perfect, like you said. The winter can be gloomy as hell though.

And then you have the proximity to the bountiful Georgia Strait/Puget Sound. I can launch a small boat from our beach and catch various species of salmon... then you have the bottom-fish - lingcod, rockfish, greenling, halibut. Then, at low tide, you can get some oysters and clams. Or grab a crab trap and drop it to the bottom to get some Dungeness or Red Rock crab.

Then, back at the beach, while you are admiring your catch, a pod of 20 orcas may swim by.

This is what awaits me in early retirement. Getting antsy.

But Jon_Snow knows not ;)

JK, I love Seattle area, and don't plan on leaving the Pacific Northwest anytime soon.

MrFancypants

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #25 on: April 25, 2014, 11:03:20 AM »
Spend a few weeks in July, in Austin, before you put it on your list.   

hmmm...  I would reword this to "spend a few weeks in Austin in October, before you put it on your list."

It isn't the summer heat that's the bad part.  After living in several parts of the country, Illinois will get almost as hot as Austin in July.  The problem with Texas, or the south in general, is that it stays so hot for such a long period of time.  Basically it's 90+ from April into October. 

The upside, of course, is the relatively mild winter from late October through early April.  But summer in the south is basically the inverse of winter up north.  Brutal, repressive heat for about half the year, rather than brutal, repressive cold for the other half of the year.

My plan is to retire somewhere with a better balance.  I don't like so much heat for so long, but I don't want that much cold for so long.  So I'm looking in the north Georgia to Tennessee/North Carolina area.  It gets cold, it gets hot, but the stretches of each are balanced about as evenly as you can find in North America.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2014, 11:05:16 AM by Mykl »

Jamesqf

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4047
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #26 on: April 25, 2014, 11:11:32 AM »
Just wondering how old the folks are that say they wouldn't mind the weather in CO as retirees?   Even though the winters are not as brutal as in other areas of the country, the cold gets a lot more difficult to handle as one ages.

Not necessarily so.  My experience, anyway, is that cold tolerance is pretty closely related to physical condition.  So if you're the sort who equates getting older* as having to become a flabby couch potato, then maybe so.  But it hasn't bothered me yet, despite the fact that really early retirement is no longer an option :-)

*Am I the only one who's noticed that there's a whole implicit social conspiracy in this?  Once you pass - oh, 40 or so - people start telling you to slow down, take it easy, "act your age", etc.  And of course if you do that, you get out of condition, gain weight while losing muscle mass, and show all the other signs associated with "middle age". 

Ykphil, I agree that Americans have a litany of options compared to us. We are forced to leave our country completely to escape winter.

But why would you want to escape?  I'd consider moving to someplace like Jasper, myself.

soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3380
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
    • My Journal
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #27 on: April 25, 2014, 12:17:22 PM »
Spend a few weeks in July, in Austin, before you put it on your list.   

hmmm...  I would reword this to "spend a few weeks in Austin in October, before you put it on your list."

It isn't the summer heat that's the bad part.  After living in several parts of the country, Illinois will get almost as hot as Austin in July.  The problem with Texas, or the south in general, is that it stays so hot for such a long period of time.  Basically it's 90+ from April into October. 



Agreed!
The upside, of course, is the relatively mild winter from late October through early April.  But summer in the south is basically the inverse of winter up north.  Brutal, repressive heat for about half the year, rather than brutal, repressive cold for the other half of the year.

My plan is to retire somewhere with a better balance.  I don't like so much heat for so long, but I don't want that much cold for so long.  So I'm looking in the north Georgia to Tennessee/North Carolina area.  It gets cold, it gets hot, but the stretches of each are balanced about as evenly as you can find in North America.

Albert

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1254
  • Location: Switzerland
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #28 on: April 26, 2014, 10:41:34 AM »
One could deal with a cold of course, but having grown up in a place with cold and long winters and now having lived for 10 years in places with much milder winters I can tell you that snow is definitely overrated. I can get plenty of it 6 months a year by taking a trip to the mountains (1-2 h), but I'm absolutely fine with it staying out of the lowlands. This year we had no snow at all. :)

The best places to retire climate wise are where you can ski and lay on the beach during the same day.

Gerard

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1323
  • Location: eastern canada
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #29 on: April 26, 2014, 10:54:27 AM »
Surely one of the advantages of being retired is that you don't have to find *one* place that pushes all your buttons. The trick might be finding somewhere that's got most of what you need, but in a profile (and location) that makes it easy or cheap for you to get the other good stuff.
That's what makes BC/Washington/Oregon sound so good to me -- the worst thing (clammy winters) can be cured by a quick and easy trip to southern California.
(And while I'm here, I want to second the observation that it's not the peak ugly weather that matters, it's how long it lasts. Austin may have long ugly summers, but my part of Newfoundland has the opposite problem. The rest of North America is pretty awesome from mid-April to mid-June. Here, thanks to a big surrounding ocean that takes a long time to warm up, those months are fuckin' awful.)

RetiredAt63

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 9025
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #30 on: April 26, 2014, 11:15:13 AM »
I agree, winter is great.  It is November/early December (cold, grey, dreary) and April/early May (have you looked at the 14 day forecast for Ottawa? ick) that try our souls.

I will plant my peas this weekend if it ever stops raining, but the tomatoes don't go in until the end of May, and the peppers in early June.

Surely one of the advantages of being retired is that you don't have to find *one* place that pushes all your buttons. The trick might be finding somewhere that's got most of what you need, but in a profile (and location) that makes it easy or cheap for you to get the other good stuff.

(And while I'm here, I want to second the observation that it's not the peak ugly weather that matters, it's how long it lasts. Austin may have long ugly summers, but my part of Newfoundland has the opposite problem. The rest of North America is pretty awesome from mid-April to mid-June. Here, thanks to a big surrounding ocean that takes a long time to warm up, those months are fuckin' awful.)

TomTX

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2951
  • Location: Texas
Re: Retire here not there: Colorado
« Reply #31 on: April 27, 2014, 08:01:56 PM »
No were actually in agreement. I have NC #1 than CO third gets tricky. Probably Washington or TX but by Austin. Gotta a few years before we can move so we will see.

Austin is nice.  Clean town, lots of stuff to do.  I think the worst I can say is that the housing prices might be inflating due to a recent influx of tech jobs.

"might" - my tax assessment is up 25% in one year. And I'm pretty far out from downtown.

It was 92 degrees today.

Traffic is BAD and getting worse. http://mobility.tamu.edu/ums/