Author Topic: Mustachianism and Punk?  (Read 10161 times)

Melody

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Mustachianism and Punk?
« on: October 15, 2013, 07:17:06 AM »
Reading some of the other topics, it seems like there are quite a few punks and ex-punks on the forums...

Just wondering what other punk/ex-punks think about how mustachainism and punk fit together?
I've always felt the two fit together really well (being free, not being consumerist etc)... but then I realise MMM is about gaming the system (e.g. buying a smaller house and doing it up yourself) whereas punk is often about living outside the system (squatting) - more so in countries other than Australia tho. What other parallels and/or conflicts do you see?

I'm not sure exactly where I am going with the topic but it would be cool to see where it goes... and if all else fails we can just swap names of obscure bands from our hometowns... I always love finding new music!

hoodedfalcon

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2013, 07:46:21 AM »
Oh, this will be fun!

I guess my take on MMM is a little different. I don't see it as "gaming" the system. I do see a very strong DIY ethos (i.e. buying a small house and fixing it up yourself) and a preference against consumerism. I think I see what you mean though. I mean, is investing in index funds punk? Eh, maybe not.   

I would say that in general MMM is more "punk" than not. There are a ton of songs that are jumping to mind that address a lot of the same things I see every day on the MMM forums. So, now I am going to go listen to them. I am interested to see where this thread goes!

Norrie

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2013, 08:03:33 AM »
It's been a great natural fit for me. The DIY ethos/no need to follow the crowd vibe is comforting, and (in my experience, at least) most of the folks that I've met who like listening to punk are usually kind, intelligent, and well-read.

I've been fascinated to find so many here too though! Not entirely surprising, but fascinating.


Mr.Macinstache

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2013, 08:18:21 AM »
What about Grunge? Sort of like punk without all the superfluous flair. Plus the music was better. :-)

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2013, 09:23:39 AM »
Maybe Mustachianism is the grown up version of punk? I can't imagine squatting with my husband and two kids.

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2013, 09:50:39 AM »
What about Grunge? Sort of like punk without all the superfluous flair. Plus the music was better. :-)

No, no it wasn't. ;)



Punk was all about anti-establishment, freedom, rebellion, expressing yourself and yes, going a little bit crazy. At least that was what it was for me.Wake up you sheep! You don't have to follow everyone else kind of attitude. Plus, I really liked dying my hair crazy-ass colors (and still do). :D

I do kind of think that mustachian philosophy could be seen as a more grown up path, but adding in some personal responsibility too - you are definitely going to have to defend your lifestyle to the rest of the more conventional types and there is a strong propensity for being up front and sometimes downright blunt and in-your-face with the advice... which does tend to be jarring if you're used to the gentle coddling of other advice sites.

Mr.Macinstache

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2013, 10:01:53 AM »
What about Grunge? Sort of like punk without all the superfluous flair. Plus the music was better. :-)

No, no it wasn't. ;)



Punk was all about anti-establishment, freedom, rebellion, expressing yourself and yes, going a little bit crazy. At least that was what it was for me.Wake up you sheep! You don't have to follow everyone else kind of attitude. Plus, I really liked dying my hair crazy-ass colors (and still do). :D

I do kind of think that mustachian philosophy could be seen as a more grown up path, but adding in some personal responsibility too - you are definitely going to have to defend your lifestyle to the rest of the more conventional types and there is a strong propensity for being up front and sometimes downright blunt and in-your-face with the advice... which does tend to be jarring if you're used to the gentle coddling of other advice sites.

Haha... well, nothing against some of the greats out there, but we'll have to slightly disagree on music taste. Pretty sure grunge was rooted in punk before it went all MTV on us. Anyway, I really hate that term grunge, but I believe was just as much the same concept of non conformity and rejection of the status quo. In the end, the machine stilled chewed them (us?) up...which can happen to all of us if we let it. That's the challenge when living as a misfit in a manufactured popular culture.

Frankies Girl

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2013, 10:10:08 AM »
What about Grunge? Sort of like punk without all the superfluous flair. Plus the music was better. :-)

No, no it wasn't. ;)



Punk was all about anti-establishment, freedom, rebellion, expressing yourself and yes, going a little bit crazy. At least that was what it was for me.Wake up you sheep! You don't have to follow everyone else kind of attitude. Plus, I really liked dying my hair crazy-ass colors (and still do). :D

I do kind of think that mustachian philosophy could be seen as a more grown up path, but adding in some personal responsibility too - you are definitely going to have to defend your lifestyle to the rest of the more conventional types and there is a strong propensity for being up front and sometimes downright blunt and in-your-face with the advice... which does tend to be jarring if you're used to the gentle coddling of other advice sites.

Haha... well, nothing against some of the greats out there, but we'll have to slightly disagree on music taste. Pretty sure grunge was rooted in punk before it went all MTV on us. Anyway, I really hate that term grunge, but I believe was just as much the same concept of non conformity and rejection of the status quo. In the end, the machine stilled chewed them (us?) up...which can happen to all of us if we let it. That's the challenge when living as a misfit in a manufactured popular culture.

Oh, absolutely - grunge was an outgrowth of punk/heavy metal... I like several grunge bands, but I'll tend to choose punk over grunge personally. I have a wide variety of taste in music, and it's definitely one of my passions.

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #8 on: October 15, 2013, 10:18:08 AM »
I have to agree on this.

When I first starting reading MMM, the punk-hairs on the back of my neck started to raise.  It echo'd some of the same ethos in punk culture.  Granted, those are in the eye of the beholder, but the general sentiments of anti-establishment, anti-consumerist, DIY, "F-U", and, most importantly a COMMUNITY of people helping each other.  Searching for genuine authenticity and doing things with the strongest of intent, no matter what everyone else around you may be doing or tell you.  Punk at the core, IMHO.

And also because it slapped me in the face and it wasn't afraid to do so, more ingrained the message and awesomeness, for me.  Almost like my former punk self was leaping 10 years into the future and slapping this out-of-line, lazy me and tell me to wake the F up and listen to this dude and these most excellent people (forums, commenters).




Norrie

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #9 on: October 15, 2013, 10:21:18 AM »
The bands that I listened to growing up (well, still do) were never the green, spiky-haired, studded jacket version of punk, and the notion of squatting is as foreign to me as living in a mansion. I always identified with the super boring-looking bands, which sums me up perfectly.

It's been pretty fun to watch music repeat itself. Our 12 year old daughter has just decided that she likes wearing band t-shirts under plaid flannel shirts. I think that she'd be all over grunge. Also, grunge is the worst word ever. Also, also, Nirvana's Nevermind still holds up beautifully.

lifejoy

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #10 on: October 15, 2013, 10:23:35 AM »
Oh, this will be fun!

I guess my take on MMM is a little different. I don't see it as "gaming" the system. I do see a very strong DIY ethos (i.e. buying a small house and fixing it up yourself) and a preference against consumerism. I think I see what you mean though. I mean, is investing in index funds punk? Eh, maybe not.   

I would say that in general MMM is more "punk" than not. There are a ton of songs that are jumping to mind that address a lot of the same things I see every day on the MMM forums. So, now I am going to go listen to them. I am interested to see where this thread goes!

Which songs are jumping to mind? Share please :)

Rachelocity

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #11 on: October 15, 2013, 10:28:34 AM »
Punk was a protest against the huge, bloated arena-rock or manufactured pop that was prevalent.  Although I admittedly had a guilty-pleasure soft spot for anything Chinn and Chapman produced, when I first heard songs like Blitzkrieg Bop, Anarchy in the UK, Oh Bondage Up Yours or Gloria, my mind was even more blown than my speakers were.

One of the core beliefs of the early punks was that you didn't need a particular skill set to play, and you'd learn what you needed to.  DIY was infinitely better than buying shit, with the exception of my collection of t-shirts, which I fervently wish I'd saved.  If this sounds like something you'd read here, you're right! 

BTW, my son, who much better fits the demographic ion this site, is a second-generation punk.  I get to go to his shows and interact with crust-punks and drunk-punks, some of whom are very sweet people who buy gray-haired types like me multiple brewskis!

Lans Holman

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2013, 10:29:15 AM »
Which songs are jumping to mind? Share please :)

"Merchandise"-Fugazi
"Junkies Running Dry"- Operation Ivy
"Lost in The Supermarket"- The Clash

Mr.Macinstache

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2013, 10:59:24 AM »
The bands that I listened to growing up (well, still do) were never the green, spiky-haired, studded jacket version of punk, and the notion of squatting is as foreign to me as living in a mansion. I always identified with the super boring-looking bands, which sums me up perfectly.

It's been pretty fun to watch music repeat itself. Our 12 year old daughter has just decided that she likes wearing band t-shirts under plaid flannel shirts. I think that she'd be all over grunge. Also, grunge is the worst word ever. Also, also, Nirvana's Nevermind still holds up beautifully.

True... I'm not sure there's a good name for it otherwise? Flannel? lol. I'm sticking to it, even though the stupid media ruined that term.

Nirvana made their first album for $600. Pearl Jam stopped making music videos and ignored anything MTV after their second album. There was a lot of shunning the MSM establishment going on.

oldtoyota

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2013, 11:30:55 AM »
Which songs are jumping to mind? Share please :)

"Merchandise"-Fugazi
"Junkies Running Dry"- Operation Ivy
"Lost in The Supermarket"- The Clash

I love, love, love, Operation Ivy!! So nice to know someone knows about them. Bet you wouldn't get THAT reaction on the dave Ramsey board. ;-)

Hm. I wonder if I still have my Bad Brains tee-shirt. I remember being in Canada. Bad Brains was playing, and it cost an ungodly sum of $15. Way too rich for my blood back then. lol




CopperTex

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2013, 11:35:24 AM »
LOL definitely not! I'm pretty sure they are coming together for their common love of Christian pop.

Which songs are jumping to mind? Share please :)

"Merchandise"-Fugazi
"Junkies Running Dry"- Operation Ivy
"Lost in The Supermarket"- The Clash

I love, love, love, Operation Ivy!! So nice to know someone knows about them. Bet you wouldn't get THAT reaction on the dave Ramsey board. ;-)

Hm. I wonder if I still have my Bad Brains tee-shirt. I remember being in Canada. Bad Brains was playing, and it cost an ungodly sum of $15. Way too rich for my blood back then. lol

oldtoyota

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2013, 11:37:27 AM »
Reading some of the other topics, it seems like there are quite a few punks and ex-punks on the forums...

Just wondering what other punk/ex-punks think about how mustachainism and punk fit together?
I've always felt the two fit together really well (being free, not being consumerist etc)... but then I realise MMM is about gaming the system (e.g. buying a smaller house and doing it up yourself) whereas punk is often about living outside the system (squatting) - more so in countries other than Australia tho. What other parallels and/or conflicts do you see?

I'm not sure exactly where I am going with the topic but it would be cool to see where it goes... and if all else fails we can just swap names of obscure bands from our hometowns... I always love finding new music!

I had to take a trip down Memory Lane and did not get to your questions.

They are linked. Look at all the folks who started zines, websites, record labels, bands, etc. The time was all about DIY. People lived in group houses and with the heat turned low...painfully low. They were vegetarians and vegans before you could find that kind of food in restaurants. They wore thrift store clothes before it was cool.

The DC version of punk was not all about mohawks and green hair. The people did not look extremely different, but they were socially active for the most part. Some of them didn't drink or do drugs--DC straight edge.

I see a lot of commonality.




Lans Holman

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2013, 03:13:33 PM »
Personally, I never dressed punk or even called myself a punk, partly because I grew up in a small town and never really connected with a punk community.  That said, it is to this day probably the biggest influence on how I see the world and think about how to live my life.  And yes, I think it lines up very nicely with the principles of mustachianism.  The lyrics to that Op Ivy song should make it the mustachian anthem, as far as I'm concerned.
I'd definitely like to hear other musical picks. 

hoodedfalcon

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #18 on: October 15, 2013, 03:50:57 PM »
I haven't listened to Op Ivy in so long! Thank you for that!

My musical influences run from Minor Threat/Fugazi to Dead Kennedys to Descendents to Buzzcocks to Moss Icon. I think there is something about certain music from a certain time period that meshes quite well with mustachianism. I barely even pay attention to music coming out these days (except for Explosions in the Sky, which isn't punk).

I'm just going to leave this right here....http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfy9ZqKUJjU

Eric

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #19 on: October 15, 2013, 04:56:59 PM »
So are there a lot of punk engineers out there?  Seems like an odd mix to me.

Norrie

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #20 on: October 15, 2013, 05:24:05 PM »
So are there a lot of punk engineers out there?  Seems like an odd mix to me.

It would weird, but I know a lot of punk engineers in real life, so it makes some sense to me. I'm nowhere near an engineer though. But if any of you guys need to talk about feelings, I'm your girl.

oldtoyota

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #21 on: October 15, 2013, 06:03:10 PM »
I haven't listened to Op Ivy in so long! Thank you for that!

My musical influences run from Minor Threat/Fugazi to Dead Kennedys to Descendents to Buzzcocks to Moss Icon. I think there is something about certain music from a certain time period that meshes quite well with mustachianism. I barely even pay attention to music coming out these days (except for Explosions in the Sky, which isn't punk).

I'm just going to leave this right here....http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lfy9ZqKUJjU

Hooded--For you.

Rocket from the Crypt
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sQfqhiw4kJM

oldtoyota

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #22 on: October 15, 2013, 06:07:10 PM »
Please welcome me to the year 2005. I just discovered punk music is on YouTube.

Ladies and Gentlemen, I invite you to listen to Bad Brains:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rIi94s5Tp-E

« Last Edit: October 16, 2013, 10:32:42 AM by oldtoyota »

fragglebock

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #23 on: October 15, 2013, 07:15:13 PM »
My favorite quote from a recent conference presentation (on the subject of open source software suiting the punk/DIY ethos):

"Punk's not dead, it's just broke"

rocklebock

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #24 on: October 15, 2013, 08:02:32 PM »
I don't really identify with the culture anymore, but the music is still really important to me, and the general DIY/anti-consumerist/anti-authoritarian ethos definitely stuck with me and made MMM more palatable.

FWIW I also know a ton of punk engineers and programmers. Pretty common professions for punks who went to college. Academia and libraries are another big one. It's almost weird to meet a librarian under 40 who *isn't* a former punk.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2013, 08:18:47 PM by rocklebock »

imustachemystash

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #25 on: October 15, 2013, 09:25:14 PM »
 I feel Incomplete if I go without responding to this post.  Some might argue that punk and mustachianism are not related, but that is their opinion and they should Leave Mine To Me.  Mustachians think living a long life as an automaton with business suits clinging black boxes, sequestering the blueprints of daily life is Stranger Than Fiction.  Tiny Voices are in our heads helping us realize we would be Better Off Dead than being Infected with consumerism.  Mustachians and Punks also don't spend their money on watching Television because we are Individuals who spend our time creatively growing our stash or rocking out in the living room circle pit.  So, Hooray For Me, I can Slumber in peace knowing my hard earned money is Marked for future freedom by not having to work someday. Inner Logic tells me that this badass lifestyle is What It Is all about in the 21st Century.

Mr.Macinstache

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #26 on: October 16, 2013, 08:21:53 AM »
An engineer punk? Ha.. I can't imagine that.

I feel Incomplete if I go without responding to this post.  Some might argue that punk and mustachianism are not related, but that is their opinion and they should Leave Mine To Me.  Mustachians think living a long life as an automaton with business suits clinging black boxes, sequestering the blueprints of daily life is Stranger Than Fiction.  Tiny Voices are in our heads helping us realize we would be Better Off Dead than being Infected with consumerism.  Mustachians and Punks also don't spend their money on watching Television because we are Individuals who spend our time creatively growing our stash or rocking out in the living room circle pit.  So, Hooray For Me, I can Slumber in peace knowing my hard earned money is Marked for future freedom by not having to work someday. Inner Logic tells me that this badass lifestyle is What It Is all about in the 21st Century.

Bad Religion. Well done.

Frankies Girl

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #27 on: October 16, 2013, 09:25:42 AM »
I just recently had to go to a different branch of my vet's office, and the vet tech who couldn't have been much over 25 had a Black Flag tattoo.

I went to a Misfits concert last year, and there were tons of kids (OMG I can't believe I call 20-somthings kids...)

So it's definitely not dead.


kt

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #28 on: October 16, 2013, 09:44:50 AM »
So are there a lot of punk engineers out there?  Seems like an odd mix to me.

i know a fair few punk/metal engineers.

and crass - big a little a. and a few of their other songs too.

hoodedfalcon

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #29 on: October 16, 2013, 09:53:56 AM »
oldtoyota - Was that James Hetfield for real? HA! Seriously though - You Tube is really awesome for finding live video footage for obscure music (and not so obscure). Like this gem: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SGJFWirQ3ks 

I know quite a few punk engineers, librarians, and lawyers, folks with PhDs, and even an MD. They may not look like what you might expect, but they are there, blending in with everyone else. :)

keith

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #30 on: October 16, 2013, 10:09:08 PM »
Look at all the folks who started zines, websites, record labels, bands, etc. The time was all about DIY. People lived in group houses and with the heat turned low...painfully low. They were vegetarians and vegans before you could find that kind of food in restaurants. They wore thrift store clothes before it was cool.

The DC version of punk was not all about mohawks and green hair. The people did not look extremely different, but they were socially active for the most part. Some of them didn't drink or do drugs--DC straight edge.

DIY Hardcore/Punk is very much active still, and this is exactly what it looks like in my city (Seattle). Its a bunch of normal looking kids, but who care deeply about the music and usually engage in social causes. Definitely some straight edge kids too. There are absolutely wonderful active DIY spaces here that throw killer shows with  active punk and hardcore bands. I see a lot of the same faces each time I go, its a great community.

Also you guys might like this... A few guys that were in some other indie/punk bands came together and recorded a 4-track punk EP about the Government Shutdown.

Great EP... love the lyrics.
http://governmentbreakdown.bandcamp.com/


Hoerwolle

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #31 on: October 17, 2013, 05:37:48 AM »
Metalhead chiming in :)

I am very surprised to learn this about punk... for me punk was always equal to "hating society", "drinking cheap beer until you are out of money" and "avoid work" - so the only similarity to the MMM-way would be not to be required to work anymore.

I never saw the DIY-side of it... and maybe I had some prejudices ;)

Melody

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #32 on: October 17, 2013, 06:32:35 AM »
I feel Incomplete if I go without responding to this post.  Some might argue that punk and mustachianism are not related, but that is their opinion and they should Leave Mine To Me.  Mustachians think living a long life as an automaton with business suits clinging black boxes, sequestering the blueprints of daily life is Stranger Than Fiction.  Tiny Voices are in our heads helping us realize we would be Better Off Dead than being Infected with consumerism.  Mustachians and Punks also don't spend their money on watching Television because we are Individuals who spend our time creatively growing our stash or rocking out in the living room circle pit.  So, Hooray For Me, I can Slumber in peace knowing my hard earned money is Marked for future freedom by not having to work someday. Inner Logic tells me that this badass lifestyle is What It Is all about in the 21st Century.

You made my day!

Metalhead chiming in :)

I am very surprised to learn this about punk... for me punk was always equal to "hating society", "drinking cheap beer until you are out of money" and "avoid work" - so the only similarity to the MMM-way would be not to be required to work anymore.

I never saw the DIY-side of it... and maybe I had some prejudices ;)

Funny, I always saw it as: "Build a better society. Build a community over long conversations about how to build a better society while drinking cheap beer. Work to live, don't live to work." Or something like that. Certainly I see focus on questioning the status quo, and putting more focus on friends/art/humanity and less focus on materialism (consistent with MMM). But I still struggle to mesh consciously thinking about money/having a reasonable wage and net worth with the punk lifestyle... (My 50% savings rate still puts my weekly spending in dollar terms higher than that of a good chunk of my punk friends). I've also gotten soft over the years! I don't think I could live in a punk house anymore!

So cool to read all of everyone's thoughts on this! Maybe investing in index funds is punk after all ;-)

Yeah, most of the punks that I know that have done college have science degrees. How does one rebel against strict religious parents? Get mohawk and a science degree! Social work/teaching and similar professions around helping misfits are also popular.

And also the only person who I know who is FI is a punk. (And this person is true MMM style FI, a low to middle income earner who did everything right financially and who has low material wants and one day woke up to discover work was optional.... just like MMM).



oldtoyota

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #33 on: October 17, 2013, 07:10:01 AM »
oldtoyota - Was that James Hetfield for real? HA! Seriously though - You Tube is really awesome for finding live video footage for obscure music (and not so obscure). Like this gem: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SGJFWirQ3ks 

I know quite a few punk engineers, librarians, and lawyers, folks with PhDs, and even an MD. They may not look like what you might expect, but they are there, blending in with everyone else. :)

LOVE THAT SONG!!!!!

Frankies Girl

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #34 on: October 17, 2013, 09:16:11 AM »


Metalhead chiming in :)

I am very surprised to learn this about punk... for me punk was always equal to "hating society", "drinking cheap beer until you are out of money" and "avoid work" - so the only similarity to the MMM-way would be not to be required to work anymore.

I never saw the DIY-side of it... and maybe I had some prejudices ;)

Funny, I always saw it as: "Build a better society. Build a community over long conversations about how to build a better society while drinking cheap beer. Work to live, don't live to work." Or something like that. Certainly I see focus on questioning the status quo, and putting more focus on friends/art/humanity and less focus on materialism (consistent with MMM). But I still struggle to mesh consciously thinking about money/having a reasonable wage and net worth with the punk lifestyle... (My 50% savings rate still puts my weekly spending in dollar terms higher than that of a good chunk of my punk friends). I've also gotten soft over the years! I don't think I could live in a punk house anymore!

So cool to read all of everyone's thoughts on this! Maybe investing in index funds is punk after all ;-)

Yeah, most of the punks that I know that have done college have science degrees. How does one rebel against strict religious parents? Get mohawk and a science degree! Social work/teaching and similar professions around helping misfits are also popular.

And also the only person who I know who is FI is a punk. (And this person is true MMM style FI, a low to middle income earner who did everything right financially and who has low material wants and one day woke up to discover work was optional.... just like MMM).


Most of the punks I know are artists. Most of us are successful in some form or fashion, but in my experience, punk and metal and other forms of outsider music was not just a form of rebellion, but of creative expression. Sure, there was anger, but that was usually from being told to conform, to settle down and shut up.

And cheap beer. Definitely. ;)

mjb

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #35 on: October 17, 2013, 11:36:23 AM »
Funny, I always saw it as: "Build a better society. Build a community over long conversations about how to build a better society while drinking cheap beer. Work to live, don't live to work." Or something like that.

+1

Also, my heroes: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minutemen_(band)#Economical_practices

Lans Holman

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #36 on: October 17, 2013, 03:06:13 PM »
Metalhead chiming in :)

I am very surprised to learn this about punk... for me punk was always equal to "hating society", "drinking cheap beer until you are out of money" and "avoid work" - so the only similarity to the MMM-way would be not to be required to work anymore.

I never saw the DIY-side of it... and maybe I had some prejudices ;)

Funny, I had a sort of parallel loss of prejudice in recent years regarding metal.  I always associated metal with the obnoxious redneck bullies in my high school, it took me a long time to realize that there's this whole other metalhead subset of basically total nerds. 
All these subcultures within subcultures...

Lans Holman

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thelamb

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #38 on: January 04, 2014, 10:24:00 AM »
With any musical genre there are always sub-genres and multiple eras.  With punk, I always think of, at least, three distinct eras:  the original, 70's (Clash, Sex Pistols, etc.); the post-punk, 80's (Black Flag, Minor Threat, etc.); and the rest, 90's and on, revivalist, whatever you want to call it (Op Ivy, Rancid, Bad Religion, etc).  Obviously, there are probably many more ways to classify, sub-classify...

Anyway, I think about that second group a lot in terms of MMM, especially bands like the Minutemen.  They were real working class, DIY, fairly sober dudes.  They played early shows so working people could attend.  They kept it cheap and lived modest lifestyles.  They weren't breaking stuff or causing riots, just allowing the message to come through the music without all the theatrics.  I don't know, there was a certain purity and simplicity to this era of punk.  Obviously, their goals probably weren't early retirement.  But through their approach they were able to make their music on their terms, which wreaks of badassity. 

T-Rex

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #39 on: January 04, 2014, 12:41:18 PM »
I could relate it to rejecting conspicuous consumerism and the traditional life path and definition of success. It makes me cringe to think of, like the end of SLC Punk, but I want a money mustache. I just don't know how I would tough out certain scenarios when I'm older without FI. I don't think banks and index funds are punk at all, but skipping laundry and not having a car or TV are. The Mustachian lifestyle for an average earner definitely has the appearance of a punk lifestyle.

lcg377

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Re: Mustachianism and Punk?
« Reply #40 on: January 04, 2014, 02:05:31 PM »
Since there are quite a few Mpls people in the forum, you should check out Condominium for house shows and tiny record store performances:

http://blog.thecurrent.org/2013/05/condominium-talk-about-signing-to-sub-pop/

The lead singer is my friend's bf, and he is frugal and seems pretty punk to me.