Author Topic: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do  (Read 16476 times)

thatbrowncat

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Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« on: February 02, 2015, 04:27:25 AM »
10 year old me: *wow. Why don't those people who bike have cars? they don't have enough money to pay for the gas, or buy a car? Are they poor?*

22 year old me: *wow! If I bike to this place, instead of commuting, i can actually save xxx amount of cash! Plus, this is exercise that's fun! I can't believe I actually thought that people who bike are poor!*

What's yours?
« Last Edit: February 02, 2015, 04:32:16 AM by thatbrowncat »

DagobertDuck

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2015, 05:25:43 AM »
My dad has always driven cheap second-hand cars despite having a well-paid job.

When I was 11 y.o. or so I felt really embarrassed because of his crappy car.

Now I understand that driving cheap cars saved him tenthousands of over all those years, enabling him to retire earlier and pay a nice part of my college education.

Thank you dad!
« Last Edit: February 02, 2015, 05:27:40 AM by DagobertDuck »

HenryDavid

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2015, 09:15:38 AM »
I think I started out with an MMM type approach as a poor student, out of necessity. Lapsed a bit, then rediscovered the whole attitude as a way of getting more free time in life, earlier. While wasting a lot less of earth's resources.
-yes to driving older cars and getting 400 kilometres out of them . . . learned from dad.
But also to spending many years without any car while living in an urban condo. Renting out the parking space paid the condo fees.
Also:
-avoiding ever signing up for paid parking at work: saved $2000/year in the 20 years I've worked there (almost done now . . .)
-biking to work for years and years is like getting paid to have fun
-making own granola at home for negligible cost, versus about $20 a kilo to buy
-air drying almost all clothes. They last way longer, and the dryer is only turned on for bedsheets.
-foraging free ripe apples from empty lots in my 'hood and making applesauce.
-cutting cable years ago because . . . there's nothing there.
-built own backyard deck. Anyone can build a deck . . . for most houses. No problems in 18 years with the thing.
-cutting waaaay back on home insurance. We had to make a claim--no fun at all--and realized that self-insuring with savings is the better method.
-sharing a main course at restaurants. They'e too big anyway.
-and so on . . . life as an adventure and a game is more fun than life as debt slavery to own stuff. So many folks take too long to figure that out.

Apples

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #3 on: February 02, 2015, 11:07:34 AM »
As a teenager with too much disposable income, I scoffed at the thought of going to the library for books.  I would drive 30 minutes to the local Borders, buy 10-15 books, spend hundreds of dollars, and be set for a while.  Now, I happily scout out what to read, put it on hold, and venture to the library to pick up my greatly anticipated next book(s)!  It's a 12 minute drive, and I go once every 2 weeks.  I end up driving more overall, but I'm not buying anywhere near as many books, and I'm more apt to read something I'm not sure I'll love, just b/c I don't have to buy it.

My friends make fun of me for using the library still.  Goofs.

2ndTimer

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #4 on: February 02, 2015, 03:11:27 PM »
Home made bread.  We always had it at home when I was growing up and when I was little eating store bread was a huge treat.  It was so sweet and soft, like cake.  Now I bake bread every week because I can't stand store bread.

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #5 on: February 02, 2015, 05:53:16 PM »
Selling things online rather than just donating them or giving them away. (I mean, if a friend/family is in need, I'll still give something to help them out, but that's not what I'm talking about here). I used to be too lazy to list things on craigslist or sell my used books. I've since figured out this actually can be worth the time in a lot of cases!

Coloring my own hair (henna ftw!)

Using a calculator in the grocery store and price comparing.

Changing my own oil (I didn't scoff at this, just didn't have ANY idea how)

Making "junk chili", "fridge stew", and "pantry glop"-- recipes I used to resent when my parents would make them to use up leftovers, but now I use them too!

mikefixac

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #6 on: February 02, 2015, 09:59:01 PM »
I must say, when I first started reading ERE (Early Retirement Extreme) and MMM, I thought they were a bit wacky.

Of course when you don't fit in the mainstream, you're going to be different.

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.

And if my wife was on board, it could be over $100K yearly turnaround. Don't get me wrong, she's not a spendthrift, but together it would be full speed ahead and I think it would be a blast.

thatbrowncat

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2015, 11:25:06 PM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.


I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

DagobertDuck

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #8 on: February 03, 2015, 03:02:56 AM »
-cutting cable years ago because . . . there's nothing there.
+1
And dnother one I learnt from my parents! When I was a kid we had only a very limited number of channels (only public and regional channels) and I hated not beeing able to watch commercial tv stations.

Living without a tv for almost a year now, never looked back.

Kris

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #9 on: February 03, 2015, 06:46:42 AM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.


I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

I wish I could cut my own hair.  Unfortunately, it is what I not so affectionately call "bullshit hair".  Very fine, curly in a fairly random way, and extremely susceptible to humidity.  Even my hair stylist has admitted that I have perhaps the most challenging hair she has worked with.  Thankfully, she does a great job.  But unless and until I can finally get it to grow out to about mid-back level so that it can just be worn long and loose (something I haven't managed to do since my mid-twenties), I'll be stuck paying for haircuts.

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #10 on: February 03, 2015, 09:15:07 AM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.


I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

I wish I could cut my own hair.  Unfortunately, it is what I not so affectionately call "bullshit hair".  Very fine, curly in a fairly random way, and extremely susceptible to humidity.  Even my hair stylist has admitted that I have perhaps the most challenging hair she has worked with.  Thankfully, she does a great job.  But unless and until I can finally get it to grow out to about mid-back level so that it can just be worn long and loose (something I haven't managed to do since my mid-twenties), I'll be stuck paying for haircuts.

I'm sure you've probably seen every method on earth, but just in case you haven't: major recommendation for Curly Gurl method and styling products for curly hair. They also have stylists certified to cut curly hair, and while you probably don't have any in their area, they have videos on the theory behind the cuts which you might find beneficial. The major changes for me came from changing how I dry my hair (plop!) and changing my hair cleaning (I co-rinse only). Best of luck taming the unruly beast!

PS- if you're sick of your curls, henna can help keep hair a little more weighed down and make it less frizzy/slightly more straight. Just know that the idea that henna is semi-permanent is LIES. The only way to remove henna from light colored and fine hair is with scissors.

OldDogNewTrick

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #11 on: February 03, 2015, 10:16:45 AM »
Being my own lawn service! Mowing, trimming, edging, clipping... all electric too. And I'm not young. Wonderful exercise and discovered I do a much better job than the paid service. My neighbors think I'm crazy.

Line drying most clothes... thankfully Florida is a right to dry state. My neighbors think I'm crazy.

Starching and pressing my husbands dress shirts rather than taking to cleaners. Saves $$ and again, I do a much better job. I do them in 2 week batches, (10), so not really as big a deal as I first thought.

Doing our own bathtub to walk-in shower conversion. Hired a plumber to install the tile-ready pan, drain, and fixtures. I'm doing the tiling myself, (completed a few projects already--back splash, counter). Our cost for complete conversion--$2500.00. Had 4-5 remodel contractors submit bids prior to going DIY--$6000.00 to $8000.00! HUGE savings.

5 years ago I would have thought anyone crazy if they suggested I would undertake these projects.

Mrs. Frugalwoods

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #12 on: February 04, 2015, 07:45:34 AM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.


I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

I wish I could cut my own hair.  Unfortunately, it is what I not so affectionately call "bullshit hair".  Very fine, curly in a fairly random way, and extremely susceptible to humidity.  Even my hair stylist has admitted that I have perhaps the most challenging hair she has worked with.  Thankfully, she does a great job.  But unless and until I can finally get it to grow out to about mid-back level so that it can just be worn long and loose (something I haven't managed to do since my mid-twenties), I'll be stuck paying for haircuts.

I'm sure you've probably seen every method on earth, but just in case you haven't: major recommendation for Curly Gurl method and styling products for curly hair. They also have stylists certified to cut curly hair, and while you probably don't have any in their area, they have videos on the theory behind the cuts which you might find beneficial. The major changes for me came from changing how I dry my hair (plop!) and changing my hair cleaning (I co-rinse only). Best of luck taming the unruly beast!

PS- if you're sick of your curls, henna can help keep hair a little more weighed down and make it less frizzy/slightly more straight. Just know that the idea that henna is semi-permanent is LIES. The only way to remove henna from light colored and fine hair is with scissors.
Mine is definitely cutting my own hair too! I finally bit the bullet and had my husband cut it for me on Saturday and, it looks awesome! It's not perfect, but it is absolutely good enough and, it was FREE. My advice is, if you have someone else who can cut it for you at home, that's ideal. You can totally cut it yourself too, but it was easier having him do it with my guidance.

I've been cutting his hair for years, so I'm tentatively saying we're never going to a salon again.

Edge of Reason

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #13 on: February 04, 2015, 05:17:40 PM »
I echo the sentiment about older cars (Excellent on gas 2006 Corolla with 256 000 kms / aprox 160 000 miles), small house (2600 square feet including a basement but I can clean the whole darn thing myself) and bagged lunches (takeout, although tasty is expensive and is not so tasty if it becomes an everyday thing).  My kids sometimes wonder why we are so "cheap" (frugal) but thankfully (because of my husband) we don't have to worry as much as those living paycheck to paycheck.  I hope that they will learn sooner than I did that Mustachianism will give you freedom.

Kris. About your unruly curly hair (sorry if this is considered a hijack).  You may want to consider The Curly Girl method for your hair.  Read Lorraine Massey's Curly Girl book which has lots of tips.  Silicone and shampoo are a curly girl's nightmare.   There are also tips on Naturallycurly.com.  I found this method by accident for my daughter.  I myself am a bi-racial curly but struggled dealing with my own hair for years.  I vowed to do better for my daughter and both our heads are  finally hydrated and in great shape because of Lorraine's tips.  My daughter started off knowing what to do right the first time and gets many compliments on her hair.   

I also cut my son's and husband's hair with clippers I got at Sally's.  I started doing this because I was tired of reminding my husband to go get a cut.  My hairdresser gave me tips and its been super cheap ever since...tonight is a trim night for my son who needs it and its going to cost me $0 as the clippers have paid for themselves tenfold.

« Last Edit: February 04, 2015, 05:36:20 PM by Edge of Reason »

MrMoogle

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #14 on: February 04, 2015, 06:18:45 PM »
As a guy, it's pretty easy to cut your own hair if you like it short.  I use two sizes for the electric clippers, a longer size on top, and shorter on the sides.  I've been doing it for years.  I messed up a bit the first try, but on the second, I asked coworkers about what they thought about my "new barber" and they all liked "him."  I never considered doing it when I was younger.

penguins4everyone!

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #15 on: February 04, 2015, 07:57:12 PM »
for anyone wanting to dip a toe into the hair cutting thing- i am starting small with my husband.  i use his beard trimmer to carefully trim around his neck and ears when it looks a little kerfuffled, that buys us about two weeks until he needs an actual $20 cut.  It's not even really about being too cheap, it's a pain in the ass to go to the barber so it's nice to space it out.

I go to the Cinta Aveda Institute in SF, it's great cause it's like $24 for a woman's cut, they use Aveda products, and the students are always pretty earnest and trying really hard.   

can't wait till we have kids and i can really unleash my hair cutting creativity.  who wants a faux-hawk, mommy's bored!

EllieStan

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2015, 09:54:49 AM »
Until my mid-20s, I believed the status symbols really meant someone had a lot of money. I was ashamed to buy unexpensive or thrift clothes, I was envious of those who spent their weekends shopping. I was ashamed to drive a used and very basic car (Accent) and couldn't wait to at least upgrade to a SUV.

Now, I realize all of this was mainly aspirational on my part. I thought it meant something, I thought this was ''success'' and ''being established'', but I realized it's not and that it doesn't align with my values at all. I still thrift and seek for sales and discounts whenever I need something. Shopping is no longer a ''hobby'' I consider interesting. You couldn't pay me to get a bigger car that would cost me more in terms of gas, insurances and repairs. My views on material possessions and consumerism overall has changed. I thought being frugal meant being poor and miserable. I now understand the less you spend, the richer you are.

2ndTimer

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2015, 11:59:49 AM »
TV.  Growing up in the country I was distressed that we only got one channel.  Used to go to the neighbors to watch cartoons because they got two channels.  Now we have a TV but it has sat in the corner for years.  I once watched a video on it.

Miss Prim

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #18 on: February 06, 2015, 04:30:46 AM »
I just don't think I could cut my own hair, but I do go to a cheap chain salon with coupons.  In between having my whole hair cut, I just get a bang cut ($6.00) and that lasts me another 6 weeks until I get my hair cut again.  So 12 weeks out of one hair cut for $12.00 plus $6.00).  In the whole scheme of things, not a lot of money per year and my hair always looks good.

It's weird because I have always done mustachian things all adult life and never really scoffed at anything other people did that looked cheap.  Except bike riding, I used to think people who biked to work or the store must have had DUI's or were poor.

                                                                            Miss Prim

Kris

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #19 on: February 06, 2015, 07:08:43 AM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.


I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

I wish I could cut my own hair.  Unfortunately, it is what I not so affectionately call "bullshit hair".  Very fine, curly in a fairly random way, and extremely susceptible to humidity.  Even my hair stylist has admitted that I have perhaps the most challenging hair she has worked with.  Thankfully, she does a great job.  But unless and until I can finally get it to grow out to about mid-back level so that it can just be worn long and loose (something I haven't managed to do since my mid-twenties), I'll be stuck paying for haircuts.

I'm sure you've probably seen every method on earth, but just in case you haven't: major recommendation for Curly Gurl method and styling products for curly hair. They also have stylists certified to cut curly hair, and while you probably don't have any in their area, they have videos on the theory behind the cuts which you might find beneficial. The major changes for me came from changing how I dry my hair (plop!) and changing my hair cleaning (I co-rinse only). Best of luck taming the unruly beast!

PS- if you're sick of your curls, henna can help keep hair a little more weighed down and make it less frizzy/slightly more straight. Just know that the idea that henna is semi-permanent is LIES. The only way to remove henna from light colored and fine hair is with scissors.

Thanks for the recs.  the unfortunate thing is, my hair is only curly underneath; the top part (aka, the part you see first) is actually pretty straight.  So I get curly frizz on the underside, with a layer of straight, limp hair that just drapes over the top of it.  It's maddening.  So, "curly" styles really don't work for me. 

I will check out Curly Gurl, though, and look into the other stuff you mentioned.  I always appreciate recommendations.  Nineteen times out of twenty, they don't work for me, but every once in a while, I'll find something that nets an improvement. 

Kris

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2015, 07:13:38 AM »
I just don't think I could cut my own hair, but I do go to a cheap chain salon with coupons.  In between having my whole hair cut, I just get a bang cut ($6.00) and that lasts me another 6 weeks until I get my hair cut again.  So 12 weeks out of one hair cut for $12.00 plus $6.00).  In the whole scheme of things, not a lot of money per year and my hair always looks good.

It's weird because I have always done mustachian things all adult life and never really scoffed at anything other people did that looked cheap.  Except bike riding, I used to think people who biked to work or the store must have had DUI's or were poor.

                                                                            Miss Prim

Funny about biking... It's weird how many people on the forum have mentioned people assuming that those who biked for transportation were poor or had DUIs.  That never occurred to me before.  Makes me wonder what practices of mine have others looking at me making assumptions about my life.  Kinda makes me laugh. 

ETA:  woo hoo!  I achieved "Handlebar" status with this post!

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2015, 08:22:32 AM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.




I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

I wish I could cut my own hair.  Unfortunately, it is what I not so affectionately call "bullshit hair".  Very fine, curly in a fairly random way, and extremely susceptible to humidity.  Even my hair stylist has admitted that I have perhaps the most challenging hair she has worked with.  Thankfully, she does a great job.  But unless and until I can finally get it to grow out to about mid-back level so that it can just be worn long and loose (something I haven't managed to do since my mid-twenties), I'll be stuck paying for haircuts.

I'm sure you've probably seen every method on earth, but just in case you haven't: major recommendation for Curly Gurl method and styling products for curly hair. They also have stylists certified to cut curly hair, and while you probably don't have any in their area, they have videos on the theory behind the cuts which you might find beneficial. The major changes for me came from changing how I dry my hair (plop!) and changing my hair cleaning (I co-rinse only). Best of luck taming the unruly beast!

PS- if you're sick of your curls, henna can help keep hair a little more weighed down and make it less frizzy/slightly more straight. Just know that the idea that henna is semi-permanent is LIES. The only way to remove henna from light colored and fine hair is with scissors.

Thanks for the recs.  the unfortunate thing is, my hair is only curly underneath; the top part (aka, the part you see first) is actually pretty straight.  So I get curly frizz on the underside, with a layer of straight, limp hair that just drapes over the top of it.  It's maddening.  So, "curly" styles really don't work for me. 

I will check out Curly Gurl, though, and look into the other stuff you mentioned.  I always appreciate recommendations.  Nineteen times out of twenty, they don't work for me, but every once in a while, I'll find something that nets an improvement.

Always worth the try! For what it's worth, I always thought my hair was "wavy". It turns out it was because I kept so much weight on it (no layers and very long) and combed the curls out. Now that I know how to tend it, I have full on ringlets (when I take care of it anyway, sigh). It's amazing how much of an impact cut, frequency of washing, and products have on hair.

Kris

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2015, 09:15:31 AM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.




I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

I wish I could cut my own hair.  Unfortunately, it is what I not so affectionately call "bullshit hair".  Very fine, curly in a fairly random way, and extremely susceptible to humidity.  Even my hair stylist has admitted that I have perhaps the most challenging hair she has worked with.  Thankfully, she does a great job.  But unless and until I can finally get it to grow out to about mid-back level so that it can just be worn long and loose (something I haven't managed to do since my mid-twenties), I'll be stuck paying for haircuts.

I'm sure you've probably seen every method on earth, but just in case you haven't: major recommendation for Curly Gurl method and styling products for curly hair. They also have stylists certified to cut curly hair, and while you probably don't have any in their area, they have videos on the theory behind the cuts which you might find beneficial. The major changes for me came from changing how I dry my hair (plop!) and changing my hair cleaning (I co-rinse only). Best of luck taming the unruly beast!

PS- if you're sick of your curls, henna can help keep hair a little more weighed down and make it less frizzy/slightly more straight. Just know that the idea that henna is semi-permanent is LIES. The only way to remove henna from light colored and fine hair is with scissors.

Thanks for the recs.  the unfortunate thing is, my hair is only curly underneath; the top part (aka, the part you see first) is actually pretty straight.  So I get curly frizz on the underside, with a layer of straight, limp hair that just drapes over the top of it.  It's maddening.  So, "curly" styles really don't work for me. 

I will check out Curly Gurl, though, and look into the other stuff you mentioned.  I always appreciate recommendations.  Nineteen times out of twenty, they don't work for me, but every once in a while, I'll find something that nets an improvement.

Always worth the try! For what it's worth, I always thought my hair was "wavy". It turns out it was because I kept so much weight on it (no layers and very long) and combed the curls out. Now that I know how to tend it, I have full on ringlets (when I take care of it anyway, sigh). It's amazing how much of an impact cut, frequency of washing, and products have on hair.

Yes, I agree.  The top part of my hair is straight basically because it's longer and so the weight straightens it out.  Problem is, in the past when I have had a stylist cut it so that that part is shorter, and wavier, I haven't really liked any of the cuts for the shape of my face.  Sigh.  The current cut I have is actually the best I've had in a very long time.  I have to use product on it and blow it out (luckily, it doesn't take all that long -- I'm super impatient)  but the end result looks good.  I can also pull it up into a messy chignon and the tendrils around my face actually look okay like that, which is my go-to look when it's humid (the tendrils curl up but it looks like I mean to do that, lol).  I've been fighting with my hair for many years, but I'm mostly okay with it right now.  My main "concern" is that when I retire abroad I'm not going to be able to have my stylist with me, of course, and the products I get will be basically what's available where I am.  So I'm just gonna have to live with what I can get.  (This is why I wish I was able to cut my hair myself -- so I could take my stylist with me!)

Rural

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2015, 12:03:43 PM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.




I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

I wish I could cut my own hair.  Unfortunately, it is what I not so affectionately call "bullshit hair".  Very fine, curly in a fairly random way, and extremely susceptible to humidity.  Even my hair stylist has admitted that I have perhaps the most challenging hair she has worked with.  Thankfully, she does a great job.  But unless and until I can finally get it to grow out to about mid-back level so that it can just be worn long and loose (something I haven't managed to do since my mid-twenties), I'll be stuck paying for haircuts.

I'm sure you've probably seen every method on earth, but just in case you haven't: major recommendation for Curly Gurl method and styling products for curly hair. They also have stylists certified to cut curly hair, and while you probably don't have any in their area, they have videos on the theory behind the cuts which you might find beneficial. The major changes for me came from changing how I dry my hair (plop!) and changing my hair cleaning (I co-rinse only). Best of luck taming the unruly beast!

PS- if you're sick of your curls, henna can help keep hair a little more weighed down and make it less frizzy/slightly more straight. Just know that the idea that henna is semi-permanent is LIES. The only way to remove henna from light colored and fine hair is with scissors.

Thanks for the recs.  the unfortunate thing is, my hair is only curly underneath; the top part (aka, the part you see first) is actually pretty straight.  So I get curly frizz on the underside, with a layer of straight, limp hair that just drapes over the top of it.  It's maddening.  So, "curly" styles really don't work for me. 

I will check out Curly Gurl, though, and look into the other stuff you mentioned.  I always appreciate recommendations.  Nineteen times out of twenty, they don't work for me, but every once in a while, I'll find something that nets an improvement.

Always worth the try! For what it's worth, I always thought my hair was "wavy". It turns out it was because I kept so much weight on it (no layers and very long) and combed the curls out. Now that I know how to tend it, I have full on ringlets (when I take care of it anyway, sigh). It's amazing how much of an impact cut, frequency of washing, and products have on hair.

Yes, I agree.  The top part of my hair is straight basically because it's longer and so the weight straightens it out.  Problem is, in the past when I have had a stylist cut it so that that part is shorter, and wavier, I haven't really liked any of the cuts for the shape of my face.  Sigh.  The current cut I have is actually the best I've had in a very long time.  I have to use product on it and blow it out (luckily, it doesn't take all that long -- I'm super impatient)  but the end result looks good.  I can also pull it up into a messy chignon and the tendrils around my face actually look okay like that, which is my go-to look when it's humid (the tendrils curl up but it looks like I mean to do that, lol).  I've been fighting with my hair for many years, but I'm mostly okay with it right now.  My main "concern" is that when I retire abroad I'm not going to be able to have my stylist with me, of course, and the products I get will be basically what's available where I am.  So I'm just gonna have to live with what I can get.  (This is why I wish I was able to cut my hair myself -- so I could take my stylist with me!)


My hair is almost exactly like yours superfine and curly only underneath. I found it got better as it turned gray, a lot less fine and less limp. Now, though, only the top, straight layer is fully gray and the bottom still has a good bit of my natural color, so it looks weird to put it up.


I found that I can manage to cut a simple straight bob by myself, though. Just a little below chin length and then I'll leave it alone until it hits my shoulders. The little bit of curl gives me some leeway in case I get it slightly crooked, because I turn it under anyway. The straight top part makes the bob look good and the curly bottom part gives it a little bit of body.


Before it went gray, I did the curly girl routine and I found it did get the top part to curl up pretty effectively. It took just a little while, a couple of weeks to get it into better shape, but then I could do curls. Once it started turning, I had to change my plan because the gray hairs are stick straight. Coloring was right out - it breaks off.

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #24 on: February 06, 2015, 12:44:29 PM »
I live near my work/kids schools/activities now. I used to use commuting as a badge of honor, mostly bragging about how I could get from town A to town b in 'only' 25 minutes because I knew the back roads to take. 

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #25 on: February 06, 2015, 01:24:41 PM »
Shopping at Goodwill for NICE clothing: that's the place where I donate my old stuff to, not where I shop! But if I can find stuff that fits it's so nice to get pants for $5 instead of $50 (bit stuck up sounding, I know)

Using coupons and adding up real costs of packages: is that big bag of rice really more expensive than two smaller bags? Again, things my mom would do and I'd whine over cause she's "taking too long"

Cutting down on heat/AC: learned to love the blanket and the open window


Just a comment on the hair thing because I have "so curly they think it's permed" hair: curly girl method works, but the actual brand product is expensive (duh). I get whatever the cheapest non-sulfate etc conditioner and shampoo, the latter of which can last me a year with some of the higher end types. I've started styling with some oil mix I found for cheap, it's actually giving me "cute" ringlets.

irishbear99

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #26 on: February 06, 2015, 03:34:37 PM »
I'm going to chime in with those who mentioned cable TV. I grew up in the boondocks where we couldn't get cable service, so we were restricted to the big 3 networks plus PBS. My friends (especially in HS) used to give me a hard time because I didn't know what happened on 90201 last night (dating myself here...) and I remember thinking as a kid that I would never let myself go without cable as an adult. Now, hubby and I have cut cable several times, the most recent time going on two years now, because most of the programs are crap and I can catch the ones that are actually decent enough to watch on Netflix or Hulu.

I don't know if this technically counts for the purposes of this thread since our cable cutting stems from the belief that it's a waste of money, not because we're deliberately trying to be frugal. Result is the same, though.

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #27 on: February 06, 2015, 03:41:17 PM »
Just a comment on the hair thing because I have "so curly they think it's permed" hair: curly girl method works, but the actual brand product is expensive (duh). I get whatever the cheapest non-sulfate etc conditioner and shampoo, the latter of which can last me a year with some of the higher end types. I've started styling with some oil mix I found for cheap, it's actually giving me "cute" ringlets.

Agreed! I use apricot kernal oil for EVERYTHING now. Lotion, makeup remover, friz tamer, etc etc. And I just use a good all natural sulfate free conditioner and co-rinse. I don't even shampoo anymore. Much cheaper overall.

KD

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #28 on: February 07, 2015, 04:38:42 PM »
" I thought being frugal meant being poor and miserable. I now understand the less you spend, the richer you are."

+1

HappierAtHome

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #29 on: February 07, 2015, 06:20:33 PM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.


I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

I wish I could cut my own hair.  Unfortunately, it is what I not so affectionately call "bullshit hair".  Very fine, curly in a fairly random way, and extremely susceptible to humidity.  Even my hair stylist has admitted that I have perhaps the most challenging hair she has worked with.  Thankfully, she does a great job.  But unless and until I can finally get it to grow out to about mid-back level so that it can just be worn long and loose (something I haven't managed to do since my mid-twenties), I'll be stuck paying for haircuts.

I'm sure you've probably seen every method on earth, but just in case you haven't: major recommendation for Curly Gurl method and styling products for curly hair. They also have stylists certified to cut curly hair, and while you probably don't have any in their area, they have videos on the theory behind the cuts which you might find beneficial. The major changes for me came from changing how I dry my hair (plop!) and changing my hair cleaning (I co-rinse only). Best of luck taming the unruly beast!

PS- if you're sick of your curls, henna can help keep hair a little more weighed down and make it less frizzy/slightly more straight. Just know that the idea that henna is semi-permanent is LIES. The only way to remove henna from light colored and fine hair is with scissors.

Thanks for the recs.  the unfortunate thing is, my hair is only curly underneath; the top part (aka, the part you see first) is actually pretty straight.  So I get curly frizz on the underside, with a layer of straight, limp hair that just drapes over the top of it.  It's maddening.  So, "curly" styles really don't work for me. 

We have the same hair! Top layer dead straight (won't hold artificial curl), underneath mine is like an 80s crimp, and not even hairdressers can straighten that layer.

So I usually just stick it in a ponytail.

Kris

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #30 on: February 08, 2015, 10:26:19 AM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.


I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

I wish I could cut my own hair.  Unfortunately, it is what I not so affectionately call "bullshit hair".  Very fine, curly in a fairly random way, and extremely susceptible to humidity.  Even my hair stylist has admitted that I have perhaps the most challenging hair she has worked with.  Thankfully, she does a great job.  But unless and until I can finally get it to grow out to about mid-back level so that it can just be worn long and loose (something I haven't managed to do since my mid-twenties), I'll be stuck paying for haircuts.

I'm sure you've probably seen every method on earth, but just in case you haven't: major recommendation for Curly Gurl method and styling products for curly hair. They also have stylists certified to cut curly hair, and while you probably don't have any in their area, they have videos on the theory behind the cuts which you might find beneficial. The major changes for me came from changing how I dry my hair (plop!) and changing my hair cleaning (I co-rinse only). Best of luck taming the unruly beast!

PS- if you're sick of your curls, henna can help keep hair a little more weighed down and make it less frizzy/slightly more straight. Just know that the idea that henna is semi-permanent is LIES. The only way to remove henna from light colored and fine hair is with scissors.

Thanks for the recs.  the unfortunate thing is, my hair is only curly underneath; the top part (aka, the part you see first) is actually pretty straight.  So I get curly frizz on the underside, with a layer of straight, limp hair that just drapes over the top of it.  It's maddening.  So, "curly" styles really don't work for me. 

We have the same hair! Top layer dead straight (won't hold artificial curl), underneath mine is like an 80s crimp, and not even hairdressers can straighten that layer.

So I usually just stick it in a ponytail.

We should start a club/support group for women with this particular brand of crappy hair. 

4alpacas

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #31 on: February 08, 2015, 11:25:03 AM »

Now, I do things I thought I'd never do. Cutting my own hair, shopping at Goodwill, actually do appliance repair calls on my motorcycle, growing my own food, are just a few things I do now.


I'm also want to learn how to cut my own hair, but i'm scared because there's a chance i might mess it up. My hair's currently at shoulder-length. I guess i can practice cutting my bangs

I wish I could cut my own hair.  Unfortunately, it is what I not so affectionately call "bullshit hair".  Very fine, curly in a fairly random way, and extremely susceptible to humidity.  Even my hair stylist has admitted that I have perhaps the most challenging hair she has worked with.  Thankfully, she does a great job.  But unless and until I can finally get it to grow out to about mid-back level so that it can just be worn long and loose (something I haven't managed to do since my mid-twenties), I'll be stuck paying for haircuts.

I'm sure you've probably seen every method on earth, but just in case you haven't: major recommendation for Curly Gurl method and styling products for curly hair. They also have stylists certified to cut curly hair, and while you probably don't have any in their area, they have videos on the theory behind the cuts which you might find beneficial. The major changes for me came from changing how I dry my hair (plop!) and changing my hair cleaning (I co-rinse only). Best of luck taming the unruly beast!

PS- if you're sick of your curls, henna can help keep hair a little more weighed down and make it less frizzy/slightly more straight. Just know that the idea that henna is semi-permanent is LIES. The only way to remove henna from light colored and fine hair is with scissors.

Thanks for the recs.  the unfortunate thing is, my hair is only curly underneath; the top part (aka, the part you see first) is actually pretty straight.  So I get curly frizz on the underside, with a layer of straight, limp hair that just drapes over the top of it.  It's maddening.  So, "curly" styles really don't work for me. 

We have the same hair! Top layer dead straight (won't hold artificial curl), underneath mine is like an 80s crimp, and not even hairdressers can straighten that layer.

So I usually just stick it in a ponytail.

We should start a club/support group for women with this particular brand of crappy hair.
Wow!  I'm so thankful for my hassle-free hair.  However, I feel very guilty for holding off on cutting it myself. 

I recently started cutting my hair.  I cut out the coloring and expensive hair products a few years ago, but I was clinging to my stylist.  I've cut my hair 3 times, and it's far from perfect.  However, it's free (using scissors from our dog's grooming set) and takes less than 10 minutes. 

Cooking.  I used to hate cooking, and I rarely cooked anything from scratch.  After looking at our grocery bills and the increasing number on the scale, I ditched the prepared foods.  It's so much easier to squeeze extra servings of vegetables in when you're making everything from scratch.  I'm still a lazy cook.  I bulk cook on the weekends, and our freezer is filled with premade individual servings of meals. 

No heat this winter.  Both my dog and my DH love the cold, so I'm the only one suffering.  Now I prefer the cold temperature in the house.  We have a great down comforter on the bed (probably about 10 years old).  I have a fantastic blanket in the living room.  And I have an excuse to wear my dinosaur slippers every day.

falcondisruptor

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #32 on: February 09, 2015, 05:00:30 PM »
I'm definitely another hair cutting one.  I've been cutting my own hair for a while, but it took some convincing before I decided to buy some clippers for his hair.

2ndTimer

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #33 on: February 10, 2015, 10:32:34 AM »
At the age of 20, I yearned to have something to make payments on.  A car, a waterbed, anything.  I was sure it was a badge of adulthood.  Fortunately, I made so little money that no one would sell me anything. 

Bardo

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #34 on: February 10, 2015, 01:24:25 PM »
Doing the dishes by hand, instead of using the dishwasher.  I know it doesn't save that much money, but it's like my own little marker of frugality!

greaper007

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #35 on: February 10, 2015, 07:53:25 PM »
Line drying my clothes, fixing EVERYTHING that breaks in the house including the furnace this winter, not using AC.   Keeping the heat at 56.    Driving as little as possible. 

Not cutting my hair at all, or shaving.     I find that I look better with long hair and a beard than I do with a bad haircut.    My wife just doesn't have the eye for fashion, so as much as I try to describe how to give me a hipster haircut she just can't pull it off.   I figured I'd get ahead of the trend and just go long.    3 years later I look like Greg Allman and I've saved over a thousand dollars on haircuts.

wintersun

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #36 on: February 16, 2015, 10:12:12 AM »
I used to scoff at my parents' frugality somewhat.  Now I feel as though they have given me a tremendous gift of knowledge.  I never thought I would be budgeting my groceries, keeping track of our expenses, writing down every expense, choosing to barely buy anything, and enjoying it all!

Lately I have been going through old bank statements and am aghast to see some of the expenses I did not blink an eye at just a year or two ago.  My parents would swallow frogs whole if they knew how much I have wasted.  They were very able and did all the repairs on everything they owned including sewing, upholstery, engine maintenance and repair, wiring, furniture repair.   I wish I had paid attention to some of the house maintenance stuff back then.

However, no time like the present!

KD

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #37 on: February 16, 2015, 10:20:17 AM »
wintersun, you can try picking up some of the Reader's Digest "Complete Do-It-Yourself Manual" type books at thrift stores and flea markets.  Some of it is very basic, or you can google any specific repairs on how-tos on youtube and such nowdays.

PatStab

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #38 on: February 16, 2015, 12:58:40 PM »
That's funny, I just trimmed DD's hair and mine earlier today.  It looks really good.  Now I might be able to do that once or twice between salon cuts but it does mount up money wise over time.  Also we had it cut in Texas and I haven't found a good beautician up here yet.

iknowiyam

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #39 on: February 16, 2015, 02:24:26 PM »
What do you call it? Navy Showers? You know, turning the water off while you shampoo or lather... I only do this in the summer, so it has been months.

Also, I cut my own hair. I used to think I had difficult hair; then I realized I was wanting things that were never going to happen with my hair. Once I settled on a style that fit my hair type, things got easier.

I also cut my SO's hair.

I used to doubt my ability to bike places more so than scoff. Now I can foresee more biking in my future, although I haven't acted much on this one yet!

Debtless in Texas

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #40 on: February 16, 2015, 02:29:30 PM »
Quote
What do you call it? Navy Showers? You know, turning the water off while you shampoo or lather... I only do this in the summer, so it has been months.
Combat showers!

I do the same thing despite buying low flow shower heads and taking ice cold showers. Ah the good old days...

cbgg

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #41 on: February 16, 2015, 09:50:57 PM »
For me it's thrift shopping.  When I was a kid I thought it was sad and gross to buy used items.  The combination of the change in attitudes during the financial meltdown plus becoming more ecologically minded (see: The Story of Stuff!) got me interested in second hand shopping.  I don't do it all the time, but it is my first choice these days.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #42 on: February 19, 2015, 05:57:31 PM »
For me it's thrift shopping.  When I was a kid I thought it was sad and gross to buy used items.  The combination of the change in attitudes during the financial meltdown plus becoming more ecologically minded (see: The Story of Stuff!) got me interested in second hand shopping.  I don't do it all the time, but it is my first choice these days.

Second hand clothes is a big one for me too! The charity shops here don't seem to be worth the effort to me, but it turns out that I can get great quality clothes much cheaper than retail on ebay. Still not "cheap", but worth it for things that look good and last forever.

GoCubsGo

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #43 on: February 20, 2015, 09:50:33 AM »
One word. Aldi.  I'm already surrounded by fancy grocery stores (Whole Foods, Trader Joes, specialty markets) and to make matters worse two more opened up last year within 3 miles (Marianos, Petes Fresh).  After seeing some of the receipts my wife brought home I almost gagged (last year was the first full year of tracking expenses).

I had always thought negatively about Aldi (not sure why) and so did my wife but I decided we should try it.  I'll admit the quarter for a shopping cart thing almost made us turn around and go home but we went in and now have replaced quite a bit of our shopping items with Aldi items.  My kids like to make fun of the knockoff product names and we all have identified our favorite Aldi alternative product.  Baby steps but glad we tried it.

johnny847

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #44 on: February 23, 2015, 11:50:50 AM »
I didn't necessarily scoff at all of these things, but I definitely changed my attitude about them:

Thrift shopping
Cutting my own hair
Biking instead of driving as much as I can


I'm considering making my own bread, but I need to check the prices on ingredients first.

Kaspian

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #45 on: February 23, 2015, 11:57:12 AM »
-cutting cable years ago because . . . there's nothing there.
+1
And dnother one I learnt from my parents! When I was a kid we had only a very limited number of channels (only public and regional channels) and I hated not beeing able to watch commercial tv stations.

Living without a tv for almost a year now, never looked back.

+2!! 

And I now MUCH prefer my own kitchen glop to anything they could serve me in a chain restaurant.  I won't ever voluntarily eat in a Casey's/Kelsey's/Applebees/Olive Garden sort of place again.  I don't know why--I used to enjoy their crap occasionally but now it tastes greasy and/or over-salted and/or bland.

2ndTimer

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Re: Mustachian things I scoffed, but now i actually Do
« Reply #46 on: February 23, 2015, 12:16:11 PM »
I always felt cheated as a kid when my mother packed home fried chicken and fresh bread in the car for a trip instead of planning for a stop at a roadside restaurant.  Now we seldom leave the house without a sandwich and a full thermos.