Author Topic: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time  (Read 12186 times)

Fastfwd

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It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« on: June 11, 2015, 07:02:43 AM »
Quit my job due to changing work conditions but had to give a long notice due to contract. Now I do almost nothing and just sit there reading websites. Days are so long.

On the plus side I will take some time off in the upcoming weeks/months and live a pre-retirement lifestyle. I do have to work a few more years to go from baseline retirement to travel all the time retirement.

Cougar

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2015, 07:14:57 AM »

If you work a desk job, in a cubicle; where you get an hour off for lunch; it's not very different from prison; and in some ways worse.

I think, in prisons many have cable tv and I think you can get almost any book you want to read and also play board games. yes, they have no real freedom; but they have freedom during their day to do what is within the rules; try and bring a book to read all day at work.

Friar

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #2 on: June 11, 2015, 07:19:48 AM »
Why not try to use the time constructively? There are plenty of things you can learn online, such as languages, that are pretty inconspicuous and could be fun.

Fastfwd

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #3 on: June 11, 2015, 08:24:44 AM »
There is a bit of a mind state that prevents me from going into anything useful; like a mini boredom depression; also I do have to work for small things here and there which is why they asked me to stay for a while.

I am reading books but it's not like at home where I can be comfortable, no noise or distractions.
I am also "learning" from various website forums such as this one.

Cougar

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #4 on: June 11, 2015, 08:45:33 AM »


I am reading books but it's not like at home where I can be comfortable, no noise or distractions.


jealous !


Retired To Win

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #5 on: June 11, 2015, 09:00:01 AM »
Why not try to use the time constructively? There are plenty of things you can learn online, such as languages, that are pretty inconspicuous and could be fun.

Also, the OP makes it sound like he/she intends to get another job.  In the same circumstances, I've used the time to start looking for that next job.

It also sounds like either the employer yanked all work away, or there's a bit of work avoidance going on.  :O

Dorje

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #6 on: June 11, 2015, 09:55:47 AM »
I prioritized doing what I want rather than taking a job I don't like for the money. It's a trade-off but now I am doing something I enjoy. I could have a lot more money but I wouldn't trade my entrepreneurial experiences and all the interesting things I have done for money. This is one aspect of "mustachianism" I don't agree with. Doing something you enjoy is more important than retiring early imo.

 

frugalnacho

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #7 on: June 11, 2015, 10:06:17 AM »

If you work a desk job, in a cubicle; where you get an hour off for lunch; it's not very different from prison; and in some ways worse.

I think, in prisons many have cable tv and I think you can get almost any book you want to read and also play board games. yes, they have no real freedom; but they have freedom during their day to do what is within the rules; try and bring a book to read all day at work.

Have you been in prison?  Usually you have some kind of responsibility or work detail you have to do.  When you're not working you have the freedom to watch tv or read a book, but the same is true of your civilian life. 

Lis

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #8 on: June 11, 2015, 10:12:41 AM »
Or you change your viewpoint and mindset and see yourself on a mini work vacation, where yes you still have to be at a certain place and have a few responsibilities, but for the most part you're getting paid to sit around and do whatever you want. This is really coming off as complainypants, to be honest. Like everyone else on this site I see the appeal of ER, but I'm always astounded how miserable people seem in their jobs. People can be shits wherever you go and we all adhere to rules and regulations we don't like. Try getting a mindset where everything about your job isn't so terrible.

Try using your free time to watch Oz and see if you still compare what you're doing to prison after that.

StockBeard

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #9 on: June 11, 2015, 10:37:41 AM »
There is a bit of a mind state that prevents me from going into anything useful; like a mini boredom depression; also I do have to work for small things here and there which is why they asked me to stay for a while.
I can relate. I am switching teams in a few weeks, after months of a similar situation ( http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/post-fire/did-you-ever-feel-the-frustration-of-being-%27close-to-the-goal%27/ ), and I've been doing the same, a lot. The worst is you kind of get used to that boredom state, and it might get tough to get back into a "productive" state.

Fastfwd

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2015, 11:24:43 AM »
This is really coming off as complainypants, to be honest.

It's definitely complainy when you complain about being paid for doing nothing but it's strange how this is actually worse than working. I like what I do and when I'm 100% busy the days fly by.
There have been big changes after an acquisition and this is why I am leaving and also why the workload is currently close to zero. I am somewhat free to do things but not to the point where I could start doing things that are definitely visibly not work related. I basically have to play pretend work.

I am not looking for another job now because it's summer and I'm technically FI if I am willing to live frugally for the rest of my life. I do intend to work again in a few months and add to the 'stash until I can easily travel the world a few times per year until I am too old/tired/unhealthy to want to.

Friar

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2015, 11:34:03 AM »
There is a bit of a mind state that prevents me from going into anything useful; like a mini boredom depression; also I do have to work for small things here and there which is why they asked me to stay for a while.
I can relate. I am switching teams in a few weeks, after months of a similar situation ( http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/post-fire/did-you-ever-feel-the-frustration-of-being-%27close-to-the-goal%27/ ), and I've been doing the same, a lot. The worst is you kind of get used to that boredom state, and it might get tough to get back into a "productive" state.

I can also completely understand this as I too have been in the situation of waiting for a role change whilst "doing time" at my old job.

I ended up spending my time trying to get a better understanding of what I was going to be doing in the future. It tough.

Retire-Canada

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #12 on: June 11, 2015, 11:40:58 AM »
Quit my job due to changing work conditions but had to give a long notice due to contract. Now I do almost nothing and just sit there reading websites. Days are so long.

You are getting paid well. Not being asked to do anything awfully demanding. So if you waste that time doing useless stuff that's really on you. You could use this opportunity to learn something or be productive in terms of some other life goal.

If you don't that's your choice, but it's not being forced upon you.

Chris22

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2015, 12:02:49 PM »
I am somewhat free to do things but not to the point where I could start doing things that are definitely visibly not work related. I basically have to play pretend work.

Why?  Would they fire you?

Agree that lots of people seem so miserable at their job that I'm guessing FIRE isn't going to improve anything for them.  Miserable people are just miserable.

mathlete

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #14 on: June 11, 2015, 12:09:59 PM »
Unless any former inmates speak up I'm going to continue believing that white collar work is about 10,000 times better than prison.

Sid Hoffman

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #15 on: June 11, 2015, 12:16:56 PM »
Unless any former inmates speak up I'm going to continue believing that white collar work is about 10,000 times better than prison.

Out in my area there's basically 3 places you can be detained:

1) City lockup (typically for people with 1-3 night stays)
2) County jail (which varies based on county, typically minimum security for the sub-12 month stays)
3) State prison / federal prison (the place you go to die at the hands of a racist psychopath)

I've had family members in the first two and one who was a druggie and briefly sent to women's prison.  I've been told that you should do anything in your power to avoid ever being sent to actual prison.  I have one nephew currently in county jail in a more socially liberal state and he's OK with it.  Not having fun, but he's in the drug offender side where it sounds to be pretty easygoing compared to where violent offenders get sent.

Either way, I would avoid making any comparisons between having a boring job and ANY of the 3 above mentioned places.

mathlete

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #16 on: June 11, 2015, 12:58:21 PM »
Out in my area there's basically 3 places you can be detained:

1) City lockup (typically for people with 1-3 night stays)
2) County jail (which varies based on county, typically minimum security for the sub-12 month stays)
3) State prison / federal prison (the place you go to die at the hands of a racist psychopath)

I've had family members in the first two and one who was a druggie and briefly sent to women's prison.  I've been told that you should do anything in your power to avoid ever being sent to actual prison.  I have one nephew currently in county jail in a more socially liberal state and he's OK with it.  Not having fun, but he's in the drug offender side where it sounds to be pretty easygoing compared to where violent offenders get sent.

Either way, I would avoid making any comparisons between having a boring job and ANY of the 3 above mentioned places.

Sorry about your nephew. Drug laws suck.

Redstone5

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2015, 12:59:05 PM »
Quit my job due to changing work conditions but had to give a long notice due to contract. Now I do almost nothing and just sit there reading websites. Days are so long.

You are getting paid well. Not being asked to do anything awfully demanding. So if you waste that time doing useless stuff that's really on you. You could use this opportunity to learn something or be productive in terms of some other life goal.

If you don't that's your choice, but it's not being forced upon you.

I disagree. I know what you're saying, but I had a similar situation in my job earlier this year and it's not that easy. For several months my job had been incredibly slow. I didn't want to quit as I'm nowhere near FI, and I don't want to leave a job I love just because of a few slow months. However, it's exhausting to pretend to work all day. The hours drag when you have nothing to do but update your filing system again and again, and you have to look like you're doing something in front of other people so you can't just do whatever. I spent most of the time doing online research, but believe me, spending 8 hours a day online sounds fun until you do it for three months.

I developed a callus on my left elbow from leaning while mouse scrolling, and some days I felt like I'd reached the end of the internet :) but the worst was the feeling that I was being so useless and not making any meaningful contribution to my life or anyone else's. I think that's what the OP means by "prison".

I did discover MMM during that time, though, so it all had a purpose, I guess :)

StockBeard

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2015, 01:02:33 PM »
Redstone5, this! Totally this!
It's amazing how stressful it becomes just after a few months.

mathlete

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #19 on: June 11, 2015, 01:05:19 PM »
Can't you guys just go home if there is nothing to do?

Or would you be afraid that someone would notice and think that maybe they could eliminate your position?

Retire-Canada

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2015, 01:13:46 PM »

I disagree. I know what you're saying, but I had a similar situation in my job earlier this year and it's not that easy. For several months my job had been incredibly slow. I didn't want to quit as I'm nowhere near FI, and I don't want to leave a job I love just because of a few slow months. However, it's exhausting to pretend to work all day. The hours drag when you have nothing to do but update your filing system again and again, and you have to look like you're doing something in front of other people so you can't just do whatever. I spent most of the time doing online research, but believe me, spending 8 hours a day online sounds fun until you do it for three months

I was talking about the OP not you. He quit. He doesn't have to pretend anything. What are they going to do? Not hold him to the contract he doesn't want to finish.

StockBeard

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #21 on: June 11, 2015, 01:54:52 PM »
Or would you be afraid that someone would notice and think that maybe they could eliminate your position?
In my specific case I intend to stay in that company for a few more years. I can't afford to "appear" like I'm slacking off, even though the real reason is that I am not getting any job because of the ongoing transition. It's about keeping appearances until I move to the next position, where, hopefully, I'll be productive again. Not sure if it makes sense. There's also a strong psychological impact on the idea that you're "doing your duty" by staying around, rather than just leaving at 4 every day...

There was an article that circulated not so long ago about the pain from people who do not have enough work to do... tries to explain what goes through people's mind in that situation:
http://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/11/the-art-of-not-working-at-work/382121/

Gone Fishing

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #22 on: June 11, 2015, 02:25:43 PM »
I frequently feel like a caged animal at the office.  Hence my FIRE plans.  When I am not at the office I am typically outside if it is not dark or raining.  At our last house, we had some friends that lived down the road and passed the house frequently.  Once they remarked that I was almost ALWAYS in the yard when they passed by!

I actually replied to a job interview question of, "What do you think will be the hardest part of the job?" with, "Being inside all the time".  I got the job...

I hear about people getting 5-10-20 years of prison and wonder how they could possibly survive locked up that long.  I probably actually go crazy after 12 months or so.  Shawshank Redemption is probably one of my favorite movies, I also read the Count of Monte Cristo many times in my youth...   

Redstone5

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #23 on: June 11, 2015, 03:39:31 PM »
Can't you guys just go home if there is nothing to do?

Or would you be afraid that someone would notice and think that maybe they could eliminate your position?

I wish! I'm pretty low down on the totem pole around here so it's not like I can say, "I'm done. I'm headed home now." Even the director of my department doesn't get that privilege.

I'm paid to sit at my desk so I have to sit in it all day long. I don't even have my own office. I share one with my supervisor (who is often trying to look busy to our director too). Also, orders for me can come in at any time so I can go from bored to super busy in a moment so I have to be here. It's always feast or famine.

Sid Hoffman

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #24 on: June 11, 2015, 09:30:05 PM »
Sorry about your nephew. Drug laws suck.

Thanks, although he's got some other issues. The jail time isn't for the drugs, really, that's just how they get something to stick. At one time or another he's had FTA warrants, possession of a concealed weapon (knife), trespassing, and apparently burglary too.  The drug charge and FTA were an easy way for the county to hold on to him for a little while that didn't require any outside witnesses or testimony from civilians.

Chris22

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #25 on: June 12, 2015, 07:36:28 AM »
I wish! I'm pretty low down on the totem pole around here so it's not like I can say, "I'm done. I'm headed home now." Even the director of my department doesn't get that privilege.

I'm paid to sit at my desk so I have to sit in it all day long.

Maybe that's why everyone on here seems to hate their job.  I'm paid to do a job, not paid to sit at a desk.  When that job is done, I leave.  Sometimes I just leave because the job can be done tomorrow.  Sometimes I stay until midnight to finish because that's the job.  This week, I played golf after work on Wednesday and Thursday, leaving at about 3PM both times to do it.  Today is summer hours, I'll leave at noon(ish).  In two weeks is our busy time, I'll probably work 60-70+ hours that week. 

If you don't have that sort of flexibility I could see how you could hate your job, but every company I've ever worked for (3 F500 companies, 2 of which were F100) has given that flexibility freely.  I could even work at home several days a week if I wanted to (which I generally don't). 

redbird

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #26 on: June 12, 2015, 07:39:20 AM »
Can't you guys just go home if there is nothing to do?

Or would you be afraid that someone would notice and think that maybe they could eliminate your position?

I work a desk job and I'd be fired if I went home early without using paid time off hours. Boss tracks when you're in the office. If you write something different on the timesheet, then that's frauding the company and is a fire-able offense. I feel like I can't be the only one.

Chris22

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #27 on: June 12, 2015, 08:05:20 AM »
Can't you guys just go home if there is nothing to do?

Or would you be afraid that someone would notice and think that maybe they could eliminate your position?

I work a desk job and I'd be fired if I went home early without using paid time off hours. Boss tracks when you're in the office. If you write something different on the timesheet, then that's frauding the company and is a fire-able offense. I feel like I can't be the only one.

As a (salaried) manager with (salaried) direct reports, I see my responsibility to be to either A) provide my employees with more (value-added) work, or B) send them home with the understanding that there are other days I will expect them to stay late to finish work. 

We had a saying in the Navy "if you don't have anything to do, don't do it here."

Friar

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #28 on: June 12, 2015, 09:46:23 AM »
Although my office is trying its best to transition to allow days working from home, there is still many people who employ presentee-ism. If you're not at your desk with Excel open and looking at a spreadsheet then you're obviously not working.

Personally, I say screw the people who think like that. If I've finished my work to at least the standard required in the time asked for then it shouldn't matter when or where its done.

Dee18

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #29 on: June 12, 2015, 11:06:16 AM »
I am sure my admin assistant feels like this.  I am salaried and am allowed to work from home, leave when I please, etc.  I used to be able to say to her, "looks like everything is caught up, so feel free to leave when you want."  But a new system was instituted so hourly employees must sign in and out through their office computers and must be at their desks 7.5 hours per day.  During our busy times, she works many extra hours, but the new rules also do not allow carrying over comp time to slack times.  We did manage to get flex time, so she can commute 4 days instead of 5, but it's still crazy. 

actualethan

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #30 on: June 12, 2015, 11:35:29 AM »
Unless any former inmates speak up I'm going to continue believing that white collar work is about 10,000 times better than prison.

x10k better sounds about right to me.  Consider your assertion validated by the anecdotal opinion of someone who has done both.
« Last Edit: June 12, 2015, 11:38:33 AM by actualethan »

Chris22

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #31 on: June 12, 2015, 11:42:38 AM »
I am sure my admin assistant feels like this.  I am salaried and am allowed to work from home, leave when I please, etc.  I used to be able to say to her, "looks like everything is caught up, so feel free to leave when you want."  But a new system was instituted so hourly employees must sign in and out through their office computers and must be at their desks 7.5 hours per day.  During our busy times, she works many extra hours, but the new rules also do not allow carrying over comp time to slack times.  We did manage to get flex time, so she can commute 4 days instead of 5, but it's still crazy.

Is she paid OT for after hours work?  If so, I'd say she's getting rewarded, if not, I'd tell her (in writing) to bank her OT hours and then dump them on her time card when she leaves early.  I'd be happy to justify that to any HR weenie who wanted to call me on it.  "Yeah I told her to "fallsify" her time card in response to last week when I had her here 3 extra hours.  So what?  Going to fire me?  Didn't think so, let's all get back to work."

Boganvillia

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #32 on: June 13, 2015, 10:17:29 PM »
I have had this too. At the time I thought of it as highly paid detention, rather than prison.

MrsPete

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #33 on: June 14, 2015, 06:47:15 AM »
Unless any former inmates speak up I'm going to continue believing that white collar work is about 10,000 times better than prison.
I worked in a prison for a while, and I'd have to agree:  Working in a white collar job IS conservatively about 10,000 times better than prison. 

A typical prisoner sleeps in a triple bunk in one big room with around 100 other prisoners -- the lack of privacy would kill me. 
He has something not unlike a high school locker in which to store all his goods. 
His personal belongings (and even his body cavities) can be searched at any time for any reason.
Yes, he has cable TV -- one TV in that big room.  Hope  he likes what the others are watching. 
He cannot control the temperature in the room. 
When he showers, it's with no curtain /in plain view of everyone else.
He has to turn in his toothbrush and razor at the end of his shower -- can't be trusted with them.
He is forced to get up /go to sleep according to lights out times.
He is forced to eat when the prison says it's time, and he has no say-so in what he gets.
Once a day he can buy cigarettes, snacks, etc. from the prison store -- if he has money from family or a prison job.
During the day, he is locked out of his bunk room /away from all his personal belongings.
He might have a job -- where I worked, the road crew was the biggest job, and it paid .40; that was a while ago.   
If he didn't have a job that day, he'd just wander around the yard.  Cold? Hot?  Too bad.  The most popular activity is lifting weights.
He is allowed to have books, etc. in the yard, but that was just not a popular activity.
He can see family once a week in a supervised setting -- if they can /will come to him. 
He is allowed to write/receive letters, but other people read them. 
If he gets sick, he can see the prison doctor (or dentist), but he has no privacy in that appointment and no choice of doctor. 

And the biggest problem of all:  When he leaves the prison, his record follows him; thus, his chance of reintegrating himself into society is vastly reduced. 

No, I see no similarities between a good-but-dull job and prison. 

Redstone5

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #34 on: June 15, 2015, 12:27:03 AM »
Unless any former inmates speak up I'm going to continue believing that white collar work is about 10,000 times better than prison.
I worked in a prison for a while, and I'd have to agree:  Working in a white collar job IS conservatively about 10,000 times better than prison. 

A typical prisoner sleeps in a triple bunk in one big room with around 100 other prisoners -- the lack of privacy would kill me. 
He has something not unlike a high school locker in which to store all his goods. 
His personal belongings (and even his body cavities) can be searched at any time for any reason.
Yes, he has cable TV -- one TV in that big room.  Hope  he likes what the others are watching. 
He cannot control the temperature in the room. 
When he showers, it's with no curtain /in plain view of everyone else.
He has to turn in his toothbrush and razor at the end of his shower -- can't be trusted with them.
He is forced to get up /go to sleep according to lights out times.
He is forced to eat when the prison says it's time, and he has no say-so in what he gets.
Once a day he can buy cigarettes, snacks, etc. from the prison store -- if he has money from family or a prison job.
During the day, he is locked out of his bunk room /away from all his personal belongings.
He might have a job -- where I worked, the road crew was the biggest job, and it paid .40; that was a while ago.   
If he didn't have a job that day, he'd just wander around the yard.  Cold? Hot?  Too bad.  The most popular activity is lifting weights.
He is allowed to have books, etc. in the yard, but that was just not a popular activity.
He can see family once a week in a supervised setting -- if they can /will come to him. 
He is allowed to write/receive letters, but other people read them. 
If he gets sick, he can see the prison doctor (or dentist), but he has no privacy in that appointment and no choice of doctor. 

And the biggest problem of all:  When he leaves the prison, his record follows him; thus, his chance of reintegrating himself into society is vastly reduced. 

No, I see no similarities between a good-but-dull job and prison.

I think the OP said the job was "like" being in prison. Not "exactly the same as" being in prison. I hope that if I said, "my throat is a dry as a desert" no one on this forum would think that I have the Sahara in my mouth.

frugalnacho

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #35 on: June 15, 2015, 08:55:59 AM »
Unless any former inmates speak up I'm going to continue believing that white collar work is about 10,000 times better than prison.
I worked in a prison for a while, and I'd have to agree:  Working in a white collar job IS conservatively about 10,000 times better than prison. 

A typical prisoner sleeps in a triple bunk in one big room with around 100 other prisoners -- the lack of privacy would kill me. 
He has something not unlike a high school locker in which to store all his goods. 
His personal belongings (and even his body cavities) can be searched at any time for any reason.
Yes, he has cable TV -- one TV in that big room.  Hope  he likes what the others are watching. 
He cannot control the temperature in the room. 
When he showers, it's with no curtain /in plain view of everyone else.
He has to turn in his toothbrush and razor at the end of his shower -- can't be trusted with them.
He is forced to get up /go to sleep according to lights out times.
He is forced to eat when the prison says it's time, and he has no say-so in what he gets.
Once a day he can buy cigarettes, snacks, etc. from the prison store -- if he has money from family or a prison job.
During the day, he is locked out of his bunk room /away from all his personal belongings.
He might have a job -- where I worked, the road crew was the biggest job, and it paid .40; that was a while ago.   
If he didn't have a job that day, he'd just wander around the yard.  Cold? Hot?  Too bad.  The most popular activity is lifting weights.
He is allowed to have books, etc. in the yard, but that was just not a popular activity.
He can see family once a week in a supervised setting -- if they can /will come to him. 
He is allowed to write/receive letters, but other people read them. 
If he gets sick, he can see the prison doctor (or dentist), but he has no privacy in that appointment and no choice of doctor. 

And the biggest problem of all:  When he leaves the prison, his record follows him; thus, his chance of reintegrating himself into society is vastly reduced. 

No, I see no similarities between a good-but-dull job and prison.

I think the OP said the job was "like" being in prison. Not "exactly the same as" being in prison. I hope that if I said, "my throat is a dry as a desert" no one on this forum would think that I have the Sahara in my mouth.

Yeah as has been pointed out multiple times, it's not even "like" being in prison.  Not even close.  It's a terrible analogy. We all understand it, and we all think it's a large exaggeration. 

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #36 on: June 15, 2015, 09:27:28 AM »
Yeah as has been pointed out multiple times, it's not even "like" being in prison.  Not even close.  It's a terrible analogy. We all understand it, and we all think it's a large exaggeration.

OP here and I have to agree on my terrible analogy. Someone mentioned detention and that would be a better fit. How ridiculous is it for an adult to be stuck in a situation that's like school detention? Why do we as a society build what we do for 1/2 of our awake time to be so unpleasant?

Chris22

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #37 on: June 15, 2015, 09:31:38 AM »
Yeah as has been pointed out multiple times, it's not even "like" being in prison.  Not even close.  It's a terrible analogy. We all understand it, and we all think it's a large exaggeration.

OP here and I have to agree on my terrible analogy. Someone mentioned detention and that would be a better fit. How ridiculous is it for an adult to be stuck in a situation that's like school detention? Why do we as a society build what we do for 1/2 of our awake time to be so unpleasant?

You alluded to not being able to quit due to your contract.  Presumably you signed this contract.  So, uhh, you kinda agreed to the whole thing, no?

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #38 on: June 15, 2015, 09:52:30 AM »
Yeah as has been pointed out multiple times, it's not even "like" being in prison.  Not even close.  It's a terrible analogy. We all understand it, and we all think it's a large exaggeration.

OP here and I have to agree on my terrible analogy. Someone mentioned detention and that would be a better fit. How ridiculous is it for an adult to be stuck in a situation that's like school detention? Why do we as a society build what we do for 1/2 of our awake time to be so unpleasant?

You alluded to not being able to quit due to your contract.  Presumably you signed this contract.  So, uhh, you kinda agreed to the whole thing, no?

You have to realize that I am just a regular employee; not a manager even if they gave me the title of VP; presumably so they could apply the 60 days clause. At the time it was a decision between staying on unemployment or signing that contract. What was sold to me as the job description and what it truly was turned out to be very different but once you start you can't complain that the employer lied and ask to go back on unemployment to look for something appropriate. There is a massive imbalance in knowledge of labor laws between HR professionals and the average employee and some will use this and maybe even go further to manipulate things to their advantage.

Live and learn. I will not sign another clause as restrictive and my 'stash will allow me to be more picky about the next job.

Ditchmonkey

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #39 on: June 16, 2015, 02:00:32 PM »
Why not try to use the time constructively? There are plenty of things you can learn online, such as languages, that are pretty inconspicuous and could be fun.

One thing about these cubicle jobs with a lot of idle time - you may not technically have anything to do, but you usually need to maintain the illusion that you are doing something constructive. It's easy to read because nobody knows that you aren't reading work-related materials. But watching training videos and other similar activities usually isn't possible.

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Re: It's like I'm being well paid to be in prison part time
« Reply #40 on: June 17, 2015, 07:30:22 AM »
What would happen if you just found another job and walked out on your contract? How legally binding is it? Unless you are in the military, where they can actually put you in prison if you walk out on the job, I don't think there would be too severe of ramifications.

I was told by some HR friends that it can't possibly be legally binding. Others have told me that maybe they could ask for financial penalties due to a critical role going unfilled. It's less painful to watch the clock for a few weeks than to risk going to court and having my named mentioned in this way on the job market.