Author Topic: Foraging 2020  (Read 5605 times)

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #50 on: August 04, 2020, 05:19:29 PM »
I would not be brave enough to forage mushrooms.

GreenToTheCore

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #51 on: August 05, 2020, 04:21:25 PM »
I would not be brave enough to forage mushrooms.

Some mushroom humor: There are old mushroom hunters and bold mushroom hunters, but there are no old bold mushroom hunters.
;)

cerat0n1a

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #52 on: August 06, 2020, 01:59:18 AM »
This evening we had fish soup with grayling that DH caught earlier and melde (Chenopodium album) that I picked today. The plant didn't taste much in the soup, but also didn't add any bitterness like some others.

Interesting - that's quite a common weed in my vegetable garden. Seems like people in India grow it as a crop, I will give it a try.

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #53 on: August 06, 2020, 03:28:31 AM »
I would not be brave enough to forage mushrooms.

Some mushroom humor: There are old mushroom hunters and bold mushroom hunters, but there are no old bold mushroom hunters.
;)

I've heard the same thing applied to pilots! It would be cool if experienced foragers gave mushroom classes. I've googled the things to look out for, spore colour on a sheet of white paper etc etc, but I'd still be scared unless someone who actually knew what they were doing showed me.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #54 on: August 06, 2020, 12:29:03 PM »
I would not be brave enough to forage mushrooms.

Some mushroom humor: There are old mushroom hunters and bold mushroom hunters, but there are no old bold mushroom hunters.
;)

I've heard the same thing applied to pilots! It would be cool if experienced foragers gave mushroom classes. I've googled the things to look out for, spore colour on a sheet of white paper etc etc, but I'd still be scared unless someone who actually knew what they were doing showed me.

Where I live we have and mushroom and plant foraging club that gives courses, but also does walks with the public. And we have a physical mushroom control in cities and a digital mushroom control where real people look at photos. I am one of those who does the mushroom control.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2020, 01:42:14 AM by Linea_Norway »

GreenToTheCore

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #55 on: August 06, 2020, 04:20:20 PM »
I would not be brave enough to forage mushrooms.

Some mushroom humor: There are old mushroom hunters and bold mushroom hunters, but there are no old bold mushroom hunters.
;)


Where I live we have and mushroom and plant foraging club that gives courses, but also does walks with the public. And we have a physical mushroom control in cities and a digital mushroom control where real people look at photos. I am one of those who does the mushroom control.
I've heard the same thing applied to pilots! It would be cool if experienced foragers gave mushroom classes. I've googled the things to look out for, spore colour on a sheet of white paper etc etc, but I'd still be scared unless someone who actually knew what they were doing showed me.

Same here Linea, there are a few local resources/clubs around here and DH gets pretty into it.
This book is pretty handy: "All That the Rain Promises, and More..." by David Arora. Also, I started with only picking Lobster Mushrooms (Hypomyces lactifluorum) since they have distinct characteristics and no look-alikes. Plus they're darn tasty :)

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #56 on: August 08, 2020, 02:13:33 PM »
An unknown species here that lobster mushroom.

We got mackerel and leaves of a plant called Atriplex prostrata (can't find an English name on wiki). And some raspberries, but I just picked a handfull.

GreenToTheCore

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #57 on: August 08, 2020, 04:47:15 PM »
An unknown species here that lobster mushroom.

We got mackerel and leaves of a plant called Atriplex prostrata (can't find an English name on wiki). And some raspberries, but I just picked a handfull.

The Atriplex prostrata looks really neat. Oh the things that can grow when there's water around...

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #58 on: August 09, 2020, 02:32:16 PM »
Today we ate two fish that DH caught in the sea for free. I picked edible mushrooms, hegdehogs (Hydnum repandum), more Atriplex prostrata leaves like my last post and sea sandwort (Honckenya peploides) for the first time. The latter was supposed to taste a bit bitter, but tasted surprisingly good.

I also picked sand ryegrass/limegrass (Leymus arenarius) in the hope that I can dry it in the sun while camping. I want to try to make bread from it, like they used to do in bad harvest years in the past.
« Last Edit: August 16, 2020, 03:36:46 AM by Linea_Norway »

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #59 on: August 10, 2020, 03:57:53 PM »
Saturday I picked a giant pail of apples from a tree on city property, and Sunday I picked rosehips while walking in the country. I'm not quite sure what to do with the rosehips, but I have a vague memory of being told that they're high in vitamin C. While apple picking, another lady who was collecting apples told me that there are loads of chokecherries in a regional park, so I may head out there too (she makes wine from them, but I'm less ambitious and would probably just make jelly).

Rural

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #60 on: August 12, 2020, 02:32:09 AM »
You can seed the rose hips and either make jelly (alone or with the apples or cherries) or dry them for rose hip tea.


It's full elderberry season here, so I need to pick more today.

cerat0n1a

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #61 on: August 12, 2020, 02:42:08 AM »
You can seed the rose hips and either make jelly (alone or with the apples or cherries) or dry them for rose hip tea.

It's full elderberry season here, so I need to pick more today.

What do you do with the elderberries? My parents used to make wine from them. I use a bit of elderflower to make drinks and sorbets earlier in the year. I tend to cut down the elder trees in my garden, but they're always popping up somewhere in my hedges.

Rural

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #62 on: August 15, 2020, 10:32:06 PM »
I don't make wine because it's a pain to get enough tiny elderberries, but pie, muffins, syrup, all are good.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #63 on: August 16, 2020, 03:39:56 AM »
Two days ago we had a starter of chantarells and penny buns (boletus edulis). Followed by a soup from mackerell and scallops and melde leaves. All self caught by me and DH.

Fishindude

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #64 on: August 17, 2020, 09:18:13 AM »
Shot three fox squirrels which I will be deboning and making a pot pie with, using the meat plus some of our garden vegetables.

Monkey Uncle

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #65 on: August 17, 2020, 02:44:25 PM »
Shot three fox squirrels which I will be deboning and making a pot pie with, using the meat plus some of our garden vegetables.

Are fox squirrels in season in August where you live?

Fishindude

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #66 on: August 17, 2020, 05:07:32 PM »
Are fox squirrels in season in August where you live?

Yep, season always opens on August 15th.

Debonair

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #67 on: August 18, 2020, 12:12:24 AM »
I don't forage much where I live now as I don't know many of the plants. Sometimes I will take a banana off an abandoned tree, or a coconut and I have gone out looking for bamboo shoots before.

I use to pick a lot of berries and sometimes dandelions in the USA.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #68 on: August 18, 2020, 04:18:08 AM »
I don't forage much where I live now as I don't know many of the plants. Sometimes I will take a banana off an abandoned tree, or a coconut and I have gone out looking for bamboo shoots before.

I use to pick a lot of berries and sometimes dandelions in the USA.

It is important with local knowledge about plants (and mushrooms). Knowledge from one part of the world is not necessarily transferable to another part.

Unique User

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #69 on: August 29, 2020, 03:28:47 PM »
Found a new app called seek by iNaturalist.  Was able to identify sassafras and shiso (beefsteak plant) today and picked some of both.  I never foraged much besides berries and mushrooms before.  Earlier this year we picked some chantarelles and a beautifully fresh 2lb chicken of the woods.

lutorm

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #70 on: August 29, 2020, 07:27:25 PM »
The foraging repertoire here is pretty different from what we've heard before in this thread: guava, mango, papaya, jabuticaba (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabuticaba, never ever heard of that before moving here), and talo ("kalo" here, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taro)  Reasonable chance of finding various citrus, too.

Mrsweisass

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #71 on: August 29, 2020, 08:18:46 PM »
Found a new app called seek by iNaturalist.  Was able to identify sassafras and shiso (beefsteak plant) today and picked some of both.  I never foraged much besides berries and mushrooms before.  Earlier this year we picked some chantarelles and a beautifully fresh 2lb chicken of the woods.

I would recommend caution using seek as your only confirmation of a plantís identity. I have found that it mistakes plants for other common plants quite often. It is great for a first pass, but if it is going in my mouth, I look to my local foraging groups and the experts within them for a better trained eye.  Try looking for foraging groups if you are on Meetup or Facebook or the like. They are a great way to get connected to local knowledge.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #72 on: August 30, 2020, 02:25:43 AM »
My local forage is very dry. I have been looking for mushrooms a couple of times, but I only find enough for 1 meal. Luckily I know mamy more species than most other people, so after they have picked, I can still find some edible amanita, which everyone thinks are poissonous. But ai would also like to pick chantarells, but they are just not to be found. We need RAIN.

Unique User

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #73 on: August 30, 2020, 10:25:11 AM »
Found a new app called seek by iNaturalist.  Was able to identify sassafras and shiso (beefsteak plant) today and picked some of both.  I never foraged much besides berries and mushrooms before.  Earlier this year we picked some chantarelles and a beautifully fresh 2lb chicken of the woods.

I would recommend caution using seek as your only confirmation of a plantís identity. I have found that it mistakes plants for other common plants quite often. It is great for a first pass, but if it is going in my mouth, I look to my local foraging groups and the experts within them for a better trained eye.  Try looking for foraging groups if you are on Meetup or Facebook or the like. They are a great way to get connected to local knowledge.

Thanks, I'd only use it on easy to identify plants and we confirmed after we got home.  But good point. 

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #74 on: September 07, 2020, 10:14:32 AM »
We went to our mountain cabin where I expected to be a look t more mushrooms than the dry forest at home. I went on three trips so far, and I worked myself into hyper stress and fatigue.
Lots of lactarius species that need to be neutralized by cooking first. And a lot of russula that have a sticky hat that is difficult to clean. I brought the drying machine for the russulas. And I am trying out new recipies from my new mushroom cooking book for the lactarius. But it means I am foraging several hours a day and spend the evening cleaning. Now I let my husband cook again, as I had been busy with the lactarius all afternoon. I found several species that I want to treat seperately. But what a work. Tomorrow I go looking for pennie buns and won't pick more lactarius that need neutralizing.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2020, 05:17:32 AM by Linea_Norway »

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #75 on: September 12, 2020, 05:20:05 AM »
The syptoms of stress and fatique in my last post were the beginning of a fever and several days of sickness. Felling well now.

DH caught his fifth big trout this week, his tenth this summer. Most of them are big enough for two meals.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #76 on: September 16, 2020, 02:49:20 PM »
We are currently living in a rental house that has a plumb tree in the garden. Now is the time. DH pucked the most ripe ones. Today a storm through another big bunch on the ground. So he picked up the good ones. DH made wine from the plumbs. I made a crumble cake and several pots of jam from the rest. The ones that we wind loosebed weren't the ripest, so taking the stone out was quite a lot on work.

Earlier this summer I discovered a fungus on the plumbs. But luckily there are many left that don't have this infection.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #77 on: September 25, 2020, 07:31:20 AM »
After a long time with draught it finally rained a bit yesterday and it will rain extremely much from tonight and next week. I have more or less given up finding mushrooms in the forest lately. But I found some in grass beside a walking/cycling path. Today I picked shaggy ink cap (coprinus comatus) and grey knight (tricholoma terreum). I will use the ink cap for demonstration purpose and the mushroom control on Sunday. The grey night is in the drying machine as we have too many plans for other food to eat.
Let's hope the forest has more mushrooms in the weekend so that I can demonstrate more species.

Fishindude

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #78 on: September 25, 2020, 07:58:08 AM »
We've got the big white puff ball mushrooms coming up now, there are a couple big ones around my yard.   I'm not a fan of them, but my neighbor eats them.
Archery deer hunting starts next week, so foraging meat for the freezer starts in earnest.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #79 on: September 25, 2020, 08:08:58 AM »
We've got the big white puff ball mushrooms coming up now, there are a couple big ones around my yard.   I'm not a fan of them, but my neighbor eats them.
Archery deer hunting starts next week, so foraging meat for the freezer starts in earnest.

I have never seen the big puffballs and would live to try one. They are supposed to taste quite good. Make sure to eat them only as long as they are white and firm on the inside.

According to my new mushroom cookbook, it cpuld be used as chicken meat. You should peel off the skin. Then you could dip slices in egg and breadcrumbs and fry it as a wiener schnitzel, or fry slices and eat them as a hamburger in hamburger bread, or grill in bits as marshmellows (after dipping the bits in melted butter). Or cut into bars, dip in tempura batter and deep fry.

PhrugalPhan

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #80 on: September 25, 2020, 11:37:56 AM »
Only things I was able to find this year was a black mulberry tree on my new jogging route and a chestnut tree.  I made a few quarts of mulberry jam.  I will see how many chestnuts I can get for this fall.

julia

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #81 on: September 26, 2020, 08:56:01 PM »
Can someone please help me identify what berry this is? I'm trying to find elderberries but I don't want to die in the process. Btw these were found in Niagara Falls, Canada if location is important.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #82 on: September 27, 2020, 12:12:22 AM »
Can someone please help me identify what berry this is? I'm trying to find elderberries but I don't want to die in the process. Btw these were found in Niagara Falls, Canada if location is important.

You could try using an app like Flore Incognita, which is a picture recognizing app. But double check yourself afterwards.

Monkey Uncle

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #83 on: September 27, 2020, 05:03:40 AM »
Can someone please help me identify what berry this is? I'm trying to find elderberries but I don't want to die in the process. Btw these were found in Niagara Falls, Canada if location is important.

The name is on the tip of my tongue, but I can't quite pull it out.  It is a non-native invasive species.  Definitely not elderberry.  I've seen crows eating the fruit, but I have no idea whether it is edible by humans.

Edit: The name I was thinking of finally came to me, but I think I was wrong.  I was thinking porcelain berry, but looking it up online, most of the pictures show leaves that are lobed like grape vines.  However, leaf shape is variable, and I did find one photo showing unlobed leaves.  Does your vine have multiple leaf shapes on it, or are they all unlobed like the ones in your picture?  And what is the growth habit of the plant?  Is it a vine, shrub, or tree?

I'm still certain it is not elderberry.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2020, 09:02:21 AM by Monkey Uncle »

cerat0n1a

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #84 on: September 28, 2020, 02:33:28 AM »
Definitely not what I would call Elderberry in the UK (Sambucus nigra).

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #85 on: September 28, 2020, 01:54:28 PM »
After months of draught it finally rained a great lot and it will rain even more. Today I found my largest portion of chantarelles this season in my home area, about 8, which says something about how bad this season has been. I didn't pick the baby mushrooms and I hope they will still be there at the end of the week and a bit bigger.

I found large groups of very big versions of Stropharia hornemannii (luxuriant ringstalk). Most of them were not so attractive, but I picked a few young ones. It is defined as edible in Norway.

I also picked a bunch of Hypholoma capnoides three times, but at home I found put that I had managed to mix in some Hypholoma fasciculare, which is poisonous. Those have a yellow/green taint on their gills, which I didn't check in the forest at the third location. So to be on the safe side, I threw away the whole bunch. Next time, only pick the ones growing on spruce stumps.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #86 on: October 02, 2020, 01:00:22 PM »
Today I found a lot of trooping funnel (Infundibulicybe geotropa). I preserved them, one portion in oil (confit) and one portion in vinegar, sugar and water with herbs and spices. It was one of the very few species I found.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #87 on: October 03, 2020, 09:23:28 AM »
Today I went to my favorite place for picking funnel chantarelle/yellowfoot (craterellus tubaeformis). In other years DH and I tend to pick several grocery bags full of them at one trip. Now I just picked enough to cover the bottom of my basket. There just weren't more of them. But it is still early in the season for them, I hope.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2020, 09:36:57 AM by Linea_Norway »

Aunt Petunia

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #88 on: October 03, 2020, 02:48:11 PM »
Can someone please help me identify what berry this is? I'm trying to find elderberries but I don't want to die in the process. Btw these were found in Niagara Falls, Canada if location is important.

They look like buckthorns to me. Did the tree have inch-long thorns on it?

cerat0n1a

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #89 on: October 14, 2020, 06:08:27 AM »
So to be on the safe side, I threw away the whole bunch. Next time, only pick the ones growing on spruce stumps.

A TV Programme here quoted a (possibly apocryphal) Ukrainian proverb -  ďAll mushrooms are edible, but some of them only once.Ē

neophyte

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #90 on: October 14, 2020, 06:16:52 AM »
I've been leaching acorns all week and I've harvested a bag of amaranth. Separating it from the chaff is going to be....fun. Yeah, fun. There's a big crab apple tree in the park nearby, but for some reason I just can't get excited to drag the ladder down there and pick.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #91 on: October 16, 2020, 09:01:56 AM »
So to be on the safe side, I threw away the whole bunch. Next time, only pick the ones growing on spruce stumps.

A TV Programme here quoted a (possibly apocryphal) Ukrainian proverb -  “All mushrooms are edible, but some of them only once.”

Yes, I know.

On wikipedia we found out that in English, the word mushroom is used for edible fungi, while the word  toadstool is used for poisonous fungi. But my English fungi guide describes boletes as toadstools, while most boletes are edible.

Is there anyone here who can explain me the difference between a mushroom and a toadstool?
By the way, the Dutch word for fungus is the Dutch word for toadstool (paddenstoel).
« Last Edit: October 18, 2020, 03:45:45 PM by Linea_Norway »

cerat0n1a

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #92 on: October 16, 2020, 09:15:45 AM »
On wikipedia we found out that in English, the word mushroom is used for edible fungi, while the word  toadstool is used for poisonous fungy. But my English fungi guide describes boletes as toadstools, while most boletes are edible.

Is there anyone here who can explain me the difference between a mushroom and a toadstool?
By the way, the Dutch word for fungus is the Dutch word for toadstool (paddenstoel).

From the scientific viewpoint, there is no difference at all - they're two words for fungi. Some people use the definition: mushroom = tasty, edible fungi, toadstool = any other kind of fungi. Other people (in the UK at least) might say: mushroom = the kind with white caps, that grow in fields, toadstool = any other kind of fungus, which may or may not be edible.

cerat0n1a

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #93 on: October 16, 2020, 09:18:03 AM »
I've been leaching acorns all week and I've harvested a bag of amaranth. Separating it from the chaff is going to be....fun. Yeah, fun. There's a big crab apple tree in the park nearby, but for some reason I just can't get excited to drag the ladder down there and pick.

Interesting. I have two crab apple trees in my garden, and rarely bother to harvest them. Walking round my village, there's at least twenty or thirty trees with real eating apples that nobody bothers to harvest. Leaching the tannin out of acorns would be considered pretty hardcore here - how do you use the end product - are you making flour for acorn bread?

neophyte

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #94 on: October 17, 2020, 06:56:58 AM »
Leaching the tannin out of acorns would be considered pretty hardcore here - how do you use the end product - are you making flour for acorn bread?

I'm not sure yet. I've mainly eaten them in dotori-muk in the past. I threw some on my yogurt this morning and I'll probably make some flour.

Monkey Uncle

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #95 on: October 17, 2020, 06:14:24 PM »
I was out grouse hunting today.  Came up empty-handed, but I sampled a few hawthorn fruits while I was out.  It's basically a tiny, pithy Granny Smith apple.  They're probably not worth the effort to collect, but if you were ever hungry in the wild in the fall, they would be a source of sustenance.

cerat0n1a

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #96 on: October 18, 2020, 01:21:54 AM »
I was out grouse hunting today.  Came up empty-handed, but I sampled a few hawthorn fruits while I was out.  It's basically a tiny, pithy Granny Smith apple.  They're probably not worth the effort to collect, but if you were ever hungry in the wild in the fall, they would be a source of sustenance.
Young hawthorn leaves are quite pleasant in spring - slightly nutty taste. Best not to eat the pips/seeds of the fruit.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #97 on: October 22, 2020, 11:02:45 AM »
When I walk back from the library today, I found some fresh mushrooms, shaggy inkcap (Coprinus comatus). I walked home with 2 hands full. My mushroom fb friend told me you can dry them, so they are now in the dryer.

Later in the afternoon I decided to look for more shaggy inkcaps along the walking route through our village. I didn't find those, but I found puffballs and parasols (hopefully chlorophyllum rachodes and not c. Brunneum, I will check with the microscope). I also found more Tricholoma Terreum that I already have dried. And I found some that are likely lepista nuda. I have only ever found those once before, but didn't dare to eat it because they smelled of rubber, which I later learned is a key feature.

Nice that the season is not over yet, as we had snow earlier this way.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2020, 11:42:38 AM by Linea_Norway »

pecunia

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #98 on: October 22, 2020, 11:37:12 AM »
Thanks for starting this.  I used to pick a lot of wild berries, sugar plums, apples and other common stuff when younger.  You've inspired a new activity to study up on over the Winter and act on it next Spring.  People will ask me what I'm doing.  "Eatin' weeds," will be the reply.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Foraging 2020
« Reply #99 on: October 23, 2020, 06:40:12 AM »
Yesterday evening, when I checked my bags of dried mushrooms, i found that some weren't quite dry. As least, they didn't feel like paper. So I put them in the drying machine together with some new mushrooms that I was drying. Unfortunately, I also found 2 bags of mushrooms that had gotten moldy, so I had to toss those.
Recently I have been taking food put of the dryer sooner than earlier. I thought that was because I had less volume in it. But it was obviously because I didn't dry them properly. Next time, I will check by testing the plastic storage bags in the microwave for 10-20 secs to see of any moist appears.