Author Topic: Expensive Hobbies  (Read 35002 times)

2527

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Expensive Hobbies
« on: September 25, 2013, 07:07:47 PM »
Anybody here maintain any expensive hobbies?  Boats, sailboats, flying, sports cars, high-end (international) travel, horseback riding, etc?

My family buys international plane tickets every year because my wife is from another country.  So it's expensive, but  more of a need than an option. 

I would like to get a sailboat when I have time, but a used sailboat without a lot of gadgets isn't very expensive, especially if it isn't very big.  I had a small sailboat once before, but had to sell it when I was transferred overseas.  I enjoyed it and sold it for more than I paid for it.  One thing with expensive hobbies is to stop them and sell the stuff when you lose interest.

ethilo

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #1 on: September 25, 2013, 08:27:12 PM »
Bicycles.  I live in an "N+1" world.  If you aren't familiar with this, there's an old joke that says: how many is enough bikes for a cyclist?  N+1, where N is the number you have now (or the number your spouse wants you to have).

Somehow I acquire/achieve more bicycles.  Currently I have 4, and just got my 5th yesterday.  Figure I'd better dump a couple of them in the next year, 2 are definitely on the chopping block but man it's so easy to buy another bike.  They are just so shiny.

Zamboni

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2013, 08:45:50 PM »
I like to downhill ski, so now my children also like to downhill ski.  Even with all used equipment for growing children, between lift tickets and travel to get to decent areas, it adds up.

Jamesqf

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2013, 08:48:25 PM »
Yes.  Owned a plane (in a 4-way partnership) up until a couple of years ago.  Got a horse now.

You could also argue that my garden is an even more expensive hobby, if you count purchasing a large enough piece of property to have a proper garden on.

Albert

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2013, 11:38:51 AM »
Depends what you call expensive... I travel quite a bit (3-4 weeks a year) and also hike in the summer and cross-country ski in the winter. Any individual thing is not particularly expensive, but it all does add up.

CommonCents

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2013, 12:14:01 PM »
Sailing.  But I do it much cheaper than I might otherwise.  (Definition of a boat: A hole in the water into which you pour money.)  I sail at a relatively low cost club.  Unlimited sails Apr-Oct for $249.  No boat maintanence.  Serve on the Board as President actually.  Which itself is an expensive hobby, because I then need to serve as a leader making donations.

Skiing.  Learned to ski/race when I lived in Alaska.  We had season passes then (parents needed something for us to not all go crazy in the winter and put this budget towards skiing).  Now, it's so expensive I only go 1-2 times a year.  Don't get much so much use out of my equipment.

Traveling.  Love to travel to foreign countries.  Been to: Canada, France, Italy, Monoco, India, Switzerland, Mexico, Hong Kong, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, England, St. Martin, Domenica, Grenada, Tobago, Barbados.  ETA: Bahamas.  Upcoming trip in October: Aruba, Columbia, Panama, Costa Rica, Grand Cayman.  Likely trip next spring: Brazil.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2013, 01:35:19 PM by CommonCents »

lifejoy

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2013, 12:39:37 PM »
Bicycles.  I live in an "N+1" world.  If you aren't familiar with this, there's an old joke that says: how many is enough bikes for a cyclist?  N+1, where N is the number you have now (or the number your spouse wants you to have).

Somehow I acquire/achieve more bicycles.  Currently I have 4, and just got my 5th yesterday.  Figure I'd better dump a couple of them in the next year, 2 are definitely on the chopping block but man it's so easy to buy another bike.  They are just so shiny.

My dream is to sell the car and use that money to buy as many bikes as possible!! :) I really want a winter bike to help me through snow/ice.

Albert

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2013, 12:41:25 PM »
Traveling.  Love to travel to foreign countries.  Been to: Canada, France, Italy, Monoco, India, Switzerland, Mexico, Hong Kong, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, London, St. Martin, Domenica, Grenada, Tobago, Barbados.  Upcoming trip in October: Aruba, Columbia, Panama, Costa Rica, Grand Cayman.  Likely trip next spring: Brazil.

Not bad at all, I'm currently at 23 countries but I have the advantage that most of those are not any further than Chicago-New York. Next year's major trips probably South Florida in March and Central Asia in August/September.

livetogive

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2013, 01:00:23 PM »
I like to downhill ski, so now my children also like to downhill ski.  Even with all used equipment for growing children, between lift tickets and travel to get to decent areas, it adds up.

Me too.  Things I do to mitigate the expense are renting a reasonably priced house with 15 people vs. paying for short term lodging and buying a season pass in April/May for the next year when they're 40-50% off.

It's still really expensive though. :(


Frankies Girl

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #9 on: September 26, 2013, 01:07:06 PM »
I had horses when I was a teen and have every intention of getting about 5-10 acres and having some again. I also want to raise chickens and goats and grow my own vegetables and maybe even some fruit trees, but it's going to cost some money for sure to implement and maintain. But if I can swing it, I'll also plant hay for the horses, and can eat the chickens and the veggies and fruits... so might not be as bad as it could be.
« Last Edit: September 26, 2013, 01:38:55 PM by Frankies Girl »

CommonCents

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #10 on: September 26, 2013, 01:34:49 PM »
Traveling.  Love to travel to foreign countries.  Been to: Canada, France, Italy, Monoco, India, Switzerland, Mexico, Hong Kong, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, London, St. Martin, Domenica, Grenada, Tobago, Barbados.  Upcoming trip in October: Aruba, Columbia, Panama, Costa Rica, Grand Cayman.  Likely trip next spring: Brazil.

Not bad at all, I'm currently at 23 countries but I have the advantage that most of those are not any further than Chicago-New York. Next year's major trips probably South Florida in March and Central Asia in August/September.

Forgot Bahamas.  Albeit when about 5-6, it still counts.  :)

I do try to be reasonable about the travel - some of those were staying with friends (England, India, Hong Kong), through school (France), free hotel points through work (Switzerland), living nearby (Canada when I was in Michigan/Alaska, Mexico when in San Diego) or just plain old student cheap (Italy, Monoco, Asia).  The rest is two cruises.  I looked into a South America trip (Argentina & Chile) paying for flights & hotels and just about choked, this after telling my husband the past 1.5 years after our wedding I wanted to go on a "nice" belated honeymoon.  We're still doing a "nice" trip, just not the one I originally envisioned.  When we fly out for the wedding in Brazil I'll have to get over that choking sensation.

Albert

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #11 on: September 26, 2013, 02:03:12 PM »
Flight expenses are unavoidable for long distance travel, but accommodation/food costs could be amazingly low in some very interesting parts of the world. Two years ago we spent only ca 300$ for two on non-flight related expenses for a week in Georgia (country not US state). Room with a local family in the mountains was about 15 euros a night (dinner and breakfast included!).

rufflina

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #12 on: September 26, 2013, 03:16:17 PM »
My piano lessons are $60 a week, so ouch. I'm not sure if there will ever be a point where I'll feel satisfied enough to stop with lessons, but we'll see.

travelbug

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #13 on: September 26, 2013, 03:30:46 PM »
International travel for us. 2A2C, it adds up. WE normally go for 8 weeks a year broken into two trips. That cost will lower a lot when we retire next year as we will be travelling and focusing on slow travel with no home base to fund.

Otherwise DH plays golf. It's his passion but he buys quality clubs and keeps them for 1 decade+. The courses when we travel add up, but it's his only large expense really and keeps him happy.


Guses

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #14 on: September 26, 2013, 03:40:12 PM »

My dream is to sell the car and use that money to buy as many bikes as possible!! :) I really want a winter bike to help me through snow/ice.

Can't you just change the tires on your bike and put on huge winter tires as you would on a car? My one and only bike is my commute bike, my road bike, my mountain bike, my grocery bike and my winter bike (also spring, summer and autumn bike). It's a mountain bike and I just change the tires based on what I use it for.

When I commute, I put on slicks and I go faster than those dudes in leggings on 5,000$ bikes. When I want to do mountain or winter stuff, I put on my regular mountain tires....

My hobby is making wine. It is expensive, but I will become self sufficient very soon.

lifejoy

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #15 on: September 26, 2013, 03:45:16 PM »
Def going to try new tires first. But the dream is to have more than one bike, just for the luxury of it all!

Ductyl

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2013, 04:12:33 PM »
My piano lessons are $60 a week, so ouch. I'm not sure if there will ever be a point where I'll feel satisfied enough to stop with lessons, but we'll see.

You just have to get good enough that you can start giving lessons to absolute beginners! Then you can even write off your own lessons as a business expense!

rufflina

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #17 on: September 26, 2013, 04:56:44 PM »
You just have to get good enough that you can start giving lessons to absolute beginners! Then you can even write off your own lessons as a business expense!

Haha, I am definitely good enough to start giving lessons to absolute beginners, but I think I would feel guilty doing so (I feel they would be much better off with a real teacher!). On the other hand, I'm definitely capable of being an SAT tutor (got paid $30/hour to do it in high school), but I'm not sure if I wouldn't be better off working harder at my job to get bonuses and promotions faster...but that's another topic.

That's not even that much. The voice teacher I work for charges $80/hr, and the ones my husband works for charge $140 and $200/hr.

However, the person who had my job before me worked in exchange for free lessons. That might be an option for you?

I agree, it's not that much, but not great by Mustachian standards. My childhood piano teacher charged more, and I think averages around here are more like $70 an hour. I think my piano teacher would prefer I practice more rather than work more haha. Anyway, piano lessons aren't exactly a financial hardship for me; I take home $6000 a month plus bonus and stock, and there are other places that I would work on first, like cooking more instead of eating out...;P

Roland of Gilead

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #18 on: September 26, 2013, 07:40:27 PM »
We do sailing, sledding (snowmobiles), dirt biking, and camping/hiking.

Expensive hobbies for sure, but have you checked out the price of life these days?

nikki

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #19 on: September 26, 2013, 10:47:24 PM »
My hobby MAKES me money! Booyaaa!

Honestly, though, I think that I'm mentally incapable of picking up an expensive hobby. I tend to gravitate toward things like reading, walking, napping, staring at walls, and camming (the hobby that earns me money).

Guses

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #20 on: September 27, 2013, 09:56:08 AM »
camming (the hobby that earns me money).

What is camming and how does it earn you money?

Did you mean canning (as in preserving food)?

nikki

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #21 on: September 27, 2013, 05:15:58 PM »
camming (the hobby that earns me money).

What is camming and how does it earn you money?

Did you mean canning (as in preserving food)?

Oh no! Canning sounds really fun too, though.

Camming is webcam modeling. Basically people give me money to see my naughty bits, etc. It's the safest form of sex work :-)

2527

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #22 on: September 27, 2013, 05:20:04 PM »
With my body, people would pay me to get dressed.

nikki

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #23 on: September 27, 2013, 05:25:29 PM »
With my body, people would pay me to get dressed.

Bahaha! You'd be surprised...

Anyway, sometimes I just get money for having a charming personality and keeping people company or amusing them with silliness (toilet paper nipple pasties? Frugal and fun!). I'm sure you have charisma, Jeff L!

StarswirlTheMustached

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #24 on: September 27, 2013, 06:08:19 PM »
My better half is an avid white-water paddler. Her speciality 'playboat' canoe probably costs as much as the car we'll end up buying so she can get out to the rapids more often. It's not mustashian by any means, and I wish she could kick the habit, but what can you do? I've been thinking about taking lessons myself. You know what they say: if you can't beat 'em, join 'em.

I'm beginning to think that in my own science/math tutoring business, I may be massively undercharging. That or the arts are just more highly valued.

DirtDiva

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #25 on: September 28, 2013, 06:11:00 AM »
Mountain biking: 

Hard tail 29er, full suspension Yeti, and soon a fat tire bike.  It's my first expensive hobby (after 47 years of not understanding why people spend money on expensive hobbies). I'm obsessed, I love it, and I have no regrets.  Fortunately I don't have to travel to ride- I can access a fun trail out my back door.

N+1 indeed.  :)

Rust

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #26 on: September 28, 2013, 06:24:27 AM »
I have a very expensive hobby which I have stopped since children arrived.

Magic the Gathering and playing Warhammer 40K and Fantasy.

Each time a new set is release for MTG, I actually get a bit sad because I know I'm not going to be drafting the new set.

twbird18

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #27 on: September 28, 2013, 06:30:33 AM »
I have a very expensive hobby which I have stopped since children arrived.

Magic the Gathering and playing Warhammer 40K and Fantasy.

Each time a new set is release for MTG, I actually get a bit sad because I know I'm not going to be drafting the new set.

I also play Magic the Gathering - to offset the insane cost of playing a Collectible Card Game, I do a lot of trading & run an online eBay store in my spare time.  Sometimes this is boring/a hassle, but it does pay for my hobby plus a little extra spending cash now that I've learned what to do.

Norrie

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #28 on: September 28, 2013, 10:56:45 AM »
Traveling is it for us. I grew up in Australia, and most of my extended family are there (the rest are in Scotland), so every other Christmas I pack up Mr. Nat and the kids, and we spend a month in Western Australia. Flights for four are incredibly expensive, but thankfully we spend most of our trip staying with my aunt and uncle. The second that we get home from Australia, we start saving for the upcoming trip, even though it's almost two years away. These trips are non-negotiable for me, especially as my family there shows signs of aging.

My husband and I also spent a few weeks in Scotland this summer, both to see relatives, and to celebrate our 15th wedding anniversary.

We travel a LOT. Much of it is paid for by Mr. Nat's frequent flyer miles, but quite a bit is not.

Jamesqf

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #29 on: September 28, 2013, 11:37:24 AM »
Mountain biking: 

Hard tail 29er, full suspension Yeti, and soon a fat tire bike.  It's my first expensive hobby (after 47 years of not understanding why people spend money on expensive hobbies).

You consider mountain biking to be an expensive hobby?  Different world views, I guess.  I mean, you spend a bit on a bike (or maybe two or three), and then what?  Occasional tire & brake replacement, chain lube, maybe a new chain every year or two?  I mean, it's not like a horse, where you have to feed the critter every day :-)

oldladystache

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #30 on: September 28, 2013, 12:28:07 PM »
My horse costs me about $500 a month. Yes, that's $6,000 a year. More than my food, more than my clothes, property tax, insurance, or any other category.

But I've been frugal (or maybe cheap) all my life, my house is paid for, between my investments and social security I have more income than I need. So I can afford it.

It's a good feeling. I can do anything I want. I just can't do everything.

Jamesqf

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #31 on: September 28, 2013, 01:13:08 PM »
My horse costs me about $500 a month. Yes, that's $6,000 a year. More than my food, more than my clothes, property tax, insurance, or any other category.

Mine probably comes in about half that, since I don't have to pay for board.  (Deal with friends: friend takes care of my horse along with her 3, and in return I ride with her so her non-riding husband doesn't nag her about being out in the mountains alone.)

Quote
It's a good feeling. I can do anything I want. I just can't do everything.

Yeah.  And even better, the main limit on what I can do is time, not money.

StarswirlTheMustached

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #32 on: September 28, 2013, 01:26:41 PM »
I have a very expensive hobby which I have stopped since children arrived.

Magic the Gathering and playing Warhammer 40K and Fantasy.

Each time a new set is release for MTG, I actually get a bit sad because I know I'm not going to be drafting the new set.
How's your painting? I never got into Warhammer, but I know people who claim they've funded the hobby by assembling, painting, and selling complete armies. Everyone wants pretty miniatures, but not everyone has the time or the skills to make 'em that way.
Not really something you can do with ankle-biters about, though, I guess.

DirtDiva

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #33 on: September 28, 2013, 05:19:10 PM »
Mountain biking: 

Hard tail 29er, full suspension Yeti, and soon a fat tire bike.  It's my first expensive hobby (after 47 years of not understanding why people spend money on expensive hobbies).

You consider mountain biking to be an expensive hobby?  Different world views, I guess.  I mean, you spend a bit on a bike (or maybe two or three), and then what?  Occasional tire & brake replacement, chain lube, maybe a new chain every year or two?  I mean, it's not like a horse, where you have to feed the critter every day :-)

Haha, well yah.  It's a lot more expensive than reading library books and walking (my previous hobbies).

You're right, there is no daily money obligation.  However, I've probably spent more than $8,000 in the past year and a half:  bikes, maintenance,  repairs (stuff breaks when you wreck), traveling, clothes/shoes/gear, and the occasional race fee.  That's a lot of money to me.

NumberJohnny5

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #34 on: September 28, 2013, 05:55:11 PM »
Traveling.  Love to travel to foreign countries.  Been to: Canada, France, Italy, Monoco, India, Switzerland, Mexico, Hong Kong, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, London, St. Martin, Domenica, Grenada, Tobago, Barbados.  Upcoming trip in October: Aruba, Columbia, Panama, Costa Rica, Grand Cayman.  Likely trip next spring: Brazil.

Not bad at all, I'm currently at 23 countries but I have the advantage that most of those are not any further than Chicago-New York. Next year's major trips probably South Florida in March and Central Asia in August/September.

Well, not to brag (meaning, I'm definitely bragging)...but we're at 24 (more if you use a very, very lose definition of "country"; some lists like the Travelers Century Club would count the continental US, Alaska, Hawaii, US Virgin Islands, etc. as separate "countries"). We'll add 2-3 more at the end of next month (still not sure whether to count Hong Kong as separate from China; I probably will since there's different visa requirements and there's still a border crossing).

brewer12345

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #35 on: September 28, 2013, 07:45:13 PM »
I could say homebrewing because I bought a $1000 brewing system a decade ago, but I am still using the same system and it chops a huge amount off our booze bill (I am always astounded what a six pack of good beer costs at the store).

Possibly camping/Rving would count.  We bought a small trailer 5 years ago and I have a truck to tow it with.

I have spent an embarrassing amount on my latest hobby (hunting and shooting) in the last couple of years, but most of the money went for firearms that tend to appreciate in value.  Ammo is expensive, but I have acquired the gear to load my own and if I end up using a lot of it I will learn how to melt and cast my own bullets and shot.  Considering that I buy a lot less stoopidly expensive bison and free range chicken when I am bringing home organic, free-range "chicken of the tree" (squirrel) and rabbit for dinner, I am not sure I would call this one extravagant.

Beyond that?  I am guess foregone earnings will make ESR the most expensive hobby of all.

Jamesqf

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #36 on: September 28, 2013, 07:59:59 PM »
However, I've probably spent more than $8,000 in the past year and a half:  bikes, maintenance,  repairs (stuff breaks when you wreck), traveling, clothes/shoes/gear, and the occasional race fee.  That's a lot of money to me.

Ah, that explains it.  You seem to mountain bike at a much different level than I do (which is taking the dogs and going to ride around someplace scenic).  I haven't (knock on wood!) had a real bike wreck since I was a kid, do just about all my own maintenance, and haven't the slightest desire to race, all of which holds the expenses down.  My expenditure for the last year & a half (excluding gas to get to riding places) is probably close to $80 than $8000.

CommonCents

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #37 on: September 28, 2013, 09:14:55 PM »
Traveling.  Love to travel to foreign countries.  Been to: Canada, France, Italy, Monoco, India, Switzerland, Mexico, Hong Kong, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, London, St. Martin, Domenica, Grenada, Tobago, Barbados.  Upcoming trip in October: Aruba, Columbia, Panama, Costa Rica, Grand Cayman.  Likely trip next spring: Brazil.

Not bad at all, I'm currently at 23 countries but I have the advantage that most of those are not any further than Chicago-New York. Next year's major trips probably South Florida in March and Central Asia in August/September.

Well, not to brag (meaning, I'm definitely bragging)...but we're at 24 (more if you use a very, very lose definition of "country"; some lists like the Travelers Century Club would count the continental US, Alaska, Hawaii, US Virgin Islands, etc. as separate "countries"). We'll add 2-3 more at the end of next month (still not sure whether to count Hong Kong as separate from China; I probably will since there's different visa requirements and there's still a border crossing).

lol.  Well, see edit above, I forgot Bahamas.  And if you count China and Hong Kong, then I claim credit for Macau too.  It was a separate passport stamp after all!

I didn't count those "flexible" countries either (or add Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico to my tally), but as a former Alaskan resident, I can tell you that at times, it definitely is treated like a separate world, and the mainland referred to as the "lower 48."

brewer12345

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #38 on: September 28, 2013, 09:20:52 PM »
Traveling.  Love to travel to foreign countries.  Been to: Canada, France, Italy, Monoco, India, Switzerland, Mexico, Hong Kong, Cambodia, Thailand, Vietnam, London, St. Martin, Domenica, Grenada, Tobago, Barbados.  Upcoming trip in October: Aruba, Columbia, Panama, Costa Rica, Grand Cayman.  Likely trip next spring: Brazil.

Not bad at all, I'm currently at 23 countries but I have the advantage that most of those are not any further than Chicago-New York. Next year's major trips probably South Florida in March and Central Asia in August/September.

Well, not to brag (meaning, I'm definitely bragging)...but we're at 24 (more if you use a very, very lose definition of "country"; some lists like the Travelers Century Club would count the continental US, Alaska, Hawaii, US Virgin Islands, etc. as separate "countries"). We'll add 2-3 more at the end of next month (still not sure whether to count Hong Kong as separate from China; I probably will since there's different visa requirements and there's still a border crossing).

lol.  Well, see edit above, I forgot Bahamas.  And if you count China and Hong Kong, then I claim credit for Macau too.  It was a separate passport stamp after all!

I didn't count those "flexible" countries either (or add Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto Rico to my tally), but as a former Alaskan resident, I can tell you that at times, it definitely is treated like a separate world, and the mainland referred to as the "lower 48."

Why on earth would you refer to Puerto Rico as a non-US country?

NumberJohnny5

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #39 on: September 29, 2013, 12:39:25 AM »
Why on earth would you refer to Puerto Rico as a non-US country?

Traveler's Century Club (http://travelerscenturyclub.org/) is a club for people who have visited at least one hundred countries and territories. Their list of countries and territories is often used to determine how many countries you've been to. It can be found at http://travelerscenturyclub.org/countries-and-territories/alphabetical-list and includes such "territories" as Alaska and Hawaii. From that page: "Although some are not actually countries in their own right, they have been included because they are removed from the parent country, either geographically, politically or ethnologically (see the Territory Status page for detailed criteria)." Using their criteria, it makes sense, but still....

Googling for "list of countries" (no quotes) brings up several good links, such as:

http://www.state.gov/misc/list/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sovereign_states
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_population
http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/countries_of_the_world.htm
http://www.internetworldstats.com/list2.htm

The last three links list Puerto Rico and New Caledonia separately. Every list had Hong Kong (though it technically belongs to China now). The second list had Puerto Rico and New Caledonia listed, but grouped with the parent country (USA and France respectively).

Albert

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #40 on: September 29, 2013, 02:27:58 AM »
Would you say that you've been to France if the only place you visited there was New Caledonia? I wouldn't and I think US-Puerto Rico situation is similar. 

I'm still in my 30-ties so plenty of time to see more of our planet. :) Australia is on the long term list for sure, but with the current currency rates and the fact we wouldn't go for less than three weeks it's going to be very expensive...

DirtDiva

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #41 on: September 29, 2013, 04:55:39 AM »
However, I've probably spent more than $8,000 in the past year and a half:  bikes, maintenance,  repairs (stuff breaks when you wreck), traveling, clothes/shoes/gear, and the occasional race fee.  That's a lot of money to me.

Ah, that explains it.  You seem to mountain bike at a much different level than I do (which is taking the dogs and going to ride around someplace scenic).  I haven't (knock on wood!) had a real bike wreck since I was a kid, do just about all my own maintenance, and haven't the slightest desire to race, all of which holds the expenses down.  My expenditure for the last year & a half (excluding gas to get to riding places) is probably close to $80 than $8000.

Hopefully part of the steep outlay is from entering the sport with nothing.  Skill-wise I lay no claims to any sort of "level".  In fact, my lack of skill explains my apparent penchant for breaking stuff.

Jamesqf

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #42 on: September 29, 2013, 11:11:28 AM »
Skill-wise I lay no claims to any sort of "level".  In fact, my lack of skill explains my apparent penchant for breaking stuff.

I didn't mean level as skill, I meant it as goals, e.g. racing.  Indeed, that's one thing that, if I can be blunt, really pisses me off about some mountain bikers, specifically the ones who ride at breakneck speed down shared-use mountain trails, oblivious to the fact that there are people, dogs, horses, and such using the trail too.  Bikes have brakes for a reason :-)

brewer12345

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #43 on: September 29, 2013, 12:39:13 PM »
Why on earth would you refer to Puerto Rico as a non-US country?

Traveler's Century Club (http://travelerscenturyclub.org/) is a club for people who have visited at least one hundred countries and territories. Their list of countries and territories is often used to determine how many countries you've been to. It can be found at http://travelerscenturyclub.org/countries-and-territories/alphabetical-list and includes such "territories" as Alaska and Hawaii. From that page: "Although some are not actually countries in their own right, they have been included because they are removed from the parent country, either geographically, politically or ethnologically (see the Territory Status page for detailed criteria)." Using their criteria, it makes sense, but still....

Googling for "list of countries" (no quotes) brings up several good links, such as:

http://www.state.gov/misc/list/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_sovereign_states
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_population
http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/countries_of_the_world.htm
http://www.internetworldstats.com/list2.htm

The last three links list Puerto Rico and New Caledonia separately. Every list had Hong Kong (though it technically belongs to China now). The second list had Puerto Rico and New Caledonia listed, but grouped with the parent country (USA and France respectively).

I'd guess that there would be a lot of extremely pissed Puerto Ricans (especially the veterans) if you told them they were not Americans.

That said, PR is a fascinating place I many respects and well worth visiting (we have done so several times).  Its a lot harder to get to from CO than it was from the NYC area, so I have not been back since we moved in mid-2011.  I miss it and the people/culture.

Riceman

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #44 on: September 30, 2013, 01:12:23 AM »
I actively try not to acquire expensive hobbies. 

I love to travel, and I'm in the Foreign Serivce.  I don't, however, constantly travel to other countries on short trips like many co-workers, or tally my "country count." I focus on appreciating the fact that I'm already living in a foreign country, so my wife and I spend more time exploring the city we live in, really learning the language, and doing domestic travel.  I have co-workers who literally travel to other countries 1-2 times a month.

Similarly, I did not pick up diving as a hobby, declining invitations from friends/coworkers, because it seems expensive, and there are plenty of alternatives that I believe I would enjoy just as much

Cooking is my biggest hobby, but I refuse to buy expensive ingredients, instead focusing on cheaper ethnic foods and foods available where I am living.

Hobbies are things you focus on, but one potentially anti-mustchian feature of this is that the more you specialize and the better your taste becomes, the exponentially more expensive enjoying certain hobbies becomes.  Wine, Diving, Golf, Cars--a lot of hobbies become extremely expensive at the margins.  I try to imagine what it what cost me to become an expert in a hobby, and if the answer is too much, I seekone of the million other things in the world to spend my time on. 

nawhite

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #45 on: September 30, 2013, 09:24:50 AM »
My better half is an avid white-water paddler. Her speciality 'playboat' canoe probably costs as much as the car we'll end up buying so she can get out to the rapids more often. It's not mustashian by any means, and I wish she could kick the habit, but what can you do? I've been thinking about taking lessons myself. You know what they say: if you can't beat 'em, join 'em.

Whitewater kayaking is my expensive hobby too. However it doesn't have to be that expensive. The trick is be on the lookout for sales and be willing to spend decent change at a moment's notice when things are cheap. Skiing is the same way.

A brand new playboat will cost you $1200 max retail. Wait 1 year or pick it up at an end of season sale and the same boat is $799-$999. 2 years old used usually go for $300-$500. Teach kayaking lessons 1x per week with a local outfitter and you get pro-deals where you can get a brand new boats for 20% off wholesale prices. I've never paid full price for a boat, paddle, dry-top, life-jacket, or helmet and I never intend to.

Also compared to skiing, kayaking is dirt cheap because you don't need to pay for lift tickets or season passes. So once you have the gear, you're all set to go.

If you're in Colorado and want lessons, let me know. I'll hook you up for cheap.

wheatstate

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #46 on: October 08, 2013, 01:38:33 PM »
I am also wrestling with the biking habit.   I will still say, that a well used bike is a bargain, and an unused bike is expensive at any price.

There is two formulas for the number of bikes you need.
n + 1: for single people where n is the number of bikes you currently have.  (discussed above)
s - 1: for married/SO people where s is the number of bikes where your partner would leave.

...Credit my local bike shop. 

Southern Stashian

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #47 on: October 08, 2013, 01:54:17 PM »
We love Key West, Disney and festivals around Florida. Those three account for about 90% of our yearly entertainment budget. Lol.


www.HavingFunInFlorida.com

legacyoneup

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #48 on: October 08, 2013, 05:14:05 PM »
Stamp collecting or philately is my drug. It has kept me away from liquor, cigs and drugs.

I got a fine silver coin collection as well. I stopped with coins in 2008 as I had amassed a collection I was happy with.

Largest acquisition was a single US stamp for $3100 odd in April this year ( celebrated the fact that my parents finances were finally self sustaining ). Yeah!!

It might make me a tidy sum over time. I bought 25 blocks of an issue for $780 in 2008; now valued at $150 - $200 per block. I've thought of becoming a dealer but just can't pull the trigger. I guess I'm a lover, not a pimp.




BlueMR2

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #49 on: October 08, 2013, 05:41:22 PM »
Too many...  On the plus side, I've slowly learned to become frugal with my expensive hobbies...

- Cycling, both mountain and road.  I do all my own work on them (including initial builds, often getting good deals on quality used parts from local racers that tried them and then quickly moved on to something else).  If I'm buying a lot of parts, online is the way to go, when I just need a couple I walk down to my local bike shop.  I no longer do group (too many nuts on those group rides) or rides where there is an entry fee (why spend money when I can ride by myself for free?).

- Flying, in a club where we collectively own a few single engine airplanes and I also rent a twin engine periodically.  Club dues are quite reasonable and you can't really find a twin cheaper to rent than a Twin Comanche!  I also don't fly many hours.  I just hit 10 hours for the year the other day...  Flying as safety pilot for other people also is a way to build some hours and get time in the air for free.  I'd probably drop out of the club and go rental only, but there aren't any 6 seater airplanes anywhere around for rent (but the club has one), and that's the one I need for going on trips (I *refuse* to ever fly commercial again, the whole commercial experience is inhumane).

- Auto racing, a full cage track/rally car plus a closer to stock sports car that I used for occasional gymkhana style events.  I do my own work when it doesn't involve hazardous materials or things so badly rusted that I know I'll destroy them.  I've dramatically decreased my range of events.  I used to do everything within a 3 hour drive.  I've cut that back to 1 hour and have chopped pretty much everything out except for rally.  I try to drive each car once a week to keep fluids flowing/battery charged, but my mileage has dropped dramatically.  At one point I was doing 30,000+ miles a year.  I'm looking at about 6,000 this year!

- Astronomy.  I quit going to the planetarium/observatory and invested in my own telescope.  No driving and paying to see just what they want to show us on their schedule.  Got a screaming bargain on a second hand scope + lens set, plus free shipping just by surfing for deals for a few months until exactly what I wanted popped up!  It'll pay for itself in a couple years.  Hardest part with this is that I enjoy it so much I *really* want a bigger scope and more/better lenses!  Time to exercise my willpower muscle.  :-)

- Shooting.  Ammo prices are absolutely through the roof right now (when you can even find anything).  Planning on dropping out of my local shooting club as I rarely get there.  I mostly do events the next city over.  I've cut those trips back as well, only going when the weather's going to be nice.  I was finally able to say I have "enough" equipment and I walked away from my wishlist.

- Amateur Radio.  I've resolved to build my own stuff instead of buying (whenever possible) now.  I've also cut back on volunteering for events.  I only volunteer for stuff in my own suburb/on this side of the city.  I no longer drive all the way across the city to help out.

- Motorcycling.  I fell off the wagon last week and bought a motorcycle...  However, due to it's condition and the circumstances of the person getting rid of it, it only cost me $1.  I'll be doing all my own work getting it driveable again.  If I'm lucky, I should be able to ride it enough in the Summer to more than cover the insurance/registration fees with the 50-60 MPG it should get (it's a 600cc, more than I wanted, but for the money I saved (even after the repairs) I can buy a LOT of extra gas...).
« Last Edit: October 08, 2013, 05:52:15 PM by BlueMR2 »