Author Topic: Expensive Hobbies  (Read 3989 times)

NotBadForADad

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Expensive Hobbies
« on: September 04, 2020, 07:54:20 AM »
Curious to see what people in the forum do with their free time and may tend to not be so 'mustachian'.

A little about me:

I'm a musician. I play, live, and breath drums. Drums are expensive when considering good quality well made instruments. I own 3 of them. My daily driver, my dads old 76 Ludwig, and also an electric kit, with an assortment of high quality pies (cymbals). The amount of money I spent on cymbals and drums in the past 25 years I could probably buy a decent SUV outright. Though my love for music and drumming has cost me time, energy, and money, I am at a point where I can make money from playing, and considering that, I have been able to break even for the most part.

I also have found a new passion for wood working and refurbishing furniture. I come from a family of builders and engineers. I have installed flooring my entire life since my family has owned and operated business'. I went to school for engineering and architecture and have held various positions in those fields as well. I wouldn't consider flooring as an expensive hobby, it's just my side gig that pays very well.

However, what I find myself doing so much now is building and recreating used goods. I built a lovely farmhouse table with a matching bench for my house, I have refurbished my mothers age old coffee table, I plan to refurbish our hope chest and soon build an entertainment stand for our living room. I have yet to make any money on my projects but followers on my IG have been asking me to build them computer desks and tables and the like. Something about working with wood in my garage has awoken something in me especially since I spend my life in an office in front of a screen.

Interested to know what others like to do that may be costly, or break even at? My boss likes to golf and drink IPAs, but he's a millionaire so he doesn't count. :)

socaso

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #1 on: September 04, 2020, 09:03:03 AM »
We like good food and interesting wine so I don't have a problem dropping money on nice restaurants or expensive ingredients when we cook at home. We tend to indulge in those for special occasions like birthdays, anniversaries or holidays so we budget for it that way.

I buy a lot of fabric and yarn. There's no practical purpose for this, it's basically hoarding. I do sew and knit things but not a rate that keeps up with the intake of new materials.

Ultimately, my sewing does help us as a family. I can mend our clothes and make them last a lot longer. I can make things we need around the house like curtains, new upholstery and more.

My husband recently invested in some power tools to do woodworking around the house. I thought that was going to fall into the "expensive hobby" category but he has made so many things that we needed that I think we are going to break even on that investment. He also is quite good at refinishing and recently refinished the record cabinet that my grandfather made for my parents when they were first married. Being able to keep that in our family and get continued use out of it is priceless to me.

Jack0Life

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2020, 09:08:26 AM »
I enjoy 2 sports that are usually very expensive.
Golf and Snowboarding.

NotBadForADad

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2020, 09:17:15 AM »
We like good food and interesting wine so I don't have a problem dropping money on nice restaurants or expensive ingredients when we cook at home. We tend to indulge in those for special occasions like birthdays, anniversaries or holidays so we budget for it that way.

I buy a lot of fabric and yarn. There's no practical purpose for this, it's basically hoarding. I do sew and knit things but not a rate that keeps up with the intake of new materials.

Ultimately, my sewing does help us as a family. I can mend our clothes and make them last a lot longer. I can make things we need around the house like curtains, new upholstery and more.

My husband recently invested in some power tools to do woodworking around the house. I thought that was going to fall into the "expensive hobby" category but he has made so many things that we needed that I think we are going to break even on that investment. He also is quite good at refinishing and recently refinished the record cabinet that my grandfather made for my parents when they were first married. Being able to keep that in our family and get continued use out of it is priceless to me.

We too are foodies, and I LOVE to grill. I received a new grill for fathers day with my gf's trump check, so I grilled a lot this year. I also love beer, but I cut drinking down and only partake on Friday and Saturday. Mainly because I'm getting fatter.

When I built our table, I was comparing the cheap particle board and laminate crap they sell at store for $2000ish. I spent hardly anything on the wood since I work at a millwork company haha. I've had tools for years and only purchased a new table saw for ripping boards.  It's heavy, solid, and custom!

NotBadForADad

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2020, 09:19:32 AM »
I enjoy 2 sports that are usually very expensive.
Golf and Snowboarding.

I love golf and snowboarding but none of my friends enjoy them so I unfortunately do not get to go out. I also gave up snowboarding because I do not enjoy the cold, I wasn't that great at it, and I don't like spending days being sore. I admit, I can be lazy. I was a better skateboarder, but the whole getting hurt thing, well.. hurts.

guitar_stitch

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2020, 09:47:43 AM »
I'm a musician. I play, live, and breath drums. Drums are expensive when considering good quality well made instruments. I own 3 of them. My daily driver, my dads old 76 Ludwig, and also an electric kit, with an assortment of high quality pies (cymbals). The amount of money I spent on cymbals and drums in the past 25 years I could probably buy a decent SUV outright. Though my love for music and drumming has cost me time, energy, and money, I am at a point where I can make money from playing, and considering that, I have been able to break even for the most part.

Musician (Multiple instruments), AV nerd, and beekeeper here.  I also have a thing for fun cars and fabrication. (metal and woodworking).

YttriumNitrate

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2020, 10:50:02 AM »
I don't do it anymore, but back in grad school I got into flying planes which was tough since my entire yearly salary only bought 160 hours of flight time. A joke I heard more than once at the FBO was that people think golf is expensive until they try aviation.

My current expensive hobby these days is growing fruit trees. The actual growing part isn't that expensive, but acquiring land is.

For the past few years I've also been spending about $1,000 a year on Christmas lights. I'm about maxed out for now so I expect that to go down next year .... unless I switch over to individually controllable bulbs and then it's game on.

NotBadForADad

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #7 on: September 04, 2020, 11:06:42 AM »
I don't do it anymore, but back in grad school I got into flying planes which was tough since my entire yearly salary only bought 160 hours of flight time. A joke I heard more than once at the FBO was that people think golf is expensive until they try aviation.

My current expensive hobby these days is growing fruit trees. The actual growing part isn't that expensive, but acquiring land is.

For the past few years I've also been spending about $1,000 a year on Christmas lights. I'm about maxed out for now so I expect that to go down next year .... unless I switch over to individually controllable bulbs and then it's game on.

That's funny! I like to venture neighborhoods with my son and look at the lights. I would never have the ambition to do it myself, but kudos to those who do and thank you!

ixtap

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2020, 11:15:54 AM »
I don't do it anymore, but back in grad school I got into flying planes which was tough since my entire yearly salary only bought 160 hours of flight time. A joke I heard more than once at the FBO was that people think golf is expensive until they try aviation.

My current expensive hobby these days is growing fruit trees. The actual growing part isn't that expensive, but acquiring land is.

For the past few years I've also been spending about $1,000 a year on Christmas lights. I'm about maxed out for now so I expect that to go down next year .... unless I switch over to individually controllable bulbs and then it's game on.

That's funny! I like to venture neighborhoods with my son and look at the lights. I would never have the ambition to do it myself, but kudos to those who do and thank you!

Fancy holiday displays are right at the top of my list of "Things I am glad other people do/have."

NotBadForADad

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #9 on: September 04, 2020, 11:42:58 AM »
I don't do it anymore, but back in grad school I got into flying planes which was tough since my entire yearly salary only bought 160 hours of flight time. A joke I heard more than once at the FBO was that people think golf is expensive until they try aviation.

My current expensive hobby these days is growing fruit trees. The actual growing part isn't that expensive, but acquiring land is.

For the past few years I've also been spending about $1,000 a year on Christmas lights. I'm about maxed out for now so I expect that to go down next year .... unless I switch over to individually controllable bulbs and then it's game on.

That's funny! I like to venture neighborhoods with my son and look at the lights. I would never have the ambition to do it myself, but kudos to those who do and thank you!

Fancy holiday displays are right at the top of my list of "Things I am glad other people do/have."

Ha yea. I was never big into decorating per season until we bought our house and now the missus gets right into it. I hardly even hung pictures on the walls in all of my apartments until recently. I guess it's cool? I do like to see the wreaths and other things she puts on the door when I pull into the driveway, but as far as lights go not so much. Maybe some year I'll put a Santa on the roof or a lit reindeer in the yard.

slappy

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #10 on: September 04, 2020, 12:23:41 PM »
I enjoy 2 sports that are usually very expensive.
Golf and Snowboarding.

I love golf and snowboarding but none of my friends enjoy them so I unfortunately do not get to go out. I also gave up snowboarding because I do not enjoy the cold, I wasn't that great at it, and I don't like spending days being sore. I admit, I can be lazy. I was a better skateboarder, but the whole getting hurt thing, well.. hurts.

I just mentioned to DH that we should get back into snowboarding, but he said it's too expensive for a casual hobby. Boo to that. I guess that will have to wait until FIRE.

Righty

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #11 on: September 04, 2020, 12:33:13 PM »
Fly fishing and mountain biking - suppose they don't have to be, but my particular flavor of gear addiction is quite expensive

ecchastang

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #12 on: September 04, 2020, 01:27:11 PM »
Rock climbing, and recently Mountain Biking.  Climbing is fairly inexpensive, but the mountain biking more than makes up the difference.

PoutineLover

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #13 on: September 04, 2020, 01:47:04 PM »
I guess it depends what you consider expensive. I spend a decent amount on a sports club membership and related spending for events and gear. It's my main sport and I'm there three times a week for half the year. Snowboarding I can do for cheap, got my gear used and buy day passes at big discounts. Travel could be considered an expensive hobby, but I definitely get great value for the amount I spend, usually one international trip a year and a few trips to visit family and friends. I will probably join a sailing club after covid concerns die down, I've been getting into racing the past few years and it's super fun.
All told I'd say hobby expenses represent almost a quarter of my spending. Since I live frugally in general and get to live a life full of fun activities and good friends doing activities I love that keep in shape, it's totally worth it.

trollwithamustache

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #14 on: September 04, 2020, 02:06:37 PM »
organic vegetable garden.

facepalm

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #15 on: September 04, 2020, 05:49:35 PM »
Mine are:

Motorcycles (road)--Sold the KTM at the end of last year, but will pick up another at some point. I love motos.
Skiing--I'll ski when I visit family in Idaho, but I am pretty done with the Sierras. I ski perhaps 1 week out of the year.
Exercise equipment--Just bought a Concept2 rower--Have been waiting 5 years to justify the purchase.  Also have a few bicycles (beaters) which I categorize as exercise tools. I used to have a full Olympic setup (bumper plates, lifting platform, and huge squat rack) but space won't permit me to have one where I am now.

I used to collect double edged razors and kept a few nice cameras around, but pretty much done with that.

Retire-Canada

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #16 on: September 04, 2020, 06:02:30 PM »
Interested to know what others like to do that may be costly, or break even at? My boss likes to golf and drink IPAs, but he's a millionaire so he doesn't count. :)

My main money burning aspect of life is sports gear. At the moment that's bikes and skateboards, but also has included SUPs, surfboards, kiteboarding gear and fly fishing as well as kayaks. I could do all this more cheaply, but I enjoy futzing with the gear as much as I do the sports themselves. But, hey I am a millionaire so maybe like your boss that doesn't count then? ;-)

I was riding a new longboard skateboard early one Sunday when a guy in a Ferrari cruised by me. I looked down at the longboard and thought "Dang! That's cheaper than one of his oil changes!" So despite having some spendy hobbies in the big picture they aren't that expensive.

NotBadForADad

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #17 on: September 04, 2020, 06:30:27 PM »
Interested to know what others like to do that may be costly, or break even at? My boss likes to golf and drink IPAs, but he's a millionaire so he doesn't count. :)

My main money burning aspect of life is sports gear. At the moment that's bikes and skateboards, but also has included SUPs, surfboards, kiteboarding gear and fly fishing as well as kayaks. I could do all this more cheaply, but I enjoy futzing with the gear as much as I do the sports themselves. But, hey I am a millionaire so maybe like your boss that doesn't count then? ;-)

I was riding a new longboard skateboard early one Sunday when a guy in a Ferrari cruised by me. I looked down at the longboard and thought "Dang! That's cheaper than one of his oil changes!" So despite having some spendy hobbies in the big picture they aren't that expensive.

Nice! I created to see the fruits of our labor. I know the community can be pretty militant at times but I wanted to have us enjoy some sinful activities that lean less mustachian.

I'm looking to drop about $2000 on a new drum set. This would be around the 11th new set I've purchased around this price range, but hey, I've paid off $14k in debt this year and by God I think i deserve it!

foghorn

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #18 on: September 05, 2020, 04:14:44 AM »
My hobby is high end audio. 

I love music and have a room in my home dedicated to my system. The equipment in that hobby can get super expensive.  Seven figures can be spent on equipment and the people who are really involved will generate their own power (cannot use the the grid - too dirty) and design rooms with acoustical engineers to get the sound just right.

My system is nothing like that - but still the cost is equivalent to a very nice car.

Retire-Canada

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #19 on: September 05, 2020, 07:13:54 AM »
Nice! I created to see the fruits of our labor. I know the community can be pretty militant at times but I wanted to have us enjoy some sinful activities that lean less mustachian.

I'm looking to drop about $2000 on a new drum set. This would be around the 11th new set I've purchased around this price range, but hey, I've paid off $14k in debt this year and by God I think i deserve it!

My thought is as long as your financial plans are on track to meet the goals you have then financially there is no major problem with having a hobby that costs a non-trivial amount of money. If your elective spending is causing you to not meet your goals and you are unhappy about that then you need to re-evaluate and decide what your true priorities are.

Congrats on paying off $14K of debt.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2020, 07:37:56 AM by Retire-Canada »

Steeze

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #20 on: September 05, 2020, 07:35:20 AM »
Snowboarding- though I haven’t gone much since getting married, but used to go 50-100 days a year. Spent $1000s in my life so far. Still go 1-2 times a year.

Just bought a new skateboard... haha I’ll forgive myself for the $50 at some point. Probably out a couple $1000 in my lifetime so far.

Backpacking - spent $300 on gear this year, maybe $1000 in my life so far.

Rock climbing - $100/mo. + $250 in gear maybe $1500 in my life so far.

My reason for FIRE is so I can do these things more! No reason to give them up now!!

bbqbonelesswing

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #21 on: September 05, 2020, 08:10:08 AM »
My most expensive are probably eating out or reading. We like trying new restaurants and food, so go out a few times per month. Nothing over the top- maybe $50/week for two people.

I also read a lot, and like to collect books. It would obviously be cheaper to take stuff out from the library, but I prefer to buy most of the time. This actually ends up being relatively cheap, as I just ask for books for every birthday and holiday.

OtherJen

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #22 on: September 05, 2020, 09:35:24 AM »
We cook and are foodies. I have no problem paying extra for good-quality ingredients and especially for humanely raised meat. Bonus points if the food was grown/produced locally. It’s a little more expensive to buy into a CSA than to visit the supermarket, but I actually get to talk to the farmer every week and know exactly where in our county the food was grown and when it was picked. It’s definitely more expensive to visit the little grocery store that sells only meat/dairy/eggs raised by independent regional farmers according to high ethical and humane standards, but all of it tastes better and we like supporting ethical local businesses and having direct contact info for the farms.

Like @socaso , I am a knitter and tend to hoard pretty natural-fiber yarn. This spring/summer, I’ve actually gotten through some expensive stuff that I’ve had for years. I make my own sweaters, have started making husband’s sweaters, and have made all our scarves and hats (and scarves/shawls for others) for years. Even so, I still have a filing cabinet full of yarn. I’ve forbidden myself to buy more until I work through the planned projects, at least.

Dr. Pepper

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #23 on: September 05, 2020, 10:28:28 AM »
Motorcycle, bought a used Harley Road King and ride around taking in the mountain views in Colorado. Worth it for me.

julia

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #24 on: September 05, 2020, 07:50:09 PM »
Rock climbing! Membership for our local gym is 1200$ a year for the two of us. Shoes are around 200$ a year. And that's just INDOOR. If you want to outdoor climb, you need to invest in a lot of gear/rope.

Traveling is the other one. That being said, we travel by bike and wild-camp so it's just the flights to Europe that cost us. Bike transport via some airlines for are 250$ (for just one bike)!

Bloop Bloop

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #25 on: September 05, 2020, 08:12:07 PM »
Sports cars. Paid $100k for my last one and will probably pay $225k for my next one.

expatartist

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #26 on: September 05, 2020, 09:06:33 PM »
1) Expensive/unusual/exotic art supplies. This tends to be paid back over time with reimbursement from work or selling art. In my new studio I'll be giving workshops with some of them, so should pay for itself eventually.

2) DIY body products. In the past I'd purchase from expensive places like Lush but after examining ingredients, found I could make my own. So I buy in bulk (cocoa/shea butter, essential oils, ingredients for body scrubs) and pay about the same amount annually, but now can share with friends. Last week made two body/face scrubs one from ground lavender and rose petals and iris root, the other from expired vanilla bean, both mixed with ground almonds and powdered clay.

Fishindude

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #27 on: September 06, 2020, 01:38:07 PM »
I'm proud to be a leader in the expensive hobby department; hunting, fishing, boating, shooting sports, etc.
Heck, I've purchased farms, tractors and farm equipment with the primary motivation being for hunting.

Malcat

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #28 on: September 06, 2020, 04:49:22 PM »
I don't do it anymore, but back in grad school I got into flying planes which was tough since my entire yearly salary only bought 160 hours of flight time. A joke I heard more than once at the FBO was that people think golf is expensive until they try aviation.

My current expensive hobby these days is growing fruit trees. The actual growing part isn't that expensive, but acquiring land is.

For the past few years I've also been spending about $1,000 a year on Christmas lights. I'm about maxed out for now so I expect that to go down next year .... unless I switch over to individually controllable bulbs and then it's game on.

I'm just getting into flying now. So excited to try it for the first time next weekend.

NotBadForADad

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #29 on: September 06, 2020, 06:42:38 PM »
I'm proud to be a leader in the expensive hobby department; hunting, fishing, boating, shooting sports, etc.
Heck, I've purchased farms, tractors and farm equipment with the primary motivation being for hunting.


LOL! You sound like my FIL, he owns 100 acres in upstate NY and hunts right on his property. I love the spoils of his labor when he comes to visit.

GreenEggs

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #30 on: September 06, 2020, 09:03:26 PM »
One man's job is another man's hobby.


Here's a few that I've enjoyed in the past and/or currently.


Skiing (snow & water), motorcycling (on & off road), boating, flying, photography, gardening & plant breeding, tropical fish raising & breeding, construction (our mountain cabin & glass studio), woodworking, pottery, welding, rebuilt a 1967 Corvette. 


Glassblowing (which became a profession for a number of years).  Built all of the furnaces, annealing ovens, polishing & grinding machines for the glass studio.  All of the equipment is relatively simple to make, but would cost 10 times the material cost to purchase.  So, $10K DIY equals $100K ready built equipment.  I enjoy making stuff. 


I'd like to learn to kiteboard, try thundercat racing (inflatable catamaran), learn to fly a glider, try hare scrambles (a type of off road motorcycle racing), and scuba diving.  I'd also like to try cruising the Caribbean, which I guess would fit in well with the scuba, kiteboarding, and the thundercat.  Hopefully, some of these will fit into my future sooner than later.  :) 

















cupcakery

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #31 on: September 08, 2020, 05:51:13 AM »
I used to scrapbook.  That was expensive, but worth it to me.  My other hobbies are free/cheap.

Laura33

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #32 on: September 08, 2020, 06:51:48 AM »
DH's is woodworking; my new one is stained glass.  None of it is cheap, or even close to cost-effective; for ex., DH has spent the past 15 yrs slowly returning the first floor of the house to stain-grade, including things like building a coffered ceiling and stripping or replacing all of the trim -- none of which will add once cent of value to the house, because I guarantee the next owner will paint it all white again.  But we get to live in a place that exactly matches our tastes, and with much nicer quality things than I would ever spend the money to buy directly.

Plus he needs a hobby or his head will explode, and at least I benefit from this one. 

cool7hand

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #33 on: September 08, 2020, 07:19:45 AM »
Freshwater bass fishing. My wife and I love it. We own a bass boat, twenty plus rods and reels, hundreds of pounds of gear, and an SUV to pull all of it. We are frugal even with our bass gear (I've dove to 12 plus feet to save lures), but what really matters is that it's what we love to do together.

GreenEggs

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #34 on: September 08, 2020, 09:10:44 AM »
DH's is woodworking; my new one is stained glass.  None of it is cheap, or even close to cost-effective; for ex., DH has spent the past 15 yrs slowly returning the first floor of the house to stain-grade, including things like building a coffered ceiling and stripping or replacing all of the trim -- none of which will add once cent of value to the house, because I guarantee the next owner will paint it all white again.  But we get to live in a place that exactly matches our tastes, and with much nicer quality things than I would ever spend the money to buy directly.

Plus he needs a hobby or his head will explode, and at least I benefit from this one.


I found a place that sells gorgeous solid black walnut interior pre hung doors for $179 (not actually black walnut, but a very close South American species), for all common sizes.  They also sell undrilled/unhung doors for about 30-$40 less, that I used for sliding bypass closet doors in the master BR.  Your DH would love them. 

rivendale

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #35 on: September 08, 2020, 11:19:23 AM »
[quote author=GreenEggs link=topic=118079.msg2696372#msg2696372

I found a place that sells gorgeous solid black walnut interior pre hung doors for $179 (not actually black walnut, but a very close South American species), for all common sizes.  They also sell undrilled/unhung doors for about 30-$40 less, that I used for sliding bypass closet doors in the master BR.  Your DH would love them.
[/quote]

Mind sharing this source?

GreenEggs

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #36 on: September 08, 2020, 12:00:10 PM »
[quote author=GreenEggs link=topic=118079.msg2696372#msg2696372

I found a place that sells gorgeous solid black walnut interior pre hung doors for $179 (not actually black walnut, but a very close South American species), for all common sizes.  They also sell undrilled/unhung doors for about 30-$40 less, that I used for sliding bypass closet doors in the master BR.  Your DH would love them.

Mind sharing this source?





I bought them from a small building supply called Big John's Closeouts [size=78%]https://bigjohnscloseouts.com/our-company/[/size].  Their supplier is Campbell Door, which is just down the hwy a few miles from their location in Mountain City, TN.  I stopped by Campbell Door, after finding their label on one of the doors, to see if they could supply 9-lite black walnut doors.  That's how I discovered they were importing the door blanks in bulk & then hanging and drilling them in TN.  They couldn't supply the door that I needed, and I don't think they were selling retail back then.  Here's their link too: [/size][size=78%]http://www.campbelldoors.com/home.html[/size]  (the style that I got looks like their Miza Pine photo)  They come unfinished & I used linseed oil, which just wipes on & looks great.  I trimmed them with local black walnut. 


They ran out of stock when I was buying them 6-7 years ago, but I noticed that Big John's had them again when I was there about a year ago.  I need to buy a few more, but they aren't at the top of my to-do list.  :)

Abe Froman

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #37 on: September 09, 2020, 10:51:18 AM »
I grew up skiing in the extreme NorthEast, grandfather taught me golf, and father tried his luck with a 17 foot sailboat.

Haven’t skied but once in the last 15 years (so not so expensive anymore), golf perhaps 2-3 times a month in playable weather (at local military courses where my boys can play free), but the sailing thing stuck.

Bought a 27 foot sailboat pre-kids and sold her just as DS #1 was cooking.

In the following years my itch has been scratched by joining a local marina’s weekly races. For only $60 a year (until this years’ COVID) – you got a weekly race with PHRF handicaps, 3-4 dinner events after a race per year, an end of year banquet prize event, and unlimited pulls from the beer keg in the Club’s Closet. This has been fun and got to learn soooo much for low dollars  – but as I am getting older – I want to sink my teeth in deeper. So I was lucky to find a guy to take me on his charter in the Bahamas this past winter for nearly two weeks on a ‘working cruise.’ It wasn’t umbrella drinks and pillow chocolate at all – it was hard, sparse to some degree – hard work, but utterly rewarding. And want to do it again, bad. And share it with family without scaring them too much (if you catch my drift).   

Now that the boys are getting older (yes – my wife somehow found herself pregnant with DS #2) – and my concern to work harder at my current job -  lets say waning – I want to try my hand at a little bit larger boat and sinking my time into learning new things, like diesel engine maintenance, fiberglass and gel-coat work, maybe some marine electrics.

Challenging all of this is my eye on the prize of a SWR of 33X, roughly about 86.93% there.

Anyone MMMers out there getting creative with ways to scratch that really expensive itch, but in a MMM kind of way?

ohio4life

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #38 on: September 09, 2020, 12:15:28 PM »
I'm kind of a hobby person and I jump from one to another. I don't consider live sports, live music, or traveling as hobbies, but I have spent a lot on those activities. Some current hobbies are listed below. I probably feel most guilty about drones, but I could recoup half of this money if I sold all my gear.

Aquariums 2020: $400ish but probably less. I could see this one getting out of hand, but I really don't have the space. This is my third foray into this hobby and I really enjoy it. YouTube is a fun way to get more into it without buying a bunch of tanks.

Kayaking 2017 to present: $800ish. I got a second kayak, 2 racks, and a new PFD this year. Before that I only had about 100 bucks invested in the hobby. It was nice to start cheap and I would love to get more into this hobby over the next few years. It shouldn't cost much going forward.

Drones 2017 to present: ~$1,300. It has that neat factor that I couldn't resist. It was an itch that I had to scratch, but don't think I will continue it for much longer.

Video games on and off for last 25 years: ~$200 bucks a year. I really am tempted to get into video game collecting and setting up vintage systems, but watching YouTube is how I indulge in this at the moment. I also have no space for this, which is probably a good thing.

Notable hobbies of the past: fishing, skiing, and home brewing. I went on a ski trip this year and didn't really care for the skiing aspects of the trip so that one is probably dead for good. I sold all my ski gear about 12 or 13 years ago. Home brewing is fun, but a lot of work and more fun to do with friends and they don't have the time for it or are not interested. I gave all my equipment away about 2 years ago. I could see myself getting back into fishing. I gave away hundreds of dollars of gear around 11 years ago and haven't touched a rod since, but I would like to dabble in it.

horsepoor

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #39 on: September 13, 2020, 09:44:21 PM »
My username pretty much sums it up.

I have one retired horse and two riding horses.  If I could downsize to just one riding horse, that would help a lot.  However, I am pursuing riding upper level dressage, so even if I do get down to one horse, it will still be expensive with all the things that go with showing and training.  Too bad I'm not content to just trail ride.

I am doing some studying/training on the side in equine anatomy, podiatry and bodywork, so that when I retire from my main gig in ~14 years I should be able to earn enough to offset my horse expenses or trade out for services.

The numbers would make any respectable Mustachian shudder, but it makes me happy and I try to keep other life expenses down to allow for it.

Eventuality

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #40 on: September 14, 2020, 10:42:57 AM »
My username pretty much sums it up.

I have one retired horse and two riding horses.  If I could downsize to just one riding horse, that would help a lot.  However, I am pursuing riding upper level dressage, so even if I do get down to one horse, it will still be expensive with all the things that go with showing and training.  Too bad I'm not content to just trail ride.

I am doing some studying/training on the side in equine anatomy, podiatry and bodywork, so that when I retire from my main gig in ~14 years I should be able to earn enough to offset my horse expenses or trade out for services.

The numbers would make any respectable Mustachian shudder, but it makes me happy and I try to keep other life expenses down to allow for it.

Yay! I'm not alone in the horse hobby. I just trail ride and keep my (relatively easy keeper, barefoot) horse  at a fairly inexpensive barn. She's very expensive as other hobbies go but cheap as far as the horse world goes. I'm happy to keep my horse experience as strictly a hobby these days. I've worked in the horse industry before and don't want to repeat the experience at this point in my life.

EricEng

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #41 on: September 14, 2020, 11:52:21 AM »
Skiing sort of. 
$600 total One time expense of boots for spouse and me.  Kids boots for nearly free from consignment sales.
$~200 total for 4 pairs of skis off marketplace with bindings already installed.
$30 for wax and repair materials
$600 annual ski pass per adult skiing or just a 4 trip pack for $230.  Last year I got 21 days in, so under $30/day.
Drive to and from ski mountains for day trips at .5-1.5 hours each.  Take off during week to avoid weekend mobs.

DadJokes

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #42 on: September 14, 2020, 12:11:13 PM »
Board games - I'm part of a local board game group, so I could actually partake in this hobby for free if I chose to simply play other people's games. However, I have around 20 games that ranged in cost from free to $90 (probably an average cost of $25).

Golf - It's expensive, but I don't play too much, since there isn't a public course in the town I live in.

Adult softball - I don't think that it's too expensive. I pay team fees every season and update my cleats every couple years. I played on a travel team for a while, which cost a fair bit more with all of the tournament fees.

Watching hockey - We offset the cost of season tickets by reselling 75% of the games. We eat before games and bring water in with us

Saffron

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #43 on: September 14, 2020, 12:21:18 PM »
Don't get into watches or Scotch, kids.

Rcc

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #44 on: September 14, 2020, 01:20:31 PM »
Scuba diving. Originally certified 25 years ago. Picked the hobby back up last year.

Around $2k in new gear and accessory purchase. Having said that - avoiding the cost of rental ($50/day) will offset that in 40-50 dives.

Break even? No. Eventually it will settle out to less than $30/dive for low key, local dives. Trips to Florida? $50-75 per dive. Caribbean live aboards (assuming we can ever go to the Bahamas again ;) )? Easily 100-125/dive (crude guesstimate)

Sugaree

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #45 on: September 14, 2020, 01:26:57 PM »
Scuba diving. Originally certified 25 years ago. Picked the hobby back up last year.

Around $2k in new gear and accessory purchase. Having said that - avoiding the cost of rental ($50/day) will offset that in 40-50 dives.

Break even? No. Eventually it will settle out to less than $30/dive for low key, local dives. Trips to Florida? $50-75 per dive. Caribbean live aboards (assuming we can ever go to the Bahamas again ;) )? Easily 100-125/dive (crude guesstimate)

^^^^This.  I have a kit that I'm more or less happy with right now, so I'm not paying to rent gear.  Unfortunately, I don't live near the coast anymore so I do have to pay ~$35/day for park entry and air fills.  I don't count the price of trips (two weeks in Roatan already booked for next summer) since that comes out of a different pot of money in my budget. 



I have kept bees in the past and plan to get back into it when I get another place to put them.  I had nearly $1000 worth of gear stolen/destroyed so I'll pretty much be starting from scratch. 

Michael in ABQ

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #46 on: September 14, 2020, 01:53:12 PM »
Children - most expensive hobby ever.

NotBadForADad

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #47 on: September 14, 2020, 02:02:39 PM »
Children - most expensive hobby ever.

YES! and Home Ownership.


StacheDash

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #48 on: September 14, 2020, 02:16:42 PM »
My coffee roasting hobby is threatening to get more expensive. I just spent $450 on a new roaster. I bought a few supplies to help with the process, too. Luckily, the cost for the green coffee beans is reasonable compared to the Aldi coffee I was buying before roasting my own.

partgypsy

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Re: Expensive Hobbies
« Reply #49 on: September 14, 2020, 02:57:28 PM »
Children - most expensive hobby ever.

YES! and Home Ownership.
i can agree with that! (Money and time).  For myself I would have said gem and jewelry, but I do more looking than anything else at this point.