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General Discussion => Welcome and General Discussion => Topic started by: trailrated on May 22, 2014, 10:41:35 AM

Title: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on May 22, 2014, 10:41:35 AM
After reading the blog for quite some time I keep seeing people talking about their FU staches (being different than their FIRE amount) as having the security to "stick it to the man" and walk off the job without stress if they want to.

This being said, I have never seen a story about using that FU money. Please, share your stories!!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on May 22, 2014, 01:28:34 PM
So nobody has ever thrown down a stack of papers and rode off into the sunset?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Russ on May 22, 2014, 01:57:20 PM
three hours isn't exactly a long time to wait for a response...

my FU money has allowed me to be very picky about the jobs I take. haven't actually had to tell anybody to fuck off yet though.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: SisterX on May 22, 2014, 02:01:51 PM
Oh man, I don't have any stories.  But I will say that last week I came this close to having an epic one.  I even had my quitting rant all planned out in my head, something about how my boss is a crazy, sociopath bitch and no amount of money is worth putting up with someone like her.  Then I took 2 deep breaths and reminded myself that having my husband get through this 2nd degree without loans is far, far more important than telling that woman exactly what I think of her.  It would have served her right to be left in the lurch (seriously, she needs me) but not exactly worth it on our end.  We could squeeze by until graduation, barely, but I'd rather get the classes all paid for by work before I give my epic rant.  :(
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mxt0133 on May 22, 2014, 02:04:49 PM
My FU money allowed me to get married, quit my job, and move across the country in the middle of the financial crisis.  That experience solidified my resolve to reach FI.  Since then my wife has been able to quit her job and be a SAHP, spend six weeks overseas to explore the possibility of living abroad for a few years, and allow me to take it 'easy' career wise to be able to spend more time with the kids while they're young.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DoubleDown on May 22, 2014, 02:08:25 PM
Man, I would have loved to witness a real life Jerry McGuire or Al Pacino in "And Justice For All" ("I'm out of order??! YOU'RE out of order!!").

A former coworker of mine just got fed up a couple of weeks ago and quit without a FIRE plan, just FU money. He didn't think he had enough to quit forever, and really has no idea. He just knew he had enough to last several years at least, and he was fed up, so he gave a week or two notice and left. I actually told him, "You're gonna be okay, you have FU money!" (he had never heard the term before).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: bacchi on May 22, 2014, 02:31:35 PM
It's not epic but I have quit on a whim more-or-less and immediately walked out of the building. It was very satisfying. Nothing soothes the soul like quitting a toxic job.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Erica/NWEdible on May 22, 2014, 02:49:27 PM
This isn't an FU money thing, but a former coworker of mine when I was cooking professionally still told the best "Quit with Extreme Prejudice" story I've ever heard.

He was working at a very, very popular restaurant - the place du jour. He was saute, which is one of the linchpin positions on a restaurant line - very busy and very fast moving. It was Friday, 7:40, the place was packed with 3 more hours of packed to go.

The chef came in and started screaming about something. Maybe an order came back, I don't know. But insane screaming rants were a pattern, apparently. About five minutes into this screaming abuse, my coworker decides he's had enough, takes off his apron, throws it on the star-top (picture an 8 burner stove, with all burners all on high), tells the chef to go fuck himself and just walks out the back door. He was done.

The flaming apron sealed it for me.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on May 22, 2014, 02:50:14 PM
three hours isn't exactly a long time to wait for a response...


Good point, I get impatient. Loved reading the rest of the responses!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: kyanamerinas on May 22, 2014, 03:05:27 PM
2 years expenses saved allowed me to rent my own place nearer my partner after just 2 months freelancing. Perhaps not the most dramatic or wisest move but i love freelancing and couldn't do it without that reassurance of back up.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cheddar Stacker on May 22, 2014, 03:49:30 PM
I'm coming up on a major crossroads in my career/at my company. I've been reluctant to post details about it here in case there are any closet mustachians in my real life that know who I am or might have ways of figuring it out.

Long story short, I've built a nice FU stache, and plan to double it before this crossroads occurs in a few years. It will be nice to have the option to take the road less traveled if I feel the need.

So trailrated, feel free to PM me in a few years to see if my FU stache came in handy and created a story worth reading. I've actually strongly considered sending a PM to a few of you mustachians to see how you might handle my situation, so if anyone is intrigued enough and willing to read a fairly long, complex, and hopefully confidential story send me a PM.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: feelingroovy on May 22, 2014, 03:59:31 PM
Not an epic leave, but a few years ago DH had a job that paid well but bored him to tears. 

One month into my 3-month maternity leave, I took my departing in-laws to the airport.  I drove home thinking, "two more months home alone with a toddler and a baby."  God help me.

When I got home, I was shocked to find DH was there.  Tuns out half the company got laid off, including him.  We high-fived.

His severance covered us just until I got back to my 3-day-per week job, so we never had to touch the stache.  Those two months with both of us home were the best.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Dr. Doom on May 22, 2014, 04:05:29 PM

I walked out of the highest paying job of my life at the tail end of 2006, IT work for a big financial company.  (Completely transparent hint:  VWELX without the V)

I'd been there about three and a half years.  First two years were good because I had a decent manager who showed signs of being a real human being once in a while.

Third year, I get a new manager, and he's a total Fbag.  He had his last name on his license plate.  Guys on his team instantly began working 65+ hours a week instead of an already demanding 50ish.  The company paid really well so I stuck with it.  It's only work, right?

Wrong.  He started calling all of his guys on home phones, cell phones, etc. to discuss any issues he could think of at any time.  I started to think of him as a terrorist because you never knew when the next attack was coming.  He would frame the calls in the guise of "production support" because part of our role was to provide after-hours support for systems and services that needed to be available.   But many of the topics were not directly related to outages and were really just beatings.  He was a micromanager, a control-freak, and a grade-A douche who hid his insecurity behind his overbearing and driven public persona.  God help his children.

The final straw came when I got a call on Sunday Dec 23rd in 2006.  We had an outage on Saturday and I'd been involved in fixing it.  My girlfriend (now wife) was helping me decorate a small, pathetic looking christmas tree.  We were trying to put work behind us and enjoy one quiet day to ourselves, without any office nonsense, prior to the upcoming week, which was going to be full of family visits and travel.  Just one goddamn quiet day, you know? 

I pick up the phone and he starts complaining about the work I did the previous day, Saturday.  (Saturday mind, you -- work I put in on a non-standard day.  I should also add it was the 6th Saturday in a row that I'd worked.  This was fairly typical for the job.)  He says I need to remember to "fall on my sword" as soon as I get back to the office on Dec 26th -- tell everyone that the Saturday problem was my fault and I'm taking the proper long term corrective actions to resolve it.  (The problem wasn't actually my fault but he wanted me to take responsibility for it anyway.)

I remind him it's Sunday, and we're coming up on Christmas, and ask if there's any current problem that needs to be resolved.  (I'm really asking:  are any systems down?  Is there any business related reason for this call or is this just a friendly Sunday afternoon beating?)  He says yes, the problem is we have too many outages and the perception of the team is negative.   I tell him we should talk about this Thursday live instead of two days before Christmas and hang up the phone.

My SO is furious.  I'm furious.  It's no longer a nice quiet day.  I try to let it go over the holidays but the anger sits in my stomach like a fruitcake from Big Y.  I can't see how I can make it through another year at this place, despite the incredible salary and benefits.

Thursday after Christmas I get into the office and my manager immediately shows up in my office to talk about Visibility, Perception and Politics.  I cut him off and say I'm leaving.

"Leaving, what you don't feel well?"
"No, leaving the company."
He takes a step back.  I'm sitting in my cube and he's standing in front of me.  "Where are you going?"  His eyes are really wide.
"Nowhere."
"You don't have another job lined up?"
"No."
"Is it the salary?"
"No."
"It is, isn't it?  I could work with HR to see if we could work something out."
"No, it's not.  You know what it is."  I'm staring at him with my arms across my chest.  He's clearly uncomfortable, kind of wavering on his feet, but I feel terrific.  I'm thinking:  Today's the last day I'm ever going to have to look at you or hear your voice.

He finally manages to say, "You should think about this.  Someone your age shouldn't leave your job."
And I said "I know exactly what I'm doing here.  Don't worry about me.  Worry about replacing me, because you'll need to."

The conversation went a little longer than that but not much.  They ended up escorting me out, probably because my manager knew I was angry and I had tons of passwords to critical systems and hey you never know.

I got a much better job a month later.  20% overall comp. package cut but 40% reduction in work and 100% removal of my old manager.

No regrets.  I feel obligated to add that it was actually a fine place to work, lots of bright people and interesting technologies.  But even decent jobs become intolerable when you're working under a toxic egomaniac workaholic inhuman prick.

One of the things I'm now fond of saying is that people usually don't leave their jobs.  They leave their managers.   
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: marty998 on May 22, 2014, 05:02:59 PM
...

YOU DA MAN.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: deborah on May 22, 2014, 05:05:36 PM
FU money enabled me to continue to live the life I chose after being hit by a bus.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wolf_Stache on May 22, 2014, 05:29:46 PM
Dr. Doom, that is epic. I have to agree that EVERY time I've quit a job its been because of the managers or personal reasons (ie moving, school, ect), NEVER because of the job itself.

One place where I worked a guy went to lunch and just never came back. It was actually a decent place to work, I only left to get my Masters Degree, but I truly regret it now - the Masters wasn't worth it and I loved that place.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: ch12 on May 22, 2014, 06:20:43 PM
...

YOU DA MAN.

Dr. Doom's story was amazing. At-will employment FTW.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: CarSafetyGuy on May 22, 2014, 06:57:31 PM
FU money enabled me to continue to live the life I chose after being hit by a bus.

Eek. What happened there?

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: CarSafetyGuy on May 22, 2014, 06:58:31 PM
Oh, and it's not epic, but I've turned down a number of jobs over the years simply because I didn't need the money enough to put up with the coworkers...or commutes. It never gets old.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: 2527 on May 22, 2014, 07:07:02 PM
My dad had a real estate partner who was really pissing him off.  He told her that if she didn't shape up, he would stop paying his half of the mortgage, and let the apartment building go into foreclosure.  She said, "You can't do that, you'll ruin your own credit rating."  He said, "I'm 60 years old, I don't need this apartment building, and I don't need a credit rating, and I'll be happy to ruin my to ruin yours."

After that, she toed the line.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on May 22, 2014, 07:31:43 PM
Not as epic as Dr. Doom - that was an awe-inspiring story - but here it goes:

I was working at a company I was unhappy at. A couple of things happened:

1. My project was losing funds and I was bored, so I interviewed internally for two projects that were on the upswing. Project 1 was more interesting, but had a boss that everyone warned me about. Project 2 was less interesting. Project 1's manager interviewed me. He was very cordial, but did mention during the interview that it wasn't a 40-hr a week job. When I asked, he mentioned about 55-60 hrs. I heard him out politely. Now, others that worked for him had warned me that he was a micro-manager and asked for things that weren't necessary. I was impressed that at least he was upfront with what he expected. After sleeping on it one night, I went in to work the next day and told him that I couldn't work more than 40-hr weeks. I would work more hours during a crunch time, but not consistently. Then he tried to negotiate with me and said I could do it on the weekends. I politely turned him down and took the offer on Project 2. He looked at me totally surprised with my answer.

2. Project 2 then started to lose funding. Well, I knew if layoffs were going to happen that I would be a target. Some layoffs happened in other groups and based on some emails that went around, I knew our group would be hit. So the week before I expected it, I made sure to empty out my desk, computer, etc. Then when I came in on Monday morning, I got called into HR for them to tell me I was being laid off and had to leave. As I was signing the paperwork (totally jovial on the upcoming "break" I had planned and knowing that as soon as I left the office I would be hanging out at the beach):

- I noticed the date was 6/6 when I was signing the paperwork and openly joked about how weird a coincidence that was (HR lady was perplexed with how relaxed and humorous I was being).

- As I was signing the paperwork, the fire alarm sounded and we all had to evacuate the building. The HR people couldn't believe they now had to spend even more time with me as they escorted me out before bringing me back in to finish signing the paperwork. While we were all outside, I was able to say goodbye to everyone and mentioned I was in the process of being laid off - in front of the HR people.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: LalsConstant on May 22, 2014, 09:23:08 PM
Well I've left a couple of jobs because there was some awful stuff going on, but I had no kind of FU money when I did it (I kind of did the second time but it's complicated), so I don't have a story of my own.

But when I was still working at Wal-Mart, I was witness to the Legend of Frank.

Frank was an older, white haired gentleman who was already a hero, he'd had a long military career and the truth is, he was one of the best employees the store had.  But he had his terms.  He had the only job at Wal-Mart he cared to have, and he worked the only shift he cared to work.

But he'd done so well for so long, no one had a problem with this.  Thing is Frank did not need the money, at all.  He had a military pension, his house was paid for, and he was actually delaying Social Security for a bigger payment because he didn't need it.  He worked for reasons that aren't fathomable to me.  He used the money he made to buy fishing lures and gave a chunk of it away to the Children's Miracle Network and stuff like that.

Now I have good and bad things to say about Wal-Mart.  Right now I'm going to say one of the bad things.

I don't know if this is by some evil design (I doubt it, never ascribe to malignancy that which can be explained by incompetence) or what, but it seems every once in a while some goober in Arkansas, for the hell of it, decides to change the way employees are scheduled or what jobs exist and what they do, and the usual effect of this is it tends to make older, more highly paid workers quit or find themselves in situations where they have to resign because they have a personal situation where they can't start working nights instead of mornings or something like that.

As a graduate of business school myself, I call that MBA thinking, and I say that pejoratively.  Actions like this are necessary sometimes but what I saw was something that some overpaid executive cooked up on a spreadsheet to make it look like he/she found a way to save money when in fact he/she was only shuffling people around and causing operational risks.  If (s)he'd paid attention in business school he'd realize what he/she was doing was in fact pointless.

This is what happens when people under intense pressure to justify their huge six or even seven figure salaries who have never worked in a Wal-Mart store, who think of the company not as people and stores and trucks and groceries and merchandise but rather as abstract numbers, make decisions about the jobs of people they will never meet.  I'm sure these corporate people are perfectly nice people, but I doubt very much that the $11 an hour workers whose fates they manipulate are more than an idea or a piece of the data to them.  Dunbar's number.  Wal-Mart has 2 million employees.  You do the math.

Well anyway, someone decided that Frank's job was too cushy and he needed a new schedule.  They basically took his job and another job, cut half the responsibilities and work from each, and switched them so you wound up with this weird situation where the new job had some of both of the old jobs.  And while it wasn't a completely illogical way to do things, it didn't make sense to the people who actually did this work.  This was a "I'm a smart corporate executive and you are a lowly peon, do what I say" initiative.

When this happens, they usually call you in to an office to tell you it's happened right before the schedules showing the changes come out.  That way they can say they gave you advance notice without really giving you any ability to deal with it.  It's a shitty thing they do because they know so many of their good employees won't quit because Wal-Mart is all they have.

But it didn't pan out for them this time.

Frank looked across at the overnight manager and said no, I won't do it.

The manager, who was a real douchebag, said yes you will and you'll like it (witness as unreliable but I can definitely imagine this guy saying that).

Frank looked at him and unclipped something from his belt and something from his shirt pocket.  He then opened his wallet and removed something.

"Here's my box cutter.  Here's my discount card.  And here's my badge.  That's everything I have of yours.  I'm going home."

Three hours into his shift, Frank turned around and walked out the front door of Wal-Mart and into a legend, vanishing in the darkness of the parking lot.  It threw the rest of us into chaos because we had to pick up the slack, but none of us complained, for he was our hero.  Because at some point, every single one of us had wanted to do that.

Last I heard of Frank, he's doing a lot more fishing nowadays.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Dr. Doom on May 22, 2014, 09:23:39 PM
Dr. Doom, that is epic. I have to agree that EVERY time I've quit a job its been because of the managers or personal reasons (ie moving, school, ect), NEVER because of the job itself.

One place where I worked a guy went to lunch and just never came back. It was actually a decent place to work, I only left to get my Masters Degree, but I truly regret it now - the Masters wasn't worth it and I loved that place.

To the guy who just disappeared.. wow.  He missed an opportunity to really enjoy himself.  Confrontations can be fun if you're calm and in control. 

I've been in my industry close to 15 years and one point repeats:  It's not what you do so much as who you have to work with that most directly affects your happiness.  I had some functionally horrible jobs in my late teens (dishwasher, retail) that were made OK because I worked with great people who supported each other and laughed about stuff to relieve stress and fatigue.  But at the same time, functionally great jobs can be rendered miserable by the company you are forced to keep.

Still, congrats on your masters.  Even if there isn't a direct financial payoff, I'm sure that there's some value in it.  I've always semi-regretted not pursuing any edu post-BS.   Learning is awesome.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: KatieSSS on May 22, 2014, 09:34:01 PM
Thank you, all, for these wonderful stories! I really needed to read this after a day like today, where I want to walk right out. I didn't and that is a good thing, but all the more reason to keep building the 'stache :) Someday I will be Frank or Dr. Doom. And it will be glorious.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: limeandpepper on May 22, 2014, 09:38:15 PM
Three hours into his shift, Frank turned around and walked out the front door of Wal-Mart and into a legend, vanishing in the darkness of the parking lot.  It threw the rest of us into chaos because we had to pick up the slack, but none of us complained, for he was our hero.  Because at some point, every single one of us had wanted to do that.

Wow I think this is my favourite story so far! It's like the Shawshank Redemption. (And I have always felt that emotions of The Shawshank Redemption would be an appropriate analogy to my feelings the day I finally break free from my workplace, haha!)

I'll be quitting my job soon, but I doubt it would be epic, as my company genuinely doesn't seem to care about people coming and going. They just make the people left behind work harder. My current draft of my resignation letter has something along the lines of "...new adventures call, and I have decided to embark upon an indefinite sabbatical" - I'm still not sure if I should include that, but it sure feels good to write it down!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: pdxvandal on May 22, 2014, 10:29:02 PM
I left a job 6 years ago, although it wasn't because of FU money.

I had been there about a year at this place where the "leadership" would treat employees unethically i.e., "promoting" someone they didn't like, then asking them to train their replacement for a month ... and then lay off that "promoted" person. Shady financial dealings, dumb office politics, firing someone during their cancer treatments, etc.

So, I'd found a newer, better job and decided to leave the d-bags. Only instead of 2 weeks' notice, I gave them a one-minute notice on a Friday at 4:59 p.m. via a short two-sentence email. And this was 5 minutes after I sent a far friendlier email to the colleagues I respected. So the brass was the last to know. It felt great. No regrets.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Bateaux on May 23, 2014, 06:21:24 AM
My FU Money allows me to post my opinions to social networking sites that might get me fired.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Basenji on May 23, 2014, 06:58:30 AM
One of the things I'm now fond of saying is that people usually don't leave their jobs.  They leave their managers.

Amen. I was at wits end at one point with my manager (but I really liked my actual job and the company) and then just when I was sending out resumes and doing interviews we had a reorganization and I suddenly worked for a whole new chain of bosses. Although the new immediate supervisor isn't the best manager, it's still waaaay better.

Oh, and +1 to knowing I am going to be FI in a limited number of years makes me lighthearted and able to deal with BS better at work.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: iris lily on May 23, 2014, 07:20:19 AM
My FU Money allows me to post my opinions to social networking sites that might get me fired.

hahahaha!

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: frompa on May 23, 2014, 07:42:45 AM
Wow.  These responses are incredible, as much for what they DON'T say as for what they do.  As a self-employed person for the last several decades, I have a more direct and controllable relationship to my work -- sure there are daily frustrations, but for the most part I can focus on what needs to be done, do it on a schedule that suits me, don't have a manager or HR to deal with, etc..  What I hear from my self-directed perch as I read everyone's stories is a powerful undercurrent of the fear and intimidation inherent in most corporate work places.  And haven't I seen it plenty with my own family and friends? It seems that for most of us work makes us dependent on whims and strategizing by invisible others who have no knowledge of or care for the real human lives they affect, with HR as the ever-willing henchmen (and -women.)  Dependency is too weak a word, slavery too strong a word, but it's somewhere in the middle there.   I find these responses moving.   
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Paul der Krake on May 23, 2014, 07:47:33 AM
Dependency is too weak a word, slavery too strong a word, but it's somewhere in the middle there.
Servitude?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: frompa on May 23, 2014, 07:51:43 AM
Yes, "servitude" with an "involuntary" in front of it.  That seems about right.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on May 23, 2014, 08:00:16 AM
Yes, "servitude" with an "involuntary" in front of it.  That seems about right.

Don't fool yourself.  It's voluntary.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Insanity on May 23, 2014, 08:06:52 AM
I've got two.  One is from a former co-worker and one is my own.  I don't know if I had FU Money, but I had a new position lined up already within the same company so i wasn't afraid to have something bad happen.

A co-woker was supporting an older web site the company had developed.  There were pager alerts that came out almost nightly, if not multiple times a night. He had already put requests in to have the alerts disabled since they could be handled at 8 AM (it was a repeated alert for the same issue) when he got in and before they needed to be addressed for business reasons.  He didn't need the pager going off all night.  The managers refused.  The bill came in and the Sr. VP was PISSED!  He came down and started berating my co-worker.  The response was epic.  The co-worker took his pager out and handed it to the Sr. VP and said: "You can take the pager and do the support then."   The Sr. VP backed down and said lets try to find another solution.

As for me.  Well, I was on web development team that required "occasional" off hours support.  In the good times, we had 6 people rotating so it was once very six weeks.  But the company decided to offshore the development work and are team dwindled down to 3 and then 1.  Yes, I was the tech lead by that point and I was the last one left.  For weeks at a time, I would get calls in the middle of the night 3-4 times a week.  I would have to be on site for nightly releases every couple of weeks.  My fiancé at the time was getting furious as was I.  She told me to turn the phone in, I told her I was just in it for a little longer.  The straw that broke the camels back was when I got calls 4 nights in a row for things the team should now be able to handle.  I walked into my manager's office and handed him the cell phone and said: "I'm here between 9-5 and will be happy to handle the transition as needed.  I am no longer accessible after those hours.".  His response was mouth agape.  He didn't take me to HR. He didn't do anything.  A week later I was starting my new position in the company, 5 months later I was called back in due to an issue on the site which is a whole different story.

DrDoom is right - most people leave companies because of management and co-workers, not the actual job.  I wanted to convert our sites to more updated technology, management didn't want to do that.  Even with the history of offshoring, I would have done that because it would have been a great learning experience.  Thanks to them, though, I am now doing application security work and much better off!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: tooqk4u22 on May 23, 2014, 08:30:49 AM
I have been offered jobs that make quite a bit more money but wasn't a fit - people would say I can't believe you are not taking it.  And I would respond "Making a change for $10, $20, or $30k is not worth it or that important to me"  People are always dumbfounded.

So FU money gives you the ability to leave but it also gives you the ability to stay.

Of course if I was in a shitty situation I would be all over it.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Winston on May 23, 2014, 08:37:35 AM
[Tale of Awesomeness]

I knew I liked you :)  I enjoy your blog, too.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: wild wendella on May 23, 2014, 08:49:30 AM
My husband used his FU money to walk away from a perfectly good job so be could move two hours away to live with me a month before our son was born and be a stay at home dad for a while.  OK, it wasn't actually designated as 'FU' money; he views it as his 'saving for a house' fund.  Regardless, having a $ cushion allows you the freedom to take risks you wouldn't ordinarily consider, because with the cushion they are no longer so risky.

Now almost two years later, he is still a stay-at-home dad and we haven't touched his stash.  :)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: brewer12345 on May 23, 2014, 09:25:50 AM
Not exactly an FU story, but...

I bailed in January right after the holidays.  There were aspects of the job that were very off-putting (travel), but the important parts of the job were interesting and generally worthwhile.  The problem was everything else.  Endless meetings and conference calls for absolutely no reason.  Reams of useless make-work that did nothing but help the officer class substantiate to their superiors that they had firm control over everything.  A work culture that was so Neolithic it was unbelievable.  A workforce that was equipped to travel all the time and execute independently in the field was not trusted to work from home (where 90+% of the job could be done) at all.  Just last year they finally changed the policy that said that if you did not make it to the office regardless of the weather (we have white out blizzards here) you would be charged a vacation day even if you worked from home.  This was all completely unnecessary, but there was no way to get them to change it.

My direct manager was easily the best I have ever worked for, but like me he was a prisoner of the system.  I took pains to give them 2 weeks' notice, make the transition as easy as I could, spent time schooling up someone who could fill in for me and left on cordial terms.  To this day I don't think they have any idea why I left.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Jon_Snow on May 23, 2014, 09:46:12 AM
If OMY Syndrome doesn't get the better of me, my "FU" later this year will likely be a pathetically polite and thankful one. I have had more than enough of this job (two near fatal close calls, and endless other indignities), but I do realize that the salary they have given me for the past 24 years has helped put me in a position to ER for good at 42.

So yeah, a most boring "FU" to my overseers is likely...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: biscuitwhomper on May 23, 2014, 11:01:03 AM
I like this thread, as it reminds me of the greatest, yet most unexpected benefit of retiring early.

I now get to choose with whom I associate.

With so much bad behavior out there, this is huge.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: ShortInSeattle on May 23, 2014, 11:21:58 AM
I think FU money is something that employers should encourage. Who would you want working with you, people who actually want to be there or people who feel like they have no choice? Don't companies always say they want engagement? I don't think engagement happens when people feel trapped.

Love the WalMart guy story. A great example of how financial stability/security preserves our dignity. When you are enslaved to paycheck-to-paycheck living, you may need to set your dignity aside if you want to eat that month.









Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Dr. Doom on May 23, 2014, 12:27:35 PM
... all the stuff

Dope.  Noisy pageouts+horribly structured on-call rotations have been an issue just about every place I've worked.  Pushing back is completely reasonable and necessary for sanity. 

I find it amazing that in every case, management is completely shocked when workers refuse to put up with obviously horrible working conditions.  That's how rarely people complain. 

All hail FU money.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: MoneyCat on May 23, 2014, 01:42:45 PM
We've only had FU money for a short time now, so I don't have any stories to tell yet.  I am working a job I enjoy right now and this thread has made me realize that I have the financial flexibility now to not have to work jobs I hate anymore.  In the old days, I worked some pretty dangerous jobs where I risked physical injury all the time.  Now, I can be choosy about what jobs I will take and that makes life so much better.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: seanc0x0 on May 23, 2014, 01:51:50 PM
I think FU money is something that employers should encourage. Who would you want working with you, people who actually want to be there or people who feel like they have no choice? Don't companies always say they want engagement? I don't think engagement happens when people feel trapped.

Love the WalMart guy story. A great example of how financial stability/security preserves our dignity. When you are enslaved to paycheck-to-paycheck living, you may need to set your dignity aside if you want to eat that month.

Oh man, engagement.  That word is a loaded one around here, I tells ya!  The HR dept is always sending crap around talking about creating an 'engaged workforce', then when it comes time to negotiate a new collective agreement, they fight tooth and nail to keep the wage increases below inflation. Sure makes us feel engaged!

That said, I did just realize I'm 25 days from hitting my 5 weeks of vacation per year, so it could be worse.  :)

Still working on the FU money. I barely have 2k in the FIRE fund (but at least it's positive!)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: rujancified on May 23, 2014, 03:01:02 PM
Love this thread. Don't have anything to add just yet, unfortunately.

My current work situation is generally easy, but utterly uninspiring and heavily bureaucratic. My boss is great and looks out for me, so I suppose that's why I stick around.

We're a few years away from FU money being stached up, but I look forward to plotting out a exit strategy.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Free at 55 on May 23, 2014, 03:07:36 PM
I used FU money in 2011 to take a sabbatical. I had just turned 51. I walked into my boss's office and said: I need to tell you something. I'm taking a year off". He said: "We don't allow that here". I said: "I'm not asking for you permission. I'm just doing it." He said: 'We can't guarantee that you can have your job back" I said: "I can't guarantee that I'll want my job back!". He asked: "How can you possibly afford to do this?" I said: "That's really a personal question, but I can tell you it involves savings and investments". Man, this dude was pissed. The president of the company called me to wish me the best and asked me to call him when I returned from my walkabout to discuss some opportunities. I ended up returning to a different department 15 months later. Higher pay. Promotion. I quit again 2 years later. They transferred me to another division. Higher pay. Another promotion.
Frugality pays.
I'm preparing for another world tour.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on May 23, 2014, 03:12:59 PM
I used FU money in 2011 to take a sabbatical. I had just turned 51. I walked into my boss's office and said: I need to tell you something. I'm taking a year off". He said: "We don't allow that here". I said: "I'm not asking for you permission. I'm just doing it." He said: 'We can't guarantee that you can have your job back" I said: "I can't guarantee that I'll want my job back!". He asked: "How can you possibly afford to do this?" I said: "That's really a personal question, but I can tell you it involves savings and investments". Man, this dude was pissed. The president of the company called me to wish me the best and asked me to call him when I returned from my walkabout to discuss some opportunities. I ended up returning to a different department 15 months later. Higher pay. Promotion. I quit again 2 years later. They transferred me to another division. Higher pay. Another promotion.
Frugality pays.
I'm preparing for another world tour.

Thank you for sharing, that is quite inspiring to someone young and starting out!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Storapa on May 23, 2014, 03:49:59 PM
Some great stories here.

I call my stash MBs (stands for Money Bananas).  It feels like I'm working at zoo sometimes. I'm just one of the chimps, chasing the others about, hanging about in my tyre etc. Once a month they chuck in some MBs.  I've been so close to telling them to stick the job.  I now know that it's my FU stash.  It feels great to have it sitting there ticking over. 

Keep the stories coming. 

PS... Storapa is Swedish for Big Monkey.......

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: C40 on May 23, 2014, 05:23:23 PM
Not a "fuck you" story, but I was able to stick up for myself and some of my coworkers in situation where most are too cautious to.

A co-worker [We'll call him SHITHEAD] that I (and many) have to work with a lot is not mentally stable. He lied very very frequently to try to make himself look good. He treated people like shit often. He'd blow up on people in big meetings with visitors from headquarters - he'd pick one person to try to focus on and blame and try to make them look bad. They'd defend themselves and their team in a reasonable way and he'd just keep going, red, furious, and yelling. He did this to me and my team a few times. I'd always stand up for us and he would blow up in ways unacceptable at our workplace.

Him and I both reported to our plant manager, who was fairly new. I didn't really like the new plant manager, but he wasn't so bad. Three on the management team - basically the three worst on the team - the HR manager, SHITHEAD, and one other guy kissed his ass a ton. They became golfing buddies. They'd golf together every weekend, talk about it at work, etc.. So I was in a situation where I knew that when I stuck up for myself and the others, I'd be in a room with SHITHEAD, his golfing buddy (our boss the plant manager), and his other golfing buddy (the HR manager, who was a miserable HR manager). I'd talked to my boss a number of times about it and I was very clear that it was absolutely not acceptable for this to continue, it but it wasn't getting any better. There were plenty of other people who saw what happened. There was one person, [JOHN] who  SHITHEAD did much worse to than me (harrassment really), but JOHN was scared to stick up for himself because he had a lower hierarchal position and was worried he'd get blamed, had a family to support, etc.  I'd beed documenting what SHITHEAD did, so I emailed it to the HR manager and my boss. My boss was new as a plant manager and he needed to look like he could handle issues with his staff. The next day he looked like shit and told me he didn't sleep the night before. I'm a good employee (which is known across the division), so firing or blaming me was not really an option. My boss knew I'd continue sticking up for myself and that I would escalate if the situation didn't improve quickly. After me, JOHN sent his documentation also. We had a formal meeting together which was pretty much your standard mediation and "be nice to eachother" stuff. A month later I got a promotion with a 15 or 20% raise and relocation (the relocation money ends up being a $10k bonus for me). I'm all but certain the timing was related to me sticking up for myself.

When I left, JOHN got promoted to my position. A few months later, SHITHEAD got a final written warning and has been behaving better now.

Having and using Fuck You money can end up making things work out better for (nearly) all involved.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Allison on May 23, 2014, 06:56:49 PM
After crying at work for the 6th time in 6 months, I got a nasty phone from my boss who was the 3rd to hold that position in 1 year.  He went into a meeting after the phone call and I sent him an email saying that this was obviously not working out.  Put my badge on my desk, apologized to my coworkers and walked out.  I heard later that he got out the meeting, saw my email and wondered if it was real.

Three days later I had a job offer in my dream city for a 25% raise.  FU money covered a month of moving and relocation fee before the new paychecks rolled.  Also allowed me to take a week long vacation 4 weeks after I started at the new job.  Best feeling ever to be able to handle all that without financial stress.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: brewer12345 on May 23, 2014, 06:59:35 PM
After crying at work for the 6th time in 6 months

Thanks for the reminder.  I used to end up in tears about twice a week before I quit.  Must have been silly seeing a grown man hop out of a truck at the train station lot with tears running down his face.  Not at all since I quit.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: B L I S S on May 23, 2014, 07:09:59 PM
Such an amazing thread.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: iwasjustwondering on May 23, 2014, 09:09:35 PM
I didn't have FU money, but I did have another job lined up.  I had an abusive sociopath of a boss.  She would call me up after conference calls, to discuss exactly what I did wrong each time (I either talked too much/interrupted, or didn't talk enough).  She criticized everything I did, and everything my coworkers did.  When I joined the company, two people pulled me aside to tell me how abusive Susan was, and to get out, get out, as quickly as I could.  Then I got severe pertussis, almost died (I coughed till I vomited every night, and cracked two ribs from coughing) and was out on disability for a month.  She posted my job on the company website during this time.

But because I did not have FU money, I had to stick with it.  Eventually I found another job and gave notice.  She started to berate me at the beginning of a conference call during my notice period, and I said, "Susan, you will speak to me in a respectful tone of voice, or you won't speak to me at all."  It was awesome.  When the client came on the line, she was so flustered she couldn't speak.

The sad thing is that the one person who managed to stay with her for more than five years became really warped.  He told me we all had to learn how to deal with her, and I said, no, actually, we don't.  Most of us wise up and leave.  He was so sad.  We called him No Affect because he spoke in this weird, scared monotone.  All the people who worked for her for more than two years started to develop this monotone, because it's what she wanted.  We weren't allowed to use the pronoun "I" with the client.  It was "we."  We weren't supposed to be actual human beings, just faceless agency reps.  No Affect ended up getting fired by her a year or so later.  There was no winning with her, and for some reason he couldn't understand that.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: vern on May 23, 2014, 11:26:57 PM
I learned many years ago that you have two choices in this life...you can be management or you can be happy.  Pick one.

A while back my two immediate supervisors called me into their office and said...

"If you don't accept this management position you're never getting promoted again."

My response...

"Cool."

You should have seen their faces!  They couldn't believe that someone would pass up a pay raise just to avoid a bunch of added headaches and stress.  (They ended up promoting a younger person, who of course complained about all of the extra work he had to put in.)

It never ceases to amaze me the amount of hoops people will jump through or the contortions they will go into in order to make a few extra grand a year. 

Having enough money banked made that call a no-brainer!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mmmellen on May 24, 2014, 05:57:00 AM
Working for someone who is toxic is extremely detrimental, not only to your psych, but also to your health. 

I was an ESL teacher and speak Spanish, also, which meant I did a lot of interpreting in meetings, even when it was not my student being discussed.  I had been moved around to different schools in the system as they moved our minority population around to "balance" the schools racially (not a good move in this system as the schools in the poorer areas were often better performing than the mostly "white" schools. 

Despite the fact that I have decades of experience teaching English to immigrant students successfully, this principal decided I did not know how to teach the children and was forbidden to teach them reading and instead to teach them vocabulary.  The problem is that children learn most of their vocabulary through reading at a certain point as everyday language with children is pretty limited (this is why we read to our children from the time they are babies, to expand their vocabulary and comprehension).

Now, I have a brain injury and could only work three days a week, which really was a huge push for me since I could not function at home, but could not leave financially (did not have FU money as I had used my savings during time off for cancer treatment).

To make a long story short, my principal wrote me up on an observation that was full of lies, which I proved to her during a meeting with others present (including my union rep).  I was told I was not allowed to send my own books home with the students, nor was I to help them learn to read or write (this is what ELL teachers do).  Eventually the stress became so great that I began having seizures on my way home from work one Friday and am now unable to work as this has further injured my brain.

My FU in this is that, since then, the school has gone through many other ESL teachers who have left because the stress was "way too high" and now, I'm sure she is recognizing (although not admitting) that I did know what I was doing.

I have no doubt that if my doctors had not told me I could no longer work, my children would not have a mother now.  The sad part is that I loved teaching.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: johnintaiwan on May 24, 2014, 06:01:07 AM
I've got two. The first happened a few months ago and isnt all that exciting, but the second happened in high school and was pretty great.

A few months ago the other foreign teacher at my school moved away and they hired a new one. I was not very happy about the new hire because he was from Iran and not a native English speaker, but this didn't stop them from telling the parents that even though his English was worse than the local teachers. I got over that since they didnt really have any other choice. But then they wanted me to start giving up some of my hours to him since he had to travel from far away and didnt want to make the trip for just two classes. I told my boss i wasnt happy about this, but there was nothing I could do. So I walked across the street to a rival school during my break, did a demo and got a job offer with a rasie. After the break told them I wouldnt be back after the 2 week Chinese New Year vacation that started the next day. They still call me offering more money if I come back and numerous students have left to find me for private classes or to come to my new school.

Sophomore year in HS I got a job at a gas station (cant pump your own in Oregon) just for spending money and investing. I didnt need the job but wanted to get some money and stay out of trouble. I was only a sophomore but had already completed more school than any of the "adults" there. For about 2 months I would get calls at 6 am on Saturday and Sunday asking if I could come in because someone got arrested or was too drunk/high to work and I was the only one who could do it. I would have to pump the gas and run the car wash by myself until 12 while the owner worked the till. He would always yell at me to wash the windows of every car that came in no matter how busy we were.

One Saturday I got the call and showed up at 6:05 (I lived pretty close). at around 6:30 There were two cars getting filled up and buying a car wash. another was being filled and i was washing the windshield. Boss came out and told me to wash the windshield of every car. I told him, with squigee in hand that I was. He asked about the other two cars and I told him they were getting a car wash. He told me I needed an attitude adjustment. I told him to go fuck himself and that he needed to wash the windows, I quit and just left. He was dumbfounded. He had to shut down the station until the next worker showed up at 12.

Three months latter he lost the station and was working the pumps just like one of us lowly workers and for the same pay (he had taken out a loan from the previous owner and was unable to pay it back. The previous owner took control again). I came in to get some gas and he made a sarcastic comment about my shirt. I told all the other workers in spanish (most of them were from Guatemala) that at least I didnt run my company into the ground. They all started laughing their asses off and he had no idea why.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DoubleDown on May 24, 2014, 10:04:35 AM
Not a "fuck you" story, but I was able to stick up for myself and some of my coworkers in situation where most are too cautious to.

A co-worker [We'll call him SHITHEAD] that I (and many) have to work with a lot is not mentally stable. He lied very very frequently to try to make himself look good. He treated people like shit often. He'd blow up on people in big meetings with visitors from headquarters - he'd pick one person to try to focus on and blame and try to make them look bad. They'd defend themselves and their team in a reasonable way and he'd just keep going, red, furious, and yelling. He did this to me and my team a few times. I'd always stand up for us and he would blow up in ways unacceptable at our workplace.

Him and I both reported to our plant manager, who was fairly new. I didn't really like the new plant manager, but he wasn't so bad. Three on the management team - basically the three worst on the team - the HR manager, SHITHEAD, and one other guy kissed his ass a ton. They became golfing buddies. They'd golf together every weekend, talk about it at work, etc.. So I was in a situation where I knew that when I stuck up for myself and the others, I'd be in a room with SHITHEAD, his golfing buddy (our boss the plant manager), and his other golfing buddy (the HR manager, who was a miserable HR manager). I'd talked to my boss a number of times about it and I was very clear that it was absolutely not acceptable for this to continue, it but it wasn't getting any better. There were plenty of other people who saw what happened. There was one person, [JOHN] who  SHITHEAD did much worse to than me (harrassment really), but JOHN was scared to stick up for himself because he had a lower hierarchal position and was worried he'd get blamed, had a family to support, etc.  I'd beed documenting what SHITHEAD did, so I emailed it to the HR manager and my boss. My boss was new as a plant manager and he needed to look like he could handle issues with his staff. The next day he looked like shit and told me he didn't sleep the night before. I'm a good employee (which is known across the division), so firing or blaming me was not really an option. My boss knew I'd continue sticking up for myself and that I would escalate if the situation didn't improve quickly. After me, JOHN sent his documentation also. We had a formal meeting together which was pretty much your standard mediation and "be nice to eachother" stuff. A month later I got a promotion with a 15 or 20% raise and relocation (the relocation money ends up being a $10k bonus for me). I'm all but certain the timing was related to me sticking up for myself.

When I left, JOHN got promoted to my position. A few months later, SHITHEAD got a final written warning and has been behaving better now.

Having and using Fuck You money can end up making things work out better for (nearly) all involved.

I enjoyed your story, especially referring to SHITHEAD in all caps throughout!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DoubleDown on May 24, 2014, 10:16:43 AM
I learned many years ago that you have two choices in this life...you can be management or you can be happy.  Pick one.

Amen. I eventually also started turning down all the "career advancing" star management jobs that were offered to me, and it was a great call. "You mean I can work an extra 10-20 hours a week, with tons of added stress and responsibility and politics and ass-kissing for an extra $10-20k/year? Woohoo, sign me up!!"

And on an unrelated note, so many assholes in this thread! Brings back many fond memories of the innumerable assholes in my career. But lots of great coworkers and managers too to balance them out.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: zataks on May 24, 2014, 10:29:53 AM
I don't have a good story for this nor do I yet have FU money as I'm destroying debt and increasing EF and the stache.  But I've worked hard and taken work seriously in my career and had good and bad bosses.  Only had 3 employers in my career and both of those two times submitting my resignation with notice was very sweet.  The latest resignation, I was still expected to work for my final week but my access to all buildings via keycard, my keys, and my login credentials were taken away and disabled.  I used sick time to get paid for that week and just showed up to submit to a tool inventory before leaving.

mmmellen that's a rough story to hear.  I'm beginning to understand the effects of stress on the body.  While my issues are not as severe as yours were, I am currently under excessive stress and very difficult working conditions that provide little time off and very little sleep and I am beginning to see my health suffer.  The hours are stepping down towards 40 over the next couple weeks and I have two different vacations coming up between now and the middle of July.  Although I don't have the FU money, I would like to tell my boss that I can't do these hours much longer--and hopefully explain that it's not the work that's bothersome but that my health is suffering for it.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wile E. Coyote on May 24, 2014, 10:37:25 AM
Not really an FU story, but back in 2003 I was working at a firm making very good money, but wasn't happy.  I got a call from my friend, and she made me realize how much my job was adversely affecting the rest of my life.  I hung up the phone and called the partner that I work for (she wasn't in the office that day).  She wasn't the problem, it was the firm leadership.  I told her that I was giving my notice and wanted to let her know.  Her response was "I know I'm supposed to try to convince you to stay, but I'm not the right person to do that because I am leaving as well."  We just laughed.  I didn't have another job lined up and it was terrifying walking away from the security of the job, but it was one of the best decisions that I ever made.  I am so much happier today as a result.  I ended up working for her again a few years later at another firm and it was great.  We're still friends to this day because she actually cared more about her team than herself (not common in my field).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: imustachemystash on May 24, 2014, 12:12:46 PM
I learned many years ago that you have two choices in this life...you can be management or you can be happy.  Pick one.

A while back my two immediate supervisors called me into their office and said...

"If you don't accept this management position you're never getting promoted again."

My response...

"Cool."

You should have seen their faces!  They couldn't believe that someone would pass up a pay raise just to avoid a bunch of added headaches and stress.  (They ended up promoting a younger person, who of course complained about all of the extra work he had to put in.)

It never ceases to amaze me the amount of hoops people will jump through or the contortions they will go into in order to make a few extra grand a year. 

Having enough money banked made that call a no-brainer!

Very well put.  My husband is a software developer and he is so much happier just coding instead of having to manage a team of people.  Living the mustachian lifestyle lets him be satisfied what he earns and takes away the pressure of having to earn more more more!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Albert on May 24, 2014, 01:07:26 PM
I don't have any horrible stories as I'm still on my first (possibly only) job after finishing grad school. I think I've been blessed with good bosses and rather relaxed work atmosphere. The second one has been better than the first one, but the first one wasn't particularly bad either. Just not really talented at dealing with people...

I have had, however, once incident from the perspective of a manager (I'm leading a small 2-3 people team). One day a member of my team, a women in her mid 20-ties, comes into my office crying and tells me that she can't work with that other guy in the lab (in his 50-ties, not reporting to me). Apparently he calls her and another female lab mate names, belittles and criticises them constantly. It was a mess, I had to involve my boss and HR to sort it all out. It was a learning experience for me, because I should have noticed something is not right but I didn't… Eventually the guy was given a formal notice and my co-worker was moved elsewhere. I later found out that the perpetrator had a long history of being unable to get along with women, particularly young women.

Also I don't agree with all managerial work being unpleasant. I enjoy very much directing my team, and as far as I know I'm popular with my employees. I manage to make them do a lot of work without being mean or intruding into their private lives. :)

By the way if I handed in my resignation here, I would have to work another 3 months (or they would have to pay me for it). It's very difficult to fire people here unless there is a major reorganisation directed from the very top.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Jon_Snow on May 24, 2014, 01:12:59 PM
This really is the best thread I've read in a long time.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DoubleDown on May 24, 2014, 02:09:21 PM
Also I don't agree with all managerial work being unpleasant. I enjoy very much directing my team, and as far as I know I'm popular with my employees. I manage to make them do a lot of work without being mean or intruding into their private lives. :)

Agreed, but I think in many (most?) large organizations the "Peter Principle" is in effect. That is, talented employees and managers keep getting promoted until they eventually reach their level of incompetence. Then you're left with some crappy managers. So watch out, if you are good at leading your small team, you just may gain notice and be tapped by your managers to lead an even larger team, or to be the boss of the small team leaders!

I know where I worked (a very, very large organization), we were constantly encouraged to keep striving for more and more responsibility, to keep taking on bigger challenges and larger roles in the organization. It was the #1 promotion criteria. If you were good at your job, you were expected to use that talent on bigger efforts and to lead others. It makes sense, but it also leads people into some positions they just do not want. And of course it feeds the lifestyle inflation treadmill, because the bigger jobs come with bigger pay. It was very difficult for people who were good at their jobs, and just wanted to remain that way, to stay put. And we had plenty of terrible managers who had been promoted until they were in over their heads.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: 5inatrailer on May 24, 2014, 02:41:37 PM
LOVE this thread. Put your money where your mouth is:)

I started my career as a paramedic in a big metro city.  I remember being 23 at 3 am in some hospital eating my supper 8 hrs into a shift thinking "what choices have I made that got me to this shitty point?"

In my chosen field as a firefighter promotions are all done via seniority.  I have moved twice after 7 years.  I now have total bliss at my new job (3 years in I still say I love my job every single day)  I know I'm rambling but coming off night shift brain here.

When I left my first job at 25 I was having trouble with this over controlling ahole of a boss.  His dad had started the ambulance company before the city took it over.  Somehow, he had managed to become a supervisor.  My last day there I ended up our conversation with "My wife doesn't talk to me like that and I love her.  I don't even like you".

My second job as a FF-Paramedic was great for 2 years then started to unravel.  Unrealistic quotas, intolerable work loads, lack of support for PTSD made it really tough.  My platoon of 24 were very tight because of this- like going into battle every single day. It took me 6 months to decide to quit and when I did I cried for 3 hours at my front door (mostly because the boys took me out to get smashed one last time:) 

I left at a time when the company was hiring 25% more workforce.  I loved walking into the Chief's office and handing him my goodbye letter.  I told him it was easy to have successful beginnings somewhere, it was difficult having successful endings.  I told him that my time was up, and for me, this was a successful ending working for them.  I was the first one to leave there and it left them flustered.  They were trying to hire 40 guys and I was leaving after 7 years? Nobody does this.  Well, 5 years later, 15 year vets are quitting every month due to the terrible workload and emotional support.  I like to think I was the ground breaker!

Now at my new job, people can't fathom why I have 15 years into the pension, and left my seniority so I will never make officer.  I tell them that there are other ways to lead people other than by rank.  Setting a good example, and having authority without domination are traits you don't get promoted into. They are traits you develop personally. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Latwell on May 24, 2014, 04:00:58 PM
One of my first jobs, I was a hostess. I was terrible at it b/c it wasn't until my next job that I would learn to not be socially awkward. I also hated all my coworkers and my bosses and waking up at the crack of dawn. I remember working on thanksgiving and crying in the bathroom because everyone else that was suppose to come in had called out and my manager told me I couldn't leave and I had to call my boyfriend at the time to tell him and his family not to wait on me any longer, for them to go ahead and eat. This was one of those times where I realized people only care about themselves.

So after only a couple months and shortly after thanksgiving, I was at my job thinking about how much I didn't want to be there so I randomly walked up to the manager that day told them I didn't want to work anymore. They were confused and thought I just wanted to leave early that day. I clarified that I didn't want to work at all or ever and that I'm leaving now and don't expect me to be coming back.

It was that job that made me realize I had to try my best to apply get a job that I WANT and not just a job that was willing to hire me.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: sobezen on May 24, 2014, 06:17:28 PM
These are some really eye opening stories!  Thank you one and all for taking the time to share in such vivid details some of your most challenging life adventures. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Financial Threedom on May 24, 2014, 08:42:02 PM
This is not about me having FU money, but an FU job offer, and the timing was nearly perfect.  I was working for this place, lets call it a financial sweatshop, for a few years.  Each year when it was time to talk annual raise, they always had some excuse for giving me a crappy raise: the economy was bad, head office cut the budget, new employee scorecard etc.  So in this particular year, I finally got my annual raise notification letter, and it was brutal, just over 1%, I was offended to even be offered such a figure.  I was super steamed.  I wanted to walk out on the spot.  I had been looking for another job for over a year at that point, I was so ready to go.  Then just a few days after getting this letter I received a job offer, which would be about a 30% raise if I took it.  It also worked out that my manager was meeting with each of us that very same day I received the offer.  So I met with my manager, and let him know right off the bat I've received a job offer from another company.  We talk about it for a bit and he asks about money.  Is there an offer he could take to his boss to see what could be done?  Really??  NOW you want to talk money?  Suddenly now I might be able to get a real raise?   I told him not to bother, because I was 100% taking this job offer no matter what they could suddenly offer me.  It was amazing. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Reepekg on May 24, 2014, 11:36:17 PM
A couple of years ago, I had about 4 years of living expenses saved. I was the only US-based employee of a small European start-up company, and the client I was a resident engineer at was going through a nasty downturn because of very poor decision-making by upper management. The problems were actually something my technology could have fixed. Nevertheless, I wasn't surprised when they decided they couldn't afford the project I was on and had to let me go. To give you an idea of the kind of decisions this client made and how they treated their employees, they let me go by blocking my login credentials one Monday morning without a word.

A few weeks later, I get an invitation to lunch with a manager I had reported to at this company in the past. He was a nice enough guy, but he was moving departments in the reorganization and clearly thought he might be able to capitalize on the fact that I must have been hard up for work. He asked me to join the client company in his new group.

Me - "With the state the company is in, the offer would have to be pretty big to convince me to come on board."
Him - "Well, I'm sure we can work something out. What were you thinking?"
Me - A number that was about a 150% raise

His face was priceless. It was more than the VP of Engineering made. He said something along the lines of "I guess there is nothing to discuss then." He got a new job about 2 months later.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Can't Wait on May 25, 2014, 10:05:37 PM
I have an FU story that did NOT work out too well for me.

I had this job in my early 20's as a sales territory rep which basically required me to drive around to a set of stores within a specific geographical area and provide training and motivation to the stores. Of course my performance was based on the performance of the stores I represented. I had to be on call 24/7 to answer any questions these store might have had. On top of that, I had this dick-hole of a boss that would call me all day almost every hour to see where I had been, who I had talked to, and how I was going to get my stores to perform better. This dick-hole also liked to critique everything about me including what kind of tie I wore on any particular day to the scuff marks on my shoes. He would threaten to "put me on the street" (fire me) almost every day if didn't get my stores to perform better. I don't know what came over me one day, but on one of his calls I just blurted out "fuck off man" and hung up on him. He fired me.

I had no money in my savings, no other job lined up, and I had a car payment and rent to make. It took me over 6 months to find a new job and I ended up using credit cards to get by. I accumulated quite a bit of debt doing this and my new job didn't pay nearly what my old job did so I had trouble keeping up with the credit card payments and my credit took a dive. I was finally able to secure a federal govt job that would have made life great but I ended up getting my offer rescinded because I couldn't get the security clearance needed.. because of my poor credit..

It took some time, but I eventually made it to the federal govt and I recovered but man, I sure did pay for those two seconds of bliss when I told the dick-hole to fuck off.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: 5inatrailer on May 26, 2014, 08:47:55 AM
It's clear that everybody leaves sooner or later.  They won't make a statue of you when you leave so best start working on your exit strategy right away.
Either through retirement or other opportunities.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gracie on May 27, 2014, 07:14:42 AM
One of the things I'm now fond of saying is that people usually don't leave their jobs.  They leave their managers.

So true. My husband is thinking of taking the FU option soon, though I think he plans to make them fire him. He actually is the manager. He was brought in to fix all the problems caused by the previous manager. Turns out HR also screwed up some pay scales and are fighting him about giving the proper increases to affected employees. They are actually trying to change everyone's job description so they don't have to give the correct pay.

It comes out to less than $5000. It is chump change to the company, but would make a huge difference to the employees. Worse, the employees all know the pay is wrong.

This is just one in a string of similar problems recently. I swear, they found all the managers from "Office Space" and hired them.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Zaga on May 27, 2014, 08:13:32 AM
These stories are just great, love reading them!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Rydenio on May 27, 2014, 08:47:56 AM
For me, "FU money" being just enough savings to get by for about a year, it's been more about having that security in the back of my mind when negotiating pay. He can see in my eyes that I won't take any offer just to stay on the job.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: workathomedad on May 27, 2014, 08:52:05 AM
One of the things I'm now fond of saying is that people usually don't leave their jobs.  They leave their managers.

So true. My husband is thinking of taking the FU option soon, though I think he plans to make them fire him. He actually is the manager. He was brought in to fix all the problems caused by the previous manager. Turns out HR also screwed up some pay scales and are fighting him about giving the proper increases to affected employees. They are actually trying to change everyone's job description so they don't have to give the correct pay.

It comes out to less than $5000. It is chump change to the company, but would make a huge difference to the employees. Worse, the employees all know the pay is wrong.

This is just one in a string of similar problems recently. I swear, they found all the managers from "Office Space" and hired them.

If the employees *know* they're purposefully being screwed by an incompetent/uncaring management, it will cost the company a lot more than $5,000/employee in the long-run. Think pretend-working, theft, low-quality, etc. The company will be destroying themselves from the inside out.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DoubleDown on May 27, 2014, 10:18:36 AM
It's amazing how easily a crappy manager (or even coworker) suddenly added into the mix can ruin what was otherwise a pretty blissful job for others. As a (former) manager myself, I was amazed how often managers would appear that apparently didn't even bother to show up for Day 1 of "Management 101" since they'd go about violating all kinds of tried and true management theory right off the bat. Hell, some of them obviously never even  showed up for "Human Decency 101."

Like, did no one ever tell them to wait at least 90 days after you show up on the job before you start introducing a bunch of changes into the workplace? Or that publicly embarrassing workers in front of their colleagues as the first go-to method is probably not the best way to get results? Or that understanding the subject matter of what you are managing can be useful and even bring some credibility?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Vitai Slade on May 27, 2014, 12:02:39 PM
This is a great thread! I have a story of my own to add as well. Not quite as badass as the others, but I felt like a champ when I did it.

Back when I was a teenager, I was working as a pizza delivery driver for Papa Johns. I always worked night shift and weekends so I never really got to hang out with friends. One particular Saturday, I worked out a way to get the opening mid-day shift so I could get that night off. I worked my shift, and when it was about time for me to go home, my manager kept telling me to just go on one more delivery, one more, one more. Finally I got fed up with it. I wanted to go hang out with friends, something I NEVER got to do. I told him, 'Look, either you are going to cash out my bank and I am going to leave, or I'm going to leave.' He cashed me out and the next day when I came in for my next shift he told me I was fired. A few days later, I got a call from HR stating that my manager did not have the authority to make me work longer than my scheduled hours and they hired me back at a different location.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: KS on May 27, 2014, 12:17:38 PM
It's amazing how easily a crappy manager (or even coworker) suddenly added into the mix can ruin what was otherwise a pretty blissful job for others.

+1! Several jobs ago, I was very happy, happy enough that when my husband got a job 300ish miles away we chose to live long distance for almost a year until he found something else up here, so I could keep my job I loved. Couple years later, enter new manager, who didn't understand at least 2 out of 3 of your described management theory mistakes (at least he didn't go in for public humiliation thankfully). Within 6-8 months over 30% of our (fairly small) branch of the company had quit, most of whom had been there a while, were awesome at what they did, and had no plans to leave otherwise. That branch has since been shut down and all activities transferred elsewhere. We still sometimes wonder if it was all part of a master shutdown plan and Bad Manager was brought in to intentionally drive out some of the old-timers and reduce the severance payments... Hard to believe anyone could so effectively fake being that bad at their job though, and he legitimately seemed bewildered every time someone else quit.

This thread has turned out to be awesome, some of you have some genuinely epic tales!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: RyanAtTanagra on May 27, 2014, 12:27:16 PM
About 8-9 years ago I was working a pretty miserable job with a crappy boss.  I was in debt (car loan, 2 maxed CCs, 2 student loans) and living paycheck to paycheck.  I wasn't making a lot of money, but more than I felt I could make somewhere else, so I was trapped.  Then a couple things clicked (meeting my frugal girlfriend was the main catalyst).  Over the course of a year I paid off all debts except one of the student loans and started saving 50% of my net.  I only had a couple months savings, but realizing I could get a job making half what I was currently suddenly put me into FU territory.  I made a list of demands for my boss, none of which were met, which is what I expected (he was the kind of guy that viewed everyone as an easily replaceable cog).  So I told him I was starting to job search, knowing what would happen.  Next day I'm handed a layoff notice (due to 'internal restructuring').  I knew 1) he would never let someone stay that was looking around, and 2) that he would have to lay me off (I'd been a flawless employee for 5 years, it would take too much time to build up a fireable case).  This made me qualify for unemployment, which at the time paid 50% of your previous 12 months wages.  Since that's what I'd been living on for a year, it had zero effect on my budget.  5 highly enjoyable and stress-free months later I landed one of the best jobs I've ever had, making 30% more than I was previously.

Not epic 'take this job and shove it', but if I hadn't had the financial stability and confidence, I might still be there.  FU money doesn't always have to be about your bank balance, either.  If you're living on half your paycheck, that opens a lot of doors that people don't usually have.  Most people can't afford to take a pay cut, which keeps them as trapped as debt or lack of savings does.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: BFGirl on May 27, 2014, 12:59:09 PM
Not an epic story, but one that demonstrates the freedom that comes with not having to worry about your job.  My mother's boss retired and she got a new boss who was horrible.  She would work through lunch (had to because of timings in lab experiments she was running) and then her boss would refuse to let her take comp time.  He basically terrorized her over her time for a while.  In the meantime, from savings that she and my dad had, she was able to buy credit towards retirement from another state she had worked in when she was younger.  Once she bought that time, she was eligible to retire.  She got a great deal of satisfaction from telling her boss she was retiring when he thought he had her over a barrel.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: totoro on May 27, 2014, 01:02:37 PM
I have one.

I was working in a mid-size law firm owned by one lawyer (no partners) as a fairly new grad. 

The firm was a microcosm of life and some new lawyers were favourites and others were not.  It was something the junior lawyers spent a lot of time complaining about.  Particularly because of the lack of job security and the idea that if you were not a favourite you could be out at the end of the next big case.

Some lawyers were marked as superstars and rain makers by the owner, and others as workers.  The rain makers got a lot of facilitated client contact, perks, and approval, and recognition for bringing in business.  It was much easier for them to meet billable hours because they travelled to clients, met with them, travelled back and billed for all the hours.  The workers, well, they got to do the legal work for the rain makers, and lots of it.

I was marked as a worker bee.  I didn't mind the work, but I did not want to be put in an office for life doing what I was doing and there seemed to be no easy way to change it due to favortism. 

I decided I had to come up with a solution. I figured out a plan that I believed would increase revenues significantly and save our clients money at the same time.  I thought if I went to the owner it would be a sure-fire win:win:win.  I would be able to implement the plan and get out of the office more to see what our client needs were on the ground, the client would save money, and the firm revenues would increase.

So, I worked on my proposal and scheduled time with the owner, which was a bit intimidating as he and I did not have a lot of prior contact, and then made my pitch.  I thought I had done well, but he flat-out said no, things were fine as they were.  No real reason given.  I left his office thinking that maybe there was something wrong with my proposal.  A reason it would not work.  I couldn't find it.  And then I started to get mad.

I went home, I slept on it, I went back in the morning and gave my notice.  I was offered a significant raise to stay.  I turned it down.  I was still pretty mad.   

It was a bit nerve-wracking to quit, but during the notice period I set up my own practice.  We had some savings and my business plan seemed to indicate that it would work out better than being an employee. I also had young children I want to spend time with.  It was a gamble, but, well, I just did not feel I could keep working for someone who was not interested in positive change.

The day I left two major clients also chose to come with me, and are still with me today.  I immediately made more money working pt than my former ft salary because I had no staff or other overhead to pay for.

And that plan I presented, turned out there was absolutely nothing wrong with it.  It continues to work for me today.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wolf_Stache on May 27, 2014, 01:59:12 PM
Totally forgot about this story until something today reminded me of it:

At the time I was working as a Temp through Robert Half. For the last 6 months I'd been working at an unnamed financial services office helping them convert their AP system program. I reported directly to the CFO, and due to what happened during the 6 months I was there, I'm 99% certain the CFO was suffering from early onset dementia.

For example, she would give me assignments, then act confused when I gave her the completed report claiming 'I never asked for this.' Another time she sketched out on her white board how she wanted a particular part of the system to work. Luckily that was still up the board later that week, because when I demonstrated it to her she freaked out and screamed at me about how stupid I was. Until I pointed up to the board, pointed to how it was working, and asked her what I did wrong. She stared at the board for about 10 min, then quietly muttered to herself and dismissed me from her office.

I quickly found out I had to get EVERYTHING in writing from her after that.

Anyway, the CFO called me one Monday morning, before the contract was supposed to end, to tell me they didn't need me any longer. I cheerfully said, ok bye! I had three months savings, plus the way my contract was worded I got unemployement.

I jumped on the net, had two interviews lined up for the next day. By Thursday I had a permanent full time offer with a 25% raise over Robert Half. That Friday, Robert Half called me and said the CFO had begged them to have me come back. When I told them, sorry, already have another position starting at $xx,xxx, the silence on the other end of the phone was deafening.

Robert Half still calls me trying to get me to come back. Got a call from them this morning -  which is what reminded me of this story.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: bagap on May 27, 2014, 04:12:13 PM
Best.Thread.Topic.Ever.

I joined the community after being a lurker for some time just to respond. On FOUR different occasions the hubby and I have had the opportunity to say FU to our employers...I'll keep it sorta brief ;)

Years ago, with two toddlers and both of us working full time, hubby's insurance job was relocating him across the country for 6 months from October to March and there was no negotiating the move...every big event in our family happens during that time, all our bdays, anniversary, and of course the holidays.  Yeah, that was a fun FU moment!  He quit and was a stay at home dad for some time and finished up some classes.  He now makes a ton more money as an engineer than he ever made in insurance.

For me, 3 separate FU stories.  First one, I had worked for a large government organization for over 14 years.  Then they hired some horrendous upper management and made completely insane hiring and reorganization decisions.  I put up with it for a year and then said FU!  They tried to keep me as I had excellent evals and was well respected...sorry, no can do! FU!

Second time for me, I worked a job where the commute was 2.5 hours (stupid, I know).  The manager and the work was okay, but the co-workers were certifiable.  A HUGE amount of backstabbing, gossip, inappropriate jokes...put up with it for a year when I decided FU!

Last one happened two months ago.  After almost three years in a mid-size nonprofit which was incompetently run, reeking of favoritism, had PROFOUNDLY inept bosses, and intense micromanagement (yes, folks were actually written up for being 5 minutes late in the mornings or after a break and were regularly fired with no notice or progressive discipline measures being taken)...I delivered the 3rd FU of my career by quitting!

The reason why my husband and I have been able to pretty much walk away from good paying jobs when they become unbearable??? No credit card debt, a paid off home, living within our means, driving economical cars, and saving at least 1/3 to 1/2 of our earnings consistently.

Freedom to CHOOSE to work, is priceless.  The ability to say FU to a shitty workplace/boss/co-workers is ...well, whatever is more priceless than priceless ;)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on May 27, 2014, 04:39:18 PM
Best.Thread.Topic.Ever.

I am trying to be humble after this... but I agree. I finally started a thread that arebelspy responded to!

That being said, awesome story thank you for sharing!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: William on May 27, 2014, 05:22:30 PM
Thanks guys for sharing these stories!  Here I thought this thread would be boring..
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gracie on May 27, 2014, 06:15:51 PM
One of the things I'm now fond of saying is that people usually don't leave their jobs.  They leave their managers.

So true. My husband is thinking of taking the FU option soon, though I think he plans to make them fire him. He actually is the manager. He was brought in to fix all the problems caused by the previous manager. Turns out HR also screwed up some pay scales and are fighting him about giving the proper increases to affected employees. They are actually trying to change everyone's job description so they don't have to give the correct pay.

It comes out to less than $5000. It is chump change to the company, but would make a huge difference to the employees. Worse, the employees all know the pay is wrong.

This is just one in a string of similar problems recently. I swear, they found all the managers from "Office Space" and hired them.

If the employees *know* they're purposefully being screwed by an incompetent/uncaring management, it will cost the company a lot more than $5,000/employee in the long-run. Think pretend-working, theft, low-quality, etc. The company will be destroying themselves from the inside out.

And the employees in question are Out-standing employees. My Husband is terribly angry about it. Luckily, he is good at hiding the anger. He is persist. He will insist on the raises until they are received or he is fired.

The amazing thing is you don't need a ton of money to FU. We can live on about 1/4th of what we make now. Or half of my income. :D
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: BlueHouse on May 27, 2014, 06:36:57 PM
Never thought about it as a FU story, more of an "always be prepared" story. 
Years ago, the company I worked for was acquired by another and I was asked to move to another city to train employees there about our products.  I took a big bump in pay and got a one year contract.  I knew it was a knowledge transfer situation and that after one year I'd be shown the door, so I was careful to save up and prepare for it. 
Well, at the one year mark, the company was not doing well and everyone was in danger of losing our jobs, but I was the only one prepared for it.  The company hired a "hatchet man" to travel around the country and lay people off.  It was awful.  He was absolutely not qualified to judge who should go and who should stay, but for some reason, the company wanted to give the illusion that this guy was making decisions - and maybe he was but it was very sad to watch what was happening. 
For some reason, when it was time for my branch to get the axe, there were delays after delays.  I had made plans to visit my new boyfriend on his super-awesome ranch, and I was starting to panic that they may not shit-can me in time for my trip.  I finally called the hatchet-man and told him I knew what was happening and wanted to know if we could discuss it over the phone that day?  He fumbled his words and sounded completely surprised but finally hemmed and hawed and said "I wanted to do this in person...."  I cut him off and said "Just mail the package".   (My severance).  It felt so good to get it over with.  I had enough saved up to last a few months, and to move me back to my previous location.   I ended up with few months severance in a lump sum, which meant I qualified for unemployment immediately, so I was able to enjoy a couple months of down-time before I hit the pavement again.  Best vacation ever. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on May 27, 2014, 07:07:57 PM
No epic FU money story here. Just had enough to quit work when I was 42 to support myself for what I thought would be a 5 year work break to do other stuff (play sports, travel...). I quit assumed I'd go back to work and would retire at a more traditional age. But knowing I had a government pension at 50, a paid off house I could sell and downsize, and no debt, kids or hubby either meant I could make the work break turn into early retirement.  Didn't walk off mad or anything, was just ....done....and wanted to do other things before I was too old.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: frugally on May 27, 2014, 07:19:15 PM
The day I left two major clients also chose to come with me, and are still with me today.  I immediately made more money working pt than my former ft salary because I had no staff or other overhead to pay for.

And that plan I presented, turned out there was absolutely nothing wrong with it.  It continues to work for me today.

The beautiful part of this one, totoro, is that you not only FU'd it, but then took a risk on investing in yourself.  Very cool.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on May 27, 2014, 07:49:41 PM
No epic FU money story here. Just had enough to quit work when I was 42 to support myself for what I thought would be a 5 year work break to do other stuff (play sports, travel...). I quit assumed I'd go back to work and would retire at a more traditional age. But knowing I had a government pension at 50, a paid off house I could sell and downsize, and no debt, kids or hubby either meant I could make the work break turn into early retirement.  Didn't walk off mad or anything, was just ....done....and wanted to do other things before I was too old.

Interesting...at what point did you decide the sabbatical turned into early retirement? Have you worked part time or anything in the meantime to plug any leaks in your plan? I wonder if I get downsized a year earlier than I expected, if I could parlay it into early or at least semi-retirement. It would be nice to hear your experience with this.

I am once-again dreading that my downsizing may happen this year instead of next as I had planned. I am still waiting to sell a house - or else I wouldn't be as worried. But my philosophy in life is that things happen when they should happen. So if I am downsized now I am sure I will figure out a way to get along. I am pretty sure I am FI for my basic needs, so it would just be a matter of figuring out the "luxuries" (how much health insurance I get, how much for travel).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Jon_Snow on May 27, 2014, 08:28:31 PM
No epic FU money story here. Just had enough to quit work when I was 42 to support myself for what I thought would be a 5 year work break to do other stuff (play sports, travel...). I quit assumed I'd go back to work and would retire at a more traditional age. But knowing I had a government pension at 50, a paid off house I could sell and downsize, and no debt, kids or hubby either meant I could make the work break turn into early retirement.  Didn't walk off mad or anything, was just ....done....and wanted to do other things before I was too old.

As a fellow 42 year old who is a bit nervous about quitting my job (for good?), this post is much appreciated.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dweebyhawkeyes on May 27, 2014, 11:02:29 PM
So happy to read these- it's downright inspiring to see how much freedom your 'staches have allowed you! It's also made me realize for the first time the power my little 'stache gives me. Although I'm currently blessed with a super easy-going and productive work environment (albeit low-paying), there's enough saved to last a few months and I'm so down with never feeling forced to work somewhere.

I've turned down.. babysitting jobs? Not much for me to contribute. Yet!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: LouisPritchard on May 28, 2014, 02:23:06 AM
Awesome thread. I'm in the midst of planning a FU moment. After working for the largest oil company in the world, getting transferred 1500 miles from home and dealing with some of the worst management I've ever had to deal with, me and the wife have decided to quit and move back home. Now instead of trying to just find a job (I'm in my 30s and still want to work for a while) I've got the wonderful dilemma of shopping for existing businesses or maybe buying a franchise and doing a start up that way. Having the fu stache is really opening up options that wouldn't otherwise exist. Now to just get over the mental issues/blocks that seem to creep in when planning possible self employment. I also kind of want to leave in a way that causes a hr investigation. My supervisors need it badly and I honestly feel it'd be good for this office and co-workers.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on May 28, 2014, 04:29:37 PM
No epic FU money story here. Just had enough to quit work when I was 42 to support myself for what I thought would be a 5 year work break to do other stuff (play sports, travel...). I quit assumed I'd go back to work and would retire at a more traditional age. But knowing I had a government pension at 50, a paid off house I could sell and downsize, and no debt, kids or hubby either meant I could make the work break turn into early retirement.  Didn't walk off mad or anything, was just ....done....and wanted to do other things before I was too old.

Interesting...at what point did you decide the sabbatical turned into early retirement? Have you worked part time or anything in the meantime to plug any leaks in your plan? I wonder if I get downsized a year earlier than I expected, if I could parlay it into early or at least semi-retirement. It would be nice to hear your experience with this.

I am once-again dreading that my downsizing may happen this year instead of next as I had planned. I am still waiting to sell a house - or else I wouldn't be as worried. But my philosophy in life is that things happen when they should happen. So if I am downsized now I am sure I will figure out a way to get along. I am pretty sure I am FI for my basic needs, so it would just be a matter of figuring out the "luxuries" (how much health insurance I get, how much for travel).
I think about a year after I left work I realized I could actually retire permanently without having to ever work again - even p/t - if I just sold my paid off house and downsized. I did that and became instantly FI.  I was also frugal, debt free, child free, divorced, and had mostly free or very low cost activities and knew I would have a government pension of $1400/month starting at age 50 and had free or low cost medical thru the VA medical system (although I have always bought a low cost private policy). I also have no heirs so have no problem spending down any principal I have in savings or investments over the coming years to supplement my pension as needed. Currently, with a paid off house and low taxes, insurance and utilities, I can live on about half my pension ($700) per month for basic expenses. The extra goes to travel and fun stuff - or needed things like getting the car fixed.  I've been FIREed over a decade now and love it. And no, I haven't had to go to work to plug any financial holes. Just reduce spending in other areas as needed or do without some things that don't have that much importance to me.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: cdttmm on May 28, 2014, 06:07:32 PM
I'll add my FU story to the list. I worked for a well-known educational services company for 15 years. The first 12 years, I was part of an independently owned franchise of the company. The franchise was a family-owned business and I quickly made myself a key player in the business as I liked my job and the office dynamic. Over time, I made myself valuable company-wide by developing some a niche skill-set. When the parent company bought out all the independently owned franchises, I was prepared to move on. I didn't have an FU-worthy stash, but I had several standing job offers so I wasn't concerned. But the parent company was desperate to keep me, so I negotiated a 100% salary bump, with guaranteed raises every year to follow, and a year's worth of severance pay should they ever decide to give me the boot. As an added bonus, the company paid rent so I could stay in my existing office space, which I just happened to own. I knew I wasn't destined for a long stay in what was now corporate land so I started stashing cash and lots of it. Two and a half years later and I saw the writing on the wall. I knew the company would ultimately have to close the division I worked for so I applied to grad school and prepared to leave. I took a weeklong vacation about 6 months later and my boss called me while I was away. I knew it must be important so I returned his call and he broke the news to me that we were getting shut down. I asked for 7 weeks to wrap up existing business, which he agreed to. The next day I got a call from the Ivy League school I had applied to and was told I had been accepted into the next class. Best timing ever. I finished out my seven weeks of work (in week six, the VP of another division called me and asked me to stay with the company in a job that was a demotion -- I declined, in what was not the most polite fashion!), then spent eight weeks relaxing, and went off to grad school for the next year, during which time I collected the year's worth of severance the company owed me. That was in 2010. I've not managed to go back to having a "real" job since. I plan to keep it that way for some time to come.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on May 28, 2014, 08:22:45 PM
I think about a year after I left work I realized I could actually retire permanently without having to ever work again - even p/t - if I just sold my paid off house and downsized. I did that and became instantly FI.  I was also frugal, debt free, child free, divorced, and had mostly free or very low cost activities and knew I would have a government pension of $1400/month starting at age 50 and had free or low cost medical thru the VA medical system (although I have always bought a low cost private policy). I also have no heirs so have no problem spending down any principal I have in savings or investments over the coming years to supplement my pension as needed. Currently, with a paid off house and low taxes, insurance and utilities, I can live on about half my pension ($700) per month for basic expenses. The extra goes to travel and fun stuff - or needed things like getting the car fixed.  I've been FIREed over a decade now and love it. And no, I haven't had to go to work to plug any financial holes. Just reduce spending in other areas as needed or do without some things that don't have that much importance to me.

Thanks, that was very helpful. I like how you played with your options and finances (selling a home) to get you where you needed to be. And I love your beach volleyball and travel stories. Those are two of some of the things I want to spend more time on. I am also child-free and debt-free and don't plan on leaving much around when I get to the inevitable.

I just "downsized" late last year to a "smaller" place that helped me get mortgage free. I'm still waiting for the old house to sell (hence the nerves). But the new place is still quite luxurious and bigger than I need. I love the area. But I do have that as my ace in the hole if I need it (can sell and downsize even more in the future).

I'm just getting used to my new expense structure with this move. I think I have shaved off $20k in yearly expenses with this move - no mortgage, no yard maintenance, no alarm, no home phone, much less insurance costs, finally cut the cable, etc. It is quite freeing to see the change! And I only moved a mile away!

I am actually understating my stash. I have more than enough to cover my basic expenses at a 4% SWR. But I'd still like to beef up the travel amount and make sure I still have enough to cover my charitable donations. I'm also a little skittish with the current market highs. I'm sure it's doable if I am forced into the situation. We shall see...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: tanhanivar on May 28, 2014, 08:37:54 PM
Thanks to the guys who posted about crying at work. I'm sorry it happened, but it's also good to know it isn't a 'girly' thing to do or a problem with the employee. It's a human thing, and frequently means there's a problem with the job. Too easy to get shamed out of forgetting that.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Insanity on May 28, 2014, 09:48:32 PM
I guess I should say that I had a reverse FU story which is currently going on as well.

On July 1, it will be 1 year since I was laid off from my full time job.  I have since gone on my own consulting and while the medical costs is severely hindering the take home pay, I am finding myself enjoying my job even more and doing the work that I was hoping to do with the consulting company but never was given the opportunity.  I was always pushed to be on the more technical side (which I can do) rather than the process side which is my stronger suit.

In the ironic portion of this FU, there are two factors.  One, I don't hold the layoff against the company.  I had a lot (still do) of personal things going on that probably distracted me more than I would like to admit it and more than I led on.  Had I asked for help dealing with them, I probably would have gotten it.  They are a good group of people and generally did care.  The second, the one contract I love right now - I beat out two of their consultants for the contract :)



Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: quilter on May 28, 2014, 10:39:12 PM
We reached if at age 52 and decided to pad the stache and wait till 55 because then hubby would get health insurance and we would be able to travel and be very comfortable.
Well, the house next door to us sells and I go over to meet the neighbors. The guy was bought in to "clean house" at the company I worked at.
So business as usual at work for me but after about six months we are told we have all been evaluated and there would be a "right sizing". The next day, HR shows up and people begin getting called into the office and escorted out. There seemed I be an awful lot of 50+ in the mix who stood to lose the most.  In our area jobs were tough to come by and being an unemployed older person was not very promising.  Some people had worked there for 30+ years with good evaluations until my clean house  neighbor comes along.
So we carry on and one day I was in a meeting with my boss/neighbor and he suggests something that I think is unethical. I mention my concerns but I am dismissed with a hand wave.
I make an appointment with the boss and tell him in my heart I feel like there are a lot of wrong things going on and I cannot be a party to it. I resign.

Well, here is the best part, about three months later a for sale sign goes up in their front yard. After he downsized the office they let him go too. It was devastating to them. He had a stay at home wife, two high schoolers and a junior high kid, all who had to switch schools to his new location.

He did apologize to me and conceded some of the things that went on were really morally wrong.

I have never been so glad that I skipped all those going out to eat lunch opportunities, did not buy clothes  and drove an old standard fuel efficient car. Because although I did not say it, FU was in my head if not on my tongue.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Tempe on May 29, 2014, 12:38:20 AM
While I was working my first full time job doing housekeeping while saving for college, I didn't realize how much I hated my job until the end. It was very gossipy talk behind your back place (Some of the older workers were as bad as some of the teenagers working there.) Some of my coworkers were wonderful, some made me cry at different times. The expectations of management to clean rooms in a certain amount of time and the pressure on cleaning fast but not missing things was stressful (Oh god the memories of smashed cereal in every surface from little kids). I hated having the fast team help me more because then I spent time cleaning what they missed outside of my routine.  The pressure to go clean a room instantly because they routinely ignored the 5 pm check in time for guests that showed up earlier. Working for 8-11 hours but never reaching overtime, and crashing asleep once I got home, eating dinner, and then going back to sleep and repeating the next day with my knees hurting.
The owner of the place was one of the worst things at times. He was an elderly man and when he was around he would catch you alone and lecture you about something, sometimes random things, or about something you did wrong, and waste your time. Thank god I lied my ass off around Easter time about going to go to church like things with family so I wouldn't get lectured on values (I could sense it coming when he asked my easter plans and it was a busy saturday, so after one or two minutes he left me alone) One time a van-full of us were hoping to get away from him and ran to catch the ride but we got a full on lecture and he held us up for 30 minutes. (Our entire department used a verb created with his name for when we got caught, it was a valid excuse for lateness with our manager) Some of his complaints were us talking to each in the hallways, that we should only talk in the rooms we were cleaning even though policy and safety was to leave the doors open. I felt bad for him because I think he was getting some form of dementia. No one said anything back to him any time because we were afraid of being fired.

Two months before I was going away to college my mom asked me to quit so I could go home and spend time with my family. At the time there was a heat wave and I was going from AC-ed rooms to heated hallways to the pool areas humidity and was on and off sick for an entire month. When she asked me to quit and I thought about giving notice, the sense of relief I felt was overwhelming and so uplifting. I gave my two weeks the next day and I was so happy. My boss was sad to see me go, and I think tried to convince me not to leave verbally, but I was done. I had a nice chunk of money saved from it all, payed off most of the debt to my mom, and then got to vacation a bit before going to college. Not quite fu money, but having some extra helped the choice to leave. I do have good memories of some of the coworkers, but the bad outweighed the good.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: CU Tiger on May 29, 2014, 06:18:26 PM
I was working for some acupuncturists in a small practice as a part time office helper. I liked the two owners, but the Office Mgr was a terrorist. She never criticized me min staff meetings, but after the meeting would call me at home to criticize something I said, or what I wore...

I asked why we did not discuss these things AT the meetings, rather than on the phone, but she continued this pattern. At review time I did a self review and met with Office Mgr first. She rated me poorly on everything from my looks to my performance. The owners said I had done a fairly good job, but needed to make some changes to suit the Office Manager.

I had FU money, and also knew that I could walk into a temp agency and have immediate work with my skills, so I said I thought I would prefer to quit. I offered two weeks notice. The owner, sounding uncomfortable, said that I did not need to work out my two weeks. I said okay, and wished them well. 30 minutes later they called me and asked if I would work out the notice. I said that I did not believe I would. I offered, they said no, and I was happy to leave it like that.

I have often wondered if the hostile OM ever found someone she liked?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Kriegsspiel on May 29, 2014, 06:32:51 PM
Has anyone done anything truly epic, like punched someone out, or lit a building on fire? Released live goats into a cubicle village? Pooped on the boss's desk?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Insanity on May 29, 2014, 06:42:39 PM
Has anyone done anything truly epic, like punched someone out, or lit a building on fire? Released live goats into a cubicle village? Pooped on the boss's desk?

Okay, so I have to tell the story......

I ran into a former co-worker a few years after we both left the company.  I left gracefully, not even FU worthy (cause I wasn't).  It just had played out and I needed a change.

He on the other hand, relayed the story of his exit to me.

I won't go into extreme details for fear someone might recognize it, but it ended with a profanity laced tired and the co-worker telling his manager to basically suck his.....   He then walked out.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on May 29, 2014, 06:46:53 PM
Has anyone done anything truly epic, like punched someone out, or lit a building on fire? Released live goats into a cubicle village? Pooped on the boss's desk?

This guy:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/JetBlue_flight_attendant_incident

Quote
Steven Slater, a flight attendant, announced over the plane's public address system that he had been abused by a passenger and that he quit his job. He then grabbed two beers and exited the plane by deploying the evacuation slide and sliding down it.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cheddar Stacker on May 29, 2014, 07:44:39 PM
Has anyone done anything truly epic, like punched someone out, or lit a building on fire? Released live goats into a cubicle village? Pooped on the boss's desk?

Not personally but I witnessed a nice one from a co-worker. College job, grocery warehouse, each store delivery had 1 sheet printed. This guy stapled his delivery order to the inside of the trailer, all the way up at the front. He then spent the next 2-3 hours filling the trailer with totally random crap that didn't belong. Then he just left. It took management hours to figure out what happened, then a few of us an hour to fix it. They had to call overtime for the entire union crew to get the orders filled that night because of this guys actions.

Its an epic way to say FU, but this guy clearly did not have proper FU funds in place. He simply had a lot of pent up frustration and took it out on the bosses. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: AlexK on May 29, 2014, 08:46:28 PM
Not epic but I want to share. My first engineering job was at an unethical company. As in fined $1M by the government for doing business with Iran unethical. We were expected to change test data for customers if the product tested out of spec. The stress was so bad I would wake up in the middle of the night with feelings of dread. I had to have brain surgery for hydrocephalus and I'm convinced it was the stress that caused it. I didn't have FU money at the time but I found another job and gave notice. The president of the company had me in his office and asked what it would take for me to stay. I told him there would have to be a 1 added to my current salary (I was making about $50k at the time). He laughed and I left.

The new job was 20% pay increase and amazing, I'm still working there 10 years later!

I do know of an EPIC quitting story but I got screwed in the process. I bought a motorcycle from a guy who said the title was in his truck and he would get it for me that night. I stupidly believed him and he never gave me the title. He wouldn't answer his phone when I called. He worked at Walmart and one time I spoofed the caller ID so it looked like Walmart was calling. He answered but gave more excuses. A few months later he went into Walmart and shot his boss in the chest with a 44 Mag (he lived) and holed up in the bathroom until cops came. I had to part that bike out on ebay.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: SisterX on May 30, 2014, 10:37:43 AM
Not epic but I want to share. My first engineering job was at an unethical company. As in fined $1M by the government for doing business with Iran unethical. We were expected to change test data for customers if the product tested out of spec. The stress was so bad I would wake up in the middle of the night with feelings of dread. I had to have brain surgery for hydrocephalus and I'm convinced it was the stress that caused it. I didn't have FU money at the time but I found another job and gave notice. The president of the company had me in his office and asked what it would take for me to stay. I told him there would have to be a 1 added to my current salary (I was making about $50k at the time). He laughed and I left.

The new job was 20% pay increase and amazing, I'm still working there 10 years later!

I do know of an EPIC quitting story but I got screwed in the process. I bought a motorcycle from a guy who said the title was in his truck and he would get it for me that night. I stupidly believed him and he never gave me the title. He wouldn't answer his phone when I called. He worked at Walmart and one time I spoofed the caller ID so it looked like Walmart was calling. He answered but gave more excuses. A few months later he went into Walmart and shot his boss in the chest with a 44 Mag (he lived) and holed up in the bathroom until cops came. I had to part that bike out on ebay.

I'm not sure I'd consider shooting one's boss "epic" in the sense intended by the original question.  More like tragic, no matter what the provocation was.
Pooping on the boss's desk = hilarious.  Shooting the boss = horrific.

However, your story is pretty fantastic.  Glad you got a much better job out of it all!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: CU Tiger on May 30, 2014, 11:05:37 AM
I was raised to be Southern nice and my parents taught me to never burn my bridges behind me. So even if I would like to poop on my bosses desk (and I had one I would have LOVED to do that to) I have always tried to leave with no hard feelings.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Grog on May 30, 2014, 12:30:57 PM
It's interesting reading this stories. Does this happen because there is no social welfare? do not people receive some kind of support the first months they are jobless?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: frugalnacho on May 30, 2014, 12:42:25 PM
One of my first jobs (still in high school) was bagging groceries.  I put in a notice that I was going on vacation for a week, and it happened to coincide with a summer holiday.  They declined it.  They said if I went on that vacation to not bother coming back.  I did go back - to pick up my last check.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: CommonCents on May 30, 2014, 12:44:32 PM
It's interesting reading this stories. Does this happen because there is no social welfare? do not people receive some kind of support the first months they are jobless?

In the US, if you voluntarily quit a job, it's hard to get unemployment benefits and depends on demonstrating you meet certain requirements.  It's designed to encourage people not to willy nilly quit and sit around on their a$$ while the government (taxpayers) support them. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: shotgunwilly on May 30, 2014, 01:46:33 PM
It's interesting reading this stories. Does this happen because there is no social welfare? do not people receive some kind of support the first months they are jobless?

In the US, if you voluntarily quit a job, it's hard to get unemployment benefits and depends on demonstrating you meet certain requirements.  It's designed to encourage people not to willy nilly quit and sit around on their a$$ while the government (taxpayers) support them.

Still happens all the time.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Kriegsspiel on May 30, 2014, 04:12:37 PM
Not epic but I want to share. My first engineering job was at an unethical company. As in fined $1M by the government for doing business with Iran unethical. We were expected to change test data for customers if the product tested out of spec. The stress was so bad I would wake up in the middle of the night with feelings of dread. I had to have brain surgery for hydrocephalus and I'm convinced it was the stress that caused it. I didn't have FU money at the time but I found another job and gave notice. The president of the company had me in his office and asked what it would take for me to stay. I told him there would have to be a 1 added to my current salary (I was making about $50k at the time). He laughed and I left.

The new job was 20% pay increase and amazing, I'm still working there 10 years later!

I do know of an EPIC quitting story but I got screwed in the process. I bought a motorcycle from a guy who said the title was in his truck and he would get it for me that night. I stupidly believed him and he never gave me the title. He wouldn't answer his phone when I called. He worked at Walmart and one time I spoofed the caller ID so it looked like Walmart was calling. He answered but gave more excuses. A few months later he went into Walmart and shot his boss in the chest with a 44 Mag (he lived) and holed up in the bathroom until cops came. I had to part that bike out on ebay.

I'm not sure I'd consider shooting one's boss "epic" in the sense intended by the original question.  More like tragic, no matter what the provocation was.
Pooping on the boss's desk = hilarious.  Shooting the boss = horrific.

However, your story is pretty fantastic.  Glad you got a much better job out of it all!

The greeter's got a gun.
the greeter's got a gun.
Shopping carts are not as fun.
Will he go on the run?
Or does he have to go number two.
He's hiding out in the loo.

They say that when he got a'busted
he had TP stuffed down his crotch.
But, man, you shoulda been there, before the cops arrived.
People all stood around and watched.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Paul der Krake on May 30, 2014, 05:13:20 PM
Goddammit Kriegsspiel, now I have to remove that song from my roadtrip playlist.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Grog on May 30, 2014, 10:57:14 PM


In the US, if you voluntarily quit a job, it's hard to get unemployment benefits and depends on demonstrating you meet certain requirements.  It's designed to encourage people not to willy nilly quit and sit around on their a$$ while the government (taxpayers) support them.

you know this is not how it works in other countries, right? it just seems to me that the fact that FU money is not spreadily available (under the form for instance of unemployment helps) give a chance to all the manager asshole to survive: if everybody working under a piece of shit could just leave and be supported a couple of months before finding a new job, then there would not be almost no asshole manager, since they would be detrimental to your company.
Although my personal point of view is that it should be responsibility of every worker to be in a position of strength, and not rely on the social system.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: libertarian4321 on May 31, 2014, 01:19:15 AM
After reading the blog for quite some time I keep seeing people talking about their FU staches (being different than their FIRE amount) as having the security to "stick it to the man" and walk off the job without stress if they want to.

This being said, I have never seen a story about using that FU money. Please, share your stories!!

FU money is useful in less dramatic ways, too.

Even if you don't do a dramatic "take this job and shove it" thing, FU money can make your life better.

For many years, I worked for a major consulting firm.  It was "expected" that everyone work at least 50 hours per week and be willing to give up their weekends any time those in power thought it "necessary."

Because I had "FU" money, I was able to make it clear to my boss that I would NOT be working ridiculous hours.  I would do my 40-hours, and that was it.  The first time he "requested" (which really, of course, was an order) I work on a Saturday, I told him I don't work weekends.  If he had a problem with that, he was free to lay me off.  He never did, though I'm sure it affected my pay raises and "yearly efficiency report."  Just having "FU" money made my work life easier.

After 5-years there, I'd had enough and wanted to early retire, so I effectively went in and asked to be laid off (I told him I was going to charge the day to the time code for "I don't have any work to do," which at that firm was the equivalent of saying "lay me off RIGHT NOW." :)

Not quite as dramatic as "Take this job and stick it," but just as satisfying.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: totoro on May 31, 2014, 09:07:08 AM


In the US, if you voluntarily quit a job, it's hard to get unemployment benefits and depends on demonstrating you meet certain requirements.  It's designed to encourage people not to willy nilly quit and sit around on their a$$ while the government (taxpayers) support them.

you know this is not how it works in other countries, right? it just seems to me that the fact that FU money is not spreadily available (under the form for instance of unemployment helps) give a chance to all the manager asshole to survive: if everybody working under a piece of shit could just leave and be supported a couple of months before finding a new job, then there would not be almost no asshole manager, since they would be detrimental to your company.
Although my personal point of view is that it should be responsibility of every worker to be in a position of strength, and not rely on the social system.

What kind of mumbo jumbo is that?

In what country do you get un/employment insurance benefits if you quit?  Neither the US nor Canada offers this as far as I'm aware and there are sound policy reasons for not doing so.  The exception is if you can demonstrate you were constructively dismissed.

Now, as far as "asshole managers", in my experience sometimes asshole managers are really fine managers with an asshole employee. It is hard to know without hearing the other side.

In the case where a manager is really unreasonably difficult/harassing they will contravene employment standards and/or human rights protections and you can quit and claim constructive dismissal.  There are often complaints processes that can be accessed in these circumstances as well.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: 5inatrailer on May 31, 2014, 09:13:47 AM
While learning my craft as a paramedic in a busy metro setting, there was this one guy who was very very good at his job. He had been there 20 years and had trained some very excellent practitioners also. If you were sick, you wanted him to come to your aid. That being said, he was very unsettled- like he was angry at himself for not doing something better with his life... anyway,
8 years after I quit (as everyone does there- 1 person has retired out of 1000) I heard a story of how he quit:

It was the typical night shift, call after call kept coming in, and finally at around 11pm, the dispatch gave his ambulance another call.  He said no on the radio, leaned over and shut the truck off (someone else was driving), took the keys and threw them across the road.  He then grabbed his personal belongings and literally walked off into a field.

I love telling that story.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Grog on May 31, 2014, 11:06:30 AM


What kind of mumbo jumbo is that?

In what country do you get un/employment insurance benefits if you quit?  Neither the US nor Canada offers this as far as I'm aware and there are sound policy reasons for not doing so.  The exception is if you can demonstrate you were constructively dismissed.

Now, as far as "asshole managers", in my experience sometimes asshole managers are really fine managers with an asshole employee. It is hard to know without hearing the other side.

In the case where a manager is really unreasonably difficult/harassing they will contravene employment standards and/or human rights protections and you can quit and claim constructive dismissal.  There are often complaints processes that can be accessed in these circumstances as well.

Just meaning to say that since is difficult to quit, employer could use that to enforce a certain stress/abuse because they know that the people CAN'T quit, since they must work to survive paycheck to paycheck.
btw, in most countries in europe you get a unemployment subsidy (if you have worked long enough to have right for) the moment you apply for it: it doesn't matter why you are jobless (even if you quit), just that you are jobless. But many people seek a new job immediately, since the longest you stay on subsidy, the harder it is to find a job since employer will find strange that you are getting the subsidy for so long, and prefer someone else.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: totoro on May 31, 2014, 12:07:45 PM
Which European countries offer an unemployment subsidy to those who have voluntarily resigned/quit?  I see that in Germany you may be able to qualify for some benefits after a three-month waiting period in which you get nothing but have been actively looking for work, which makes some sense. 

As far as not being able to quit because you "must work to survive" paycheck to paycheck, that seems pretty dramatic and something that should be up to the individual to resolve in most cases.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dweebyhawkeyes on May 31, 2014, 12:30:59 PM
Has anyone done anything truly epic, like punched someone out, or lit a building on fire? Released live goats into a cubicle village? Pooped on the boss's desk?

Not money-related at all- but my friends and I took a live goat to our high school campus after graduation. The sophomores and juniors loved it and administration freaked out. Desire result achieved.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: train_writer on May 31, 2014, 01:05:22 PM
btw, in most countries in europe you get a unemployment subsidy (if you have worked long enough to have right for) the moment you apply for it: it doesn't matter why you are jobless (even if you quit), just that you are jobless.


Which country in Europe is that I am curious?
It is the same here (NL+Belgium) as in the US (only a limited months subsidy in case of unvoluntary layoff). But you can, however, simply ask your employer to lay you off and if they agree, you can collect your build up months of subsidy (depending how long you have been in the work force 3 months up to 2 years).

Still, you are right that the wrong 'manager attitude' is being sustained by this system. Just wait for the years where employees are more in demand than employers.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: train_writer on May 31, 2014, 01:12:17 PM
Epic FU of my Co-worker. A silver haired lady of 60 with a very high work ethic and lots of experience and knowledge in the field decided she did not like the new management and new rules, that prevent personal contact or a personal touch. She was really a bit bullied by management at a certain point.

One 'idle Tuesday', she painted a certain something on the wall of our newly furnished building, she really took her time, like one hour?
Which we co-workers silently supported.
When she was finished she said goodbye to us all, gave us an address of where she would serve us a pint that afternoon and waited for the management meeting to walk passed her "mural".
She smiled, waved and just left.

Badass!!
* Not very detailed because it was kind of an unique painting :)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Zamboni on May 31, 2014, 02:28:26 PM
These are some great stories.

Long ago at another job I once had a colleague who was quite obviously unhappy.  He had two bosses who were both incompetent and douche bags, and watching their absurdity from a safe distance made me grateful I wasn't in his group.  Instead of making a big scene or even telling anyone he quit, on the last day he was in the office he simply used his corporate card to buy himself and his girlfriend a nice expensive vacation.  The next day they left for their newly purchased vacation on the other side of the world, and then he just never came back.  He travelled a fair amount for work, so even though it was an international flight, the trip was not immediately flagged as unusual.  It took the company some time to figure out that he was not on a business trip and that he did not intend to ever return.  They might have even paid him for the last couple of weeks of that month before they realized he was gone.  Boy, was his boss pissed!  Still makes me laugh even though it was fraud.  He was not a citizen and I don't even know if they ever even found him to get the money back.

FU money:  pretty sure he had it.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: blackomen on May 31, 2014, 11:19:48 PM
I never had to use my FU money yet but I guess I learned the value of it pretty early in my career.

I graduated with a MS in Finance in 2009 with zero job experience.  Yes, it can't be bleaker than that so when I was finally able to land a job in 10 months, I was elated..  and didn't mind that it was a salaried position that paid literally the equivalent of $10/hr !!!  This was my first real job: an assistant analyst for a financial firm that ran several small hedge funds.

I put in 12 hour days and the boss would call me to come in on the weekend like every 3-4 weeks.  I didn't mind back then because I felt lucky to have a job.  Days and days went by and the boss got nastier.  Eventually, it wore on me.

I'm not sure if anyone else who doesn't work in the hedge fund industry (or anything that front-office buy-side in finance) can relate but here are some examples:

- Being yelled at and ridiculed for the smallest mistakes, sometimes for hours on end and receiving the same treatment for multiple days in a row.

- When the weekend came, it was my only refuge from the constant yelling from the boss..  then he calls you in to come in and work on something only to be yelled at even more.  Except there's no pay (since you're salaried.)

- I come in every single day at 6 - 6:30 in the morning since that's when the US markets open on the West Coast and work without even a lunch break until 1:00pm.  Manager deprives me of the much needed lunch break and calls me in for meeting and to be pelted mercilessly with foul language.

The above went on for about a year to a year and a half before I started to break down from the stress.  I started making more and more mistakes, which in finance, was not a good thing.  I think I ended up costing the company more than $100,000 in a single Trading error one time when I accidentally bought instead of selling something like $3 million dollars of a stock.  (That's more than TWICE my annual salary in a single mistake!)  I was pushed to my limits with the persistent daily verbal abuses and these sorts of errors multiplied over the next few months.

At that time, I was casually chatting with one of the secretaries after work and she tactfully told me that I was pretty much the best the company has ever found and proceeded to talk about how the firm hired and fired failure after failure for this position.

I figured I had less to lose than I thought but just to be safe, I checked my bank accounts..  I had saved about $15,000 extra since I started the job and that money could probably last me a year if I got fired.  So I started cutting back my hours..  this job was intended to be a 8 or 9 hour a day deal as opposed to the 12+ I was working so I tested leaving earlier and earlier each day, hopefully to regain my sanity.  I was surprisingly met with little resistance.  Eventually, I was given raises and promotions even though I had effectively cut my daily hours from 12 to like 7-8 today.  To this day, I'm still looking for greener pastures for my career but this experience has taught a valuable lesson about standing your ground.  FU money is ONE tool in your arsenal to accomplish this.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: C40 on June 01, 2014, 12:04:26 PM
Epic FU of my Co-worker. A silver haired lady of 60 with a very high work ethic and lots of experience and knowledge in the field decided she did not like the new management and new rules, that prevent personal contact or a personal touch. She was really a bit bullied by management at a certain point.

One 'idle Tuesday', she painted a certain something on the wall of our newly furnished building, she really took her time, like one hour?
Which we co-workers silently supported.
When she was finished she said goodbye to us all, gave us an address of where she would serve us a pint that afternoon and waited for the management meeting to walk passed her "mural".
She smiled, waved and just left.

Badass!!
* Not very detailed because it was kind of an unique painting :)

What did she paint on the wall? "FU"?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: train_writer on June 01, 2014, 01:23:20 PM
What did she paint on the wall? "FU"?


Nope, a cartoonesk sea mammal referring to someone in our management with some foul accesoires.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Southern Stashian on June 01, 2014, 02:49:53 PM
Over a decade ago I worked for a national home builder named Len ..... (you fill in the rest). I had been on track to win "builder of the year" and a nice sized bonus on top of my $100k + earnings / bonuses for the year. The bonus would end up becoming my FU money just a few days later .....

Well, living in the south we have to deal with these things called hurricanes, or as my 5'-3" ball sack of a manager would say "hurry-up-canes", basically meaning ditch your own home for the preperation of ours. I would spend days locking down the community with just hours to spare for our own home. Not a good situation.

Anyway, the storm came and went and the next morning I came in to access the damage on my own time. I was amazed to find that 17 of my homes were virtually damage free except for one that a sub had left a window partially opened on, resulting in a flooded kitchen.

As I was cleaning up the damage and removing drywall, my six month pregnant wife and two year old son dropped in on me to see how everything was going and to bring me some lunch. A few minutes later my troll of a manager dropped in too, and after seeing the damage he ripped me a new one with a least a hundred F-bombs directed at me in front of my family.

Nuff said. You just dont do that to a man, especially in front of his family. He was lucky he made it out of the house that afternoon.

Anyway, I now laugh because the very next day he found my keys, company cell and a zerox copy of my middle finger on my desk instructing him on what body part to place it all in. I also sent corporate a polite email (wasn't their fault he had little man syndrome) saying that my manager would have some explaining to do to them.

From what I heard it was quite comical at the awards ceremony the following week when they called out the award for the Top Builder and no one was there to claim it. Talk about a big FU! to him in front of the company and all of his corporate execs when he had to explain on the spot why their top guy just walked away, hehhe.

They spent the next two weeks apologizing and trying to get me to return, offering more $$$ and different leadership but it was too late as I had made up my mind. (and yes, I still received the bonus check in the mail with my final paycheck - a double FU! lol). They eventually collasped into BK so the timing worked out perfectly.

So, in the end I quit my job AND received my FU money (@ $15K)  from the company while also purging myself (and my family) of the angry little man. Score.

I still see him a few times a year and show him my personal, "original copy" of the zeroxed paper that I left for him when I quit years ago.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Vitai Slade on June 02, 2014, 07:09:37 AM
Over a decade ago I worked for a national home builder named Len ..... (you fill in the rest). I had been on track to win "builder of the year" and a nice sized bonus on top of my $100k + earnings / bonuses for the year. The bonus would end up becoming my FU money just a few days later .....

This is the BEST FU story on this thread so far! NICE!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: shotgunwilly on June 02, 2014, 08:27:10 AM
Anyway, I now laugh because the very next day he found my keys, company cell and a zerox copy of my middle finger on my desk instructing him on what body part to place it all in. I also sent corporate a polite email (wasn't their fault he had little man syndrome) saying that my manager would have some explaining to do to them.


This guy wins. Awesome.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: brewer12345 on June 02, 2014, 11:58:15 AM
If I were a manager I would never do the insulting/harassing things I have read on the third page of the thread.  Not only is it a waste of time and energy, but I think there is significant risk to those jerks that someone will snap and go after them physically.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on June 02, 2014, 12:53:37 PM
my 5'-3" ball sack of a manager

... my troll of a manager ...

(wasn't their fault he had little man syndrome)

LOL, short people are such trolls amirite?  Every time I see a shorty, I just like to give them a little kick to remind them how terrible they are.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: galaxie on June 02, 2014, 02:22:10 PM
Not quite FU money, but spending less than I earn has enabled me to take a pay cut in order to go do my dream job.  Nothing wrong with my old job, just the opportunity of a lifetime.  We should still both be able to retire in about 14 years (when I'm 46).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gray Matter on June 02, 2014, 02:43:02 PM
my 5'-3" ball sack of a manager

... my troll of a manager ...

(wasn't their fault he had little man syndrome)

LOL, short people are such trolls amirite?  Every time I see a shorty, I just like to give them a little kick to remind them how terrible they are.

Thank you for sticking up for us, Dragoncar!  As a short person who has spawned two short boys, that struck me as well.  Why can't short men be plain ole garden variety assholes like average/tall men?  Why do they have to have "little man syndrome"?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on June 02, 2014, 03:03:28 PM
my 5'-3" ball sack of a manager

... my troll of a manager ...

(wasn't their fault he had little man syndrome)

LOL, short people are such trolls amirite?  Every time I see a shorty, I just like to give them a little kick to remind them how terrible they are.

Thank you for sticking up for us, Dragoncar!  As a short person who has spawned two short boys, that struck me as well.  Why can't short men be plain ole garden variety assholes like average/tall men?  Why do they have to have "little man syndrome"?

"Just cause you have one doesn't mean you have to be one!" But then again I guess you can't use that to call a girl a dick...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Dr.Vibrissae on June 02, 2014, 03:16:15 PM
my 5'-3" ball sack of a manager

... my troll of a manager ...

(wasn't their fault he had little man syndrome)

LOL, short people are such trolls amirite?  Every time I see a shorty, I just like to give them a little kick to remind them how terrible they are.

Thank you for sticking up for us, Dragoncar!  As a short person who has spawned two short boys, that struck me as well.  Why can't short men be plain ole garden variety assholes like average/tall men?  Why do they have to have "little man syndrome"?

"Just cause you have one doesn't mean you have to be one!" But then again I guess you can't use that to call a girl a dick...
I thought it was calling someone and asshole...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: warfreak2 on June 02, 2014, 03:23:15 PM
Thank you for sticking up for us, Dragoncar!  As a short person who has spawned two short boys, that struck me as well.  Why can't short men be plain ole garden variety assholes like average/tall men?  Why do they have to have "little man syndrome"?
Q: Why did Southern Stashian's manager get rich when Lehman Brothers collapsed?

A: Because he was short.


...Sorry, couldn't resist. OK OK I'll show myself out.

(Actually, I agree with you. When you make fun of some characteristic that somebody has, even if the particular person you're targeting is an asshole, remember that you're making fun of everyone with that characteristic, not just the asshole. (No offense intended to anyone who has an asshole.))
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: fantabulous on June 02, 2014, 03:44:50 PM
"Just cause you have one doesn't mean you have to be one!" But then again I guess you can't use that to call a girl a dick...

Depends on the woman.

I still see him a few times a year and show him my personal, "original copy" of the zeroxed paper that I left for him when I quit years ago.

Perhaps a bit unhealthy (on my part), but I really enjoy this part of the story.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on June 02, 2014, 03:46:02 PM
my 5'-3" ball sack of a manager

... my troll of a manager ...

(wasn't their fault he had little man syndrome)

LOL, short people are such trolls amirite?  Every time I see a shorty, I just like to give them a little kick to remind them how terrible they are.

Thank you for sticking up for us, Dragoncar!  As a short person who has spawned two short boys, that struck me as well.  Why can't short men be plain ole garden variety assholes like average/tall men?  Why do they have to have "little man syndrome"?

"Just cause you have one doesn't mean you have to be one!" But then again I guess you can't use that to call a girl a dick...
I thought it was calling someone and asshole...

You just changed my whole world view. Everything I have ever known is a lie
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Ftao93 on June 02, 2014, 04:20:49 PM
Once I worked at a big corporate flour mill.    It was routine that if you hadn't been there a decade, the senior Union folks ignored your existence. 

The schedule was at times, very punishing, but I had no formal education, and no understanding of anything.  If I had half a brain back then I would have invested, but I was turned off by my friend's daytrading when he lost 50k in a year!

Anyway, we were 12 on, 12 off, every day, for 76 days in a row.  I lived an hour away.  It was like Groundhog Day!

then I realized that my expenses were only about $700 a month, and half of that was gas to get to a job I hated.    I was only 20 and there were women to pursue!  I had about 4k in uncashed checks.  The boss had already been angered by the fact that I had called in a couple of times just to get some darned rest.

I got pulled over for speeding ( was running late).  The boss berated me on how unacceptable it was, how unprofessional I was, I wasn't playing by the rules, etc.  So I told him "I'm probably just not a good fit for this job.  It's boring, unfulfilling, and you're a prick."   Then I left, never to return :).

Had I done anything positive with that money, or any of the money I earned for the next decade, life would be much different.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Southern Stashian on June 02, 2014, 04:22:39 PM
Hahaha! Looking back it does seem that I have an issue with the "smaller people" of society. Since I'm 5'-9" myself and my troll of a wife is 5'-3", you wouldn't think I would have that issue. I mean my oldest 12 year old dwarf of a son is my best buddy while my vertically challenged 9 year old daughter is so beautiful and pint sized 4 year old couldn't be any happier.

Thankfully I don't think that way! ....... :)

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gray Matter on June 02, 2014, 06:30:12 PM
Hahaha! Looking back it does seem that I have an issue with the "smaller people" of society. Since I'm 5'-9" myself and my troll of a wife is 5'-3", you wouldn't think I would have that issue. I mean my oldest 12 year old dwarf of a son is my best buddy while my vertically challenged 9 year old daughter is so beautiful and pint sized 4 year old couldn't be any happier.

Thankfully I don't think that way! ....... :)

You really got to hand it short people...

Otherwise they couldn't reach it.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: aclarridge on June 03, 2014, 12:37:56 PM
This is one of my favourite threads - it highlights one amazing "side-benefit" that we can all enjoy on our journey to FI.

No big FUs given by me yet, but I can say that my stash is making me bolder at work in terms of asking for what I want. And I'm learning that the squeaky wheel gets the grease!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: MooseOutFront on June 03, 2014, 08:31:15 PM
I look forward to documenting it here, but my ability to call my own shots at work will almost certainly grow in relation to my stache. Hell, I already give less shits knowing that I no longer need to make all the right moves to hit executive management some day like I used to think. I'll quit looong before I even hit middle management. :)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on June 04, 2014, 07:33:39 AM
So I started cutting back my hours..  this job was intended to be a 8 or 9 hour a day deal as opposed to the 12+ I was working so I tested leaving earlier and earlier each day, hopefully to regain my sanity.  I was surprisingly met with little resistance.  Eventually, I was given raises and promotions even though I had effectively cut my daily hours from 12 to like 7-8 today.

Your story (and especially this part) totally reminds me of BNL's latest post: "The Man" is You (http://www.bravenewlife.com/06/the-man-is-you/).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dude on June 04, 2014, 09:20:03 AM
Not an FU Money story or even a literal FU! story, but more of a hindsight FU-ish story.  Worked at a large law firm between second and third years of law school.  Back then the expectation was you'd get an offer for employment at the end of the summer, for the following year (i.e., after graduation).  I hated everything about that job, about the corporate law firm existence, the white-shoe suit-and-tie set.  And it obviously showed.  At one point, I was given a ridiculously stupid assignment by a 4th or 5th year associate. I asked him what the deadline for completion was, and he told me, no hurry, before the end of summer.  Several weeks later (well short of the end of summer), he calls me to his office and asks where the project is.  I tell him it's only about 30% complete. He tells me he wanted it today.  I politely tell him, no you didn't.  A back and forth ensues that ends up with me going off on the guy, dropping a few F bombs and generally telling him he's full of shit, all heard by others in the vicinity.  This was just one of the many little idiotic typical law firm episodes I had that summer.  Did I mention I hated it?  And I REALLY hated the idiotic billable hour system, where you had to keep track of client billing in six-fucking-minute increments!!  WTF?  I was miserable, and more than a few of my friends noticed it.  Nevertheless, I anticipated getting an offer and taking that job.  It's basically what I'd been programmed to do in law school (and I'd taken this summer position over several others I'd been offered -- times were good).  And it paid really well.  And it was "prestigious." Classic golden handcuff situation.

And then the offer didn't come.  I was politely told over the phone that I wouldn't be getting an offer.  Stunned (though in hindsight, I'm not sure why), I asked if the caller could expound upon the reasons why.  He said, "Some of the Committee members thought you lacked a seriousness of purpose."  In other words, I didn't play the game like a good soldier is supposed to.

It took me a couple days to get past this rejection -- but once I did, I had this overwhelming feeling of liberation.  I'd been freed from taking that shitty job that I would have taken for no other reason than that it paid good money.  Weeks later, I interviewed for my current job with the federal government, and had an offer just a month later.  Turned out to be the best thing that could have happened to me.  16 years later, I'm looking at FIRE in another 5 years and change, and have had a really good career thus far.  No asshole bosses, no make-work B.S., plenty of autonomy, mostly interesting work, a sane work schedule, a shitload of money frankly (not like the law firm job but more than enough), and a pension when I retire.  In short, I hit the career jackpot.  All because I didn't get that offer, thank God.  Not a day goes by when I'm not thankful for the way things turned out. 

So the FU here is more of a hindsight FU to the corporate legal sector, and to my law school for steering me there, and to those Hiring Committee members who apparently thought I'd never amount to much. But even then, I have to temper the FU with a 'thank you,' for the reasons stated above. 

In short, life is good.  -)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: MidwestGal on June 04, 2014, 09:50:28 AM
I love this thread.

Not terribly epic, but I did quit my first Big Girl job as a manager.  The company wasn't treating their employees very well and my direct boss was also going along with it.  The money I did have enabled me to leave the situation while supporting a family with NO job lined up, and the employer I found a few months later had much more integrity.  I don't work there anymore but still recommend folks to do business with them due to that one factor.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Dr. Doom on June 04, 2014, 10:16:16 AM
So I started cutting back my hours..  this job was intended to be a 8 or 9 hour a day deal as opposed to the 12+ I was working so I tested leaving earlier and earlier each day, hopefully to regain my sanity.  I was surprisingly met with little resistance.  Eventually, I was given raises and promotions even though I had effectively cut my daily hours from 12 to like 7-8 today.

Your story (and especially this part) totally reminds me of BNL's latest post: "The Man" is You (http://www.bravenewlife.com/06/the-man-is-you/).

I would change the title of BNL's article to "The Man Might Be You."  There are clearly times when it's not you -- it's your employer, or possibly even your entire industry.

Look, I'm a geezer of 37 and I lived through the tech downturn of 2000.  Companies were outsourcing like gangbusters, laying off thousands of workers, and if you weren't one of the top contributors, you were gone, period.  I watched it happen:  India and APAC took many of those jobs.  There was intense pressure to increase output and in many cases that meant more hours in the form of unpaid overtime.  I had a few friends get laid off and they had trouble finding work because no one was hiring.

In this case, make no mistake about it, The Man really is The Man.

So make sure you have that FU money built up before you start ratcheting the hours down.   It works out for some people -- maybe even most people -- but not everyone.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on June 04, 2014, 10:25:53 AM
Weeks later, I interviewed for my current job with the federal government, and had an offer just a month later.  ... No asshole bosses, no make-work B.S., plenty of autonomy, mostly interesting work, a sane work schedule, a shitload of money frankly (not like the law firm job but more than enough),

You did hit the jackpot-- I'd caution anyone reading this post not to consider any of the above typical in the federal government
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dude on June 04, 2014, 12:16:51 PM
Oh, forgot about my favorite FU job-quitting story.  Guy named Willie, a grizzled, bearded biker dude who worked on a roofing crew I worked on one summer (easily one of the worst jobs in America -- this is the industrial, hot tar roofing I'm talking about, not that easy by comparison residential shingling stuff, which I've also done plenty of).  The owner of the company's last name was Grodd (first name withheld).  Mr. Grodd confronted Willie one time on the job, and Willie took exception.  He told him, "Fuck you, your name is Grodd, not God," and promptly walked off the job.  hahaha!

He ended up getting his job back.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: clarkfan1979 on June 04, 2014, 10:44:43 PM
I used FU money in 2011 to take a sabbatical. I had just turned 51. I walked into my boss's office and said: I need to tell you something. I'm taking a year off". He said: "We don't allow that here". I said: "I'm not asking for you permission. I'm just doing it." He said: 'We can't guarantee that you can have your job back" I said: "I can't guarantee that I'll want my job back!". He asked: "How can you possibly afford to do this?" I said: "That's really a personal question, but I can tell you it involves savings and investments". Man, this dude was pissed. The president of the company called me to wish me the best and asked me to call him when I returned from my walkabout to discuss some opportunities. I ended up returning to a different department 15 months later. Higher pay. Promotion. I quit again 2 years later. They transferred me to another division. Higher pay. Another promotion.
Frugality pays.
I'm preparing for another world tour.

sounds like "office space"
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: chesebert on June 05, 2014, 05:38:15 AM
Weeks later, I interviewed for my current job with the federal government, and had an offer just a month later.  ... No asshole bosses, no make-work B.S., plenty of autonomy, mostly interesting work, a sane work schedule, a shitload of money frankly (not like the law firm job but more than enough),

You did hit the jackpot-- I'd caution anyone reading this post not to consider any of the above typical in the federal government

I agree, given the current state of legal industry. A stunt like that today will probably not end well.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: clarkfan1979 on June 05, 2014, 06:37:07 AM
Not that epic, but does involve poop. There are two parts.

Part one: After graduating from undergrad, I took a "year off" before going to grad school. I worked for my cousin's plumbing business. He had someone quit unexpectedly and offered me good money to work for him for one month while he looked for a replacement. He was very nice and paid me well. However, I never worked with him on the job. I worked with a different plumber that treated me like sh*t. He really enjoyed calling me "college boy" and was looking for excuses for yelling at me. I finally lost it and put him in his place. I told him that I was there to help out my cousin and not listen to his bullsh*t. I told him that if he yelled at me again I was going to leave and he would be doing twice the amount of work until a replacement was found. My cousin also had a talk with him and he stopped.

Part two: My uncle was having a party and he hired me to drive drunk people home. The "plumber" knew my uncle and was at the party. I honestly didn't have any hard feelings and things were going well. However, after a few beers he started doing his thing again by calling me "college boy" and yelling at me to do things. I think he was trying to show off. I didn't say anything or do anything until I gave him a ride home. I was taking 4 guys to their houses including the plumber. He was bombed and kept up with his remarks so I dropped him off first. After dropping him off, I got into the van and the other guys were apologizing for his behavior. They suggested that I kick his ass because he was a small man. I would never fight someone for being rude, but I did feel the need to poop. Without saying anything I got out of the van and pooped on his front porch. I wiped my butt with mapquest directions to his house so he knew that it was me. When I got back into the fan the three guys were like, "That's messed up, dude." I said, "You know what, I had to put up with his sh*t for one month. Now he has to put up with mine for one day."

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dude on June 05, 2014, 06:38:35 AM
Weeks later, I interviewed for my current job with the federal government, and had an offer just a month later.  ... No asshole bosses, no make-work B.S., plenty of autonomy, mostly interesting work, a sane work schedule, a shitload of money frankly (not like the law firm job but more than enough),

You did hit the jackpot-- I'd caution anyone reading this post not to consider any of the above typical in the federal government

HAHA!  Absolutely right!  I got very fortunate.  And yes @chesebert, the legal market was vastly different then than it is now!  Had I not taken my current path, I was ready to go back to active duty as a lawyer in the JAG corps.  I was told I was a shoe-in, but they weren't making offers until March of my graduation year, whereas my current job gave me an offer in December, so I went with the bird in hand.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dude on June 05, 2014, 06:40:25 AM
Not that epic, but does involve poop. There are two parts.

Part one: After graduating from undergrad, I took a "year off" before going to grad school. I worked for my cousin's plumbing business. He had someone quit unexpectedly and offered me good money to work for him for one month while he looked for a replacement. He was very nice and paid me well. However, I never worked with him on the job. I worked with a different plumber that treated me like sh*t. He really enjoyed calling me "college boy" and was looking for excuses for yelling at me. I finally lost it and put him in his place. I told him that I was there to help out my cousin and not listen to his bullsh*t. I told him that if he yelled at me again I was going to leave and he would be doing twice the amount of work until a replacement was found. My cousin also had a talk with him and he stopped.

Part two: My uncle was having a party and he hired me to drive drunk people home. The "plumber" knew my uncle and was at the party. I honestly didn't have any hard feelings and things were going well. However, after a few beers he started doing his thing again by calling me "college boy" and yelling at me to do things. I think he was trying to show off. I didn't say anything or do anything until I gave him a ride home. I was taking 4 guys to their houses including the plumber. He was bombed and kept up with his remarks so I dropped him off first. After dropping him off, I got into the van and the other guys were apologizing for his behavior. They suggested that I kick his ass because he was a small man. I would never fight someone for being rude, but I did feel the need to poop. Without saying anything I got out of the van and pooped on his front porch. I wiped my butt with mapquest directions to his house so he knew that it was me. When I got back into the fan the three guys were like, "That's messed up, dude." I said, "You know what, I had to put up with his sh*t for one month. Now he has to put up with mine for one day."

hahaha!  Nice!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: aclarridge on June 05, 2014, 08:06:29 AM
So I started cutting back my hours..  this job was intended to be a 8 or 9 hour a day deal as opposed to the 12+ I was working so I tested leaving earlier and earlier each day, hopefully to regain my sanity.  I was surprisingly met with little resistance.  Eventually, I was given raises and promotions even though I had effectively cut my daily hours from 12 to like 7-8 today.

Your story (and especially this part) totally reminds me of BNL's latest post: "The Man" is You (http://www.bravenewlife.com/06/the-man-is-you/).

I enjoyed this article. From another perspective though, if the "Man" represents the company owners who basically want you to work like a slave for them, then you have to keep in mind that if you are an equity index investor you are a small part of the "Man". If you stick up for yourself like he says, and are a part owner in the company as well, you're the "Man" and from both perspectives you're doing great.
Sometimes when people complain about some jackass corporation that is part of an oligopoly and is ripping them off, I tell them it's a public company, if you think they make so much money then why not just buy part of it and participate in the fantastic profits?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Kriegsspiel on June 05, 2014, 11:07:39 AM
Not that epic, but does involve poop. There are two parts.

Part one: After graduating from undergrad, I took a "year off" before going to grad school. I worked for my cousin's plumbing business. He had someone quit unexpectedly and offered me good money to work for him for one month while he looked for a replacement. He was very nice and paid me well. However, I never worked with him on the job. I worked with a different plumber that treated me like sh*t. He really enjoyed calling me "college boy" and was looking for excuses for yelling at me. I finally lost it and put him in his place. I told him that I was there to help out my cousin and not listen to his bullsh*t. I told him that if he yelled at me again I was going to leave and he would be doing twice the amount of work until a replacement was found. My cousin also had a talk with him and he stopped.

Part two: My uncle was having a party and he hired me to drive drunk people home. The "plumber" knew my uncle and was at the party. I honestly didn't have any hard feelings and things were going well. However, after a few beers he started doing his thing again by calling me "college boy" and yelling at me to do things. I think he was trying to show off. I didn't say anything or do anything until I gave him a ride home. I was taking 4 guys to their houses including the plumber. He was bombed and kept up with his remarks so I dropped him off first. After dropping him off, I got into the van and the other guys were apologizing for his behavior. They suggested that I kick his ass because he was a small man. I would never fight someone for being rude, but I did feel the need to poop. Without saying anything I got out of the van and pooped on his front porch. I wiped my butt with mapquest directions to his house so he knew that it was me. When I got back into the fan the three guys were like, "That's messed up, dude." I said, "You know what, I had to put up with his sh*t for one month. Now he has to put up with mine for one day."

You win.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: frugally on June 08, 2014, 08:04:30 AM
Not that epic, but does involve poop. There are two parts.

Part one: After graduating from undergrad, I took a "year off" before going to grad school. I worked for my cousin's plumbing business. He had someone quit unexpectedly and offered me good money to work for him for one month while he looked for a replacement. He was very nice and paid me well. However, I never worked with him on the job. I worked with a different plumber that treated me like sh*t. He really enjoyed calling me "college boy" and was looking for excuses for yelling at me. I finally lost it and put him in his place. I told him that I was there to help out my cousin and not listen to his bullsh*t. I told him that if he yelled at me again I was going to leave and he would be doing twice the amount of work until a replacement was found. My cousin also had a talk with him and he stopped.

Part two: My uncle was having a party and he hired me to drive drunk people home. The "plumber" knew my uncle and was at the party. I honestly didn't have any hard feelings and things were going well. However, after a few beers he started doing his thing again by calling me "college boy" and yelling at me to do things. I think he was trying to show off. I didn't say anything or do anything until I gave him a ride home. I was taking 4 guys to their houses including the plumber. He was bombed and kept up with his remarks so I dropped him off first. After dropping him off, I got into the van and the other guys were apologizing for his behavior. They suggested that I kick his ass because he was a small man. I would never fight someone for being rude, but I did feel the need to poop. Without saying anything I got out of the van and pooped on his front porch. I wiped my butt with mapquest directions to his house so he knew that it was me. When I got back into the fan the three guys were like, "That's messed up, dude." I said, "You know what, I had to put up with his sh*t for one month. Now he has to put up with mine for one day."

This is brilliant.  Have you seen him since then?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gerard on June 08, 2014, 11:48:02 AM
A lot of the stories here are about people who didn't have anything to go to, or a backup plan, or any money saved... in essence, people who lost their jobs because they preferred the satisfaction of being in charge of the situation for five seconds.

Which is why I think *real* FU money is so powerful. You don't have to use it. You can afford to be nice to everyone, even assholes. You just don't do anything you don't want to, or that you think is wrong. Because you don't need that five-second satisfaction, because you're not stressed out or frustrated or overwhelmed or vulnerable to start with.

</captain obvious>
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on June 08, 2014, 06:19:35 PM
A lot of the stories here are about people who didn't have anything to go to, or a backup plan, or any money saved... in essence, people who lost their jobs because they preferred the satisfaction of being in charge of the situation for five seconds.

Which is why I think *real* FU money is so powerful. You don't have to use it. You can afford to be nice to everyone, even assholes. You just don't do anything you don't want to, or that you think is wrong. Because you don't need that five-second satisfaction, because you're not stressed out or frustrated or overwhelmed or vulnerable to start with.

</captain obvious>

Should be called IPD money ("I politely decline")
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: clarkfan1979 on June 08, 2014, 06:56:19 PM
A lot of the stories here are about people who didn't have anything to go to, or a backup plan, or any money saved... in essence, people who lost their jobs because they preferred the satisfaction of being in charge of the situation for five seconds.

Which is why I think *real* FU money is so powerful. You don't have to use it. You can afford to be nice to everyone, even assholes. You just don't do anything you don't want to, or that you think is wrong. Because you don't need that five-second satisfaction, because you're not stressed out or frustrated or overwhelmed or vulnerable to start with.

</captain obvious>

I politely disagree. I burn bridges because I can afford to do so. Being polite is typically someone who doesn't want to burn a bridge because they might still need something. I like the fu*king thing on fire!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Sofa King on June 08, 2014, 07:05:27 PM
Your story (and especially this part) totally reminds me of BNL's latest post: "The Man" is You (http://www.bravenewlife.com/06/the-man-is-you/).

This was great!!!!


[Mod Edit: Quote tags fixed.]
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: 2527 on June 09, 2014, 09:25:15 AM
The source of strength here was not money, but it is still a good story.

I was a major in the Air Force working for an obnoxious colonel.  At various times, he had thrown food at me, called me an asshole, and little shit.

Then, I was transferred to work in a small office directly supporting a four-star general, the colonel's boss' boss. 

I did something he didn't like, and he called me and started the phone conversation by calling me "fuckface."  The other people in the office could hear it.  I kept my cool, finished the conversation, and waited two days.  He obviously didn't grasp the significance of the fact that I now longer worked for him and was, in fact, pretty highly placed in the 4-star's office.

I went to his office, and told him his behavior was unprofessional and obnoxious, and I had been waiting two days for him to call me and apologize, but he hadn't done so.  I made sure to use the words asshole, fuckface and little shit over and over again.  He kept trying to divert the conversation, but I kept bringing it back to him and his behavior.  At several points, he abruptly stood up and walked around and looked out the window.  He clearly didn't want to be in the conversation.  I advised him several times that if he treated me unprofessionally, I would bring it up with his boss, a two-star general, and if that didn't work, I would bring it up with is boss's boss, who was the 4-star I now worked for. 

It was great.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Miamoo on June 09, 2014, 01:26:52 PM
Wow.  Maybe this has been covered but when I was growing up FU money was something the housewife stashed in case she had to escape from an abusive or intolerable marriage.  Showing my age I suppose.  Very negative and not good eh?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: citrine on June 09, 2014, 03:13:14 PM
I had some FU money saved up from the sale of my condo in 2005 and from stream lining my expenses....close to $35K.  My job in big pharma was getting out of control with a lying/cheating VP, a diva-esque Director, and just plain dysfunctional group of managers.  I had been told that I was not a team player because I would not fudge the bar tab on the expense report or lie for the VP when his pregnant wife called (he was hanging out with the VP of Marketing in her room drinking). 
We were having a change in management (again) and in the midst of all the interviews and what not...I handed in my resignation and told them I was going to go and explore other avenues...massage school in particular ;)  Many people snickered and laughed outright...said I would be back in a year begging for my job back.
Fast forward 5 years....I have a very successful practice, choose the hours/cases I will work with (medical massage), and the funny part is that a couple of those in high management have found me through Linkedin and became my clients :) I will never work for anyone else again.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Rural on June 09, 2014, 08:03:20 PM
Wow.  Maybe this has been covered but when I was growing up FU money was something the housewife stashed in case she had to escape from an abusive or intolerable marriage.  Showing my age I suppose.  Very negative and not good eh?


I don't know. I'd say having the FU money in that case is much better than not having it, so I wouldn't call it "not good." Too many abused spouses now don't have it.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: europe on June 10, 2014, 06:37:57 AM
Not that epic, but does involve poop.

I like it when posts start like this... :D
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wildflame on June 10, 2014, 12:33:20 PM
Gerard, I'm not sure it's so simple. Even with FU money, most people are inclined to be accommodating, non-confrontational people. There will always be someone who incites stress or frustration in the workplace. The 'power' of FU money doesn't come from the money itself - it comes from realising that in most circumstances, the 'worst that can happen' is not really that bad, and with that knowledge comes strength. Obviously having cash behind you eliminates many possibilities from 'the worst that can happen', but it's not the money that makes these stories so interesting - it's the object lesson in seeing a person discover their strength and resilience, and pushing back against the arseholes and bullpoop that make so many workplaces much more unpleasant than they need to be.

My FU money story was really boring. I got sick of my job. I wanted to take some time off before changing careers. So I quit, worked out my notice, and am the happier for it. If I was destitute, I could not have done that. One of my co-workers at that job has been in the same low-level retail job for five years working weekends on top of his regular job in a hospital - doing six days a week or thirteen days a fortnight between them. He will not and can not ever quit, because he is up to his armpits in debt and spends money like it's going out of fashion. He stressed about it every time I worked with him. Poor bugger. Thank goodness I'm not that guy. Thank goodness for FU money. =)

EDIT: Ah! I do have a slightly better one. About four months ago another of my coworkers decided to go study - interstate, with classes starting in a week. He was a casual, so he could quit with nothing more than a note. Which, because he hated the boss, is exactly what he did, writing the following immortal words and smiley into the store diary while working on the weekend, taking up a whole A4 page: "I don't work here anymore =) -(Name)". He blocked the boss's mobile and the store phone numbers, packed his stuff in his car and a hired trailer, and was gone just like that. I'm not sure how much savings he had, but it was definitely enough to keep him going for a good 3-4 months at least.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dweebyhawkeyes on June 10, 2014, 02:54:28 PM
Wow.  Maybe this has been covered but when I was growing up FU money was something the housewife stashed in case she had to escape from an abusive or intolerable marriage.  Showing my age I suppose.  Very negative and not good eh?

Interesting. I offered to rent an apartment for my friend and I if her emotionally abusive boyfriend wouldn't let her out of the relationship.. My FU money, but worth it to me to save her if needed.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 10, 2014, 03:28:11 PM
I think about a year after I left work I realized I could actually retire permanently without having to ever work again - even p/t - if I just sold my paid off house and downsized. I did that and became instantly FI.  I was also frugal, debt free, child free, divorced, and had mostly free or very low cost activities and knew I would have a government pension of $1400/month starting at age 50 and had free or low cost medical thru the VA medical system (although I have always bought a low cost private policy). I also have no heirs so have no problem spending down any principal I have in savings or investments over the coming years to supplement my pension as needed. Currently, with a paid off house and low taxes, insurance and utilities, I can live on about half my pension ($700) per month for basic expenses. The extra goes to travel and fun stuff - or needed things like getting the car fixed.  I've been FIREed over a decade now and love it. And no, I haven't had to go to work to plug any financial holes. Just reduce spending in other areas as needed or do without some things that don't have that much importance to me.

Thanks, that was very helpful. I like how you played with your options and finances (selling a home) to get you where you needed to be. And I love your beach volleyball and travel stories. Those are two of some of the things I want to spend more time on. I am also child-free and debt-free and don't plan on leaving much around when I get to the inevitable.

I just "downsized" late last year to a "smaller" place that helped me get mortgage free. I'm still waiting for the old house to sell (hence the nerves). But the new place is still quite luxurious and bigger than I need. I love the area. But I do have that as my ace in the hole if I need it (can sell and downsize even more in the future).

I'm just getting used to my new expense structure with this move. I think I have shaved off $20k in yearly expenses with this move - no mortgage, no yard maintenance, no alarm, no home phone, much less insurance costs, finally cut the cable, etc. It is quite freeing to see the change! And I only moved a mile away!

I am actually understating my stash. I have more than enough to cover my basic expenses at a 4% SWR. But I'd still like to beef up the travel amount and make sure I still have enough to cover my charitable donations. I'm also a little skittish with the current market highs. I'm sure it's doable if I am forced into the situation. We shall see...
I did tweak some things a bit but nothing too dramatic or life changing. Sort of a "Latte-Factor" kind of trade-off with most things. i.e. I didn't give up things, just found alternative (less expensive) ways to have the things I want. Like you, I also didn't have to move too far from my home in SoCal (Orange County) as I didn't want to move too far from my family and friends. So just moved about 100 miles away (and 7,000 ft up!) and bought a home for about 1/4th the price I sold my place for. And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon! So I think there are ways to retire or temporarily quit your job (with enough FU money that is) and not have to make too drastic of a lifestyle change.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on June 10, 2014, 07:33:35 PM
Gerard, I'm not sure it's so simple. Even with FU money, most people are inclined to be accommodating, non-confrontational people. There will always be someone who incites stress or frustration in the workplace. The 'power' of FU money doesn't come from the money itself - it comes from realising that in most circumstances, the 'worst that can happen' is not really that bad, and with that knowledge comes strength. Obviously having cash behind you eliminates many possibilities from 'the worst that can happen', but it's not the money that makes these stories so interesting - it's the object lesson in seeing a person discover their strength and resilience, and pushing back against the arseholes and bullpoop that make so many workplaces much more unpleasant than they need to be.

Wow that was so awesome I re-read it 3 times. Perfectly stated!!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Insanity on June 10, 2014, 07:36:13 PM
And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon!

You suck.

No, really, you suck.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on June 10, 2014, 08:25:17 PM
So just moved about 100 miles away (and 7,000 ft up!) and bought a home for about 1/4th the price I sold my place for.

Sweet!!! I live in a high COL area, but also close to family and friends...and the beach. But Florida has other beach towns that are cheaper. I guess I can move to one of those in the future. My parents are getting old and frail so I can't move too far away yet.

I would also love to live in Colorado. I can't ever see myself buying two places though.

I agree that there's always a cheaper way to do the same thing and spend a lot less money. You just have to be creative and flexible.

And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon!

You are living my dream life!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 10, 2014, 10:29:15 PM
And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon!

You suck.

No, really, you suck.
I'm sorry I can't hear you with all that beach sand in my ears :-)!90 minutes outside LA:
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 10, 2014, 10:36:47 PM
So just moved about 100 miles away (and 7,000 ft up!) and bought a home for about 1/4th the price I sold my place for.

Sweet!!! I live in a high COL area, but also close to family and friends...and the beach. But Florida has other beach towns that are cheaper. I guess I can move to one of those in the future. My parents are getting old and frail so I can't move too far away yet.

I would also love to live in Colorado. I can't ever see myself buying two places though.

I agree that there's always a cheaper way to do the same thing and spend a lot less money. You just have to be creative and flexible.

And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon!

You are living my dream life!
I think I would have liked to live in a lower cost area myself but living only 90 minutes away from family (also elderly parents) was important to me too. Plus I had several  pets (dogs and cats) so knew I couldn't get a condo or apt or rent a room and had to get a house. It wasn't ideal but was very workable.  Having pets was a big factor when I chose to quit working - even if I had the FU money to do it - as I knew that would greatly effect my  housing options. Much easier to walk off the job when you know you only have yourself to look after and provide for. Something for those with pets contemplating leaving their jobs.

edited to add that I moved back down "The Hill" 2 years ago and bought a house near the beach with my sister back in Orange County Calif. So I am back in a high cost area - although bought the house as a foreclosure during the bottom of the market for a low price- but splitting the purchase cost and housing costs is a huge money saver. Otherwise I wouldn't be able to buy  in this area. And I'm still only 90 minutes from the mountain ski resorts and 10 minutes from the beach :-)!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: iris lily on June 10, 2014, 10:49:09 PM
And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon!

You suck.

No, really, you suck.

aw there she is, sashaying around the web gloating again.  :)  She's the Gloat Queen on another simple living board. I can attest to it, I've been reading her posts for more than 10 years and she really DOES have the life. But she knows how to make the decisions to get there.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 10, 2014, 11:08:45 PM
And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon!

You suck.

No, really, you suck.

aw there she is, sashaying around the web gloating again.  :)  She's the Gloat Queen on another simple living board. I can attest to it, I've been reading her posts for more than 10 years and she really DOES have the life. But she knows how to make the decisions to get there.
It's not gloating, it's inspirering others to become lazy good for nothing mustachian fools too :-)! And when are you going to quit that job-thingie and join me in lazytown? Then we can both suck!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Insanity on June 11, 2014, 07:34:18 AM
And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon!

You suck.

No, really, you suck.

aw there she is, sashaying around the web gloating again.  :)  She's the Gloat Queen on another simple living board. I can attest to it, I've been reading her posts for more than 10 years and she really DOES have the life. But she knows how to make the decisions to get there.
It's not gloating, it's inspirering others to become lazy good for nothing mustachian fools too :-)! And when are you going to quit that job-thingie and join me in lazytown? Then we can both suck!

I don't think it is gloating.  But it doesn't change the fact she still sucks.

You promise my fat and lazy ass a doubles tourney as soon as I FIRE and I'll be there.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on June 11, 2014, 11:21:37 AM
And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon!

You suck.

No, really, you suck.
I'm sorry I can't hear you with all that beach sand in my ears :-)!90 minutes outside LA:

I love big bear, but property isn't exactly cheap there.  Is it super seasonal there?  And how bad is the snow?  I've only been in the summer.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 11, 2014, 01:52:36 PM
And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon!

You suck.

No, really, you suck.

aw there she is, sashaying around the web gloating again.  :)  She's the Gloat Queen on another simple living board. I can attest to it, I've been reading her posts for more than 10 years and she really DOES have the life. But she knows how to make the decisions to get there.
It's not gloating, it's inspirering others to become lazy good for nothing mustachian fools too :-)! And when are you going to quit that job-thingie and join me in lazytown? Then we can both suck!

I don't think it is gloating.  But it doesn't change the fact she still sucks.

You promise my fat and lazy ass a doubles tourney as soon as I FIRE and I'll be there.
I'll be there to whup your hiney-end :-)! Of course I'm older and slower now since I've been FTRE'd sooooooooo long now. Hmmm...sounds like that could be a gloat :-)!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 11, 2014, 02:06:50 PM
And still was close enough to snow ski in the morning and surf at the beach (or play beach volleyball) in the afternoon!

You suck.

No, really, you suck.
I'm sorry I can't hear you with all that beach sand in my ears :-)!90 minutes outside LA:

I love big bear, but property isn't exactly cheap there.  Is it super seasonal there?  And how bad is the snow?  I've only been in the summer.
Big Bear's not as cheap as it was but still much less when compared to The O.C. - especially the coastal area I was living in (and now live in again). The drive up and back can be hard, especially in winter, and you often need snow tires and 4 x 4 or chains. The roads sometimes get closed because of mudslides or avalanches (and can take week or even months to be re-opened) and there can be wildfires that cause problems. But still, lots of people choose to live there and actually commute to LA or the IE everyday (lots of crazy people IMHO) as there really aren't any good paying jobs up there. Weather-wise it is near perfect I think. Much cooler then most of SoCal in summer (and cold at night), close to year round sunshine, fairly minimal snow (maybe 80 inches a year - and only a 30 minute or less drive to get off the mountain and into warm dry weather), more rain in summer due to thunderstorms but brief refreshing rain, and a pretty place to live. Lots of recreation. The Village area can get crowded but it's an easy walk or bike ride everywhere in the Valley so can go carless - even have a bus that goes between all the mountain communities and down to San Bernardino. I liked living there but it is a small place, surrounded by National Forest, and not for those who want the city life. However, like many resort areas, it has everything a small city has, just on a smaller scale. 4 seasons too - all nice.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on June 11, 2014, 08:38:02 PM
aw there she is, sashaying around the web gloating again.  :)  She's the Gloat Queen on another simple living board. I can attest to it, I've been reading her posts for more than 10 years and she really DOES have the life. But she knows how to make the decisions to get there.

Spartana - the Goddess of FIRE.

I don't see it as gloating. I am quite inspired by her stories.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: iris lily on June 11, 2014, 09:08:41 PM
aw there she is, sashaying around the web gloating again.  :)  She's the Gloat Queen on another simple living board. I can attest to it, I've been reading her posts for more than 10 years and she really DOES have the life. But she knows how to make the decisions to get there.

Spartana - the Goddess of FIRE.

I don't see it as gloating. I am quite inspired by her stories.

Oh it's gloating all right, haha. This is an inside joke of long standing.  And I'm in countdown mode, less than a year to go punching a time clock and then I can sit around and gloat about enjoying a carefree life.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on June 11, 2014, 09:20:43 PM
aw there she is, sashaying around the web gloating again.  :)  She's the Gloat Queen on another simple living board. I can attest to it, I've been reading her posts for more than 10 years and she really DOES have the life. But she knows how to make the decisions to get there.

Spartana - the Goddess of FIRE.

I don't see it as gloating. I am quite inspired by her stories.

Oh it's gloating all right, haha. This is an inside joke of long standing.  And I'm in countdown mode, less than a year to go punching a time clock and then I can sit around and gloat about enjoying a carefree life.

(premature) Congratulations!

I may be 1-3 years away myself. I am looking forward to the carefree life. I do try my best to incorporate the carefree attitude in my current life. I'm so close to FIRE that even if it happens earlier than planned, I can cope.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 12, 2014, 12:36:51 AM
aw there she is, sashaying around the web gloating again.  :)  She's the Gloat Queen on another simple living board. I can attest to it, I've been reading her posts for more than 10 years and she really DOES have the life. But she knows how to make the decisions to get there.

Spartana - the Goddess of FIRE.

I don't see it as gloating. I am quite inspired by her stories.

Oh it's gloating all right, haha. This is an inside joke of long standing.  And I'm in countdown mode, less than a year to go punching a time clock and then I can sit around and gloat about enjoying a carefree life.
well you know the longer you call me out on my gloating...er...inspiring ancedotes, the worse they will become :-)!

Now if I can only get that flame dress from Hunger Games and the chariot to pull me thru the streets while cheering people throw money and roses at me, then I'll know I am truly The Goddess of FIRE and Queen of the Gloaters! Until then I shall remain humble ole me :-)!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 12, 2014, 12:47:51 AM
OK back to the topic! Has anyone ever just up and left a job with no FU money? Just enough to maybe get them thru for a little while in the hopes of getting something better?

 My younger sister did this kind of thing off and on for years. At 17 - after finishing high school and working a retail job - she went skiing for a weekend with some friends and ended up just staying at the ski resort. No money except a jar of pennies (yep, pennies). She was able to find a place to crash for a few night, scrounge up a bit of food and then a job as a lift ticket checker. She ended up staying there for several years.

Another time she just left her job and took off to New Zealand for a year and returned with 13 cents to her name (worked while she was there picking fruit). Another time she just left her job and travelled around the US for a year. And 4 years in a row she just worked enough in winters so she could take off in summers and spent 4 summers in Alaska (working there too). Lots of other things like that. She eventually got a job with a big defense contractor and "settled" down in her early 30's and has been there ever since and plans to retire from there once she is 55.

And surprisingly, doing all those years of giving the finger to various low paying jobs and spending all her money each time afterwards, she still has a huge stash, was able to buy a place with cash in a SoCal beach community, and could probably retire now oif she chooses. No college education (or debts of any kind) either. So there's hope for people who want to say FU to the job occasionally yet still get ahead.
 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: ch12 on June 12, 2014, 04:33:42 AM
OK back to the topic! Has anyone ever just up and left a job with no FU money? Just enough to maybe get them thru for a little while in the hopes of getting something better?

My younger sister did this kind of thing off and on for years.
And surprisingly, doing all those years of giving the finger to various low paying jobs and spending all her money each time afterwards, she still has a huge stash, was able to buy a place with cash in a SoCal beach community, and could probably retire now if she chooses. No college education (or debts of any kind) either. So there's hope for people who want to say FU to the job occasionally yet still get ahead.

'Stashing is probably a byproduct of the frugal habits she picked up when she was making small amounts of money. Once she made a normal wage, she kept the habits and ended rich anyway.

I have friends who are still at that stage (early 20s) and I hope they get sorted out the same way. I'm a wee bit jealous of their adventures (where are we this week? Patagonia), but there is something to be said about the stability of an office job with a regular paycheck.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 12, 2014, 09:15:27 AM
OK back to the topic! Has anyone ever just up and left a job with no FU money? Just enough to maybe get them thru for a little while in the hopes of getting something better?

My younger sister did this kind of thing off and on for years.
And surprisingly, doing all those years of giving the finger to various low paying jobs and spending all her money each time afterwards, she still has a huge stash, was able to buy a place with cash in a SoCal beach community, and could probably retire now if she chooses. No college education (or debts of any kind) either. So there's hope for people who want to say FU to the job occasionally yet still get ahead.

'Stashing is probably a byproduct of the frugal habits she picked up when she was making small amounts of money. Once she made a normal wage, she kept the habits and ended rich anyway.

I have friends who are still at that stage (early 20s) and I hope they get sorted out the same way. I'm a wee bit jealous of their adventures (where are we this week? Patagonia), but there is something to be said about the stability of an office job with a regular paycheck.
Yes you are right. She continued to live on very little money and stashed the rest. I know she is happy with her choices to travel and have adventures while young rather then work as she, like me, often see people who have been in school and working hard all their lives who sort of lose it around age 40. All of a sudden dump it all (job, money, often spouse and kids) and run off to the tropical isle (or buy that snazzy red sports car :-)!).  The non-stop/no-breaks school and work thing may really be the culprit behind a lot of mid-life crisis'. Maybe taking a break in between for a couple of years or before serious career can be more stable in the long run then an office job and a pay check. For a little while at least :-)!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on June 12, 2014, 10:06:37 AM
Has anyone ever just up and left a job with no FU money? Just enough to maybe get them thru for a little while in the hopes of getting something better?

Others here disagree, but to me this is the definition of FU money: enough to leave a bad job.  For me it's less than FIRE money, but for others it's the same or even zero.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: OzzieandHarriet on June 12, 2014, 10:51:29 AM
I can't remember exactly when it dawned on me that I could put the maximum into my 401k and IRA. It was some time after I got married at 41 (am now 56). I didn't start working full time until I was 35 and had no clue about retirement accounts because I was just getting by (though frugally). My only investment at the time was a house that my mother helped me buy. But in any case, husband and I both started maxing out all possible retirement accounts at some point in the past 15 years. We both kept getting modest raises every year (his salary always about double mine). When my job became intolerable last year, I did try to improve things there, but nothing worked. I looked at our income and our stash and realized that yes, we had enough for me to jump, so I did. I left on good terms, but left nevertheless.

It's been almost a year now, and we have had no money problems whatsoever. I've been keeping track of how our investments are doing, and they are generating twice as much income as we need (of course that can change depending on the stock market); at the moment, we are living on about half of husband's income and still saving so haven't had to touch the stash.

I was able to set up a freelance side gig, now am wondering if I even need to keep doing that -- it's taking up too much of my valuable time!

Not exactly "epic," but I still can't believe I was able to do it.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gerard on June 12, 2014, 05:10:01 PM
Gerard, I'm not sure it's so simple. Even with FU money, most people are inclined to be accommodating, non-confrontational people. There will always be someone who incites stress or frustration in the workplace. The 'power' of FU money doesn't come from the money itself - it comes from realising that in most circumstances, the 'worst that can happen' is not really that bad, and with that knowledge comes strength. Obviously having cash behind you eliminates many possibilities from 'the worst that can happen', but it's not the money that makes these stories so interesting - it's the object lesson in seeing a person discover their strength and resilience, and pushing back against the arseholes and bullpoop that make so many workplaces much more unpleasant than they need to be.

I see your point, and your "worst that can happen" point is wise and I thank you for expressing it so clearly. My point was/is that in many of the earlier stories on here, the pushing back involves harming the pusher as much as the pushee. I didn't see much power in them. To deliberately misquote, revenge is a dish best eaten not at all.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Iconoclast on June 13, 2014, 04:36:59 AM
From all the stories here (great thread!) I realized I might have my own FU money story...

After law school, my second full-time job was as a legal researcher at an institute of a certain university. They hired me to write a book for which they had already received the grant. After a few months, I learned I was the only one who applied for the job. Had I known that, I might have bargained a bit harder... My contract was for one year, with the option of being hired for a PhD position afterwards.

Anyhow, it dawned pretty quickly on me that it was a toxic workplace. The professor in charge was a psychopath who would just yell at people if he felt like it. The people around him were a bunch of yes men. My direct colleagues -the other researchers and Ph D students- were great people however. We helped each other out after we'd been the victim of another one of the professor's fits and generally had a lot of fun, behind the backs of management of course.

It took me a few months to write the requested book. After that, the idea was to have me working on other projects to generate some extra income for the institute. The other projects never materialized and I was bored out of my wits. In the beginning, I'd go to the university library to read up on different subjects, but even that got boring. What I did in the end -and I'm not proud of it but as I said, the boredom was intolerable- is go to the office, hang my coat on my desk chair, then bike home again and go back in the evening to pick up my coat. It was pretty clear that I needed another job, so I prepared for the entrance exams for another job in government. I aced those tests (thanks to all the preparation time) and am still in that organization today.

A couple of months before my contract was up, I got the confirmation that I was accepted in the new job. My contract would end in July and the other job would start in October, although they offered me to start earlier, which I politely declined because I had enough 'stache to cover a couple of months of expenses to travel and generally bum around. Those months were awesome! At work I gave my manager the impression that I was very interested in a PhD position, so they thought they could take advantage of me for a couple of more years. Eventually I had to break the news to my (fairly spineless) manager and he listened to me but never replied, he just nodded and never said a word to me after that. I followed up with an e-mail to cover my behind so he could not deny that I had informed him. I think that when I told him, he realized the professor would be screaming at him because I was leaving and he was probably scared shi(r)tless.

A couple of days before my last work day, one of the secretaries informed me that I would have a meeting with the professor in a couple of hours. Obviously he wanted to have one last yelling session at me for some invented reason, while the real reason was that I was committing treason by leaving. I walked out the building and never returned. There was already a farewell party planned with my direct colleagues so there was no damage there.

As I said, I had a few great months in between jobs. The story doesn't end there, however. About six months later, I received the PhD dissertation from my manager in the mail, with a request for money to buy him a gift (AS IF!). When I browsed the book, I noticed that some parts were copied  from articles that I had published in my time at the institute, without the proper footnotes. I notified the committee that had decided on his PhD application, and the PhD graduation ceremony was cancelled. The local press jumped on it. There was a ceremony afterwards, but it was very hush-hush and a note was added to all the dissertation papers that pages X to Y had been written by Iconoclast and the author had "forgotten" to include the footnotes.

About a year later, the institute was disbanded. The university had been building a file against the professor, and he left for another university with some of his yes men. The PhD's were transferred to other departments to finish their work there. The contracts of the other people were not renewed, including my manager. According to LinkedIn, he's still working in my current region in the same field as me, but I'm pretty sure he's unemployed because I never run into him professionally. It doesn't help that when you Google his name, the word plagiarism is never far off.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: shadowmoss on June 13, 2014, 07:44:54 AM
Spartana has a(nother) forum to gloat, errr, inspire!  Whoopieeee!  I've been reading her gloats with envy for many years!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 13, 2014, 03:18:15 PM
Spartana has a(nother) forum to gloat, errr, inspire!  Whoopieeee!  I've been reading her gloats with envy for many years!
And now that Iris-Lily will be joining me on the darkside and into ER soon you're next!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: lhamo on June 13, 2014, 05:00:46 PM
Friends from the Simple Living forums (waving to all of you) are probably sick of my story but I'll share it anyway, as it might be helpful to others.

I had a career meltdown a few years ago in which FU money saved my life, literally.  Short story is I hit a very thick, impenetrable glass ceiling imposed by a boss with psychopathic traits.  Longer story is that they hired someone in over my head to do a job that should have been mine, without ever telling me the job was available.  New hire had NO relevant experience and was totally incapable of doing the job, and it was clear I would be doing it for him.  Oh, and then they tried to give me a 20% paycut because I was no longer in a managerial role.  Almost quit at that point, and again when psycho boss engineered a very negative performance review to cover his butt (I stupidly walked right into that one).  But I had some projects that meant a lot to me that I wanted to wrap up, so I focused on those while I literally started counting the days until I would leave.  I had a lovely excel spreadsheet that calculated what I was earning daily.  I spaced out my time off so that I would have a few "money for nothing" days interspersed every few weeks to help keep me going.  I applied for a fellowship that I was almost certain I would get as my transition strategy.

The day I had my fellowship interview and got confirmation that I would be getting it, I wrote and submitted my resignation.  Originally my DH was going to quit, too (we worked for the same organization), but in the end he decided to stay -- that ended up being good for us financially, but did cause some tension in our marriage.  The fellowship money was only about 1/2 my takehome pay, but our expenses were low and we were basically living off of one salary anyway, so the risks were minimal.  We also had a very large cash stash to fall back on as we had been living way below our means for several years.

I wasn't really sure what I was going to do once the fellowship (which was for about 6 months) was over.  Had originally thought I'd do some kind of consulting, but was worried about whether/how it would work.  Serendipity played her hand and a great job came up right as my fellowship was winding down.  It was a bit below my skill set, and I took a paycut, but it turned out to be just what I needed.  I could do the job well pretty much in my sleep, and quickly became indispensable to the organization and the program.  Decent raises followed, and I'm now on the verge of a major promotion and (hopefully) a more significant raise.  There have been some ups and downs in the last year, and to be honest I'm not sure I'm all that happy with how things have played out and not sure how long I'm going to stick with things.  Definitely in "play it by ear" mode at the moment.  But the last few years have been VERY good for us financially and if push came to shove we are in a position where we could sell our apartment and be financially set for life.  DH doesn't want to do that, and isn't ready to stop working yet, so we're in a bit of a holding pattern.  I look at our spreadsheets pretty obsessively and am running numbers on Fidelity's Retirement INcome Planner regularly just to confirm that we can cut the handcuffs any time.

Sometimes I wish I was on my own so I could take the leap like Spartana (my frugal Wondertwin!) did, but the reality is I wouldn't have gotten this far without a great and supportive spouse, who is someone I want to grow old with, so I need to be patient and wait until he is ready, too.

That being said, my fantasies about quitting and opening a dive shop in Costa Rica intensify every day.  And I don't dive and I've never been to Costa Rica.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 13, 2014, 05:12:04 PM
Friends from the Simple Living forums (waving to all of you) are probably sick of my story but I'll share it anyway, as it might be helpful to others.
Sometimes I wish I was on my own so I could take the leap like Spartana (my frugal Wondertwin!) That being said, my fantasies about quitting and opening a dive shop in Costa Rica intensify every day.  And I don't dive and I've never been to Costa Rica.
Well I love hearing your story - and the "dream life" of opening a dive shop in Costa Rica with out having ever dived - cracked me up.

And before she was a Wonder Twin, she was She-Rah, Princess of Power and Gloat. Hanging with He-Man and Ihamo the Wonder Woman :-)!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on June 13, 2014, 05:22:20 PM
Friends from the Simple Living forums (waving to all of you) are probably sick of my story but I'll share it anyway, as it might be helpful to others.

I had a career meltdown a few years ago in which FU money saved my life, literally.  Short story is I hit a very thick, impenetrable glass ceiling imposed by a boss with psychopathic traits.  Longer story is that they hired someone in over my head to do a job that should have been mine, without ever telling me the job was available.  New hire had NO relevant experience and was totally incapable of doing the job, and it was clear I would be doing it for him.  Oh, and then they tried to give me a 20% paycut because I was no longer in a managerial role.  Almost quit at that point, and again when psycho boss engineered a very negative performance review to cover his butt (I stupidly walked right into that one).  But I had some projects that meant a lot to me that I wanted to wrap up, so I focused on those while I literally started counting the days until I would leave.  I had a lovely excel spreadsheet that calculated what I was earning daily.  I spaced out my time off so that I would have a few "money for nothing" days interspersed every few weeks to help keep me going.  I applied for a fellowship that I was almost certain I would get as my transition strategy.

The day I had my fellowship interview and got confirmation that I would be getting it, I wrote and submitted my resignation.  Originally my DH was going to quit, too (we worked for the same organization), but in the end he decided to stay -- that ended up being good for us financially, but did cause some tension in our marriage.  The fellowship money was only about 1/2 my takehome pay, but our expenses were low and we were basically living off of one salary anyway, so the risks were minimal.  We also had a very large cash stash to fall back on as we had been living way below our means for several years.

I wasn't really sure what I was going to do once the fellowship (which was for about 6 months) was over.  Had originally thought I'd do some kind of consulting, but was worried about whether/how it would work.  Serendipity played her hand and a great job came up right as my fellowship was winding down.  It was a bit below my skill set, and I took a paycut, but it turned out to be just what I needed.  I could do the job well pretty much in my sleep, and quickly became indispensable to the organization and the program.  Decent raises followed, and I'm now on the verge of a major promotion and (hopefully) a more significant raise.  There have been some ups and downs in the last year, and to be honest I'm not sure I'm all that happy with how things have played out and not sure how long I'm going to stick with things.  Definitely in "play it by ear" mode at the moment.  But the last few years have been VERY good for us financially and if push came to shove we are in a position where we could sell our apartment and be financially set for life.  DH doesn't want to do that, and isn't ready to stop working yet, so we're in a bit of a holding pattern.  I look at our spreadsheets pretty obsessively and am running numbers on Fidelity's Retirement INcome Planner regularly just to confirm that we can cut the handcuffs any time.

Sometimes I wish I was on my own so I could take the leap like Spartana (my frugal Wondertwin!) did, but the reality is I wouldn't have gotten this far without a great and supportive spouse, who is someone I want to grow old with, so I need to be patient and wait until he is ready, too.

That being said, my fantasies about quitting and opening a dive shop in Costa Rica intensify every day.  And I don't dive and I've never been to Costa Rica.

So how did it save your life?  I was waiting to hear how the ex-boss murdered his new subordinate.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: FunkyStickman on June 13, 2014, 05:52:29 PM
I guess I'll add my "epiphany" moment.

3 years ago, I was working in I.T. for a small-ish branch of a local manufacturer. I'd been working for about 15 years as a contract desktop support guy, and after all that, I was capped out around $28K a year, if that. Through those 15 years, my wife and I managed to go completely debt-free except our mortgage while raising 4 kids.

So at that time I was working as a contractor in Louisiana. My "manager" was a slacktard in North Carolina who oversaw a half dozen units, mostly small remote ones, like ours. I worked at that factory for 5 years, and he never once came to visit, but somehow our unit was always at the bottom of the performance scorecards. Didn't matter what I did, it was never enough. He would randomly IM me during the day and ask me why I hadn't gotten on certain tickets. Usually it was because our local factory guys couldn't drop what they were doing to wait an hour for us to fix something, so we had to wait till they were available. Over and over, our "manager" would berate our performance, demand action, throttle our internet access, change our process every other month, generally make things as difficult as possible.

A lot of other units had figured out how to "game" the system and were making ridiculous numbers doing nothing at all, but I refused to cheat the system. I documented everything and kept trying to make our customers happy. I spent those 5 years making really good relationships with the managers in the factory, and from being generally helpful and nice, I had a lot of pull with people. One manager pulled me aside and said "Jeff, I like you. If you ever want to leave the I.T. department and come work for me, I'd love to have you." She was cool, but I was stoic and loyal to my "manager."

Then I got seriously hurt, was off of work for 2 months. I had come to my senses... I realized I was never going to make more than $15/hr fixing computers. I was going home hating my job every day.

One day, I asked the HR person off-hand what a starting tractor assembler made, with no experience. They said "$16.50. Why?"

I went straight back to my desk, called my manager, and told him in no uncertain terms that I was quitting.
Him: "You're quitting?"
Me: "Yes. I can make more money assembling tractors in the factory, with no experience, than fixing printers and replacing laptop motherboards all day with 15 years' experience. Think about that for a minute."
Him: "You do know if you quit, you can't come back?"
Me: "Don't worry, that won't happen."
Him: "....."

I'm now working for that woman that asked me to join her department... only built tractors for about 6 months before I got promoted. And now I'm a full company employee, not a contractor. Making almost $50K, and I love my job. Now I'm able to stash 25% of my income towards FI.

If I wasn't debt-free, I never would have had the guts to quit my job. We had 6 months income in the bank.

About a year into the new job, both of my upper managers were replaced... so now my managers are corporate yes-men. One of them only got the position because his old job was eliminated, so they created a management place for him. Yay.

I told them in no uncertain terms that I love my job, I had enough money to not care about working overtime, I did *not* wish to get promoted or go on salary, and I was *not* okay with all the stupidity that went with being a corporate whore. Every week or so I get the "you should have a development plan" speech, and I just tell them I'm not interested in advancement, as I will be retired before either of them.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: lhamo on June 13, 2014, 06:42:11 PM
So how did it save your life?  I was waiting to hear how the ex-boss murdered his new subordinate.

The entire career meltdown thing threw me into a severe depression.  If I hadn't walked away I might have walked off the edge of a tall building instead. 

The new subordinate was as much of a snake as psycho boss and actually outlasted him, in spite of having absolutely nothing to offer the organization beyond excel spreadsheet fiddling skills.  Subordinate finally just got canned recently, though. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: PloddingInsight on June 16, 2014, 08:13:17 AM
I guess I'll add my "epiphany" moment.

3 years ago, I was working in I.T. for a small-ish branch of a local manufacturer. I'd been working for about 15 years as a contract desktop support guy, and after all that, I was capped out around $28K a year, if that. Through those 15 years, my wife and I managed to go completely debt-free except our mortgage while raising 4 kids.

So at that time I was working as a contractor in Louisiana. My "manager" was a slacktard in North Carolina who oversaw a half dozen units, mostly small remote ones, like ours. I worked at that factory for 5 years, and he never once came to visit, but somehow our unit was always at the bottom of the performance scorecards. Didn't matter what I did, it was never enough. He would randomly IM me during the day and ask me why I hadn't gotten on certain tickets. Usually it was because our local factory guys couldn't drop what they were doing to wait an hour for us to fix something, so we had to wait till they were available. Over and over, our "manager" would berate our performance, demand action, throttle our internet access, change our process every other month, generally make things as difficult as possible.

A lot of other units had figured out how to "game" the system and were making ridiculous numbers doing nothing at all, but I refused to cheat the system. I documented everything and kept trying to make our customers happy. I spent those 5 years making really good relationships with the managers in the factory, and from being generally helpful and nice, I had a lot of pull with people. One manager pulled me aside and said "Jeff, I like you. If you ever want to leave the I.T. department and come work for me, I'd love to have you." She was cool, but I was stoic and loyal to my "manager."

Then I got seriously hurt, was off of work for 2 months. I had come to my senses... I realized I was never going to make more than $15/hr fixing computers. I was going home hating my job every day.

One day, I asked the HR person off-hand what a starting tractor assembler made, with no experience. They said "$16.50. Why?"

I went straight back to my desk, called my manager, and told him in no uncertain terms that I was quitting.
Him: "You're quitting?"
Me: "Yes. I can make more money assembling tractors in the factory, with no experience, than fixing printers and replacing laptop motherboards all day with 15 years' experience. Think about that for a minute."
Him: "You do know if you quit, you can't come back?"
Me: "Don't worry, that won't happen."
Him: "....."

I'm now working for that woman that asked me to join her department... only built tractors for about 6 months before I got promoted. And now I'm a full company employee, not a contractor. Making almost $50K, and I love my job. Now I'm able to stash 25% of my income towards FI.

If I wasn't debt-free, I never would have had the guts to quit my job. We had 6 months income in the bank.

About a year into the new job, both of my upper managers were replaced... so now my managers are corporate yes-men. One of them only got the position because his old job was eliminated, so they created a management place for him. Yay.

I told them in no uncertain terms that I love my job, I had enough money to not care about working overtime, I did *not* wish to get promoted or go on salary, and I was *not* okay with all the stupidity that went with being a corporate whore. Every week or so I get the "you should have a development plan" speech, and I just tell them I'm not interested in advancement, as I will be retired before either of them.

This is a great story.  Thanks for the inspiration.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Trudie on June 16, 2014, 05:29:39 PM
I read this whole thread from start to finish today.  Very inspirational and funny.

I don't have FU money yet, but I think almost everyone fantasizes about being able to tell their crappy managers off.  What strikes me about this forum is how dehumanizing and rude so many managers are.  I think this is due to the "every person for him/herself" ethic that is so pervasive in the work force.  It's the "eat or be eaten" mentality.  I manage a department at a small company.  My peers and I know that if push came to shove our general manager would throw any of us under the bus.  Especially if his future, job, or compensation were threatened.  He views us all as replaceable cogs in a wheel, but I know that he would have difficulty replacing any one of us.  He can, but it would be expensive and involve using consultants.  Since we're publicly-owned and in a small community I don't think shareholders would stand for it.  In my first month on the job he told me that "We don't really have any exceptional employees here."

My dream -- which I will never realize -- is to give him my two week notice at a difficult time (like before the audit) then basically say, "Fuck you fucker!" 

It will never happen, but it makes me laugh.  It is very likely that I will someday have the great joy of handing in my notice and making his life difficult, however.  And it will piss him off all the more because I don't NEED him, and I don't NEED the job.  Quite honestly, taking the high road and just walking out and making it clear that he doesn't have power over me and I don't owe him anything will be infinitely more satisfying.  That's liberation!


Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DutchMustachian on June 17, 2014, 05:50:49 AM
These are all very cool FU stories, love them!

Anyone keeping a "FU resignment" letter under a shortcut on their desktop or hard-copy around at work? Just in case you'll need it and have a FU stash?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on June 17, 2014, 09:00:12 AM
These are all very cool FU stories, love them!

Anyone keeping a "FU resignment" letter under a shortcut on their desktop or hard-copy around at work? Just in case you'll need it and have a FU stash?

Nope, just a bottle of jack and a parachute.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Trudie on June 17, 2014, 10:47:33 AM
These are all very cool FU stories, love them!

Anyone keeping a "FU resignment" letter under a shortcut on their desktop or hard-copy around at work? Just in case you'll need it and have a FU stash?

Nope, just a bottle of jack and a parachute.

"Just a bottle of jack and a parachute..."  Laughing my ass off at that one.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on June 17, 2014, 11:37:20 AM
Spartana has a(nother) forum to gloat, errr, inspire!  Whoopieeee!  I've been reading her gloats with envy for many years!
And now that Iris-Lily will be joining me on the darkside and into ER soon you're next!

I feel so left out. I just met you and haven't read your gloats for too long yet, but I would like to receive the ER-prodding encouragement from the Queen of Gloat for my ER in the next few years.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: marty998 on June 17, 2014, 04:40:43 PM
What strikes me about this forum is how dehumanizing and rude so many managers are. 

This is the fault of management consultants and the HR industry. Staff are not referred to as people anymore. We are simply "resources" no different than say computers.

It's less of an emotional burden to fire, allocate and restructure resources than it is to do the same with people. Another piece of evidence in favour of the idea you need to be a dispassionate, unfeeling psychopath to be a "good" executive.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DMoney on June 17, 2014, 07:28:01 PM
Awesome thread. Enjoying reading all the stories.  Raised some good discussions with my SO this evening.

Our take aways: Neither of us are really into burning bridges, especially since we work in rather small fields.  And luckily right now have pretty good bosses.  BUT I do like the idea that FU money gives you more leverage.  For instance, I'm hoping in a year or two my SO can ask to work from home 1-2 days a week in the event we move closer to my new assignment (which would result in a long commute for him).  Reading all these posts has let me know we probably have some leverage in that request.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Chippewa on June 17, 2014, 08:54:36 PM
It's not epic but I have quit on a whim more-or-less and immediately walked out of the building. It was very satisfying. Nothing soothes the soul like quitting a toxic job.

Love the last sentence. And while I love my career, I can't wait for the day I can make an on-the-whim decision like that without hurting me financially.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Lifestyle Deflation on June 17, 2014, 09:01:38 PM
About ~3-4 years ago I was working at a consulting firm and working about 80-90 hours a week. The workload was flat-out ridiculous and I was also on-call 24/7. Every other night I'd get a page at 2 AM that I'd have to respond to. I was about 25 at the time and it was my first "real" job. I'd had it for 3-4 years so I was loyal and didn't rock the boat.

The biggest issue? I made about $50,000. One day I decided to look up what the average consultant in my field was making in my area. It was $100,000. I thought about it for a week or two and decided to ask my boss for a raise to $100,000, printing out the article that said what the average salary was. He made some excuses about "seniority" and other crap and gave me a raise to $55,000.

A month later, still stressed out and feeling like shit, I decided to give my 2 weeks notice without having another job lined up. I had about $10k in savings and I could not take it anymore, I was turning into an alcoholic, stressed out nightmare. After a week of decompression, I tailored my resume and started listening to offers from recruiters.

After 3 job interviews, I got 3 offers and I took a job paying $112k ($150k with bonuses). With a much better work/life balance. I work 45 hours a week today as opposed to 80 then. It was that day I realized how true it is that you have to change companies to move up in pay and in status. You can accept meager raises from one company or get yourself out there and make real money. It's a sad fact of today's corporate climate.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 18, 2014, 12:33:13 PM
Spartana has a(nother) forum to gloat, errr, inspire!  Whoopieeee!  I've been reading her gloats with envy for many years!
And now that Iris-Lily will be joining me on the darkside and into ER soon you're next!

I feel so left out. I just met you and haven't read your gloats for too long yet, but I would like to receive the ER-prodding encouragement from the Queen of Gloat for my ER in the next few years.
Ha Ha! I'm always happy to oblige :-)! The gloat-joke started at another forum because a guy there wanted to retire and we had a sort of poke-fun-at-each-other thing going where I would post something gloaty about early retirement and he would scream loudly :-)! Of course now he is retired and off doing all sorts of adventures - most involving travellin to various part of the world for months on end bike touring. So every few days he sends me a gloaty e-mail and now I'm the one who's screaming. Paybacks are, as they say, a bee-ach!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Liberty Stache on June 18, 2014, 02:00:39 PM
No ridiculous FU money story here. Actually I had the opposite experience.

My wife and I have FU money and I took a stretch role where I took on a very large responsibilty. I was underpaid initially because I was still learning and proving myself at the next level. I had a horrible manager that drove me to initially work 70-80 hours / week for the first 6 months of the assignment. He delayed a promotion even though I was outperforming and my workload was heavier than the majority at the next level). It culminated when he literally had the balls to yell at me after my honeymoon that I should have been working DURING my honeymoon stating "I don't understand why you [Investor814] don't care enough". I immediately walked out of the office at 2pm that day and did not come back. I gave serious thought on quiting the next morning just because I could but decided not to. I realized that I could leverage my FU money even better.

I stayed an additional year+ getting great experience while cutting back my hours to ~45hrs/week. It drove him crazy that he couldn't force me to work more hours or make me work on projects that I did not want to work on. However once I hit what the job marketplace considered as an acceptable amount of experience I lined up another job at a 40% pay increase in a different company and left two weeks later. No big exit, no ridiculous story, just the satisfaction that my family was significantly better off.

FU money gave me leverage to completely move past a horrible manager and end up in a much better spot professionally and financially. Without the FU safety net, I would have either quit and not gotten the great resume builder or I would have had to suffer another 1.5-2 years of 70+hrs/wk hell to keep the job. It allowed me to stand toe to toe to my horrible manager for 1.5-2 years and hold my ground.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on June 18, 2014, 02:22:54 PM
No ridiculous FU money story here. Actually I had the opposite experience.

...

I stayed an additional year+ getting great experience while cutting back my hours to ~45hrs/week. It drove him crazy that he couldn't force me to work more hours or make me work on projects that I did not want to work on. However once I hit what the job marketplace considered as an acceptable amount of experience I lined up another job at a 40% pay increase in a different company and left two weeks later. No big exit, no ridiculous story, just the satisfaction that my family was significantly better off.

That's exactly what FU money is - it lets you do what you want at work.  It doesn't mean you have to say FU and have a big quitting story, but it was your cash cushion (FU money) that let you cut back to 45 hrs/week without caring what the boss thought.

Awesome story, thanks for sharing!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jfer_rose on June 18, 2014, 02:40:30 PM
Posting for no other reason than wanting to make sure I don't miss future replies.

That said, my coworker just quit her job without having another job lined up. She said she has a year's worth of savings to get her through until she figures out what is next. I ran into her the other day and she said AirBnB rental income might even extend that time. Despite the fact she and I shared a fantastic supervisor and immediate coworkers, the work environment has been extremely stressful for all of us the past year or so. So it's very inspirational to me that she quit without knowing what she wants to do next.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: RootofGood on June 18, 2014, 02:55:31 PM
Not exactly throwing my FU money in their faces, but I got let go very suddenly and decided to call it retirement.  I didn't realize I was retired until the next day when I started crunching the numbers to make sure I'm good.  Then everyone in the office found out I had retired at 33.  That's what happens when you start a blog and facebook exists apparently. :)

 Some (like the 50-60-somethings that will never be able to retire) thought it was all a joke.  Months after I got let go, I bumped into my asshole manager that fired me.  I couldn't wipe the smug smile off my face.  When he asked what I was up to these days I just said "you know, hanging out, having a good time, catching up on some reading, playing with the kids".  Asshole manager got shit canned right after he fired me because he didn't hire the right people to replace me (the jobs I left behind were political candy to be handed out by the governor's office to faithful helpers as it turns out).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DeepEllumStache on June 18, 2014, 03:08:40 PM
At a company my sister worked for, they randomly announced one morning that there would be drug testing for all employees that afternoon.  More than 1/2 of the guys working at the loading dock left for lunch and never came back.  Not particularly epic but the company probably learned to not schedule across the board drug testing unless they were willing to risk losing entire departments.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Trudie on June 18, 2014, 03:31:02 PM
Really, someone could write a book on this topic.  It's that awesome.

Makes me realize, also, how many turd managers there are.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Chloe358 on June 18, 2014, 05:00:23 PM
Longtime listener, first time caller......Or long time lurker, first time poster.

No epic story just yet, but boss asks why I didn't apply for promotional opportunity.  I say well, I don't know if I want the additional hassle, and really, I'm not going to work here forever.  He says he's not either.  I tell him my plan is 5 years and I'm out.  (My boss and I are both 41).  He says well I'd like to be out of here in 5 years but it's just not possible for me.  I say nothing and he says, so it's possible for you?  I respond and said, not sure, it could be 5 1/2, could be 6, maybe 4, we'll see, but somewhere around there.  He then tells me all the reasons why unexpected things are going to happen and how that will blow my plan around, etc etc.  so I nod my head and inside I'm thinking, well if you got yourself on scorched earth you could be gone in the same time I could.   It was a nice smug feeling anyway.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Primm on June 18, 2014, 07:32:50 PM
Mine isn't my FU money (well, it kind of is) but my husbands. Several years ago he was in a really shitty job, and one closer to home and with far less stress came up. So he applied for and took it.

He is a born organiser - not like me, I might add. When doing training for his new company they recognised this and asked if he wanted to go in as manager for a storefront that needed serious restructure and help, as opposed to the one just down the street that was already functioning well. He said yes. Six months later, once he got the first place up and running nicely and got rid of the dead wood, they "offered" him a transfer to a further away location. He told them he wanted to go back to the original place they'd hired him for. Seriously, it was so close he could have walked home and back for his 1/2 hour lunch break. They told him it was the one hour commute each way place or nothing. So he chose nothing. They countered with "but you have a mortgage! And four teenage children! You can't afford that on your wife's income!"

They were sort of right - we had to cut back the 50% savings rate we were working on for the six months he was out of work (having an awesome time playing with the house and the kids, by the way. And the live-in housekeeper and chef I had - I could get used to that!). But we didn't actually use any of our savings or FU money in the end. And they certainly didn't expect the "no, actually you're wrong, I'm leaving then" response that they got.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on June 18, 2014, 08:18:34 PM
At a company my sister worked for, they randomly announced one morning that there would be drug testing for all employees that afternoon.  More than 1/2 of the guys working at the loading dock left for lunch and never came back.  Not particularly epic but the company probably learned to not schedule across the board drug testing unless they were willing to risk losing entire departments.

Your story reminds me of a really funny thing that happened at work once. There was a guy who was known for being not-too-bright and everyone suspected dabbled in some illegal drugs. We used to have random drug tests. Well, one morning he received notice that he had to report to the nurse's office for a random drug test that afternoon. A co-worker pulled his leg and said that not only would they do a urine test, but that they would also take a strand of his hair to test. Well, this guy goes out to lunch and comes back with a shaved head. He must have still failed the drug test because he was gone soon thereafter.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Trudie on June 18, 2014, 08:20:21 PM
Mine isn't my FU money (well, it kind of is) but my husbands. Several years ago he was in a really shitty job, and one closer to home and with far less stress came up. So he applied for and took it.

He is a born organiser - not like me, I might add. When doing training for his new company they recognised this and asked if he wanted to go in as manager for a storefront that needed serious restructure and help, as opposed to the one just down the street that was already functioning well. He said yes. Six months later, once he got the first place up and running nicely and got rid of the dead wood, they "offered" him a transfer to a further away location. He told them he wanted to go back to the original place they'd hired him for. Seriously, it was so close he could have walked home and back for his 1/2 hour lunch break. They told him it was the one hour commute each way place or nothing. So he chose nothing. They countered with "but you have a mortgage! And four teenage children! You can't afford that on your wife's income!"

They were sort of right - we had to cut back the 50% savings rate we were working on for the six months he was out of work (having an awesome time playing with the house and the kids, by the way. And the live-in housekeeper and chef I had - I could get used to that!). But we didn't actually use any of our savings or FU money in the end. And they certainly didn't expect the "no, actually you're wrong, I'm leaving then" response that they got.

Thanks for sharing this.  It's good to hear others' stories and realize that we probably have more choices than we think we do.  Makes me ponder how many decisions - including my own - are made based on fear.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on June 18, 2014, 08:22:21 PM
They told him it was the one hour commute each way place or nothing. So he chose nothing. They countered with "but you have a mortgage! And four teenage children! You can't afford that on your wife's income!"

Wow! That took a lot of nerve on their part and was very intrusive. It's like they try to use people's weaknesses to manipulate them to act as they want. I think this is exactly why FU money is needed. It should be no one's business what your financial situation is.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Primm on June 18, 2014, 11:40:33 PM
Yep, we couldn't believe they even went there. Ultimately the 6 months he took off didn't really affect our RE date because he probably avoided a hospital admission for depression, which has happened in the past. So we made less but spent less as well.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: SisterX on June 19, 2014, 11:39:54 AM
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: payitoff on June 19, 2014, 12:21:08 PM
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

EPIC! just scrolled through the blog and that is some priceless experience.. good for him!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wolf_Stache on June 19, 2014, 01:46:16 PM
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

Ok, this is awesome! I've been reading his blog, not very far yet, but I'm jealous. Is he still single? LOL
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jordanread on June 19, 2014, 04:11:15 PM
I was originally going to just comment because I keep missing the updates, but realized something kind of cool.

I've never (until recently) had FU money, but I've always had a kind of life rule where "If I don't like what I'm doing, I do something else or go somewhere else).
One job I had when I was 17 (fast food). The money didn't bug me, but it was really soul crushing. Decided I was done. Turned in my two weeks at the beginning of the shift. The manager was extremely surprised because apparently nobody every did that while making minimum wage. Got put on shitty duty, and I realized that this is how the next two weeks were going to be. Walked up to her and told her I made a mistake. She got all smug and said I could stay. I looked at her, and said "Oh no. I just meant that even though that letter said two week notice, it was more like a two minute warning..." I know I stole that from somewhere, but it was still fun.
Had another job the next day.
Another time I worked as the lead baker. Fun work, biked in, and was on my own until about 6am when everyone else showed up. After some changes in management, they screwed up my check (by shorting me about 50%). I asked the new management what I needed to do to get it fixed, and they said deal with it. As I walked out, I accidentally had my knife open, and cut a 50lb bag of flour open...in front of a giant fan...that was on.

Those were fun, but not a huge deal. However, my most recent position was a bit more serious. I worked at a really cool cable company. Worked my way into a junior application dev role, and slowly worked my way up until I was a full developer with 6 years of professional experience. Lot's of reorganization happened, and the company turned into something like a shinier version of comcast...not pleasant. My boss left, followed shortly thereafter by the rest of my department. New boss came in, and while he was a good politician, not that great at anything else...like managing, or technology, or being smart. I knew I should leave, but was scared to death. I was making like $45K/year!!! I'd be stupid to give that up!! At this time, I also had just found MMM and read every article, plus I had my old boss cheering me on, saying that I was worth a lot more than what I was getting. Thought about looking, so I brushed off the resume, and got the sense of what my skill set was actually worth. The boss called me in, and said (since I was the only one left) that I was invaluable, and they would like to offer me a substantial raise...to $50K.
I realized that invaluable wasn't the right word, and that I wasn't valued at all. I immediately turned in my two weeks notice. 3 days later I got an offer doing work that was really fun, for a substantially larger amount.

So not necessarily an FU money story, but more of an anecdote about how much fear can cost you. You don't even need FU money per se to do the math and know that you'll be okay. FIRE date is within 6 years now, since I almost completely avoided the lifestyle inflation aspect of getting more money.

I'll never forget the day I shot myself in the face with MMM's optimism gun (http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2012/10/03/the-practical-benefits-of-outrageous-optimism/), and got free from that fear.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: SisterX on June 19, 2014, 04:40:36 PM
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

Ok, this is awesome! I've been reading his blog, not very far yet, but I'm jealous. Is he still single? LOL

Actually, yes he is!  Broke up with another girlfriend a few months ago, albeit on friendlier terms.  And, he lives in Seattle!  I've sometimes thought about trying to set him up with a Seattle Mustachian....
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on June 19, 2014, 05:17:22 PM
I was originally going to just comment because I keep missing the updates, but realized something kind of cool.

I've never (until recently) had FU money, but I've always had a kind of life rule where "If I don't like what I'm doing, I do something else or go somewhere else).
One job I had when I was 17 (fast food). The money didn't bug me, but it was really soul crushing. Decided I was done. Turned in my two weeks at the beginning of the shift. The manager was extremely surprised because apparently nobody every did that while making minimum wage. Got put on shitty duty, and I realized that this is how the next two weeks were going to be. Walked up to her and told her I made a mistake. She got all smug and said I could stay. I looked at her, and said "Oh no. I just meant that even though that letter said two week notice, it was more like a two minute warning..." I know I stole that from somewhere, but it was still fun.
Had another job the next day.
Another time I worked as the lead baker. Fun work, biked in, and was on my own until about 6am when everyone else showed up. After some changes in management, they screwed up my check (by shorting me about 50%). I asked the new management what I needed to do to get it fixed, and they said deal with it. As I walked out, I accidentally had my knife open, and cut a 50lb bag of flour open...in front of a giant fan...that was on.

Those were fun, but not a huge deal. However, my most recent position was a bit more serious. I worked at a really cool cable company. Worked my way into a junior application dev role, and slowly worked my way up until I was a full developer with 6 years of professional experience. Lot's of reorganization happened, and the company turned into something like a shinier version of comcast...not pleasant. My boss left, followed shortly thereafter by the rest of my department. New boss came in, and while he was a good politician, not that great at anything else...like managing, or technology, or being smart. I new I should leave, but was scared to death. I was making like $45K/year!!! I'd be stupid to give that up!! At this time, I also had just found MMM and read every article, plus I had my old boss cheering me on, saying that I was worth a lot more than what I was getting. Thought about looking, so I brushed off the resume, and got the sense of what my skill set was actually worth. The boss called me in, and said (since I was the only one left) that I was invaluable, and they would like to offer me a substantial raise...to $50K.
I realized that invaluable wasn't the right word, and that I wasn't valued at all. I immediately turned in my two weeks notice. 3 days later I got an offer doing work that was really fun, for a substantially larger amount.

So not necessarily an FU money story, but more of an anecdote about how much fear can cost you. You don't even need FU money per se to do the math and know that you'll be okay. FIRE date is within 6 years now, since I almost completely avoided the lifestyle inflation aspect of getting more money.

I'll never forget the day I shot myself in the face with MMM's optimism gun (http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2012/10/03/the-practical-benefits-of-outrageous-optimism/), and got free from that fear.

Love it!  Those first two are fun, but that third one is life changing. Awesome!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 19, 2014, 05:24:33 PM
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: zataks on June 19, 2014, 05:55:23 PM
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

"I'd prefer not to," may be a bit more apt.  =)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on June 19, 2014, 06:32:49 PM
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

Nice.  It may have hurt your "reviews" or ability to get a glowing recommendation, but if you're not worried about that and are confident in your ability to find a job (which you should be - too many people are scared, rather than confident), then that's the perfect way to handle that.

"I was hired under X, I will continue, if you don't like it, fire me."  Love it. :D
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wolf_Stache on June 19, 2014, 09:46:13 PM
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

Ok, this is awesome! I've been reading his blog, not very far yet, but I'm jealous. Is he still single? LOL

Actually, yes he is!  Broke up with another girlfriend a few months ago, albeit on friendlier terms.  And, he lives in Seattle!  I've sometimes thought about trying to set him up with a Seattle Mustachian....

I've been reading his blog. Up through his arrival in London. Sounds like an awesome trip! I've dreamed of doing something smaller down the Pacific coast (N. Cali down the coast). I looked at a tour group that did the ride, but even in my pre-mmm days I thought the price was too steep.

I need to hook up with some other bicyclists in the city. my ex was so inactive, and we did so few things together anyway, that I didn't want to add another activity that I did alone. But now that I'm single, I'd love to join a cycling group up here! In Salt Lake I rode with a group called the Sugarhouse Cyclists. We were just a group of people that would go out on group rides all over the city. Loved it!

If you think he'd be up for it, I'd love to meet, even if its just to discuss cycling in the city!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 20, 2014, 12:09:07 AM
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

Nice.  It may have hurt your "reviews" or ability to get a glowing recommendation, but if you're not worried about that and are confident in your ability to find a job (which you should be - too many people are scared, rather than confident), then that's the perfect way to handle that.

"I was hired under X, I will continue, if you don't like it, fire me."  Love it. :D
Just glad I had keys and the security code to get in there or I would have had to start later like everyone else :-)!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Insanity on June 20, 2014, 04:54:49 AM
I just realized, the most epic FU money story I've ever heard of is my brother's.  It's more of an FU to life than work.  He had a series of unfortunate life events coincide: his longtime girlfriend left him (from what I hear, he basically proposed and she said, "Actually, no, see ya") so he had to move out of the apartment they'd been sharing.  Then he lost his job due to layoffs (in 2009).  Then he turned 30 while living with our parents, jobless and girlfriendless.  He said "Fuck life, I'm out."  Planned a giant trip, mostly by bicycle, and left for the next year.  (If you want to read the whole thing, he kept a blog: http://myliferebooted.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html.  Just don't mind the spelling errors, he's always been terrible at that!)  It was seriously badass, and I'm still jealous that he did this.

At the time when I told people what he was doing they almost always said, "How can he afford that?!"  I was like, "Um, he saved money while he had a job?"  If you're wondering about the finances, he did it on significantly less than $30,000, because that was the money he set aside for this and he came back with enough to live on for a bit.

Ok, this is awesome! I've been reading his blog, not very far yet, but I'm jealous. Is he still single? LOL

Actually, yes he is!  Broke up with another girlfriend a few months ago, albeit on friendlier terms.  And, he lives in Seattle!  I've sometimes thought about trying to set him up with a Seattle Mustachian....

I've been reading his blog. Up through his arrival in London. Sounds like an awesome trip! I've dreamed of doing something smaller down the Pacific coast (N. Cali down the coast). I looked at a tour group that did the ride, but even in my pre-mmm days I thought the price was too steep.

I need to hook up with some other bicyclists in the city. my ex was so inactive, and we did so few things together anyway, that I didn't want to add another activity that I did alone. But now that I'm single, I'd love to join a cycling group up here! In Salt Lake I rode with a group called the Sugarhouse Cyclists. We were just a group of people that would go out on group rides all over the city. Loved it!

If you think he'd be up for it, I'd love to meet, even if its just to discuss cycling in the city!

A friend of mine, isn't really an FU story because he would go back to where he worked, just took 3 months off (he is a contractor so essentially he terminated the contract) to bike cross country.  He lives in Philly, but is blogging about it.  I'm jealous.  Number 1, I wish I had the health and ability to do it.  Number 2, I wish I had the time.  I don't want to be away from my kids that long.  My wife and the would have to follow by car or something. My wife doesn't like to ride.

If you ever have the time, do it.  The stories about the ride are amazing.  The scenery (he's riding through the blue ridge mountains, the colorado mountains).  4300 miles in all.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: oldtoyota on June 20, 2014, 05:58:50 AM

I do know of an EPIC quitting story but I got screwed in the process. I bought a motorcycle from a guy who said the title was in his truck and he would get it for me that night. I stupidly believed him and he never gave me the title. He wouldn't answer his phone when I called. He worked at Walmart and one time I spoofed the caller ID so it looked like Walmart was calling. He answered but gave more excuses. A few months later he went into Walmart and shot his boss in the chest with a 44 Mag (he lived) and holed up in the bathroom until cops came. I had to part that bike out on ebay.

You got screwed? What about the guy who got shot? He had it a bit worse than you.

What if the guy had never owned the bike and you were selling stolen parts?

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Basenji on June 20, 2014, 06:02:53 AM
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

"I'd prefer not to,"may be a bit more apt.  =)
Oh hell yeah Bartleby!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: oldtoyota on June 20, 2014, 06:10:45 AM


What kind of mumbo jumbo is that?

In what country do you get un/employment insurance benefits if you quit?  Neither the US nor Canada offers this as far as I'm aware and there are sound policy reasons for not doing so.  The exception is if you can demonstrate you were constructively dismissed.

Now, as far as "asshole managers", in my experience sometimes asshole managers are really fine managers with an asshole employee. It is hard to know without hearing the other side.

In the case where a manager is really unreasonably difficult/harassing they will contravene employment standards and/or human rights protections and you can quit and claim constructive dismissal.  There are often complaints processes that can be accessed in these circumstances as well.

Just meaning to say that since is difficult to quit, employer could use that to enforce a certain stress/abuse because they know that the people CAN'T quit, since they must work to survive paycheck to paycheck.
btw, in most countries in europe you get a unemployment subsidy (if you have worked long enough to have right for) the moment you apply for it: it doesn't matter why you are jobless (even if you quit), just that you are jobless. But many people seek a new job immediately, since the longest you stay on subsidy, the harder it is to find a job since employer will find strange that you are getting the subsidy for so long, and prefer someone else.


I would like to move into the Dream World Totoro describes. I've never seen a company give a lick about a bad boss. If a boss has half a brain, they are not going to put anything bad in writing and they can easily get around being caught in the act. Even in a case when a boss is caught in the act--banging on the office door of an employee while yelling, for instance--I've seen nothing done.





Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dude on June 20, 2014, 06:31:22 AM
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

At the risk of being labeled one of those lazy, un-fireable government employees (I'm not), I do have to say that the mere presence in the government workforce of numerous employees who should have been fired years ago but haven't been, kinda gives me a sense of security akin to FU money security.  I mean, so long as I don't do drugs and don't commit any serious crimes, it's pretty fucking hard to get fired here.  But on the flip-side, those golden handcuffs (i.e., the generous LEO pension) keep me here no matter how dull or uninspiring my job is (and it is at times just that), so not having the freedom to just walk away on a whim can be a little stifling at times too.  But I can see the light at the end of the tunnel (and it ain't an oncoming train) just less than 5 years away . . .
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Judith681 on June 20, 2014, 10:24:39 AM
Great to hear these stories. I myself do not have too much FU money but enough to last 6 months maybe.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: HawkeyeNFO on June 20, 2014, 11:14:19 AM
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

At the risk of being labeled one of those lazy, un-fireable government employees (I'm not), I do have to say that the mere presence in the government workforce of numerous employees who should have been fired years ago but haven't been, kinda gives me a sense of security akin to FU money security.  I mean, so long as I don't do drugs and don't commit any serious crimes, it's pretty fucking hard to get fired here.  But on the flip-side, those golden handcuffs (i.e., the generous LEO pension) keep me here no matter how dull or uninspiring my job is (and it is at times just that), so not having the freedom to just walk away on a whim can be a little stifling at times too.  But I can see the light at the end of the tunnel (and it ain't an oncoming train) just less than 5 years away . . .
SO FUCKING TRUE!!!!  I'm at the Pentagon, and have run out of fingers counting the people who don't even show up to work but continue to geta a full paycheck.  One guy disappearred for over 3 months, and showed up this past Christmas Eve smelling like a distillery.  Sure, they sent him to rehab twice since then, but he is still getting paid.  Another lady had the NCIS investigating here whereabouts, because she never showed up to work over about a 6 month period.  And this doesn't even cover the people who come to work and do nothing.  As for me, I try my best to get the job done, but my office breeds an unhealthy work ethic because all the BS that is tolerated, and the fact that quality work is rewarded with more work, while the slackers earn the same as everyone else.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spartana on June 20, 2014, 01:03:58 PM
OK I though of a semi-FU story. I worked for a government agency and we consolidated with several others but kept in the lead position  as far as who managed what. I headed my own very small dept. When we consolidated, we were told everyone's hours where changing. I refused to change my hours. Just said "no" and kept coming in at the same time I always did. Did this for awhile with them constantly telling me I couldn't do that. I just said that I hired on at those hours and would work those hours. If that wasn't acceptable then they would have to fire me. They didn't and I just continued on working my same old hours until I quit a year or 2 later.

At the risk of being labeled one of those lazy, un-fireable government employees (I'm not), I do have to say that the mere presence in the government workforce of numerous employees who should have been fired years ago but haven't been, kinda gives me a sense of security akin to FU money security.  I mean, so long as I don't do drugs and don't commit any serious crimes, it's pretty fucking hard to get fired here.  But on the flip-side, those golden handcuffs (i.e., the generous LEO pension) keep me here no matter how dull or uninspiring my job is (and it is at times just that), so not having the freedom to just walk away on a whim can be a little stifling at times too.  But I can see the light at the end of the tunnel (and it ain't an oncoming train) just less than 5 years away . . .
Well quitting was a hard decision to make as a govmint employee. Having to give up those long grueling lunch hours and donut and nap breaks was tough :-)! But seriously, yes it was a tough choice knowing that if I just stayed an extra 8 years until I was 50 I'd have a much bigger pension and if I stayed an additional 5 years beyond that I'd have low cost medical, but I was done so flew the coop. Best decision I made I think.  Now I can nap and eat donuts when ever I want, and take even longer lunches then ever before :-)!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Stache In Training on June 20, 2014, 11:16:01 PM
So I have an FU Money story that is about to happen.  I won't give too many details, just in case someone from my work reads this forum (though I doubt it).  So I'll provide more details when I have given my notice.

So I currently work at a very anti-mustachian job/company, with a gravely micro-manager owner.  Luckily my immediate supervisor is better, but he is micro-managed a ton, so it trickles down.  Within 2 weeks, I'm going to be giving my two-week notice, with no job lined up (more on what I'll be doing later). 

Everyone who works there is very money oriented; as am I, being a mustachian, although I'm sure you can imagine it's the opposite, because they want more money in order to spend more, as opposed to I am money oriented to achieve FIRE.  So I can't wait to see if I get the, "Wait, you're lying.  Where are you headed?"  Or "How will you make ends meet?"  They have no idea I have FU Money, and don't actually need the job.

So while it's not going to be as awesome as a story as "you want me to do what?! nah, I quit."  It'll still be sweet to flaunt it!  And it probably wouldn't be happening without MMM and me building up some FU money!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Self-employed-swami on June 21, 2014, 12:25:41 AM
Mine isn't a quitting story, but I once took a 1 month unpaid medical leave, partially to see if my job was the main cause of my depression, and weigh my options.  I got a doctor's note, and the owners were reasonably decent about it (still paid my healthcare while I was gone).  When I returned after my month off, one of my bitchy co-workers asked me how I could afford to take a month off work, without pay, since we had just bought a house the year before, and my husband was in school full time.  I told her I had ~$138,000 in the bank, and she didn't even know what to say, other than 'oh'. 

I left that place a few months later, to become self employed.  The straw that broke this camel's back, was when I was told that I would be in charge of cleaning the client kitchen, in an e-mail, CCed to the rest of the company, from one of the owners.  I was a professional scientist, and the receptionist had always been responsible for the kitchen duties.  The reason I was being assigned them, was as a weird punishment for an ill-timed joke to one of the owners, during lunch, in the staff kitchen. 

I asked my manger if he had a few minutes, and I told him that I wouldn't be back in the new year (it was December 3rd or so).  He understood, and wished me well.  I consulted with a lawyer about filing a constructive dismissal lawsuit against them, but decided that it wasn't worth my time or energy (they had been sued before, and were very leery of it happening again).  I worked a few more days, before they decided to escort me out, and pay me for the month.  And since the Christmas gifts were already ordered, I also got a nice e-reader as a parting gift, along with the smug satisfaction of knowing that I won't ever have to work for someone like that again (if I ever decide to end my self-employment stint).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Zamboni on June 21, 2014, 03:51:29 PM
^As a female scientist being told to clean the kitchen, unless male colleagues were also being assigned kitchen duty, you had a sexual harassment case to file, not just a constructive dismissal case.  That aside, I'm glad things are working out for you.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Self-employed-swami on June 21, 2014, 04:05:49 PM
It has been 4 years, and I am glad everyday that I left when I did.

Thank you for your kind words, I had never thought of it like that.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Latwell on June 21, 2014, 06:19:55 PM
Not an FU money story but recently put my manager in his place.

I work for a small firm (10 employees during the summer, 7 in the winter). The owner is in his very late 60s. Many people who work for the firm (or have left recently) are concerned about my bossss age. My coworkers are afraid of "the unknown". My senior coworker and my manager have work for my boss forever.

My boss hasn't made any clear indications as to when he plans on retiring and/or what will happen to the business afterwards. My manager has made it clear that he does not want to take over the business. At this time, he is the only qualified person to take it over.  Every so often my manager tries to talk about my boss doing succession planning. This is followed by my boss telling my manager, "if you are concerned about the business, write me a check and it is yours". That shuts my manager up for a bit.

My manager has become increasingly annoying about the topic. He will come in my office and spend an hour telling me that we should have a meeting with my boss. He thinks I should be the one to voice the concerns because he thinks my boss "likes me the best" and if my manager mentions anything it just turns into an argument.

I tried to tell my manager that I didn't feel comfortable to have a meeting and be the one to put things on the table when my manager and senior worker have worked for my boss 20 years compared to my 3 years.

A month ago, my manager tried to talk to me again about the topic. I stopped him and pointed out that I will not be the person to discuss the topic with my boss. I explained that the only people who need to be concerned are the workers who feel as if they do not have other options. I went on to tell him that I am more than capable of finding a new employer and it won't take long. I have options. If he doesn't have options, he should start working towards creating options.

He hasn't brought it up since, even now that my boss is getting a surgery.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wolf_Stache on June 22, 2014, 08:32:33 AM
Not an FU money story but recently put my manager in his place.

I work for a small firm (10 employees during the summer, 7 in the winter). The owner is in his very late 60s. Many people who work for the firm (or have left recently) are concerned about my bossss age. My coworkers are afraid of "the unknown". My senior coworker and my manager have work for my boss forever.

My boss hasn't made any clear indications as to when he plans on retiring and/or what will happen to the business afterwards. My manager has made it clear that he does not want to take over the business. At this time, he is the only qualified person to take it over.  Every so often my manager tries to talk about my boss doing succession planning. This is followed by my boss telling my manager, "if you are concerned about the business, write me a check and it is yours". That shuts my manager up for a bit.

My manager has become increasingly annoying about the topic. He will come in my office and spend an hour telling me that we should have a meeting with my boss. He thinks I should be the one to voice the concerns because he thinks my boss "likes me the best" and if my manager mentions anything it just turns into an argument.

I tried to tell my manager that I didn't feel comfortable to have a meeting and be the one to put things on the table when my manager and senior worker have worked for my boss 20 years compared to my 3 years.

A month ago, my manager tried to talk to me again about the topic. I stopped him and pointed out that I will not be the person to discuss the topic with my boss. I explained that the only people who need to be concerned are the workers who feel as if they do not have other options. I went on to tell him that I am more than capable of finding a new employer and it won't take long. I have options. If he doesn't have options, he should start working towards creating options.

He hasn't brought it up since, even now that my boss is getting a surgery.

Nice way to put it!

I currently work for a small business owned by two older men - one is around 70 something, the other is Japanese and honestly I can't tell how old he is (I know he is over 50 because we had a bday party for him last week, but that is the most I know). One owner had a stroke last October. He has done really well in recovery, but who knows if they have any succession plans in place.

However, as you said above, I'm not too worried. I'm employable - everyone needs accountants/CPAs - and I know if anything does happen I can easily take my time to find another job.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Latwell on June 22, 2014, 02:25:20 PM
Not an FU money story but recently put my manager in his place.

I work for a small firm (10 employees during the summer, 7 in the winter). The owner is in his very late 60s. Many people who work for the firm (or have left recently) are concerned about my bossss age. My coworkers are afraid of "the unknown". My senior coworker and my manager have work for my boss forever.

My boss hasn't made any clear indications as to when he plans on retiring and/or what will happen to the business afterwards. My manager has made it clear that he does not want to take over the business. At this time, he is the only qualified person to take it over.  Every so often my manager tries to talk about my boss doing succession planning. This is followed by my boss telling my manager, "if you are concerned about the business, write me a check and it is yours". That shuts my manager up for a bit.

My manager has become increasingly annoying about the topic. He will come in my office and spend an hour telling me that we should have a meeting with my boss. He thinks I should be the one to voice the concerns because he thinks my boss "likes me the best" and if my manager mentions anything it just turns into an argument.

I tried to tell my manager that I didn't feel comfortable to have a meeting and be the one to put things on the table when my manager and senior worker have worked for my boss 20 years compared to my 3 years.

A month ago, my manager tried to talk to me again about the topic. I stopped him and pointed out that I will not be the person to discuss the topic with my boss. I explained that the only people who need to be concerned are the workers who feel as if they do not have other options. I went on to tell him that I am more than capable of finding a new employer and it won't take long. I have options. If he doesn't have options, he should start working towards creating options.

He hasn't brought it up since, even now that my boss is getting a surgery.

Nice way to put it!

I currently work for a small business owned by two older men - one is around 70 something, the other is Japanese and honestly I can't tell how old he is (I know he is over 50 because we had a bday party for him last week, but that is the most I know). One owner had a stroke last October. He has done really well in recovery, but who knows if they have any succession plans in place.

However, as you said above, I'm not too worried. I'm employable - everyone needs accountants/CPAs - and I know if anything does happen I can easily take my time to find another job.

That is exactly what I'm working on, my CPA. And because I work in audit, I can always work for one of my clients or in my client's field if needed (which is always tempting because my salary would double but their job isn't what I want to do just yet).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mercenary on June 23, 2014, 04:53:34 AM
So this story kinda comes out of a financial disaster.  Some folks here might not agree with what happend and the way I handled the situation but here goes....

So at the beginning of 2008, my wife and I were in financial ruin.  I had just lost my high paying mill job, had large amounts of consumer credit debt, and no savings to speak of. Bankruptcy was inevitable at this time and by May we had declared insolvency.  I'm a certified Millwright but work in that field was pretty limited at the time. I also hold a class 1 (CDL) drivers license.  I found a job driving a truck in Alberta's oil patch by the end of July of 2008.

Right off the hop I knew that I was going to have problems working here.  Under the rules of bankrupty you could only earn so much money.  If you made over a certain amount, you had to pay half of that towards your creditors.  I began to save that other half in earnest.

So this company....which is a big player in Alberta's oil patch...played fast and loose with the rules of trucking and the rules of safety...IMO.  It was common for drivers to work all day in the shop and then get dispatched out to a 10-15-20 hour job right at the end of the work day.  Under the trucking rules, you needed to declare all shop time as hours worked, not driving....which counted towards your overall hours worked in a day.  These clowns told all of us not to mark in those hours worked but to instead mark them as time off.  That's a big no no in trucking but no one seemed to care.  They also had non qualified workers performing brake jobs, bearing changes and all sorts of other repairs that required a certified tradesperson to perform.

So I kinda just kept my head down and mouth shut until one particular day when I was asked to go into a confined space.  There are all sorts of safety rules that dictate what sorts of steps you need to perform in order to ensure safety for the workers entering the confined space.  I won't go into them here....but I am well versed in what they are from my years spent working in mills.  Anyway...I refused to do the job.  My boss just explodes in anger in front of me and a couple other guys.  He gets really mad and basically accuses me of being a lazy ass who is trying to skip out on the work.  I told him that I had lots of experience in this area and I'd be happy to go over the proper rules with him but he was having none of it.  He took me off the job and told me to go home.  So I did.  Head down....mouth shut.

Skip forward to the middle of winter.  Some folks here might know that in order to travel down many industrial roads in this neck of the woods you need to chain up the drive wheels on the trucks for traction.  These chains are heavy and awkward to deal with.  Well...long story short I end up tweaking a muscle in my back which takes me out of commission for quite a while.  My boss tells me to take a few days off and see how I feel then.  Screw that. I'm off to the doctor.  The doctor does his thing and he wants me to take a month off work.  I show up back at work with all the doctor's notes and stuff and my boss basically says they don't put much stock in what the doctor's say and he wants me back in the truck the next day.  Again screw that.  Doctors orders.  I take a month off.  My back is still pretty sore by the end of the month so I head back to the doctor and he wants me on light duty for another month.  I head back out to work and MY boss is out for lunch.  HIS boss asks me "What are you doing here?"  I told him that I'm back to work light duty for a month.  He says to me that my boss told him that I quit.  I said I definitely didn't quit and here's all my medical records as proof.  My boss gets back to work and gets reamed out...but not fired over this incident.  It's at this point I know my days are numbered.

So I do a month of light duty work in the shop.  Basic clean up and some light filing.  All in all...just busy work while I'm healing up.  I go back to the doc and get a clean bill of health and am cleared to go back driving the truck.....which I do the next day.  By now I've worked here for 10 months.  In that time I've saved up around 10 grand in cash.  It was tough...but the only way I could do it was because of our bankruptcy.  Remember....I could have saved up 20K but half of that money went to my creditors...which I really didn't mind...as it was my fault I got so far in debt with no emergency funds.  Anyway...I've worked for these guys for 10 rough months and was sticking it out with no intentions of quitting or anything like that.  One day after a job I'm back at the shop running my truck through the truck wash.  My boss comes out and tells me he needs to see me in his office.  Off I go and when I get to his office....he's not there....but there is a nice, shiny layoff notice with my name on it sitting on his desk.  I sit back with a big grin on my face.  Sure I wasn't going to quit....but I didn't like working there anyway.  Besides...with the layoff I qualified for unemployment benefits right away.  So he comes in to the office with the HR person and explains that times are slow and they have to let some guys go.  I'm happy and it shows.  Due to the short notice, they owe me a severance AND all my holiday pay.  I walked out of that office with 10k in the bank, a check for 3500 dollars in holiday pay and severance and a big happy smile on my face.  Sure...some of that money had to go to my creditors due to the bankruptcy but with that 10k nest egg, severance, and unemployment benefits I was able to take my sweet time finding a mcuh better job....with better management :)

All in all...it worked out OK.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: warfreak2 on June 23, 2014, 08:46:40 AM
Under the trucking rules, you needed to declare all shop time as hours worked, not driving....which counted towards your overall hours worked in a day.  These clowns told all of us not to mark in those hours worked but to instead mark them as time off.  That's a big no no in trucking but no one seemed to care.  They also had non qualified workers performing brake jobs, bearing changes and all sorts of other repairs that required a certified tradesperson to perform.

So I kinda just kept my head down and mouth shut until one particular day when I was asked to go into a confined space.  There are all sorts of safety rules that dictate what sorts of steps you need to perform in order to ensure safety for the workers entering the confined space.  I won't go into them here....but I am well versed in what they are from my years spent working in mills.  Anyway...I refused to do the job.  My boss just explodes in anger in front of me and a couple other guys.  He gets really mad and basically accuses me of being a lazy ass who is trying to skip out on the work.  I told him that I had lots of experience in this area and I'd be happy to go over the proper rules with him but he was having none of it.
Did you report them to the relevant authorities? You should. It could save somebody's life.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DoubleDown on June 23, 2014, 10:31:03 AM
Did you report them to the relevant authorities? You should. It could save somebody's life.

I'll second that. Now that you're free of this employer, I hope you'll consider alerting the proper authorities. We just saw Tracy Morgan and Co. get rear ended by a trucker whom the NTSB says was speeding and driving more hours than allowed. And good job on getting your finances turned around, you've come to the right place!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Paul der Krake on June 23, 2014, 10:41:32 AM
Yeah that's terrifying, please please please, report these fools ASAP, they're playing with their employees and the public's lives at risk by putting their drivers through this. It's downright criminal and they deserve more than a scolding for this.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: CNM on June 25, 2014, 12:32:56 PM
Best thread ever!  Posting here so I can check in periodically.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: SwordGuy on June 25, 2014, 07:25:06 PM
Here's an FU story without FU money that still turned out well.

To this day I still think the lady was simply brilliant!

She had a boss who was making her life miserable.  For her mental health, she really, really, really needed to tell him what an SOB the fellow was.

But she also really, really needed her job and its paycheck. 

So she kept quiet and suffered.

Until she came up with a cunning plan.

She went storming into her bosses office, looking mad as hell.

"What's wrong?" he asked.

"I was driving to work today and this asshole cut me off in traffic.  I pulled up along side him and told him ..." 

Then she looked her boss right in the eye and continued,

"You SON OF A BITCH!"

Still looking him straight in the eye, she said, "That's what I said to him.  I said, 'You SON OF A BITCH!'"

"Ok, I feel better now.  Thanks."

And she walked out of his office.

She got all the mental satisfaction of telling her boss off to his face without losing her job.

Simply brilliant!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Inevitable on June 26, 2014, 07:34:13 AM
If you think he'd be up for it, I'd love to meet, even if its just to discuss cycling in the city!

I'm waiting on updates telling us all how you met the love of your life through the FU money stories thread :-P
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wolf_Stache on June 26, 2014, 07:57:24 AM
If you think he'd be up for it, I'd love to meet, even if its just to discuss cycling in the city!

I'm waiting on updates telling us all how you met the love of your life through the FU money stories thread :-P

Ahahaha!  If that happens I will be sure to update this thread.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: shotgunwilly on June 26, 2014, 07:59:27 AM
If you think he'd be up for it, I'd love to meet, even if its just to discuss cycling in the city!

I'm waiting on updates telling us all how you met the love of your life through the FU money stories thread :-P

HAHA! I was thinking the same thing.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: CommonCents on June 26, 2014, 08:01:06 AM
Not epic, and not me, but I have a coworker that is walking away on July 3rd, with no job lined up.  Seems like she's burnt out from fairly long hours/hard work the past few years which hasn't let up much.  She plans to travel, sing, and study, before she figures out what she wants to do next.  (I don't think she's FIRE at 34ish, but it's not something I've ever asked.  Seems a bit too personal to randomly bring up in conversation.) 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DoubleDown on June 26, 2014, 10:54:17 AM
(I don't think she's FIRE at 34ish, but it's not something I've ever asked.  Seems a bit too personal to randomly bring up in conversation.)

It's okay if you do it delicately and on the sly, like this: "So how much money do you have?"
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Latwell on June 26, 2014, 11:35:16 AM
(I don't think she's FIRE at 34ish, but it's not something I've ever asked.  Seems a bit too personal to randomly bring up in conversation.)

It's okay if you do it delicately and on the sly, like this: "So how much money do you have?"

Lol "what's in your wallet"
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on June 26, 2014, 12:41:03 PM
(I don't think she's FIRE at 34ish, but it's not something I've ever asked.  Seems a bit too personal to randomly bring up in conversation.)

It's okay if you do it delicately and on the sly, like this: "So how much money do you have?"

Lol "what's in your wallet"

I think "so, do you think you'll ever go back to work?" might get you there without being too invasive
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cheddar Stacker on June 26, 2014, 03:28:12 PM
(I don't think she's FIRE at 34ish, but it's not something I've ever asked.  Seems a bit too personal to randomly bring up in conversation.)

It's okay if you do it delicately and on the sly, like this: "So how much money do you have?"

Lol "what's in your wallet"

I think "so, do you think you'll ever go back to work?" might get you there without being too invasive

You got a mustache?
Have some FU money huh?
Been stacking cheddar?

Or just slip her a link to your MMM profile if you're not worried about confidentiality.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jordanread on June 26, 2014, 08:39:45 PM
Been stacking cheddar?

And now we know how you pick up people. ;-) This should go into the username thread (that you started, if I remember). I originally viewed a creepy dude with a weird wink afterwards...but then I realized who said it, and I then imagined the XXX (beer) guy, which added enough class to where I think you could pull it off.

(http://cdn.memegenerator.net/instances/500x/51723314.jpg)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on June 26, 2014, 10:55:50 PM

I then imagined the XXX (beer) guy, which added enough class to where I think you could pull it off.



I don't always drink beer.  But when I do, I prefer tres equis.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on June 26, 2014, 11:53:14 PM
Pretty sure the triple x beer guy doesn't always drink beer, but when he does, the bottles get lodged... places (on camera).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on June 27, 2014, 12:31:27 AM
Pretty sure the triple x beer guy doesn't always drink beer, but when he does, the bottles get lodged... places (on camera).

We're talking about this guy, right?

(http://s3.amazonaws.com/rapgenius/9w57isl3TRypb6zs5BSz_triple_x.jpg)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on June 27, 2014, 12:59:35 AM
Of course.

The truth is out there.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cheddar Stacker on June 27, 2014, 06:05:33 AM

I then imagined the XXX (beer) guy, which added enough class to where I think you could pull it off.



I don't always drink beer.  But when I do, I prefer tres equis.

Very nice jordanread. ; )
If dos equis is good, tres equis must be better right? Particularly in our gluttonous culture of more more more.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jordanread on June 27, 2014, 06:18:06 AM



Very nice jordanread. ; )
If dos equis is good, tres equis must be better right? Particularly in our gluttonous culture of more more more.

You know, I thought that seemed off but couldn't figure out why. I even typed dos, and then took the easy way, which I think turned out even more awesome.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cheddar Stacker on June 27, 2014, 06:40:03 AM
Agreed
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: shotgunwilly on June 27, 2014, 08:33:59 AM

You know, I thought that seemed off but couldn't figure out why. I even typed dos, and then took the easy way, which I think turned out even more awesome.

Agreed

I triple that. :D
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: RootofGood on June 27, 2014, 09:17:00 PM
I'll drink to that.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Stache In Training on June 27, 2014, 11:05:29 PM
tres equis: https://screen.yahoo.com/tres-equis-ii-000000238.html (https://screen.yahoo.com/tres-equis-ii-000000238.html)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cheddar Stacker on June 28, 2014, 07:49:31 AM
tres equis: https://screen.yahoo.com/tres-equis-ii-000000238.html (https://screen.yahoo.com/tres-equis-ii-000000238.html)

Nice. Thanks for sharing. Hadn't seen that.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mercenary on June 28, 2014, 11:56:50 AM
Did you report them to the relevant authorities? You should. It could save somebody's life.

My God did I yell and scream at the proper authorities.  I talked to anyone who'd listen.  However....without documented proof it breaks down into a "He said, He said" situation.  All I had was my word as my driving logs showed what they needed to in order for me to remain employed.

These kinds of things are rampant in the oil patch trucking industry.  I guarantee the majority of drivers on the road have false logs and they do so willingly.  Drivers do it to make the BIG MONEY as they chase the dream of keeping up with the Joneses and continue to buy crap they don't need just to make themselves look good.

Another quick story...I worked with a driver at this same company I was talking about.  We were driving back to the shop one day talking about life and stuff.  He's telling me he hates his job, can't stand living up here, too much debt, and so on.  I ask him where he'd like to be and he says the happiest he has ever been was while working as a prison guard.....  Ok...to each their own I guess.  Anyway he tells me that he's going to save up some cash in order to quit his job and go back to working in the prison system.  We get back to the shop and go on days off.

So I had six days off but I didn't see him for a few weeks after that.  I run into him in the parking lot one day and he's getting out of a brand new truck with a shiny new 4 wheeler in the back.  He sees me and asks me how I like his new truck and 4 wheeler?  I ask what about the plan to save some cash and get another job?  He mumbles something about needing a new truck and that's where the conversation ends.

These kinds of stories are rampant in the area I work.  I work with plenty of folks who not only drive new trucks...but they drive 60 thousand dollar 1/2 ton trucks.  They own 15 thousand dollar snowmobiles, 20 thousand dollar side by side 4 wheelers, sea doo's, boats, and all manner of different toys but they're all leveraged up to their eyeballs and living paycheck to paycheck. Most of these folks are young and if you could just convince them that they could be retired at 35 or earlier they just laugh.  You talk to the older guys (like me) and they say they need 5-10-15 million to retire......

I'm sure most...if not all...of us know people like that.....
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Glenstache on July 01, 2014, 03:00:14 PM
Not a story, but I came across this image on The Oatmeal and it seemed like a good mental picture for this thread:
https://scontent-b-sea.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/t1.0-9/10447073_10154349984680078_6092289075562906656_n.jpg

... and yes, those are stacks of money spelling out FU.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jordanread on July 01, 2014, 03:45:07 PM
Not a story, but I came across this image on The Oatmeal and it seemed like a good mental picture for this thread:
https://scontent-b-sea.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/t1.0-9/10447073_10154349984680078_6092289075562906656_n.jpg

... and yes, those are stacks of money spelling out FU.

I remember following that story. Didn't even think about the FU Money thing...I believe that was $250,000 but can't be sure off the top of my head.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Michael792 on July 01, 2014, 04:02:12 PM
Not a story, but I came across this image on The Oatmeal and it seemed like a good mental picture for this thread:
https://scontent-b-sea.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xpa1/t1.0-9/10447073_10154349984680078_6092289075562906656_n.jpg

... and yes, those are stacks of money spelling out FU.

I remember following that story. Didn't even think about the FU Money thing...I believe that was $250,000 but can't be sure off the top of my head.


It's $220,000. http://boingboing.net/2012/07/09/oatmeal.html
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: AlmostIndependent on July 01, 2014, 07:16:01 PM
In 2006 I was working as an officer aboard a research ship. I spent 2 months on the ship as the 3rd Officer and then moved up to the 2nd Officer job when that guy went home.  When my 4 months on the ship was up (I had been there about 135 days when we pulled back into port) they asked if I could stay another month because they were having trouble coming up with reliefs; I agreed to stay. They swore on everything holy that they would have a relief waiting on the pier for me when we came back to port. Of course when we pulled back into Japan there is no relief. After 164 days on the ship I put all my stuff in my sea bag and told the Captain I was going home. He gave me some sort of lecture on my responsibility to the ship. I said "fuck you guys" and left to get on the train to Fukuoka to fly home.

The kicker is that after 4 months at home they actually called me to come back to work! It turned out that the guy who had relieved me as 3rd Officer 8 months prior was still on the ship and they needed someone to relieve him. I laughed maniacally and declined the offer.

And that is how I began my sea-going career.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: farmstache on July 01, 2014, 10:00:33 PM
Well... mine isn't exactly a FU story (I think almost everyone said that).

I've been working since I was 19 or 20, I think, so not too young. When I still lived with my parents (up to 26yo, saved some money but not really mustachian, oh had I known!), basically I always considered my internships and jobs from a position of power. After all, I didn't really need the money to live, right?

My first internship was really really nice work, but with a terrible boss, who yelled at everyone and was really unbalanced. My last month there was crazy, she brought 4x more clients than the team had capacity to fulfill, and wouldn't hire new people. In mid-january I told her I was taking more classes that semester and would stop with the internship mid-feb. She asked me to just finish one last thing. I said I might not be able to, but I'd do my best (I did do my best and still wasn't able to finish - it was really a lot of work and I think her way of keeping me there). At least once a week she would casually drop in a conversation that I was staying until the end of that project. I would half smile and give her a serious look of No. Anyway, when classes were about to start, I handed in most things to the other interns and said goodbye. She didn't even turn to look at me when I went into her office. Afterwards she sent an email asking if I could do XYZ for her on the project. I didn't have the balls to say FU, but pretended I never saw it.

My latest FU experience was: I worked as a contractor at this really large multinational company and they merged my team with another in december (meaning they fired everyone from my team). They needed someone to do knowledge transfer to the new team and I was the lowest paid, so they did this amazing offer: you can get your thank-you bonus (2 months salary), work full time for two months (at double my previous PT salary), or work part time for two months (at my previous salary). I laughed out loud when I read this. It was the bonus OR work. So, knowing we can live full well and still save almost 40% of my boyfriend's income, I sat down and wrote a really sweet email where I said this offer made me feel like they didn't value my 3 years of work in the company, and I would love to do the transfer but can't do it only out of the goodness of my heart (these 4 words are actually on my email). In the end I got the bonus, plus full-time salary for 1 month, plus stayed another 4 months in an increased PT salary (because the new office incurred new expenses with transportation and lunch - which of course I banked on by bringing my own from home). And they asked me to stay more time, because I really did love the job and did it pretty well.

Now comes the real FU: for a long time I've been meaning to move to a smaller town, but how? Boyfriend and I passed for this govt job. He was called to fill the position in May, to start in June. If we both got called, we would have this really amazing income that would sum up to almost 100k a year, but no, I wasn't (I was next in line, but they decided they were done and closed the process). So suddenly we would be down to only one income (slightly larger than his previous salary but quite smaller than both of ours combined), and thinking what to do? Well, we have about two year's expenses stashed away, and we can still live comfortably on 50% of his new paycheck. So I kissed my job goodbye, we decided to move anyway and enjoy the new lifestyle, while I look for new opportunities on the new town or telecommuting. In this case, our FU money was the means to achieve a lifestyle choice, not necessarily to quit a job I hated (because I didn't really hate it).

And it's a great feeling to know that whatever money I make will go directly to the stash. I can't seem to see it grow fast enough.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on July 01, 2014, 10:57:42 PM
offer: you can get your thank-you bonus (2 months salary), work full time for two months (at double my previous PT salary), or work part time for two months (at my previous salary). I laughed out loud when I read this. It was the bonus OR work.

So options #1 and #3 were the same amount of money, but #1 is no work and #3 requires work?  Doy.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: farmstache on July 01, 2014, 11:49:18 PM
offer: you can get your thank-you bonus (2 months salary), work full time for two months (at double my previous PT salary), or work part time for two months (at my previous salary). I laughed out loud when I read this. It was the bonus OR work.

So options #1 and #3 were the same amount of money, but #1 is no work and #3 requires work?  Doy.

Yeah! That moment I actually wanted to say FU (and the bf actually told me to).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: AH013 on July 02, 2014, 07:24:54 AM
offer: you can get your thank-you bonus (2 months salary), work full time for two months (at double my previous PT salary), or work part time for two months (at my previous salary). I laughed out loud when I read this. It was the bonus OR work.

So options #1 and #3 were the same amount of money, but #1 is no work and #3 requires work?  Doy.

Yeah! That moment I actually wanted to say FU (and the bf actually told me to).

I bet they actually expect some people to continue working with an offer like that.  In a bizarre sort of sense, some people would think they would be in a stronger position while hunting for a new job if they are still presently employed....never mind they are sacrificing all those hours they could use job hunting working for no net benefit versus taking the severance.  Add to that they are throwing away another moderately well paying job -- job hunting while on unemployment (usually at 1/2 your regular pay)!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: farmstache on July 02, 2014, 04:15:45 PM
I bet they actually expect some people to continue working with an offer like that.  In a bizarre sort of sense, some people would think they would be in a stronger position while hunting for a new job if they are still presently employed....never mind they are sacrificing all those hours they could use job hunting working for no net benefit versus taking the severance.  Add to that they are throwing away another moderately well paying job -- job hunting while on unemployment (usually at 1/2 your regular pay)!

As a contractor I didn't really have the possibility of getting on unemployment. I'll look into my local laws for this, but I'm pretty sure I can't. Maybe next time? I didn't have the "right" to a severance bonus either. But since they offered the OR, I asked for the AND. And got it. It was really sweet and I must say I only got the guts to negotiate it after reading several threads on this forum and following a few links to external resources on negotiating... Thanks, everyone!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jordanread on July 02, 2014, 05:30:24 PM
I bet they actually expect some people to continue working with an offer like that.  In a bizarre sort of sense, some people would think they would be in a stronger position while hunting for a new job if they are still presently employed....never mind they are sacrificing all those hours they could use job hunting working for no net benefit versus taking the severance.  Add to that they are throwing away another moderately well paying job -- job hunting while on unemployment (usually at 1/2 your regular pay)!

As a contractor I didn't really have the possibility of getting on unemployment. I'll look into my local laws for this, but I'm pretty sure I can't. Maybe next time? I didn't have the "right" to a severance bonus either. But since they offered the OR, I asked for the AND. And got it. It was really sweet and I must say I only got the guts to negotiate it after reading several threads on this forum and following a few links to external resources on negotiating... Thanks, everyone!

The optimism gun strikes again!! Fear is the mind killer, and you don't know what's possible unless you ask.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gimesalot on July 03, 2014, 09:28:20 AM
Mine is not quite a "I have FU money right now" story, it is a, "I will have FU money in the future" story.

When I was 16, I was working at a mall department store.  I had originally said I could work every night of the week and all day on the weekends.  I graduated HS and began taking some night classes at the C.C.  My manager at the time was very nice, understanding, and accommodating.  She told me that my education was the most important thing in my life, because she didn't want me to end up like her, 40 something, living pay check to pay check.  Over time, I got fed up working there, so I told her I was leaving.  She asked me to stay because it would make her life easier if I could train my replacement.  I liked her, so I agreed.

Of course, she got promoted, and I got a really crappy manager.  I held out for a while, but one day I was scheduled to come in during one of my night classes.  I told my new manager that I needed to switch my schedule because I had class on Tuesday.  She said I couldn't switch because my employee profile said that I could work every night.  I told her that my schedule had changed since I graduated HS, and that my previous manager had honored my request for Tuesdays off.  She told me, get this, that I needed think about my priorities and get them straight.  My jaw dropped!  I told her that I did not need time to "think about it,"  I knew that my priority was college because, "I didn't want to end up like her, in my 40s working a miserable dead-end job." I was a typical teenager asshole!  She was surprised, and then even more surprised when I told her, that I decided that that was my last night there.  She demanded two weeks notice, which still included me missing class to come to work.  I said, nope!  I could not believe that I didn't get fired for mouthing off to her.

I had very little if any money, but I knew that my engineering degree was enough to say, "FU! I'm out!"
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Liberty Stache on July 03, 2014, 10:14:08 AM
She told me, get this, that I needed think about my priorities and get them straight.  My jaw dropped!  I told her that I did not need time to "think about it,"  I knew that my priority was college because, "I didn't want to end up like her, in my 40s working a miserable dead-end job."

Awesome! Its funny how situations become so clear once you truly decide what your priorities are whether they be college, FIRE, family, hobbies, work, etc. Having a back up plan (FU money, college path, etc) really allows one to follow their own priorities vs allowing the rest of the world to dictate what your priorities should be.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Zamboni on July 03, 2014, 04:18:44 PM
Quote
She demanded two weeks notice, which still included me missing class to come to work.  I said, nope!  I could not believe that I didn't get fired for mouthing off to her.

Wow, she was a moron.  I think my response to that would have been "Okay, you drive a hard bargain, M'am, so even though I just quit, my last day will actually be two weeks from today instead of tonight.  And you are right:  I will be here on Tuesdays as well."  Then I would just have never come back. 

I find myself explaining the concept of "Nobody HAS TO do ANYTHING when it comes to a job" to people on a regular basis.  We've had more than one person just stop showing up, or email a resignation letter while they are on vacation (with the last day of work conveniently falling on a future date that they are still on vacation), or agree to take on a big project and then turn around and put an "I resign effective immediately" letter under the boss's door after hours, yet somehow the illusion that people have to keep coming into the office until they are given permission to leave persists.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on July 03, 2014, 05:08:56 PM
Quote
She demanded two weeks notice, which still included me missing class to come to work.  I said, nope!  I could not believe that I didn't get fired for mouthing off to her.

Wow, she was a moron.  I think my response to that would have been "Okay, you drive a hard bargain, M'am, so even though I just quit, my last day will actually be two weeks from today instead of tonight.  And you are right:  I will be here on Tuesdays as well."  Then I would just have never come back. 

I find myself explaining the concept of "Nobody HAS TO do ANYTHING when it comes to a job" to people on a regular basis.  We've had more than one person just stop showing up, or email a resignation letter while they are on vacation (with the last day of work conveniently falling on a future date that they are still on vacation), or agree to take on a big project and then turn around and put an "I resign effective immediately" letter under the boss's door after hours, yet somehow the illusion that people have to keep coming into the office until they are given permission to leave persists.

Yeah, nobody HAS to leave bridges intact.  Some could burn them.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: warfreak2 on July 03, 2014, 05:15:36 PM
If bridges start trying to walk over you, then you might not be worried about burning them.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Kriegsspiel on July 03, 2014, 08:21:23 PM
Destroying a bridge might look easy in the movies, but remember: They're designed to withstand the immense shear-forces of wind and weather. Deploying an underwater M-32 satchel charge at the base of each load-bearing pylon looks like the answer, but it might not even shake a modern riveted steel highway or railroad bridge. Without delving into the complex language of the guerrilla combat engineer, the best advice I can give you is to forgo subtlety in favor of brute force: Put two satchel charges at each X-shaped trestle buck, and this should rob the bridge of any reinforcing strength and cause it to buckle nicely.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: farmstache on July 03, 2014, 08:49:35 PM
Destroying a bridge might look easy in the movies, but remember: They're designed to withstand the immense shear-forces of wind and weather. Deploying an underwater M-32 satchel charge at the base of each load-bearing pylon looks like the answer, but it might not even shake a modern riveted steel highway or railroad bridge. Without delving into the complex language of the guerrilla combat engineer, the best advice I can give you is to forgo subtlety in favor of brute force: Put two satchel charges at each X-shaped trestle buck, and this should rob the bridge of any reinforcing strength and cause it to buckle nicely.

Can you please rewrite that in a way that explains the metaphor? I'm not sure you're saying we should explode our bosses or even what exactly is made to withstand wind and weather (the job market)? ;-)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Middlesbrough on July 03, 2014, 09:07:13 PM
Destroying a bridge might look easy in the movies, but remember: They're designed to withstand the immense shear-forces of wind and weather. Deploying an underwater M-32 satchel charge at the base of each load-bearing pylon looks like the answer, but it might not even shake a modern riveted steel highway or railroad bridge. Without delving into the complex language of the guerrilla combat engineer, the best advice I can give you is to forgo subtlety in favor of brute force: Put two satchel charges at each X-shaped trestle buck, and this should rob the bridge of any reinforcing strength and cause it to buckle nicely.

Can you please rewrite that in a way that explains the metaphor? I'm not sure you're saying we should explode our bosses or even what exactly is made to withstand wind and weather (the job market)? ;-)
What my structural engineering buddy is trying to say is, create a chain type structure with your first hit and knock it down with the second.

If you burn your bridges, do it like a boss.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Michael792 on July 03, 2014, 09:09:40 PM
Destroying a bridge might look easy in the movies, but remember: They're designed to withstand the immense shear-forces of wind and weather. Deploying an underwater M-32 satchel charge at the base of each load-bearing pylon looks like the answer, but it might not even shake a modern riveted steel highway or railroad bridge. Without delving into the complex language of the guerrilla combat engineer, the best advice I can give you is to forgo subtlety in favor of brute force: Put two satchel charges at each X-shaped trestle buck, and this should rob the bridge of any reinforcing strength and cause it to buckle nicely.

Can you please rewrite that in a way that explains the metaphor? I'm not sure you're saying we should explode our bosses or even what exactly is made to withstand wind and weather (the job market)? ;-)

It's easy to quit in an epic manner, but you should remember that dick managers are pretty much born dicks: they're not going to give a shit about you quitting. So instead of using the old go-to Fuck-You-I'm-done methods of quitting, you need to quit in such a manner that no one's going to posses any illusions of a cordial exit. Instead of getting in a more-than-mild spat with said dick manager, the simplest and most effective thing to do is to fucking destroy any hope of good relations with that company, and make sure they know the entire mess is due to dick manager.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Primm on July 03, 2014, 09:39:50 PM
Destroying a bridge might look easy in the movies, but remember: They're designed to withstand the immense shear-forces of wind and weather. Deploying an underwater M-32 satchel charge at the base of each load-bearing pylon looks like the answer, but it might not even shake a modern riveted steel highway or railroad bridge. Without delving into the complex language of the guerrilla combat engineer, the best advice I can give you is to forgo subtlety in favor of brute force: Put two satchel charges at each X-shaped trestle buck, and this should rob the bridge of any reinforcing strength and cause it to buckle nicely.

Can you please rewrite that in a way that explains the metaphor? I'm not sure you're saying we should explode our bosses or even what exactly is made to withstand wind and weather (the job market)? ;-)

It's easy to quit in an epic manner, but you should remember that dick managers are pretty much born dicks: they're not going to give a shit about you quitting. So instead of using the old go-to Fuck-You-I'm-done methods of quitting, you need to quit in such a manner that no one's going to posses any illusions of a cordial exit. Instead of getting in a more-than-mild spat with said dick manager, the simplest and most effective thing to do is to fucking destroy any hope of good relations with that company, and make sure they know the entire mess is due to dick manager.

http://youtu.be/qfSAcVq6s9c?t=2m22s
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Michael792 on July 04, 2014, 02:54:44 AM
Destroying a bridge might look easy in the movies, but remember: They're designed to withstand the immense shear-forces of wind and weather. Deploying an underwater M-32 satchel charge at the base of each load-bearing pylon looks like the answer, but it might not even shake a modern riveted steel highway or railroad bridge. Without delving into the complex language of the guerrilla combat engineer, the best advice I can give you is to forgo subtlety in favor of brute force: Put two satchel charges at each X-shaped trestle buck, and this should rob the bridge of any reinforcing strength and cause it to buckle nicely.

Can you please rewrite that in a way that explains the metaphor? I'm not sure you're saying we should explode our bosses or even what exactly is made to withstand wind and weather (the job market)? ;-)

It's easy to quit in an epic manner, but you should remember that dick managers are pretty much born dicks: they're not going to give a shit about you quitting. So instead of using the old go-to Fuck-You-I'm-done methods of quitting, you need to quit in such a manner that no one's going to posses any illusions of a cordial exit. Instead of getting in a more-than-mild spat with said dick manager, the simplest and most effective thing to do is to fucking destroy any hope of good relations with that company, and make sure they know the entire mess is due to dick manager.

http://youtu.be/qfSAcVq6s9c?t=2m22s

The international association of combat engineers approves of this message.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: pom on July 04, 2014, 05:04:34 AM
She told me, get this, that I needed think about my priorities and get them straight. 

Haha, something similar happened to me too in the last year of HS when I worked in the kitchen of a restaurant. After I quit, the manager told me "it will look bad on your resume". As if graduating as an Actuary I was going to put my HS jobs on my resume and as if HR would care.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: rabbit on July 04, 2014, 10:03:48 AM
Long time reader, first time poster here! My FU money story isn't very epic, but here goes. 
I recently gave my notice at a job I've worked at for over 10 years to go back to grad school full time in a field I'm passionate about.
As a 40 yo single mom of 2, I thought I would be stuck working at a job I hate forever; but after reading MMM and especially jlcollinsnh, I realized that I need to "work to live", not "live to work."
Since I've always been pretty mustachian, I had enough money saved to say FU to my crappy desk job and hello to my dream career. It's a huge step and I'm really excited to take it!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Self-employed-swami on July 04, 2014, 12:21:56 PM
Long time reader, first time poster here! My FU money story isn't very epic, but here goes. 
I recently gave my notice at a job I've worked at for over 10 years to go back to grad school full time in a field I'm passionate about.
As a 40 yo single mom of 2, I thought I would be stuck working at a job I hate forever; but after reading MMM and especially jlcollinsnh, I realized that I need to "work to live", not "live to work."
Since I've always been pretty mustachian, I had enough money saved to say FU to my crappy desk job and hello to my dream career. It's a huge step and I'm really excited to take it!

Congratulations!!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: brewer12345 on July 04, 2014, 12:37:31 PM
Destroying a bridge might look easy in the movies, but remember: They're designed to withstand the immense shear-forces of wind and weather. Deploying an underwater M-32 satchel charge at the base of each load-bearing pylon looks like the answer, but it might not even shake a modern riveted steel highway or railroad bridge. Without delving into the complex language of the guerrilla combat engineer, the best advice I can give you is to forgo subtlety in favor of brute force: Put two satchel charges at each X-shaped trestle buck, and this should rob the bridge of any reinforcing strength and cause it to buckle nicely.

Can you please rewrite that in a way that explains the metaphor? I'm not sure you're saying we should explode our bosses or even what exactly is made to withstand wind and weather (the job market)? ;-)

It's easy to quit in an epic manner, but you should remember that dick managers are pretty much born dicks: they're not going to give a shit about you quitting. So instead of using the old go-to Fuck-You-I'm-done methods of quitting, you need to quit in such a manner that no one's going to posses any illusions of a cordial exit. Instead of getting in a more-than-mild spat with said dick manager, the simplest and most effective thing to do is to fucking destroy any hope of good relations with that company, and make sure they know the entire mess is due to dick manager.

Guppy in the radiator? (a special smell when the heat fires up)
Shrimp in the hollow space of a curtain rod?
Drop a steamer in a desk drawer right before the weekend and break the key off in the lock?
Annoy-a-trons placed in a few offices?
Offer the boss a "chocolate-covered" pretzel?
Leave a tray of ex lax brownies for all in the break room?

There are lots of ways to skin that cat.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: zataks on July 04, 2014, 12:39:49 PM
Shrimp in the hollow space of a curtain rod?

Of all you posted, this seemed the most sinister to me.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: msilenus on July 04, 2014, 02:10:55 PM
Destroying a bridge might look easy in the movies, but remember: They're designed to withstand the immense shear-forces of wind and weather. Deploying an underwater M-32 satchel charge at the base of each load-bearing pylon looks like the answer, but it might not even shake a modern riveted steel highway or railroad bridge. Without delving into the complex language of the guerrilla combat engineer, the best advice I can give you is to forgo subtlety in favor of brute force: Put two satchel charges at each X-shaped trestle buck, and this should rob the bridge of any reinforcing strength and cause it to buckle nicely.

Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: G-dog on July 04, 2014, 04:01:51 PM
Dr. Doom "But even decent jobs become intolerable when you're working under a toxic egomaniac workaholic inhuman prick.

One of the things I'm now fond of saying is that people usually don't leave their jobs.  They leave their managers. "

+ infinity ....
This ROCKS!
Businesses know this about managers/supervisors - how come they never appear to get rid of the TOXIN? They seem to prefer to let a lot of good, hard-working people quit, become disengaged (but stay), burn out, etc. rather than deal with the A number one asshat they MUST know is costing them productivity, engagement, quality, reputation, and loyalty.  It just boggles my mind...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Zamboni on July 04, 2014, 04:51:35 PM
That's awesome, Rabbit!

Quote
Yeah, nobody HAS to leave bridges intact.  Some could burn them.

Deciding you don't have to do XYZ task or project, or even that you don't have to work there is not burning a bridge.  Heck, as long as you get along with most of your co-workers, you can score a glowing recommendation from "the former employer" by just listing a friend/colleague from the place as your reference.  I've served as this type of reference for tons of people.  Nobody really expects to be able to speak with your previous boss; half the time he or she is no longer even working there by the time you need a reference from the place.  It doesn't matter at all what your ex-boss thinks about how you left unless you immediately try to get your job back or another identical job across the street with your ex-boss's buddy. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Kriegsspiel on July 04, 2014, 06:16:51 PM
Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville

While larger rounds incapacitate a target more reliably than the smaller 5.56, they are also much heavier to hump over the mountains. Being able to lay down a more ferocious volume of fire can be well worth the decrease in stopping power, especially when you have encountered a frisky opponent. Utilize your SAW gunner to suppress incoming fire, while your assault team maneuvers to better overrun the enemy position. If bounding proves difficult, remember, 5.56 can penetrate cover like Swiss cheese, although you will still be prudent to continuously engage targets until all teams have swept the objective area.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Michael792 on July 04, 2014, 10:38:36 PM
Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville

While larger rounds incapacitate a target more reliably than the smaller 5.56, they are also much heavier to hump over the mountains. Being able to lay down a more ferocious volume of fire can be well worth the decrease in stopping power, especially when you have encountered a frisky opponent. Utilize your SAW gunner to suppress incoming fire, while your assault team maneuvers to better overrun the enemy position. If bounding proves difficult, remember, 5.56 can penetrate cover like Swiss cheese, although you will still be prudent to continuously engage targets until all teams have swept the objective area.

Also, utilizing air and artillery support can shorten the effort, along with conserving your ammo. Definitely remember to sweep the kill zone afterward to eliminate survivors or take captives, mission depending. Once area is swept and the reports sent up, hopefully you can CM.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Nords on July 04, 2014, 10:51:39 PM
Epic FU money?  How about giving up $750K-$1M in salary & pension?

http://the-military-guide.com/2013/12/12/hanging-on-for-the-military-pension/

As most of you have read by now, I stayed on active duty for 20 years to vest my military pension.  In retrospect that was about eight years too long for my physical & mental health, but I survived the stress.  I should have gone Reserves as soon as my career peaked at the 12-year point, but I was ignorant and overworked and too afraid to even pay serious attention to the Reservists around me.  I didn't understand how a Reserve pension worked, and fear was the main reason I kept chasing those paychecks. 

In 1999, three years before my retirement, my active-duty spouse was picking up the wrong kind of signals from her assignment officer.  She was at her 16-year point, where they know that you're motivated by the pension and unlikely to resign from active duty.  An assignment officer's rationale is that "Needs of the Navy" take precedence over personal (and family) priorities.  My spouse was needed in Norfolk or Yokosuka, but she couldn't stay in Hawaii.

Up until this point the Navy had kept us dual-military spouses together, but now I was on my final tour and my assignment officer had no reason to send me to my spouse's new homeport.  Her orders would be an unaccompanied tour.  My daughter and I would stay in Hawaii until I retired (18-24 months after Mom left) and then we'd go to Mom's duty station. 

We all wanted to feel at home in a place that has the things we like and is closer to Hawaii.  We didn't want to try to live in a foreign land with an unfamiliar culture and no friends-- so my spouse chose Yokosuka.

We resigned ourselves (yet again) to the inevitable and began talking about the family logistics.  One afternoon on the way home from 3rd grade, my daughter broke down in tears.  She only knew a few words of Japanese and she didn't think that she'd be able to learn enough in time to handle the schools.  I explained to her that she'd go to an English-speaking school (on base) where they'd also teach her Japanese, but her feelings made clear that she wasn't happy about being separated from Mom-- and then having to leave her friends (and Hawaii) to get Mom back.

I wasn't very happy about the separation either, although I was in supportive-spouse mode.  But this would be our 14th move, dammit, and I'd had enough.  We'd been in Hawaii since 1989 but we'd had to leave once before ('94-'97 in San Diego) so we knew we wanted to retire in Hawaii.  We were definitely not interested in moving just so that my spouse could check a career block before retiring from active duty.

Things came to a head in early 2000 when my spouse and I were tweaking our transfer plan.  She mentioned that a friend had recommended great family counselors in both Hawaii and Yoko to help us deal with the unaccompanied tour.  When it became clear that this career move might require the assistance of mental-health professionals, we finally asked ourselves:  "Why are we doing this?!?"

I ran the numbers.  If she resigned from active duty and joined the Reserves, then my pension and our savings should bridge the gap until her Reserve pension started in 2022.  By resigning from active duty now (and giving up an active-duty pension in 2003) she'd pass up at least $750K while awaiting her Reserve pension.  Depending on the cost-of-living adjustments to the active-duty pension, the forsaken amount could've been over $1M. 

Her attitude was "Well, if we run out of money then I can always get a real job."  She drafted her resignation letter that night, had her CO endorse it the next morning, and faxed it in to BUPERS before lunch. 

Nobody took her seriously.  A Navy officer's resignation letter can give 12 months' notice, so it's traditionally regarded as merely the start of serious poker negotiations, and the assignment officer ignored her bluff.  He issued her resignation orders, which he expected her to cancel at any minute.  He found her a relief and stopped returning her calls.  We ran our financial numbers again-- still good.  (We didn't appreciate that the stock markets had reached their peak.)  We attended my retirement seminar together and became even more firmly convinced that she'd made the right choice.

In June 2000 we stumbled across our dream home four miles over in the next neighborhood.  Bigger house, better school system, bigger yard, fantastic views.  It was absolutely filthy and in crappy material condition but it has good bones for DIY sweat equity.  It was the pits of Hawaii's decade-long real estate recession, the sellers were desperate, the price was ridiculously low, and our conclusion was "We have to buy this place".  We closed the deal and rented out our old home.  Surprisingly our FI numbers still (barely) worked.  Hey, I could always get a real job too.

You military veterans know what comes next:  we used my spouse's resignation orders to ship our household goods at the Navy's expense.

When the assignment officer saw the invoice, he went nuts.  "Do you realize what you've done?!?  When you cancel your resignation and go to Yoko, you're going to have to pay that back!!"  Spouse got her CO's finger-wagging lecture on "Are you sure you know what you're doing?  I don't think you appreciate the significance of your mistake."  Coworkers asked "Are you guys OK?  Have you started your job search yet?"  None of them could even spell FI, let alone FIRE.

Surprisingly enough, our numbers still worked.  We were hugely leveraged (with an 8% mortgage!) and a job could certainly provide a safety margin, but our rental would offset our gargantuan mortgage payments.  The stock market was a little shaky by late 2000, but we were finally staying in Hawaii.

When she left active duty in May 2001 she had 17 years, 11 months, and 10 days.  She affiliated with the PACOM Reserve unit the next day. 

The stock markets sucked, but our ohana quality of life took a prompt jump.  My spouse spent the first few months taking naps and getting her life back.  During Reserve drill weekends she found a whole new Navy community that appreciated what she could do.  We dug into the DIY home improvement on our new home.  Our daughter thrived in the new school with her new friends.  I cruised on down my retirement glide slope.

Then 9/11 happened. 

When the stock markets re-opened on 17 September 2001, I ran the numbers one again.  Our portfolio was melting down like an ice cube at the beach and the college fund was in jeopardy, but we still had... barely enough.  I retired in June 2002.  We cut expenses and delayed our home improvements, and October 2002 was ugly, and we ate through our cash reserves, but by 2003 we were back on track. 

"Losing" $750K-$1M has not affected our lifestyle one bit.  Pursuing it would have wrecked our family.

No regrets. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on July 04, 2014, 10:58:04 PM
I've read it before, and I enjoyed it even more this time.  I love your wife's story Nords, and what she has done since then (the various volunteer work).  It's one of my favorite ER stories.  So awesome.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on July 04, 2014, 11:08:14 PM

Quote
Yeah, nobody HAS to leave bridges intact.  Some could burn them.

Deciding you don't have to do XYZ task or project, or even that you don't have to work there is not burning a bridge. 

That was in response to this:

Quote
We've had more than one person just stop showing up, or email a resignation letter while they are on vacation (with the last day of work conveniently falling on a future date that they are still on vacation), or agree to take on a big project and then turn around and put an "I resign effective immediately" letter under the boss's door after hours

All of which is definitely bridge burning.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: paddedhat on July 05, 2014, 06:17:33 AM

Guppy in the radiator? (a special smell when the heat fires up)
Shrimp in the hollow space of a curtain rod?
Drop a steamer in a desk drawer right before the weekend and break the key off in the lock?
Annoy-a-trons placed in a few offices?
Offer the boss a "chocolate-covered" pretzel?
Leave a tray of ex lax brownies for all in the break room?

There are lots of ways to skin that cat.


A good friend of mine had a small business doing appliance installation and repair.  One day he reports to a mansion just outside of NYC, and spent several hours installing a downdraft exhaust on a new range. He presents the bill to the owner, and expects a check. The owner is a professional body builder, who looks down at my buddy and says, " FU, I'm not paying you, get out" When asked what the issue is, the customer just states that he doesn't have to pay, so get out.  A few weeks later my buddy is surf fishing and lands a serious fish. He waits for darkness, and heads to the muscle head's mansion. He jumps the wall, unscrews the grille from the range exhaust, and using a broom handle, pushes his catch about ten feet into the ductwork under the kitchen........
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: G-dog on July 05, 2014, 09:09:31 AM
Not quite FU stories, but at least Some FU attitude:
I left me first job after college (without FU$) after my boss lied to me about a promotion "the university won't let me promote anyone until they are a co-author on a paper."  Bulshit - the university doesn't give a crap and had all the criteria explicitly listed AND I had turned down an offer to be a co-author on a paper because I thought I hadn't done enough work on that project. So, I found another job (in the same dept) and gave my 2.weeks notice.  Boss tells me it is unprofessional to give only 2weeks notice, a professional (salaried person) should give at least a month. I checked with the new boss, and he says 'fine'.  The next day, the soon-to-be ex-boss asks me if there is anything he can do to get me to stay - I  said 'no' ( but WISH I had said, go see what you can do an let me know --- and THEN I could have turned him down).
At the current job, a co-worker at a higher pay band interrupts a meeting I am having with one of his peers and proceeds to yell at both of us.  Our boss was in town, so I march right to their office, relate the story and say 'I WILL NOT be treated like this!'.  YES - I have FU money and I know I can walk out and be fine for a year or more. The other person who got yelled at has big time school debt, and is quiet as a church mouse (and continued to get abused by the yeller).  The yeller got in trouble, and never yelled at me again, and we mostly just avoided each other when possible.
So, as others have said, FU money gives you more (better) options, even if you don't pull the penultimate trigger.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: vern on July 05, 2014, 02:28:32 PM
We didn't want to try to live in a foreign land with an unfamiliar culture and no friends-- so my spouse chose Yokosuka.

Har!  Great stuff Nords!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: EarlyRetirementGuy on July 08, 2014, 08:43:45 AM
Not as epic as some stories in here, but mine came with a double FU!

A couple of years ago, my partner and I both started working at a local restaurant to supplement our incomes from our other jobs. While we both liked the job, we hated the manager.

He was your typical loud mouthed, arrogant, rude and demeaning boss who believed everything he did was right.

Things eventually came to a head when he started yelling at me one day in the kitchen infront of everyone about some 'compulsory' training I hadnt completed yet. I told him that he hadnt given me any time to do this training while at work and with my other job I didnt have time to do it at home. In the UK it is actually a legal requirement that you are paid to do all compulsory training however he conveniently forgot that fact and demanded I do all training in my own time.

Halfway through his rant, I held up my hand and very calmly said: "I dont come to work to be yelled at so I'm going to be quitting right now. You can continue yelling about things but it doesnt matter from this point onwards. By the way, my partner will also be quitting".

The look on his face was priceless. Luckily my partner and I had both agreed we would quit if either of us wanted to.. and because we both had our other jobs and a large emergency cash pile leaving this one would have no major impacts on us.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jordanread on July 08, 2014, 09:47:20 AM

Halfway through his rant, I held up my hand and very calmly said: "I dont come to work to be yelled at so I'm going to be quitting right now. You can continue yelling about things but it doesnt matter from this point onwards. By the way, my partner will also be quitting".

The look on his face was priceless. Luckily my partner and I had both agreed we would quit if either of us wanted to.. and because we both had our other jobs and a large emergency cash pile leaving this one would have no major impacts on us.

Teamwork!!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: EarlyRetirementGuy on July 09, 2014, 05:57:26 AM
Teamwork!!

It felt good knowing that my partner would support my decision.

Since then she's found another part time job she enjoys far more and I've picked up alot of weekend overtime for my main job which pays alot more!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: G-dog on July 09, 2014, 07:40:39 PM
I left me first job after college.......

Apparently I was a pirate ...AARRGGHH!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Liberty Stache on July 11, 2014, 06:53:53 AM
A good friend of mine had a small business doing appliance installation and repair.  One day he reports to a mansion just outside of NYC, and spent several hours installing a downdraft exhaust on a new range. He presents the bill to the owner, and expects a check. The owner is a professional body builder, who looks down at my buddy and says, " FU, I'm not paying you, get out" When asked what the issue is, the customer just states that he doesn't have to pay, so get out.  A few weeks later my buddy is surf fishing and lands a serious fish. He waits for darkness, and heads to the muscle head's mansion. He jumps the wall, unscrews the grille from the range exhaust, and using a broom handle, pushes his catch about ten feet into the ductwork under the kitchen........

While I like the story a better one would have been the installer putting a mechanic's lien on the mansion and then foreclosing on it!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: AlmostIndependent on July 11, 2014, 11:49:17 AM
A good friend of mine had a small business doing appliance installation and repair.  One day he reports to a mansion just outside of NYC, and spent several hours installing a downdraft exhaust on a new range. He presents the bill to the owner, and expects a check. The owner is a professional body builder, who looks down at my buddy and says, " FU, I'm not paying you, get out" When asked what the issue is, the customer just states that he doesn't have to pay, so get out.  A few weeks later my buddy is surf fishing and lands a serious fish. He waits for darkness, and heads to the muscle head's mansion. He jumps the wall, unscrews the grille from the range exhaust, and using a broom handle, pushes his catch about ten feet into the ductwork under the kitchen........

While I like the story a better one would have been the installer putting a mechanic's lien on the mansion and then foreclosing on it!

Agreed.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Unique User on July 13, 2014, 01:42:47 PM
These are awesome!  I walked out a job right after college.  I was working as a waiter, the GM who regularly screamed and ranted at waitstaff called me a c***.  I had warned her before that if she did that to me that I would leave and did, I handed her my apron and pad and walked out.  Fancy pants restaurant across from the Board of Trade in Chicago on a busy Friday night, only regret was the office job I landed soon after paid half what I made there.  I think I had enough to pay for a couple months of expenses, but don't need much when you're 22.   
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: avongil on July 13, 2014, 03:12:42 PM
Nords, that brought a tear to my eye.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Workinghard on July 13, 2014, 03:32:32 PM
What a great story about priorities, Nords! And look how your daughter turned out and where she's at now. I have no doubt that you made the right decision.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Nords on July 13, 2014, 10:08:59 PM
Nords, that brought a tear to my eye.
What a great story about priorities, Nords! And look how your daughter turned out and where she's at now. I have no doubt that you made the right decision.
Thanks!

After our daughter finishes her tour on her Rota ship, she'll go to a year of nuclear power training.  She'll follow that up with two years in the engineering department of an aircraft carrier (rarely seeing daylight).  Her carrier homeport choices will be East Coast, West Coast, or... Japan.  I'm pretty sure she won't want to stay in the U.S.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: secondcor521 on July 16, 2014, 02:58:03 PM
http://www.departurememo.com/ - more the way I want to be about my departure.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: farmstache on July 16, 2014, 04:54:28 PM
http://www.departurememo.com/ - more the way I want to be about my departure.

Amazing! Wishing her all the luck!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: johnintaiwan on July 16, 2014, 07:59:49 PM
The other teacher at my school is due to leave at the end of them month. Things are getting pretty heated between him and the owner right now. There may be an epic quitting story. The problem though is he has no FU money at all. I think it is gonna be a train wreck.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on July 16, 2014, 11:52:36 PM
Check out this lawyer's FU story. She turned it into a cartoon.
https://shine.yahoo.com/work-money/lawyer-quits-her-job-with-most-creative-departure-memo-ever-151105791.html

Her website has the whole cartoon:
http://www.departurememo.com/
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Eric on July 17, 2014, 12:06:23 AM
Hey, have you guys seen this website?  It's a cartoon about a lawyer quitting her job.

http://www.departurememo.com/

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Michael792 on July 17, 2014, 02:18:40 AM
Hey everyone, just thought y'all might want to see this: http://www.departurememo.com/

It's a cartoon by a lawyer about quitting her job.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: gimp on July 17, 2014, 01:54:33 PM
Hey guys, what was that website about a lawyer quitting her job?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: secondcor521 on July 17, 2014, 06:35:50 PM
Please remove me from this distribution list.  Thank you.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: msilenus on July 17, 2014, 07:29:50 PM
Me too!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: allergic2average on July 17, 2014, 09:30:47 PM
Well I've left a couple of jobs because there was some awful stuff going on, but I had no kind of FU money when I did it (I kind of did the second time but it's complicated), so I don't have a story of my own.

But when I was still working at Wal-Mart, I was witness to the Legend of Frank.

Frank was an older, white haired gentleman who was already a hero, he'd had a long military career and the truth is, he was one of the best employees the store had.  But he had his terms.  He had the only job at Wal-Mart he cared to have, and he worked the only shift he cared to work.

But he'd done so well for so long, no one had a problem with this.  Thing is Frank did not need the money, at all.  He had a military pension, his house was paid for, and he was actually delaying Social Security for a bigger payment because he didn't need it.  He worked for reasons that aren't fathomable to me.  He used the money he made to buy fishing lures and gave a chunk of it away to the Children's Miracle Network and stuff like that.

Now I have good and bad things to say about Wal-Mart.  Right now I'm going to say one of the bad things.

I don't know if this is by some evil design (I doubt it, never ascribe to malignancy that which can be explained by incompetence) or what, but it seems every once in a while some goober in Arkansas, for the hell of it, decides to change the way employees are scheduled or what jobs exist and what they do, and the usual effect of this is it tends to make older, more highly paid workers quit or find themselves in situations where they have to resign because they have a personal situation where they can't start working nights instead of mornings or something like that.

As a graduate of business school myself, I call that MBA thinking, and I say that pejoratively.  Actions like this are necessary sometimes but what I saw was something that some overpaid executive cooked up on a spreadsheet to make it look like he/she found a way to save money when in fact he/she was only shuffling people around and causing operational risks.  If (s)he'd paid attention in business school he'd realize what he/she was doing was in fact pointless.

This is what happens when people under intense pressure to justify their huge six or even seven figure salaries who have never worked in a Wal-Mart store, who think of the company not as people and stores and trucks and groceries and merchandise but rather as abstract numbers, make decisions about the jobs of people they will never meet.  I'm sure these corporate people are perfectly nice people, but I doubt very much that the $11 an hour workers whose fates they manipulate are more than an idea or a piece of the data to them.  Dunbar's number.  Wal-Mart has 2 million employees.  You do the math.

Well anyway, someone decided that Frank's job was too cushy and he needed a new schedule.  They basically took his job and another job, cut half the responsibilities and work from each, and switched them so you wound up with this weird situation where the new job had some of both of the old jobs.  And while it wasn't a completely illogical way to do things, it didn't make sense to the people who actually did this work.  This was a "I'm a smart corporate executive and you are a lowly peon, do what I say" initiative.

When this happens, they usually call you in to an office to tell you it's happened right before the schedules showing the changes come out.  That way they can say they gave you advance notice without really giving you any ability to deal with it.  It's a shitty thing they do because they know so many of their good employees won't quit because Wal-Mart is all they have.

But it didn't pan out for them this time.

Frank looked across at the overnight manager and said no, I won't do it.

The manager, who was a real douchebag, said yes you will and you'll like it (witness as unreliable but I can definitely imagine this guy saying that).

Frank looked at him and unclipped something from his belt and something from his shirt pocket.  He then opened his wallet and removed something.

"Here's my box cutter.  Here's my discount card.  And here's my badge.  That's everything I have of yours.  I'm going home."

Three hours into his shift, Frank turned around and walked out the front door of Wal-Mart and into a legend, vanishing in the darkness of the parking lot.  It threw the rest of us into chaos because we had to pick up the slack, but none of us complained, for he was our hero.  Because at some point, every single one of us had wanted to do that.

Last I heard of Frank, he's doing a lot more fishing nowadays.

The Legend of Frank was epic :)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gracie on July 17, 2014, 11:46:27 PM
Update to our FU money story: My husband yelled at the VP of his division a few weeks ago, giving the man a 10-minute lesson in good management technique at the top of his voice. My husband NEVER yells. He said there was a stunned silence in the department. The VP had reprimanded my husband at the front of the office and made some snide remarks. After a few months of this, my husband had enough.

Best part - The VP was apologizing and back-peddling at the end of it. He finally realized he had pushed too far.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on July 18, 2014, 10:10:12 AM
Hey guys, what was that website about a lawyer quitting her job?

I think it was something like goodbye-note.org
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gone Fishing on August 08, 2014, 12:33:38 PM
Keep them coming!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: tyler1215 on August 08, 2014, 10:49:39 PM
It's technically not an FU story, yet, but I constantly remind the senior managers that they only have to put up with me for 10 more years. Each manager, all in their fifties, says the same thing "I wish I could retire in 10 years." That's when I tell them "not you. I'm retiring in 10 years." I'm literally half their age. One manager loves it when I do that to them.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Michael792 on August 09, 2014, 01:45:55 AM
One time, I told my boss I had to quit because I was joining Active Duty and the Army would be sending me to Korea. She was mad at me, even though I was already in the Army and she knew what I planned on doing. Tried to fire me, but I threw my orders at our general manager. Not only did I not get fired, I have a guaranteed place in the company if I come back within five years. Not that I plan to, just kind of a Fuck You to her.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: RelaxedGal on August 09, 2014, 06:34:02 AM
My husband was stressed at work, hated the long commute, being away from our little girl for hours each day and working evenings and weekends from home.  Not unhappy enough to quit, but to look for a new position.  A buddy called, told him a rival company was opening a new office 5 miles from our house.  Won't you join us?

We expected a pay cut, we just didn't know how much.  Having FU money meant it really didn't matter how much, it was going to be work he enjoyed in a better environment and location.  As long as the offer wasn't enough of a paycut that he felt insulted, we agreed that he'd take the position if offered.

The salary offer matched his old salary plus bonuses.  Not an epic FU money story, but the money gave us freedom and confidence.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: iris lily on August 09, 2014, 10:16:25 AM
My husband was stressed at work, hated the long commute, being away from our little girl for hours each day and working evenings and weekends from home.  Not unhappy enough to quit, but to look for a new position.  A buddy called, told him a rival company was opening a new office 5 miles from our house.  Won't you join us?

We expected a pay cut, we just didn't know how much.  Having FU money meant it really didn't matter how much, it was going to be work he enjoyed in a better environment and location.  As long as the offer wasn't enough of a paycut that he felt insulted, we agreed that he'd take the position if offered.

The salary offer matched his old salary plus bonuses.  Not an epic FU money story, but the money gave us freedom and confidence.

This is a great story, not epic FU like some of the stories above, but it gets to the heart of the matter.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Stache In Training on September 05, 2014, 01:53:22 PM
Not as Epic, but FU money made it happen.

I quit to become a SAHD.  They were blown away and not expecting it at all.  That's not the epic part, but by being poilite and not burning bridges made this next part happen.

After a few weeks, they ask me to lunch, and offer me a promotion to a manager.  So basically the fact that they knew I don't need the money, means they gave me the most aggressive offer they've offered someone in that position, and the job description was changed to how I wanted it.  I was also able to ask for a bunch of vacation days that I now had planned, since I was planning on not working.  That wouldn't have been the case had I not quit and were just offered the promotion while still working there.

So not too epic in the sense of "stick it to the man," but definitely a great story and proof that FU money truly helps and gives you leverage... now I'll just be building even more FU money.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Zamboni on September 05, 2014, 02:51:11 PM
^That's fantastic.  Congrats!

Sometimes you just need to be gone for a little while to be appreciated for your efficiency and hard work.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on September 05, 2014, 05:35:01 PM
Nice, congrats SIT!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Liberty Stache on September 08, 2014, 06:41:50 AM
Stache In Training - Outstanding!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Rustyfa on September 08, 2014, 10:00:11 PM
My first post, might as we'll be here.

A little over a month ago I was told my department was going to salary.  This isn't surprising and I am surprised it took this long.  10 days later I was brought in to be told my salary from the new controller who had been working there two months.  They offered my hourly rate x 52 weeks x 40 hours. I slip up and swear a couple times a year but my reaction was to tell him to go f himself.  I couldn't help myself.  I said that if they wanted to retain me they needed to figure in my 7 hours of ot weekly.  They came back with a number that gave me a loss of five percent of my income.  Not ideal but i was later told by a friend higher up that I was the only one to complain and I was making 7500 more than anyone else in my department.  I have the cushion where if my wife and I get fired we can last 6 months and we have a very good start to our retirement.  I figure 9 to 17 years depending on the market.  So mid forties to early fifties.  Without this I would have taken it like the others. 

I was genuinely hurt by this.  I truly like my job and have worked my rear off to be very good at the job.  I was hurt by this and finally called the recruiter that had been hounding me back.  He scheduled an interview for the next day.  I sent out two resumes and after one interview at one spot and four at the other I have two offers.  One for comparable money but not in my field.  I had to turn it down,  would have loved working there but needed financial incentive.  The second offer is a 30 minute commute but offered more than I have made before base wise.  I countered with what i assumed a ridiculous number.  Two weeks go by.  I had emailed to thank them for the offer but decided to call and talk to the owner.  After a solid conversation I know they just can't match what I need to switch, travel etc even though it is a step up in career and money.  5 hours later I get an offer of 4percent more than the ridiculous number I asked for. 

I had to take it, had to.  So now I will be starting over there in a month and am scared and excited.  Having the fu money allowed me to counter at both jobs when a person without it may have been silenced.  I am sort of sad as I truly like my current job and the people.  Had they simply made a fair offer or gone up another 4k on the secondary offer they would have kept me.  Hope this works out well.  I live in rural Midwest and I never thought I would ever earn this much although it isn't close to six figures I see here.

No fu to the company.  I told them it was the best job I have ever had and that I didn't want to leave but financially I had no choice.  I want to not burn a bridge as someday I really may come back and work here again.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: arebelspy on September 09, 2014, 07:52:13 AM
Awesome that you had that flexibility Rustyfa.  I'm sure your current job will miss you.  Hope you like your new job even more than the old one!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Jellyfish on September 09, 2014, 09:05:25 AM
I honestly don't know whether I get kudos or a face punch for this. I am new to MMM, love the forum.  Have been good with saving and investing my whole live, but due to job uncertainties over the last few years started hoarding cash in fear of being laid off.  Sort of accidentally saved a giant FU fund.  Last November my job got miserable (massive project, working 70+ hours per week) and I'm a single mom to a 9 year old boy who was struggling with school.  We just found out he was dyslexic and I needed to have time with him to sort things out.  Long story short my FU fund enabled me to give 2 weeks notice. 

My employer (large consulting firm, I do HR/Recruiting) convinced me to take a 3 month leave of absence instead.  I did, and when I came back I negotiated a flexible work arrangement where I work 8am-3pm at 80% pay.  I'm off when my son comes home from school.  Works great, and now I can focus on my FIRE plan. 

My FU fund gave me the freedom to walk away, and my employer knows I am still willing to do so at any moment, which is great.  I realize after reading the MMM blog and this forum though that having as much cash as I do is ridiculous though (well over 1 year's living expenses, what was I thinking??).  I have Vanguard index funds and investments (401(k) and non-retirement, and am well diversified, just haven't been able to let go of this ridiculous safety blanket of cash.  Time to fix that.  I am 42 and think my ER goal is age 48 or 50.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jordanread on September 09, 2014, 09:28:05 AM
I honestly don't know whether I get kudos or a face punch for this. I am new to MMM, love the forum.  Have been good with saving and investing my whole live, but due to job uncertainties over the last few years started hoarding cash in fear of being laid off.  Sort of accidentally saved a giant FU fund.  Last November my job got miserable (massive project, working 70+ hours per week) and I'm a single mom to a 9 year old boy who was struggling with school.  We just found out he was dyslexic and I needed to have time with him to sort things out.  Long story short my FU fund enabled me to give 2 weeks notice. 

My employer (large consulting firm, I do HR/Recruiting) convinced me to take a 3 month leave of absence instead.  I did, and when I came back I negotiated a flexible work arrangement where I work 8am-3pm at 80% pay.  I'm off when my son comes home from school.  Works great, and now I can focus on my FIRE plan. 

My FU fund gave me the freedom to walk away, and my employer knows I am still willing to do so at any moment, which is great.  I realize after reading the MMM blog and this forum though that having as much cash as I do is ridiculous though (well over 1 year's living expenses, what was I thinking??).  I have Vanguard index funds and investments (401(k) and non-retirement, and am well diversified, just haven't been able to let go of this ridiculous safety blanket of cash.  Time to fix that.  I am 42 and think my ER goal is age 48 or 50.

My vote is for kudos. Could the money be invested better? Sure. Did it 'buy' you freedom (in some form)? Absolutely. That's what money is about around these parts. :-) Congrats!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DeepEllumStache on September 09, 2014, 09:28:17 AM
No face punches there, your FU money gave you exactly what it was supposed to give - the power to walk away from a situation that wasn't good for you.  Then you used it to negotiate a better path.  Great job!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: lhamo on September 09, 2014, 03:06:08 PM
I agree that you deserve kudos -- awesome story.

And I wouldn't worry too much about having a large reserve fund in your situation.  You are the sole income in your family and have a special needs child to support (both financially and otherwise).  I would advocate on the side of being prudent with cash reserves.  But this is coming from someone who has 2-3 years of current living expenses in cash or cash-like reserves.  Yes, I have a serious case of bag lady syndrome, in spite of a net worth that could have me set up as a different kind of bag lady (Prada, Chanel, etc) were I into such things....
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: ender on September 09, 2014, 04:20:27 PM
It's technically not an FU story, yet, but I constantly remind the senior managers that they only have to put up with me for 10 more years. Each manager, all in their fifties, says the same thing "I wish I could retire in 10 years." That's when I tell them "not you. I'm retiring in 10 years." I'm literally half their age. One manager loves it when I do that to them.

This is great.

I have some coworkers who are in a similar position, though I'm not bold enough to say something like that to them...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: fantabulous on September 09, 2014, 08:39:02 PM
I honestly don't know whether I get kudos or a face punch for this.

Kudos to you, face punch to your employer.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: viper155 on September 10, 2014, 06:10:19 AM
I was bartending at a place that I actually loved working in but I was getting bored. I was waiting to be called to my dream job with the FDNY. Biding time. One day I received my notice that I would be getting sworn in 8 weeks later. I went to work the next day and when the boss came in, out of nowhere, I told him I quit. I worked one more day and the day after that I left on a 6 week bicycle journey. I had done this sort of thing before, but this time I did it the right way.
That was 1990. Today I'm retired from my job with the FDNY but it sure did feel good to just pack up and go!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Pat on September 10, 2014, 08:10:50 AM
I agree with what tooqk4u22 said on the first page about FU money affording one the opportunity to stay as well as leave. I enjoy the work I do, most of the people I work with, have a relatively short commute, never travel for work, save >50% of my take-home, and still have room to grow in my career with our organization, so I have turned down other potentially higher paying opportunities because I didn't want to risk ending up somewhere I'm not as happy as I am now.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: TurtleMarkets on September 10, 2014, 01:58:33 PM
Two Stories that are not me but I witnessed.

1. This guy worked with us for a few months. We had a meeting almost monthly were we got yelled at for not doing enough work. All in really vague and unmeasurable terms. I thought they were funny and almost seemed like satire from a office show. This one guy did not. He called off the next day. Then the day after that called in and said I am not coming in today or ever again. Not sure how you want to notify HR or the rest of management but I will mail my ID badge in.  (Click)"   (The manager told us this conversation in a tone like this guy was a loser) Turns out he was working on a side project and needed to work for a few more months before he could go on his own. That meeting made him say it was time.

2. Get an email from a .net devloper that says.  "It was nice working with  you all. Good bye"  Management flipped out because he didnt give any warning. He sent that email and walked out with no explanation.  Still have no idea what happened
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: missbee on September 11, 2014, 01:14:27 AM
I’m not sure if this belongs in the “find a new job” gauntlet challenge or here:
I had a horrible job – I took it because I thought it would be a good move but I never did get anything I was promised in the interviews…
Anyway, after a bit over a year in the job, the workload had tripled (as was expected) and they finally got me the long promised assistant. And decided to pay them more than me, even though I would be training and supervising them. This was the straw that broke the camel’s back (see other work related rant from a few months back).
So I did some sums and realised that I did have a couple of months FU money up my sleeve and I could afford to stand up for myself for once. So I did, and got sacked.
But, being in the wrong they had to give me my accrued leave and pay in lieu of notice so I got a few unexpected grand for acting in my own best interests for a change :)
The day after, I bumped into some team mates from a previous government job and got a foot back in the door there. I did get a glorious three weeks of leisure before stepping into a cushy role that pays more per hour for a fraction of the responsibility and has awesome flexibility in a super convenient location. Yes, FU money is a nice thing to have.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on September 22, 2014, 08:44:39 AM
OP here, I think this lady takes the cake

http://www.mediabistro.com/tvnewser/alaska-tv-reporter-quits-on-air-fk-it-i-quit_b239657
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: pachnik on September 22, 2014, 09:14:17 AM
OP here, I think this lady takes the cake

http://www.mediabistro.com/tvnewser/alaska-tv-reporter-quits-on-air-fk-it-i-quit_b239657

Wow, I can't believe that one.  Talk about burning bridges.  I don't think I'd ever have the courage to do it quite so dramatically.  Thanks for posting it. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: partgypsy on September 23, 2014, 01:19:46 PM
I guess in retrospect I have a couple fu stories. I got a job right out of college that was actually quite good, in the late 80's making 21K a year in the field I wanted to be in (research). In addition to the job I was being paid to do (study coordinator for a study funded by a particular company) I did a lot of other things for them, being a recent college grad and eager beaver, including editing their newsletter, working on other studies, and formatting letters for the secretary (she was there for her looks and that's about it). Anyways the study is expanding to other sites, and I'm flown out to meet the expanded team. I'm also recognized because we were the first site and also helped them redo the data collection forms. The VP of the company lets us know that each site is getting 35K to pay for our job, and to let him know if we are not getting it. My mouth drops open. I figure I don't even care if I get the full 35K, but can use the news to at least get 28K a year. I schedule a meeting with the office manager (it's fall). He says he can only talk salary at the annual meeting in spring. Being naive, I wait until spring. When I go to meet with him, he basically pats me on the head, says that money is short but for me they will stretch and give me a 3% raise. I bring up what the VP said. He basically calls me a liar and "take it or leave it." Mind you, this is an office where 95% of the employees are cowed married middle aged females who work for peanuts, and only the primary doctor and upper management are men who drive cars that cost more than any employee's annual salary. Other sexist things like the women staff had to wear a skirt or dress on days the (male) doctor worked. So I let my immediate supervisor know, and think about it for a day. Basically I was so disgusted by them thinking I was this stupid I didn't think I could work for them anymore. I go back the next day saying "thank you for the opportunity, you said take it or leave it so I leave it; this is my 2 weeks notice". Now it was his turn for his mouth to drop open.
The VP ends up personally calling me, asking me to stay and I will get the money, as long as I agreed to stay until the trial was over (3 years). As I was planning to apply to grad school for the following year I end up having to decline, plus the situation would be, uncomfortable. (I had heard from the grapevine the manager had some "esplaining" to do). During the year and a half I did work there I had saved 7K, and all these long time employees who knew my grad school plans were shaking my hand, and congratulations kind of a Norma Rae moment. Because I lived frugally, was able to take 6 months off, and then just worked a part time job for the few months before beginning grad school.

As I now have dependents and house and such it would take me a lot more to something like that, but strangely it was the right decision at the time.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Joggernot on September 23, 2014, 02:22:50 PM
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins (http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: SisterX on September 23, 2014, 03:06:38 PM
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins (http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins)

What the f*%# did I just read?  I sincerely hope that was satire, because otherwise it's partisan politics beyond inanity and into the realm of crazy.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Joggernot on September 23, 2014, 03:20:07 PM
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins (http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins)

What the f*%# did I just read?  I sincerely hope that was satire, because otherwise it's partisan politics beyond inanity and into the realm of crazy.
Not satire.  Real.  You can cuss out the boss and expect to keep your job.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jordanread on September 23, 2014, 04:02:39 PM
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins (http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins)

I don't think FU money means what you think it means... :D
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: zataks on September 26, 2014, 10:40:10 AM
Kind of have one; it's more about being badass by living below my means than actually having FU money but I think the principles are the same in this case.

Have been extremely over worked and understaffed for a long time and I reached a breaking point and applied for a different position that would be a voluntary demotion for me.  Not really much less money (maybe 5%) but a significant status and responsibility demotion.  I saw my manager yesterday (who I do not directly report to; there's a supervisor as a buffer) and told her how exhausted I am and concerned for my health and that is why I'm applying for the lower position. 
She came back to me later in the day and emailed today saying that they are going to get us temporary assistants for relief until a long-term position can be created as well as attempting to get me a status and wage promotion (10%)! 

tl;dr: because I don't need higher wages I encouraged management to give me help and more money by applying for a lower level job.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: SisterX on September 26, 2014, 11:54:52 AM
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins (http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins)

What the f*%# did I just read?  I sincerely hope that was satire, because otherwise it's partisan politics beyond inanity and into the realm of crazy.
Not satire.  Real.  You can cuss out the boss and expect to keep your job.

I was referring to the article itself.  It's crap.  And I'm not saying this from a partisan perspective, but as someone who understands journalism.  That article is not it.  Find better sources.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Joggernot on September 26, 2014, 01:59:39 PM
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins (http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins)

What the f*%# did I just read?  I sincerely hope that was satire, because otherwise it's partisan politics beyond inanity and into the realm of crazy.
Not satire.  Real.  You can cuss out the boss and expect to keep your job.

I was referring to the article itself.  It's crap.  And I'm not saying this from a partisan perspective, but as someone who understands journalism.  That article is not it.  Find better sources.
Please provide me with your list of unbiased sources that I may use them.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: nyxst on September 26, 2014, 02:37:20 PM
Back when I was married my ex had gotten promoted to a new job making decent money and his relative passed away leaving some inheritance.  I thought it was a good opportunity to shift gears and started taking real estate classes.  I worked as a receptionist at a lawyers office for shit money and didn't want to stay there forever.  Anyway, about a year later I was all squared away with my license. They hadn't given me a raise yet and it was about review time. They had increase my workload substantially from just receptionist to now doing all of the filing and estate planning for one of the partners.  I made a long list detailing everything I did for the firm and went in for my review.  I asked for a $8000 raise (which was a huge percentage of my salary...) and they basically laughed me out of the conference room.  So I handed them my two weeks notice (pre-typed) and kept my cool.  Each partner took turns over the next week grilling me on how I was going to manage and trying to scare me into staying.  Finally the 2 weeks passed and on my last Friday I was saying goodbye to my friends. Of course the top dawg partner calls me into his office and offers me a $10,000 to stay and said that he though I was just calling their bluff and they never interviewed anyone for the job and had no one to replace me.  I politely declined and explained that I didn't play games like that, but my moral code said human beings should treat each other with respect.  I was 23 at that time.... he was 67.. and he thought he was way more important that me since he was a big shot lawyer.  I don't think anyone had ever stood up for themselves like that with him.   It felt great! They ended up begging me to come in part time 2 days per week for over 3x my hourly rate to finish the estate work for 3 months.  I took that and ended up using them as my divorce lawyers (free of charge!!) so I'm glad I didn't burn the bridge to the ground.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cheddar Stacker on September 26, 2014, 02:41:16 PM
@nyxst, cool story. Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Zamboni on September 26, 2014, 09:12:33 PM
That is a great story, nyxst.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: SisterX on September 29, 2014, 11:09:17 AM
Just found this article.  Guess we can do this with impunity now...

http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins (http://www.caintv.com/obamas-nlrb-now-ordering-reins)

What the f*%# did I just read?  I sincerely hope that was satire, because otherwise it's partisan politics beyond inanity and into the realm of crazy.
Not satire.  Real.  You can cuss out the boss and expect to keep your job.

I was referring to the article itself.  It's crap.  And I'm not saying this from a partisan perspective, but as someone who understands journalism.  That article is not it.  Find better sources.
Please provide me with your list of unbiased sources that I may use them.

I would never say "unbiased".  Everyone is biased.  I said "better".  The article you linked to?  That's the equivalent of using Buzzfeed as a source.

nyxst, fantastic story!!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: MooseOutFront on September 30, 2014, 09:49:46 AM
@nyxst, perfect FU money story.  FU and your money, guy.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: GardenFun on September 30, 2014, 11:14:43 AM
Worked at a company for over 13 years.  Had a major customer audit coming up.  Was working 12-14hrs/day for months preparing for it.  Boss (CEO) didn't understand the urgency and was consistently pushing against any changes I proposed until customer berated him due to lack of implementation.  It became my fault for not explaining the issue, not his fault for failing to listen for multiple months. 

One month prior to audit, boss tells me that they hired my replacement but are moving me to a new role.  Basically wanted me to sit in audit, state their implementation delay was my fault, and then let me go after audit was complete (my take on the last part).  Even if they didn't let me go, my workload wouldn't be reduced because the new hire would dump all the grunt work on me while she sat in meetings, looking very "director-ish". 

First conversation with boss on this change started with the phrase "you know, it is very hard to go from two incomes to one income".  I was in such shock, I didn't know what to say.  But what he didn't know was that the house was paid off, had plenty of FU money, and I had already planned on exiting the company a month or so after the audit, mostly due to him.  So I submit the 2-week notice, and the HR director (nice guy BTW), comes in and starts with the same "you know, it is very hard to go from two incomes to one income" line.  By this time, I had a night of sleep and a clear head.  I stopped him and said "we can skip the rest of the conversation.  This is where all of you erred in judgment.  I don't NEED to work.  I CHOOSE to work.  Everything we have is paid.  Forget the two week notice, I am quitting right now."  Didn't make a scene, just walked out.  I huge weight was lifted when I walked through those doors.  Met co-workers for lunch and they were happy for me to get the heck out of there.  Still friends with many of them. 

Like someone else said, you don't leave companies, you leave bosses. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: SwordGuy on September 30, 2014, 07:36:13 PM
Like someone else said, you don't leave companies, you leave bosses.

I did that very thing today!   

Same client, new client department, new employer, better pay, more interesting technology to work with. :)

Got a nice send off from the client management today, which I'm sure rubbed my old boss the wrong way.  He was lurking around all day today, barely spoke, but looked like he wanted to say something snarky and couldn't.   It was pretty creepy.

Ladies, know that guy who watches you all the time and stands - just so - in a way that makes the hair on the back of your neck stand up?   That's how it was today.   People who came into our work area noticed it right away and commented on it to me.

Only reason I didn't leave over a year ago was because I really believe in what our client does and want to do my best for them.

I don't have an epic FU story to go with it, other than to say that having a goodly stache meant I didn't have to worry while I looked for a better position.  I could negotiate with the client, my (now) past employer, and any potential new employer from a position of strength.   

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jprince7827 on October 02, 2014, 07:26:51 AM
So over a period of days I have read every. single. post. on this thread. This is the greatest thread of all time.

I too have a kind-of FU story, though at no point did I burn bridges or say FU.

About 1.2 years ago I was 1.5 years into my first job and hating it. We were working 10-12 hour days and once a quarter we'd spend a weekend in the office. It's software so spending that long coding does something to your mind. This is not to say my boss was an asshole, or even his boss's boss, I love and still love all the people that worked at this company, and consider my former boss one of my best friends and mentors. It was just that the upper management demanded unreasonable things from us in unreasonable time so we all had to put in the effort.

Well, 1.2 years ago, I was standing in the shower after having worked the last 12 days in a row, 10-12 hours each, and suddenly I had a nervous break down. It felt terrible and such a release at the same time. I resolved then and there that I'd begin looking for work elsewhere. I'd done my time.

Right after that, as if the company sensed I was pissed(I had been doing some interviews), the hours lessened, the deadlines became more reasonable, and we graduated to 9-10 hour days and weekends were a virtual guarantee. There was one 34 hour stint in the office overnight to get a product launched but I wore that as a badge of honor. I decided to stay, but also I started posting for jobs on Elance.

I took a job making <5$/hr for 20 hrs to beat out the Indians and built a Ruby gem wrapper for some company's API. It was crappy work. The next job I got a month later paid 20$/hr, and eventually I got that client up to 60$/hr. By the end of last year(about 8 months after said break down), I was charging 80$/hr for 10-15hrs/week on the side of my real job running a private consulting firm.

By January of this year I was making 1$ for every 1$ I made at work, working only 10-15hrs a week, making 100$/hr. I had hired on my co-workers to do part-time work for me and was making 50% margins on their hours as well. In one two week period, I brought in 5,000$, outside of my normal paycheck.

Life was good. I was stashing hard. Then my main client offered me the CTO position at his company, for 2x my current salary, with similar equity. I thought about it hard for three weeks, and then informed my boss. My boss didn't even try to counter me, though if he had matched the price, or even come close, I would have certainly stayed - by this point the hours had gotten much more palatable.

I gave them 6 weeks notice, and during those 6 weeks the company offered me to keep working out of my office there since my new job was completely remote. They wanted to keep an eye on me and basically would let me have my job back whenever I want. In return, whenever they have a question about the software I wrote I'm right there to ask, and I still get to hang out with my co-workers every day(though they're in a different part of the building now.) They're good friends, so it works out.

The new company I work for is a startup and while they DO have money it is a risk. My previous company is worth 500mm. The stashing I did during the last year made sure I had at least 4 months expenses saved up before I dropped the bomb, and this is not even counting the years of coverage I have stashed in my retirement accounts if the worse came to worst.

FU money is a powerful thing. And now I'm freer than I've ever been.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on October 02, 2014, 09:25:37 AM
Congrats, truly inspiring! It is pretty amazing to see real world examples paying off...it really reinforces why we all do what we do here.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dragoncar on October 02, 2014, 09:32:51 AM
So over a period of days I have read every. single. post. on this thread. This is the greatest thread of all time.

I too have a kind-of FU story, though at no point did I burn bridges or say FU.

About 1.2 years ago I was 1.5 years into my first job and hating it. We were working 10-12 hour days and once a quarter we'd spend a weekend in the office. It's software so spending that long coding does something to your mind. This is not to say my boss was an asshole, or even his boss's boss, I love and still love all the people that worked at this company, and consider my former boss one of my best friends and mentors. It was just that the upper management demanded unreasonable things from us in unreasonable time so we all had to put in the effort.

Well, 1.2 years ago, I was standing in the shower after having worked the last 12 days in a row, 10-12 hours each, and suddenly I had a nervous break down. It felt terrible and such a release at the same time. I resolved then and there that I'd begin looking for work elsewhere. I'd done my time.

Right after that, as if the company sensed I was pissed(I had been doing some interviews), the hours lessened, the deadlines became more reasonable, and we graduated to 9-10 hour days and weekends were a virtual guarantee. There was one 34 hour stint in the office overnight to get a product launched but I wore that as a badge of honor. I decided to stay, but also I started posting for jobs on Elance.

I took a job making <5$/hr for 20 hrs to beat out the Indians and built a Ruby gem wrapper for some company's API. It was crappy work. The next job I got a month later paid 20$/hr, and eventually I got that client up to 60$/hr. By the end of last year(about 8 months after said break down), I was charging 80$/hr for 10-15hrs/week on the side of my real job running a private consulting firm.

By January of this year I was making 1$ for every 1$ I made at work, working only 10-15hrs a week, making 100$/hr. I had hired on my co-workers to do part-time work for me and was making 50% margins on their hours as well. In one two week period, I brought in 5,000$, outside of my normal paycheck.

Life was good. I was stashing hard. Then my main client offered me the CTO position at his company, for 2x my current salary, with similar equity. I thought about it hard for three weeks, and then informed my boss. My boss didn't even try to counter me, though if he had matched the price, or even come close, I would have certainly stayed - by this point the hours had gotten much more palatable.

I gave them 6 weeks notice, and during those 6 weeks the company offered me to keep working out of my office there since my new job was completely remote. They wanted to keep an eye on me and basically would let me have my job back whenever I want. In return, whenever they have a question about the software I wrote I'm right there to ask, and I still get to hang out with my co-workers every day(though they're in a different part of the building now.) They're good friends, so it works out.

The new company I work for is a startup and while they DO have money it is a risk. My previous company is worth 500mm. The stashing I did during the last year made sure I had at least 4 months expenses saved up before I dropped the bomb, and this is not even counting the years of coverage I have stashed in my retirement accounts if the worse came to worst.

FU money is a powerful thing. And now I'm freer than I've ever been.

Ah yes, nothing like an incestuous client relationship to keep the money train rolling :-)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jprince7827 on October 02, 2014, 01:27:57 PM
Quote

Ah yes, nothing like an incestuous client relationship to keep the money train rolling :-)

Not to mention one of my subcontractors was my brother, so hello nepotism :D He also then did two years of internship at the 500mm company on my recommendation. It's all who you know in this world.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: oinkette on October 06, 2014, 02:35:05 PM
Mine isn't a real FU story but I did manage to quit.

I basically had the boss who could write the book on how NOT to be a manager.  How one could manage to be a micro-manager yet totally unavailable is beyond me, but that was him.  He literally walked around the office at 4:55 each day to make sure everyone was still there.  His way of "motivating" people (literally his words) was to threaten to fire them.

He was absurdly paranoid to the degree that we could not send an email to another department unless we cc'ed him. He forbade us from going to the staff Christmas party or the staff retreat. 

Then he hired a crazy woman to be the assistant manager so he wouldn't have to deal with us lowly worker bees. She basically took her cues from him and one upped them.  She would lie to make us look bad in front of clients.  She took over the 4:55pm rounds, but worse, she was a workaholic and did the rounds at 8am as well to make sure we were there for the start of the day as well. 

One day she informed me, in front of coworkers, that my top was innappropriate because I was "jiggling" in it.  It wasn't even low-cut or tight! I know because I checked with at least 3 other employees (other the ones who were right there and appropriattely mortified for me).

I eventually found another job accross town making 10% more in a better company.  My last day I wore that top just to spite her.  The best part is, we have monthly meetings in town with all the people who work in that industry and so I see both her and my old boss occasionally.  I try to wear that top (which my current boss has no problem with) when I can.  I'm also sure it's a thorn in his paranoid side to know that I discuss him and his awful management style with my current coworkers.  Which I do.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: TootTootBeepBeep on December 05, 2014, 08:04:32 PM
I didn't end up quitting, but it felt really good

I had just gone through a company sponsored training program that was significant in time and money, but poorly run. I didn't get a lot out of it. Throughout the program I gave a lot of feedback to make it more useful, but this fell on deaf ears. Upon being released and required to perform my new monkey skills I still needed to ask for help. I went to a good friend and coworker just down the way to ask how to do a particular task. While talking to my cw and a few others about the task, his boss (a bitter old man who helped fund the training program) approached. He listened for a moment then looked directly at me and said:

You can't even do that? Well you aren't worth much.

I looked him in the eye and stated: You're a Dick.

TBH I didn't actually mean to say it, It was word vomit. BUT IT FELT WONDERFUL!

The company i work for is super prim and proper. It is a large organization, but this man certainly could have had me fired or at least had me written up among other punishments. He and the other cw's stood in disbelief and I walked away.

Though no consequences (that i am aware of) came to be, my small FU 'stache which would cover my expenses for 6 months or so gave me the freedom from anxiety of whatever consequence my word vomit would produce. It was the best, most accidental moment of my working career.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Zamboni on December 05, 2014, 08:17:31 PM
^That's beautiful.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jprince7827 on December 05, 2014, 08:18:04 PM

I looked him in the eye and stated: You're a Dick.


DAYUMN.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: smalllife on December 06, 2014, 10:20:56 AM
I finally have a story!

I don't have what I consider to be a FU stache, but I just had a major win at work.  My company has been resisting work from home opportunities for people in my department because of some responsibilities that do require physical presence.  I had a conversation with my direct boss and good friend that basically said that if the work environment didn't change I was one foot out the door.  The work is fine, we're just understaffed, overburdened, and have a physically stressful work environment (constant noise, distractions, and interruptions).  That led to a nice long chat with the head of the company, who will be meeting with my department to air some laundry and create a workable list of solutions.  AND I get to test working from home one day a week :-)

I credit a semblance of FU stache, a growing confidence in my skills and employability, and a wonderfully supportive SO.

WIN!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DoubleDown on December 06, 2014, 10:39:48 AM

One day she informed me, in front of coworkers, that my top was innappropriate because I was "jiggling" in it.  It wasn't even low-cut or tight! I know because I checked with at least 3 other employees (other the ones who were right there and appropriattely mortified for me).


I am not an employment law expert, but I'd say (based on a fair amount of training as a manager) this is about as much of a glaring, textbook, poster child example of sexual harassment that you could find (okay, one slightly step higher would be "have sex with me or I'll fire you"). I'd venture that if you pursued a claim against the company, you would almost certainly win (or force a settlement). I'm not advocating that course of action, because you may very well deem it's best to let it go and give it no further attention or power in your life. But if you were inclined to do so, I'd say you have a rock solid case. Perhaps a lawyer with experience in this area could chime in, if needed.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: ScienceSexSavings on December 06, 2014, 12:00:22 PM
Vengeful fashion statements are my favorite fashion statements.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: RetiredAt63 on December 07, 2014, 06:42:24 AM
My story is not at all dramatic, but it does illustrate the power of FU.

I was close to retirement in my teaching job (1 year to go) when I heard about a really interesting term contract.  I applied, was offered the job, but - the job was at a higher level, in a Province that pays better, and they offered me less than the salary I was already making.  I had checked with the faculty union and knew starting salaries were negotiable, unlike the school I was at where salaries were totally set by the collective agreement (so I was not at all used to negotiating).  I had to sadly but confidently explain that although I really wanted the job, I did not need the job (which they knew) and I could not afford to take the job since they were offering me considerably less than my salary. Counteroffer - if the person talking salary with me could get it, would I take the job if I had a salary match plus some research money? Yes, I say, and a phone call a few days later said I had the new salary.  Of course after that it was a whirlwind move, but no bridges burned.  I am still on excellent terms with colleagues and superiors at my previous school and visit at least once a year.  But I did all the "responsible" things, got everything prepared for my successor, all in about two weeks.    So everyone was happy, although my colleagues were in shock at how fast it all happened - academic moves like I did are usually long slow processes.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: retired? on December 07, 2014, 11:07:38 AM
In my view, the real value of FU$ is that it allows one to not say FU and hang on in fairly poor, but not horrific situations.  It changes your mindset and allows one to ignore stuff that would otherwise make you quit.  Two cases where this is very valuable are 1) you're in a high paying job but want more savings and 2) you are near your preferred full retirement age......allows you to hold on rather than enter a job search.

Unfortunately for me, I didn't realize that I had FU$.  Wasn't until after I quit (first time I'd quit without having a new job lined up) and started reading MMM, etc. that I started to realize I could cut way back on my earnings and be fine.  With my new and better understanding of my situation, I probably would not have quit.  Just knowing you can is a powerful thing.  Makes me think of the quote "The best offense is a good defense".


RE leaving managers rather than companies, attached is what I provided to sr. mgt. who perhaps had no idea how poor the mgr above me really was.  The company has an agenda to have more women in higher roles (a good idea), but there are not many women, at this firm, in roles that would lead to sr mgt roles.  Thus, whether or not a lady has sound mgt skills does not really matter in whether to "fast track" them.  I got a poor one.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Nords on December 07, 2014, 11:17:01 AM
In my view, the real value of FU$ is that it allows one to not say FU and hang on in fairly poor, but not horrific situations.  It changes your mindset and allows one to ignore stuff that would otherwise make you quit.  Two cases where this is very valuable are 1) you're in a high paying job but want more savings and 2) you are near your preferred full retirement age......allows you to hold on rather than enter a job search.

Unfortunately for me, I didn't realize that I had FU$.  Wasn't until after I quit (first time I'd quit without having a new job lined up) and started reading MMM, etc. that I started to realize I could cut way back on my earnings and be fine.  With my new and better understanding of my situation, I probably would not have quit.  Just knowing you can is a powerful thing.  Makes me think of the quote "The best offense is a good defense".
If it's any consolation, anecdotal experience over the last decade (both here and Early-Retirement.org) indicates that once you're FI you have even less patience for the BS. 

I'm skeptical that anyone can ignore quitting-level provocations when they can just-- quit.  Six months before you reach FI, sure.  Six months after-- not so much.

My brother-in-law the tax CPA is coming up on his last tax season.  He just reached FI this summer but he Stockholm Syndrome feels obligated to go through one more marathon with the team before hanging it up in May.  Either that or he wants to make sure that he understands exactly why he's going to ER and never go back...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: retired? on December 07, 2014, 11:57:11 AM
Nords - I'd call my situation "at FU$ with do-able effort in the spending area", but working another 5 years and I'd be "FU$ with no effort".  That's the trade-off for me.

There's FI and there's FI.  But, I agree, FI doesn't require much change would make it hard to put up with the bs.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: lizzie on December 07, 2014, 12:44:22 PM

One day she informed me, in front of coworkers, that my top was innappropriate because I was "jiggling" in it.  It wasn't even low-cut or tight! I know because I checked with at least 3 other employees (other the ones who were right there and appropriattely mortified for me).


I am not an employment law expert, but I'd say (based on a fair amount of training as a manager) this is about as much of a glaring, textbook, poster child example of sexual harassment that you could find (okay, one slightly step higher would be "have sex with me or I'll fire you"). I'd venture that if you pursued a claim against the company, you would almost certainly win (or force a settlement). I'm not advocating that course of action, because you may very well deem it's best to let it go and give it no further attention or power in your life. But if you were inclined to do so, I'd say you have a rock solid case. Perhaps a lawyer with experience in this area could chime in, if needed.

Nonlawyers are often under the impression that comments like this lead to automatic liability and big payouts from employers. It just isn't so. Sexual harassment is actionable only when it is so severe or pervasive that it effectively changes a term or condition of the plaintiff's employment. The "jiggling" comment almost certainly wouldn't meet that standard. You would be completely shocked at the behavior that courts have said is not severe enough to create liability.

That said, lawsuits are still expensive for employers, even if the employer is almost certainly likely to win. They want employees to stay far away from any behavior that could lead to a lawsuit so as to avoid the expense. That's why they train their managers to nip this kind of thing in the bud.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Raay on December 08, 2014, 01:57:32 PM
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.

P.S. It may come as a shock to you, but managers are people, too, not some bloodthirsty alien exploiters. They may be even genuinely worried about you from time to time, and they are most certainly concerned about making things run smoothly (if only in self-interest).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: hdizz on December 08, 2014, 02:09:49 PM
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.

P.S. It may come as a shock to you, but managers are people, too, not some bloodthirsty alien exploiters. They may be even genuinely worried about you from time to time, and they are most certainly concerned about making things run smoothly (if only in self-interest).

When you say "employment contract" are you speaking figuratively?  Because while you make some good points, for many the only conditions set out as requirements are the minimum requirements of US labor law, and frankly, even then I've rarely seen all of them met at the same time, and this is at white collar and blue collar jobs alike.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: NumberCruncher on December 08, 2014, 02:16:13 PM
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.

P.S. It may come as a shock to you, but managers are people, too, not some bloodthirsty alien exploiters. They may be even genuinely worried about you from time to time, and they are most certainly concerned about making things run smoothly (if only in self-interest).

You do have a point to a certain extent - sabotaging work is not the healthiest response to a bad work environment, but those stories seem like the minority.

I think the problem is that too often it can feel like you're trapped into a job and don't have the flexibility to choose or just get another job (or maybe the energy to look after particularly stressful days). That's why FU money (and mustachianism in general) can be so powerful, as illustrated in what seems to me as the majority of stories on this thread - you start feeling like you have the agency to up and move, as opposed to living in fear. Many people without as much financial security would see declining work as a luxury they could not afford.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Eric on December 08, 2014, 02:16:44 PM
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Congrats!  You figured out the point of this thread!  Quitting feels good when your job sucks, but you can't quit if you're in debt or living paycheck to paycheck.  Hence, F U Money.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Raay on December 08, 2014, 02:17:56 PM
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.

P.S. It may come as a shock to you, but managers are people, too, not some bloodthirsty alien exploiters. They may be even genuinely worried about you from time to time, and they are most certainly concerned about making things run smoothly (if only in self-interest).

When you say "employment contract" are you speaking figuratively?  Because while you make some good points, for many the only conditions set out as requirements are the minimum requirements of US labor law, and frankly, even then I've rarely seen all of them met at the same time, and this is at white collar and blue collar jobs alike.

Well, the places I worked (white collar in Germany) all had written contracts that always included a job description, at least outlining the tasks and responsibilities involved, and also included the clause that I will essentially "do my best" to fulfill my assigned duties. So saying "FU" to my employer or attempting any other "epic" escape would certainly feel to me like breaching the contract that I myself signed.

Here in Germany we also get an "Arbeitszeugnis" at the end of a job - which is a recommendation (or a veiled warning) from the employer that can be presented to (and is often asked by) the next employer. I long felt that it was stupid and patronizing and sucking out employees' liberty, but considering some stories told here, maybe it's not such a bad idea...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Raay on December 08, 2014, 02:22:31 PM
Having read many of these stories here, I don't get one point: why do the posters feel self-congratulatory and proud about them in a cynical way?

From my point of view (of a self-employed individual who also employs some other people), you are the guys who have voluntarily signed a contract to work for someone, agreeing to conditions set out in said contract, essentially selling your best-effort labor for a given remuneration. If you don't like the conditions or think the pay is too low, you should have sought employment elsewhere (or maybe self-employment). If your employer is violating the contract terms, politely decline to continue working for them and get out. Even if your employer mistreated you, behaving like some entitled vengeful brat, sabotaging work while waiting for the "enough FU money release" and then sticking it "to the man" when you quit reflects as poorly on you as it does on your unfortunate boss.

Congrats!  You figured out the point of this thread!  Quitting feels good when your job sucks, but you can't quit if you're in debt or living paycheck to paycheck.  Hence, F U Money.

Ok, I suppose I'm just arguing semantics. "FU money" certainly has an aggressive/negative/malevolent connotation to me... unlike "FI money". I just note that many stories revolve against long-term unhealthy work relationships and vengeful quitting, not just departure (maybe simply because the latter - not involving any sort of scandalous behavior or vigilance - tend to be rather boring and go unnoticed).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: GardenFun on December 08, 2014, 05:02:50 PM
One common problem in the U.S. are "non-compete agreements".  So if you are good at your job in a particular field, but the working conditions at your company have deteriorated from when you first hired on (and signed the non-compete), you typically cannot work in the industry for 1-2 years, depending on the length of non-compete paperwork.  For most of us who got a job right out of college and have worked at the same place for 10+ years, trying to break a non-compete agreement is a unknown (and somewhat scary) issue.  Hence, the desire/freedom of having FU money available to ride out the unemployed/underemployed timeframe.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Zamboni on December 08, 2014, 05:22:36 PM
^^Congratulations because it certainly sounds like your working conditions in white collar Germany were better than people is the USA often experience.

Until very recently I have not had a job description that had any substance to it.  In some jobs there was not any description at all, or at least not one that anyone showed to me.  Other descriptions were so vague as to be completely meaningless.  I certainly agree with you:  it is refreshing to have an explicit document that one can examine before taking a job, and then again later whenever there are questions about exactly what one is supposed to be doing. 

But you have to remember that people often take job A (which might or might not have no written job description but is fairly amenable to the person's skills and interests) and then, either gradually over time or suddenly, that lovely job gets morphed into completely different job B without anyone ever asking them about it.  Sometimes it is simply a change of manager that leads to this; some managers just like to ignore formal company policies like working hours and some managers think it is somehow fun or motivational to insult or belittle other people. Sometimes it is a formal restructuring that takes a person out of a role they like and puts them into work conditions they don't enjoy at all. Sometimes someone ends up being harassed daily for years or otherwise harshly mistreated, and this is certainly difficult to predict from a few minutes at an interview before taking a job.  Sometimes a worker (often a women or minority) finds out that he or she is being drastically underpaid compared to everyone else who has the same job.  Sometimes when they point this out to the kind and reasonable manager that we must all surely work for, they are told "tough shit" either quite directly or in not so many words.  Indeed, there are all kinds of reasons someone might have an FU attitude upon leaving a job, and if you have never experienced that, then be thankful that you have had such a charmed working life.

GardenFun, from what I understand non-compete agreements are rarely worth the paper they are written on, but they do effectively scare many people into thinking that can't get another similar job.  Originally they were designed to keep salesmen from stealing customer lists, which made sense. I worked for a company that instituted these mid-stream to all employees after I'd been there a few years (everyone had to sign one when they earned their next promotion.)  The result was that most people just wouldn't tell anyone at work where they were going to work next when they left the company.  It was odd.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: electriceagle on December 08, 2014, 05:39:30 PM
One common problem in the U.S. are "non-compete agreements".  So if you are good at your job in a particular field, but the working conditions at your company have deteriorated from when you first hired on (and signed the non-compete), you typically cannot work in the industry for 1-2 years, depending on the length of non-compete paperwork.  For most of us who got a job right out of college and have worked at the same place for 10+ years, trying to break a non-compete agreement is a unknown (and somewhat scary) issue.  Hence, the desire/freedom of having FU money available to ride out the unemployed/underemployed timeframe.

Fortunately, these are enforceable in California only when your former employer pays you for your time.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: gimp on December 08, 2014, 08:34:13 PM
Quote
from what I understand non-compete agreements are rarely worth the paper they are written on

This is true. California is especially explicit, but it holds true pretty much everywhere: if you want an employee to honor a non-compete, you're paying them.

Investment banks and financial firms actually often do this, if you're laid off or whatever they will pay you 3 months' salary in exchange for a 3-month noncompete agreement. (3 months is normal but it may be more or less.) This is so that by the time you go back to work, any confidential information you had is most likely irrelevant / out in the open.

Tech companies try to make employees sign non-compete agreements but you can just laugh at those. Some try to make the noncompete a condition of employment but they'll never enforce it. In some cases, they will actually pay out to get a noncompete to really hold weight. This is entirely different from signing upon leaving that you won't discuss internal xxyyz and secret blah blah; that's not only good form, it's also probably already implicitly agreed upon when you signed NDAs to start working - now it's just explicit what you're NDAing on. Interviewers always understand an answer like "Well, I worked in this area with these sort of tools, but unfortunately I can't give you explicit details" - because your new employer wants you to be good at keeping secrets.

Basically non-competes are bullshit scare tactics. I've actually heard of non-competes... for people working in fast food... so they "can't" work for any other competition (any other restaurant in the area.) You can imagine exactly how much this is enforced. But you can also imagine scumbag managers ("managers" earning $10/hr instead of $8/hr) threatening high school kids with legal action if they take that taco bell job. Shit's weird, yo.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: farmstache on December 09, 2014, 06:21:03 AM
Well, the places I worked (white collar in Germany) all had written contracts that always included a job description, at least outlining the tasks and responsibilities involved, and also included the clause that I will essentially "do my best" to fulfill my assigned duties. So saying "FU" to my employer or attempting any other "epic" escape would certainly feel to me like breaching the contract that I myself signed.

I think you either might not have experienced workplaces that are just bad enough, or maybe you are in a line of work where people don't suck the life out of their employees. Maybe Germany is nicer about their employers. I had contracts with job descriptions once. About a month in, the whole job description had changed, because me and another employee could work best at different stuff and our manager redivided the responsibilities to cater to our strengths. This was for the best and certainly was not added to the contract. Then there are whole industries where you are hired for 40h weeks, but expected to "give your blood and sweat" to the company, and work 60h weeks. This isn't in the contract and if you want out, you have to basically change your whole field of work, because every company is very similar in this field.

Still, most of us DO AGREE with these crazy conditions beforehand and it isn't them that makes us want to quit in a whim. It's the attitude of a boss after you ask to change some of it, it's a problem with a coworker, it's a particularly long stretch of strenuous work without recognition and taken for granted, it's the fact that you reach FI and don't need it anymore. If you have a boss that sucks, sometimes you won't be able (or want) to quit "politely" as you say. Also, there are bosses that feel extremely insulted by someone's leaving, especially if the reason isn't a higher pay somewhere else.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Dr.Vibrissae on December 09, 2014, 06:25:38 AM
Quote
from what I understand non-compete agreements are rarely worth the paper they are written on
...
Basically non-competes are bullshit scare tactics....
In my field non-competes of a year are pretty typical, however, they are usually geographically limited. They can be challenged on the grounds that the geographic radius (5 miles or whatever) is wider than the area from which clients are drawn.  However, if they are appropriate, they are enforceable.  This is to stop associates from leaving a practice, setting up they're own shop (or moving to a neighboring practice) and poaching their previous employer's clients. Or, less commonly, to prevent a Dr. from selling their practice and then reopening a new practice shortly thereafter.

I worked with one Dr. who was originally hired on a part-time contract (no non-compete clause) though she was now working full-time hours.  She used that fact and the fact that she was the highest grossing Dr. as leverage to improve the terms of our emergency duty and to resist interference from the terrible manager that was hired on just before I left.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Raay on December 09, 2014, 02:46:44 PM
Zamboni and farmstache, I see your point ("this is not what I signed up for"), but still I wouldn't condone developing a FU attitude - I guess I dislike that it implicitly (and perhaps somewhat paradoxically) puts you into a "vengeful victim" position rather than at eye level with your employer.

To put it another way, I don't like the idea of tit for tat taken to such extremes - if someone is an asshole to you, it doesn't automatically justify  being asshole to them (I'd say it's not honorable) or worse yet, toward the company (as in case of a single asshole manager - by making a FU exit you might be striking not so much against that particular person, but more against the organization, which may or may not be at fault for your "misfortune"). To put it even shorter, it's childish behavior.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: RyanAtTanagra on December 09, 2014, 04:23:27 PM
Zamboni and farmstache, I see your point ("this is not what I signed up for"), but still I wouldn't condone developing a FU attitude - I guess I dislike that it implicitly (and perhaps somewhat paradoxically) puts you into a "vengeful victim" position rather than at eye level with your employer.

I think you're looking at it too far on that end of the spectrum.  FU money isn't so you can treat your employer poorly, it's so you don't have to put up with your employer treating YOU poorly.  Before getting into personal finance I was in debt and broke feeling stuck working for a shitty company and a shitty boss.  Once I got my finances under control, nothing about how I treated my company or did my job changed, but it let me see a way out, so I did, burning no bridges and having an open offer to come back.  That's how I read most of the stories here.  Maybe having FU money is like having power, where it can show you what kind of person you are?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Bikeguy on December 09, 2014, 05:00:12 PM
Wanted to point out that non competes for employees are illegal in California.   So,  if you move to California,  your non compete won't apply.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: SwordGuy on December 09, 2014, 06:34:45 PM
Depends on whether the non-compete has a clause in it stating the court of jurisdiction is somewhere else...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: iamsoners on December 09, 2014, 09:09:41 PM
Wow, great thread. I've got one, and it involves the entire Board of Directors of our organization...

My first job out of college was working for a rapidly growing non-profit.  It grew way faster than management had the capacity or brains to deal with. After 12 weeks as a temp, they hired me to run an entire department (fresh out of college, with a degree in history which I assure you was entirely unrelated to the task at hand).

In the beginning the work had a sense of urgency to it and I enjoyed essentially getting thrown into the deep end and learning how to swim in my field. But the leaders of this organization were crazy--narcissistic, lazy, fought with each other over everything, were working kick backs, you name it. Job dissatisfaction was high and so was turn-over (about 50% per year).

At one point I quit my job and stayed on as a consultant. My new job didn't pan out and I still really cared about the cause and had hope for changes in the organization (the Board had just fired the E.D.) so I negotiated to come back--at twice what my starting salary had been 24 months prior.

I stayed for another 2 years and though the organization never got better or more effective. It was boring and easy but the money was ridiculous for my age and being a non-profit so I stuck around, saving something like 65%.

But it was crushing my idealism to see these absolute idiots squander so much money, pick fights with each other, and generally do nothing to address our stated mission. One guy, "Tony" was particularly tedious and terrible--farming work out to other departments, taking credit for things he didn't do, boring the shit out of us with his slide-show presentations of photographs from his most recent vacations (which were mandatory!!), doing inane shit like making everyone with an Associate job title carry his 30 houseplants across the office when he moved to a bigger office, always asking the youngest woman in the office to get him a sandwich (that kinda crap makes me mad--you have an assistant, don't take advantage of the new kids). Oh and he organized an all staff retreat led by EST (which may or may not be a cult depending on who you talk to). Honestly--it wasn't the straight up stealing stuff I'd seen previous senior staff do but it was enough to be annnnnnnnnooooyyying but not really my problem since it was in another department.

Then, it just so happened that the day I went to put in my resignation, the E.D. also announced his departure. The Board of Directors of the organization was meeting in person and called us in towards the end of the day to let us know that "Tony" would manage things for the forseeable future (probably a year, maybe forever).  After 25 years of shit jobs, this was finally Tony's big break!

The Board benignly asked if anyone had any questions or concerns.... I raise my hand and politely ask why this guy is being promoted when all of his direct reports have filed complaints against him, their department never meets their targets and he took us all to his cult meeting?  I'm not joking when I say I said it in the politest possible tone. He was sitting 5 feet from me. This set off an hour of others piling on their complaints about why he shouldn't lead the organization.

Ultimately the Board continued with their plan to place him as interim director--which only shows how f'ed up the whole place was. But it felt good to tell them all the crap that was happening under their watch and it did probably prevent him from becoming the permanent ED.

Several years on from that, I probably wouldn't do it again today--it's not worth any professional consequences and it's not as important to me to prove my rightness by being mean.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: iamsoners on December 09, 2014, 09:17:14 PM
As an aside, I also witnessed another pretty badass departure from the same organization.  Our first ED had some actual psychological problems--narcissism high among them. He went through assistants at a pretty fast clip--probably one per month.  At one point we hired a new assistant. He came into work two days, everything seemed as ok as it could be given the crazy boss. The weekend passed, Monday came, everyone said hey, "where's new assistant"?  I sat in the cube next to him. Tuesday: Hey, has anyone seen new assistant?  Wednesday: Someone should call new assistant...

It took the company two weeks to realize new assistant was never coming back.

Also at the same company:
-woman gives her resignation and two weeks notice in protest of them firing one of her friends. Over the next two weeks she files a major complaint with the BBB and gathers confidential info about the org which she then uses to start an "anonymous" blog criticizing the organization--it was well read amongst staff and the entire community of our work.
-man gets fired. deletes all of the files off of his computer before walking out. We had no system to deal with that... the files were literally just gone.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: halftimer on December 09, 2014, 10:31:02 PM
I have 2 related stories of being willing to end a job when the circumstances merited:
1. My long time office was moving to another city, and offered to fund my relocation with them. After considering all the options, I said no but helped train my replacement and accepted a lovely severance/parting package. I took a few months off without even looking for another job, then decided to try out temping.
2. The agency put me in a 'temp to hire' position that started off ok, but my coworkers were horrible. After a particularly bad day I realized there was no reason for me to continue. I called the agency and asked how much notice was needed to quit. "None" (Mental high-five!) But the next day when the agency relayed to the company that I would not be returning, the big boss asked for permission to contact me. I consented and explained why I didn't want to continue, then he explained that my coworkers were "known bullies" but that he planned to close that department in 2 months. They had not yet given the layoff notices, but if I was willing to keep that information confidential they wanted me to continue on during the transition, then afterwards in a better position. I admit it was a lovely feeling going back into work the day after that - having the bullies speculate on why I was not there the day before and then continue with their grumbling - while I smiled with the knowledge that they had 10 years tenure and were about to get rightfully fired, while I was invited to stay in a bought out contract. I continued with that job for a few years with advancing responsibilities and never regretted my early meeting with the boss at the time when I 'quit'.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jprince7827 on December 10, 2014, 10:11:09 AM
I have 2 related stories of being willing to end a job when the circumstances merited:
1. My long time office was moving to another city, and offered to fund my relocation with them. After considering all the options, I said no but helped train my replacement and accepted a lovely severance/parting package. I took a few months off without even looking for another job, then decided to try out temping.
2. The agency put me in a 'temp to hire' position that started off ok, but my coworkers were horrible. After a particularly bad day I realized there was no reason for me to continue. I called the agency and asked how much notice was needed to quit. "None" (Mental high-five!) But the next day when the agency relayed to the company that I would not be returning, the big boss asked for permission to contact me. I consented and explained why I didn't want to continue, then he explained that my coworkers were "known bullies" but that he planned to close that department in 2 months. They had not yet given the layoff notices, but if I was willing to keep that information confidential they wanted me to continue on during the transition, then afterwards in a better position. I admit it was a lovely feeling going back into work the day after that - having the bullies speculate on why I was not there the day before and then continue with their grumbling - while I smiled with the knowledge that they had 10 years tenure and were about to get rightfully fired, while I was invited to stay in a bought out contract. I continued with that job for a few years with advancing responsibilities and never regretted my early meeting with the boss at the time when I 'quit'.

Oh, that's just delicious. Well played, sir.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: BlueHouse on December 10, 2014, 02:05:17 PM
Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.
When I was a college student working as a waitress, I thought it was so much fun!  I couldn't understand how or why the older servers had such negative attitudes or allowed the random bad customer to get under their skin.  Then I realized that the difference in attitudes was because I had choices in my life.  I was in college, working toward any number of better opportunities.  The older servers were single moms or people with no education, struggling to pay the rent or a kid's medical bill.  Not a lot of choice for them. 
While I'm sure you treat your employees with respect and dignity, not everyone does.  And it often seems that those who supervise the people with fewer choices are sometimes complete jerks. 

As I write this, I am remembering a certain Labor Day weekend where the restaurant manager tried to strong-arm me into working a single shift in the middle of the weekend, despite me giving notice weeks in advance that I wouldn't work that weekend.  I was able to say "no thanks" with the knowledge that it could get me sacked.  It didn't, but it did force the lady with kids to cancel her plans to cover the shifts.
 
Education or savings or plans = options=choice
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Paul der Krake on December 10, 2014, 04:42:31 PM
Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.
When I was a college student working as a waitress, I thought it was so much fun!  I couldn't understand how or why the older servers had such negative attitudes or allowed the random bad customer to get under their skin.  Then I realized that the difference in attitudes was because I had choices in my life.  I was in college, working toward any number of better opportunities.  The older servers were single moms or people with no education, struggling to pay the rent or a kid's medical bill.  Not a lot of choice for them. 
While I'm sure you treat your employees with respect and dignity, not everyone does.  And it often seems that those who supervise the people with fewer choices are sometimes complete jerks. 

As I write this, I am remembering a certain Labor Day weekend where the restaurant manager tried to strong-arm me into working a single shift in the middle of the weekend, despite me giving notice weeks in advance that I wouldn't work that weekend.  I was able to say "no thanks" with the knowledge that it could get me sacked.  It didn't, but it did force the lady with kids to cancel her plans to cover the shifts.
 
Education or savings or plans = options=choice
This is true for a lot of other, non-employment related things. It's a whole mindset and explains why many members of this board think that tinkering with their cars or going camping is fun.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: iris lily on December 10, 2014, 08:10:44 PM
...--it's not worth any professional consequences and it's not as important to me to prove my rightness by being mean.

It's not mean if it was truthful. That you had the position to say it (because you were skipping out the next day) was golden. Your colleague will forever remember that.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: BlueHouse on December 12, 2014, 12:07:16 PM
I looked him in the eye and stated: You're a Dick.
I've been daydreaming about doing this all week long. I said it out loud about 100 times in my car.  problem is that I'm getting to my goal so much faster with this job than I would with another, so I'm going to have to suck it up a few more years.
I also started thinking that if I did this in front of a few witnesses and the guy really was being a dick, I bet he wouldn't say anything to get me fired either. If his behavior were called into question, I'm guessing he would be mortified for other people to know how he behaves. Anyway, this is my new exit strategy once the house is paid off. 
Thanks for making my day! 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: vern on December 12, 2014, 08:00:37 PM
"And what hurts is the steadily diminishing humanity of those fighting to hold jobs they don’t want but fear the alternative worse. People simply empty out. They are bodies with fearful and obedient minds. The color leaves the eye. The voice becomes ugly. And the body. The hair. The fingernails. The shoes. Everything does.

As a young man I could not believe that people could give their lives over to those conditions. As an old man, I still can’t believe it. What do they do it for? Sex? TV? An automobile on monthly payments? Or children? Children who are just going to do the same things that they did?

Early on, when I was quite young and going from job to job I was foolish enough to sometimes speak to my fellow workers: “Hey, the boss can come in here at any moment and lay all of us off, just like that, don’t you realize that?”

They would just look at me. I was posing something that they didn’t want to enter their minds.

Now in industry, there are vast layoffs (steel mills dead, technical changes in other factors of the work place). They are layed off by the hundreds of thousands and their faces are stunned:

“I put in 35 years…”

“It ain’t right…”

“I don’t know what to do…”

They never pay the slaves enough so they can get free, just enough so they can stay alive and come back to work. I could see all this. Why couldn’t they? I figured the park bench was just as good or being a barfly was just as good. Why not get there first before they put me there? Why wait?

I just wrote in disgust against it all, it was a relief to get the shit out of my system. And now that I’m here, a so-called professional writer, after giving the first 50 years away, I’ve found out that there are other disgusts beyond the system.

I remember once, working as a packer in this lighting fixture company, one of the packers suddenly said: “I’ll never be free!”

One of the bosses was walking by (his name was Morrie) and he let out this delicious cackle of a laugh, enjoying the fact that this fellow was trapped for life."

Bukowski
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: nancyjnelson on December 14, 2014, 12:32:35 PM
Not an epic FU story - more like frugal habits = financial choices.  I worked for the Dept of State as a Foreign Service officer and really liked my job.  Although I was frequently transferred, I knew that if I didn't like either my supervisor or colleagues, either they or I would be moving on within a couple of years.  Then the world changed and the number of dangerous, unaccompanied tours soared.  The Dept instituted a policy of "fair-share" so that all of us would share the burden of these tours (there aren't many of us - there are fewer FSOs worldwide than full-time musicians with the U.S. Army bands).  I agreed with the policy, but I was a single mother with no one with whom I could have left my daughter.  Boarding school would have been provided, but all kids are different - and mine wouldn't have done well in that environment.  So, having reached the age of 50 with 25 years in, I retired.

My colleagues were taken aback when I told them I didn't plan on getting a full-time job afterwards (pension at age 50 is drastically reduced so most early "retirees" have another full-time job lined up before they take the plunge).  How was I going to survive?  This is where my frugal habits saved me.  While my colleagues had purchased nice houses in the suburbs when they started their careers, I had bought an 850 sq ft fixer-upper within a 5 minute walk to the metro and only one stop to DC.  In addition to saving time (I spent about 35 minutes a day commuting on public transport - my colleagues spent on average 2 1/2 hours), it saved money - $1.40 per trip, vs over $4.00.  When the real estate situation improved, I didn't upgrade.  I also didn't upgrade my 2-dr Toyota despite some urging (a couple of different colleagues actually took me aside and told me that my dented, 17 year old car wasn't part of the image that the U.S. Embassy wanted to project).

When I retired, I sold my house for triple for what I paid for it, moved to the midwest closer to my relatives, and bought a house for cash.  A year later I am working on my own web-based business - it doesn't make any money yet, but I can afford to do what I want.  It's a great feeling. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Liberty Stache on December 15, 2014, 02:48:04 PM
Not an epic FU story - more like frugal habits = financial choices.  I worked for the Dept of State as a Foreign Service officer and really liked my job.  Although I was frequently transferred, I knew that if I didn't like either my supervisor or colleagues, either they or I would be moving on within a couple of years.  Then the world changed and the number of dangerous, unaccompanied tours soared.  The Dept instituted a policy of "fair-share" so that all of us would share the burden of these tours (there aren't many of us - there are fewer FSOs worldwide than full-time musicians with the U.S. Army bands).  I agreed with the policy, but I was a single mother with no one with whom I could have left my daughter.  Boarding school would have been provided, but all kids are different - and mine wouldn't have done well in that environment.  So, having reached the age of 50 with 25 years in, I retired.

My colleagues were taken aback when I told them I didn't plan on getting a full-time job afterwards (pension at age 50 is drastically reduced so most early "retirees" have another full-time job lined up before they take the plunge).  How was I going to survive?  This is where my frugal habits saved me.  While my colleagues had purchased nice houses in the suburbs when they started their careers, I had bought an 850 sq ft fixer-upper within a 5 minute walk to the metro and only one stop to DC.  In addition to saving time (I spent about 35 minutes a day commuting on public transport - my colleagues spent on average 2 1/2 hours), it saved money - $1.40 per trip, vs over $4.00.  When the real estate situation improved, I didn't upgrade.  I also didn't upgrade my 2-dr Toyota despite some urging (a couple of different colleagues actually took me aside and told me that my dented, 17 year old car wasn't part of the image that the U.S. Embassy wanted to project).

When I retired, I sold my house for triple for what I paid for it, moved to the midwest closer to my relatives, and bought a house for cash.  A year later I am working on my own web-based business - it doesn't make any money yet, but I can afford to do what I want.  It's a great feeling.

Outstanding. I love it.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: RyanAtTanagra on December 15, 2014, 03:06:40 PM
Not an epic FU story - more like frugal habits = financial choices.
...

Yep good example, FU ability isn't just about money.  It's about being aware you have options, having money being just one of the things that can provide you with an option.  Last time I job searched I realized how many options I have.  Having enough money to tide me over for a bit during a job search + knowing it wouldn't take that long to find something decent if I had to = 'FU money'.

Some peoples FU money limit is $0 because they know they can always get another job, even if it's a different job, which seems to be a freeing mindset that I'm envious of.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: nawhite on December 16, 2014, 09:46:26 AM
Yep good example, FU ability isn't just about money.  It's about being aware you have options, having money being just one of the things that can provide you with an option.  Last time I job searched I realized how many options I have.  Having enough money to tide me over for a bit during a job search + knowing it wouldn't take that long to find something decent if I had to = 'FU money'.

Some peoples FU money limit is $0 because they know they can always get another job, even if it's a different job, which seems to be a freeing mindset that I'm envious of.

I agree with this assessment. I'm a big fan of "keep looking for better jobs constantly. There will eventually be something much better, you just have to be ready when it comes." I moved jobs a lot. I'd usually stick around for a year but because I had been looking for the whole year I had a very good idea of who was hiring and what I was worth. Having another job is freeing in the same way FU money is because it allows you to say "nope, you haven't been treating me the way I want to be treated, so I'm leaving."

When I found my current job (which I'm REALLY happy with) and gave notice at the old one, I was able to say: "you dropped the Employee Stock Purchase Plan this year which is worth over $10k per year to me. Without a big salary increase, you aren't that competitive anymore. Oh and the new company lets me work from home full time." Probably a slightly different feeling than true FU money, but having another job lined up gives you a lot of the same freedom.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mtn on December 16, 2014, 10:54:18 AM
My “FU” story really isn’t much of one, and it hasn’t been completed yet. I accepted a position with a different company—more money, for the most part better benefits, and hopefully a better situation in terms of the work environment. I’m only giving a week of notice because I need to be employed on the 1st of the year—I get 4 extra days of vacation paid out, and the 401k match. I’m sorely tempted to leave sooner, or take a sick day or two in that week, but I don’t want to burn any bridges. I cannot wait to get out of here though, and if they start treating me poorly during that last week, I’ll just walk out. I’ll have everything out of my desk by then, so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: CommonCents on December 17, 2014, 01:03:22 PM
My “FU” story really isn’t much of one, and it hasn’t been completed yet. I accepted a position with a different company—more money, for the most part better benefits, and hopefully a better situation in terms of the work environment. I’m only giving a week of notice because I need to be employed on the 1st of the year—I get 4 extra days of vacation paid out, and the 401k match. I’m sorely tempted to leave sooner, or take a sick day or two in that week, but I don’t want to burn any bridges. I cannot wait to get out of here though, and if they start treating me poorly during that last week, I’ll just walk out. I’ll have everything out of my desk by then, so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).

If you know now, why not give notice now?  That'd make 2 weeks notice (which is fairly standard) rather than 1 and help to not burn bridges as you say you don't wish to do?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Holyoak on December 17, 2014, 01:45:29 PM
Quote
FU money isn't so you can treat your employer poorly, it's so you don't have to put up with your employer treating YOU poorly.  Before getting into personal finance I was in debt and broke feeling stuck working for a shitty company and a shitty boss.

Yep, 100%.  How about this for a company and boss; he even signed it:

(http://s19.postimg.org/kpe0egqw3/fuck_you_letter.jpg)

My FU money story was I was getting sick of one of the pilots being a total dick to me, and the other workers...  Rolling eyes, racial/religious comments, completely crap attitude and treatment to us 'lessers" who service/fuel the aircraft.  I did the gig to stay busy, and was fully FI at the time. One day I walked right up to him with nearly every employee present, and told him:

"You're a fucking punk", got the "what did you say", to which I repeated the same, and the boss/owner told me to go home and not return.  I did just that, filed and won my unemployment comp claim, despite the owner/boss stating to the UC committee that he felt I was going to punch a-hole and had witnesses (total lie, playing I got nothing better than to pull the workplace violence card).  Funny too when I reported my initial claim, I was flatly denied because it showed I had two entire quarters of no wages...  Seems douchebag was not reporting my earnings to the state!!!  What a dishonest asshat, and I hope they/IRS nailed him for it.

How sweet it felt to draw a $92/week unemployment check, knowing it made a-holes head explode.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Bikeguy on December 17, 2014, 04:59:19 PM


so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).

I don't think so.   Had a coworker give two weeks notice before Christmas.   You had to work the first day of the next year to get profit sharing.   He said he was quitting Jan 2.  Got a certified letter stating" Thanks for letting us know you want to quit.   Your last day is Dec 23".  Cost him $17K.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mtn on December 18, 2014, 06:20:07 AM
My “FU” story really isn’t much of one, and it hasn’t been completed yet. I accepted a position with a different company—more money, for the most part better benefits, and hopefully a better situation in terms of the work environment. I’m only giving a week of notice because I need to be employed on the 1st of the year—I get 4 extra days of vacation paid out, and the 401k match. I’m sorely tempted to leave sooner, or take a sick day or two in that week, but I don’t want to burn any bridges. I cannot wait to get out of here though, and if they start treating me poorly during that last week, I’ll just walk out. I’ll have everything out of my desk by then, so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).

If you know now, why not give notice now?  That'd make 2 weeks notice (which is fairly standard) rather than 1 and help to not burn bridges as you say you don't wish to do?

If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first. Basically, this:



so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).

I don't think so.   Had a coworker give two weeks notice before Christmas.   You had to work the first day of the next year to get profit sharing.   He said he was quitting Jan 2.  Got a certified letter stating" Thanks for letting us know you want to quit.   Your last day is Dec 23".  Cost him $17K.

But for that point, it is in our HR manual that if we resign and they have us leave earlier, they are to pay us for either 2 weeks or through the date we give, whichever is less.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: plainjane on December 18, 2014, 07:07:19 AM
If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first.

It's very odd that you would get 4 days accrued based on just one more week of work.  Generally one accrues vacation at a steady rate throughout the year.

In my industry people talk, so giving only a week of notice would be a CLM overall, not just if you wanted to go back to the original company.  Really think this through.

so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).
I don't think so.   Had a coworker give two weeks notice before Christmas.   You had to work the first day of the next year to get profit sharing.   He said he was quitting Jan 2.  Got a certified letter stating" Thanks for letting us know you want to quit.   Your last day is Dec 23".  Cost him $17K.
But for that point, it is in our HR manual that if we resign and they have us leave earlier, they are to pay us for either 2 weeks or through the date we give, whichever is less.
[/quote]

In almost every region you need to be paid out the two weeks (or whatever your minimum notice is), but they have absolutely no reason to pay you out a bonus after you have said you are leaving, even if it was previously established you'd be getting one.  Salary and bonus/profit sharing are two very separate things.  Make sure any bonus you're expecting is dropped into your account before you give notice.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Philociraptor on December 18, 2014, 07:14:15 AM
If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first.

It's very odd that you would get 4 days accrued based on just one more week of work.  Generally one accrues vacation at a steady rate throughout the year.

In my industry people talk, so giving only a week of notice would be a CLM overall, not just if you wanted to go back to the original company.  Really think this through.

so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).
I don't think so.   Had a coworker give two weeks notice before Christmas.   You had to work the first day of the next year to get profit sharing.   He said he was quitting Jan 2.  Got a certified letter stating" Thanks for letting us know you want to quit.   Your last day is Dec 23".  Cost him $17K.
But for that point, it is in our HR manual that if we resign and they have us leave earlier, they are to pay us for either 2 weeks or through the date we give, whichever is less.

In almost every region you need to be paid out the two weeks (or whatever your minimum notice is), but they have absolutely no reason to pay you out a bonus after you have said you are leaving, even if it was previously established you'd be getting one.  Salary and bonus/profit sharing are two very separate things.  Make sure any bonus you're expecting is dropped into your account before you give notice.

And this is why if I get a new job I won't be giving notice until Jan 1.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mtn on December 18, 2014, 07:47:21 AM
If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first.

It's very odd that you would get 4 days accrued based on just one more week of work.  Generally one accrues vacation at a steady rate throughout the year.

In my industry people talk, so giving only a week of notice would be a CLM overall, not just if you wanted to go back to the original company.  Really think this through.

so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).
I don't think so.   Had a coworker give two weeks notice before Christmas.   You had to work the first day of the next year to get profit sharing.   He said he was quitting Jan 2.  Got a certified letter stating" Thanks for letting us know you want to quit.   Your last day is Dec 23".  Cost him $17K.
But for that point, it is in our HR manual that if we resign and they have us leave earlier, they are to pay us for either 2 weeks or through the date we give, whichever is less.

In almost every region you need to be paid out the two weeks (or whatever your minimum notice is), but they have absolutely no reason to pay you out a bonus after you have said you are leaving, even if it was previously established you'd be getting one.  Salary and bonus/profit sharing are two very separate things.  Make sure any bonus you're expecting is dropped into your account before you give notice.
[/quote]

I think you're missing/mis-interpretting some of this:

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: eyePod on December 18, 2014, 12:52:26 PM
Quote
She demanded two weeks notice, which still included me missing class to come to work.  I said, nope!  I could not believe that I didn't get fired for mouthing off to her.

Wow, she was a moron.  I think my response to that would have been "Okay, you drive a hard bargain, M'am, so even though I just quit, my last day will actually be two weeks from today instead of tonight.  And you are right:  I will be here on Tuesdays as well."  Then I would just have never come back. 

I find myself explaining the concept of "Nobody HAS TO do ANYTHING when it comes to a job" to people on a regular basis.  We've had more than one person just stop showing up, or email a resignation letter while they are on vacation (with the last day of work conveniently falling on a future date that they are still on vacation), or agree to take on a big project and then turn around and put an "I resign effective immediately" letter under the boss's door after hours, yet somehow the illusion that people have to keep coming into the office until they are given permission to leave persists.

I felt bad about my situation at my previous company but it's similar to this. Terrible morale, tough work that requires a lot of off-shift. No opportunities to move up whatsoever. Layoffs abound and all the top performers left to mop up. Plus there were tons of reorganizations (I went from one manager in 3.5 years to have that one plus 3 new ones in one year, and not due to performance). My wife got an internship in another state and once she accepted, I started looking. We've moved, I got a job before her start time, I got a bigger pay increase than I've ever had, and I'm doing much more satisfying work with a better schedule.

I did kind of blame my wife for it all, but the thing that made it tough was I got the offer 2 weeks after a round of layoffs. If I knew I was going to get it, I could have left, taken a severance, and saved someone else from getting laid off. But I guess that's the way the cookie crumbles.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Sibley on December 19, 2014, 12:14:56 PM
Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville

While larger rounds incapacitate a target more reliably than the smaller 5.56, they are also much heavier to hump over the mountains. Being able to lay down a more ferocious volume of fire can be well worth the decrease in stopping power, especially when you have encountered a frisky opponent. Utilize your SAW gunner to suppress incoming fire, while your assault team maneuvers to better overrun the enemy position. If bounding proves difficult, remember, 5.56 can penetrate cover like Swiss cheese, although you will still be prudent to continuously engage targets until all teams have swept the objective area.

Also, utilizing air and artillery support can shorten the effort, along with conserving your ammo. Definitely remember to sweep the kill zone afterward to eliminate survivors or take captives, mission depending. Once area is swept and the reports sent up, hopefully you can CM.

Or maybe you snore/steal blankets/thrash around/something else equally annoying in your sleep and she's tired of it.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: frugalnacho on December 19, 2014, 12:25:11 PM
Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville

While larger rounds incapacitate a target more reliably than the smaller 5.56, they are also much heavier to hump over the mountains. Being able to lay down a more ferocious volume of fire can be well worth the decrease in stopping power, especially when you have encountered a frisky opponent. Utilize your SAW gunner to suppress incoming fire, while your assault team maneuvers to better overrun the enemy position. If bounding proves difficult, remember, 5.56 can penetrate cover like Swiss cheese, although you will still be prudent to continuously engage targets until all teams have swept the objective area.

Also, utilizing air and artillery support can shorten the effort, along with conserving your ammo. Definitely remember to sweep the kill zone afterward to eliminate survivors or take captives, mission depending. Once area is swept and the reports sent up, hopefully you can CM.

Or maybe you snore/steal blankets/thrash around/something else equally annoying in your sleep and she's tired of it.

I've been pitching the separate beds idea for awhile but my wife won't go for it.  It's nice to have that special someone there...but it definitely lowers my quality of sleep.  A nice comfortable bed to myself is so much better, and I sleep so much better when I am alone. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Pooperman on December 19, 2014, 01:07:28 PM
Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville

While larger rounds incapacitate a target more reliably than the smaller 5.56, they are also much heavier to hump over the mountains. Being able to lay down a more ferocious volume of fire can be well worth the decrease in stopping power, especially when you have encountered a frisky opponent. Utilize your SAW gunner to suppress incoming fire, while your assault team maneuvers to better overrun the enemy position. If bounding proves difficult, remember, 5.56 can penetrate cover like Swiss cheese, although you will still be prudent to continuously engage targets until all teams have swept the objective area.

Also, utilizing air and artillery support can shorten the effort, along with conserving your ammo. Definitely remember to sweep the kill zone afterward to eliminate survivors or take captives, mission depending. Once area is swept and the reports sent up, hopefully you can CM.

Or maybe you snore/steal blankets/thrash around/something else equally annoying in your sleep and she's tired of it.

I've been pitching the separate beds idea for awhile but my wife won't go for it.  It's nice to have that special someone there...but it definitely lowers my quality of sleep.  A nice comfortable bed to myself is so much better, and I sleep so much better when I am alone.

Have you tried separate blankets? It helps a lot.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Sibley on December 19, 2014, 01:19:42 PM
Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville

While larger rounds incapacitate a target more reliably than the smaller 5.56, they are also much heavier to hump over the mountains. Being able to lay down a more ferocious volume of fire can be well worth the decrease in stopping power, especially when you have encountered a frisky opponent. Utilize your SAW gunner to suppress incoming fire, while your assault team maneuvers to better overrun the enemy position. If bounding proves difficult, remember, 5.56 can penetrate cover like Swiss cheese, although you will still be prudent to continuously engage targets until all teams have swept the objective area.

Also, utilizing air and artillery support can shorten the effort, along with conserving your ammo. Definitely remember to sweep the kill zone afterward to eliminate survivors or take captives, mission depending. Once area is swept and the reports sent up, hopefully you can CM.

Or maybe you snore/steal blankets/thrash around/something else equally annoying in your sleep and she's tired of it.

I've been pitching the separate beds idea for awhile but my wife won't go for it.  It's nice to have that special someone there...but it definitely lowers my quality of sleep.  A nice comfortable bed to myself is so much better, and I sleep so much better when I am alone.

Have you tried separate blankets? It helps a lot.

I know multiple happy couples, various ages, that always or frequently have separate beds. One couple has 2 twin beds pushed up against each other, separate sheets/blankets. Works great for them - one bed is soft, the other is hard as a rock apparently.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Bikeguy on December 19, 2014, 02:07:32 PM


If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first.

It's very odd that you would get 4 days accrued based on just one more week of work.  Generally one accrues vacation at a steady rate throughout the year.

In my industry,  vacation is accrued quarterly.   Sounds like the same policy.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jordanread on December 19, 2014, 02:10:06 PM
If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first.

It's very odd that you would get 4 days accrued based on just one more week of work.  Generally one accrues vacation at a steady rate throughout the year.

In my industry,  vacation is accrued quarterly.   Sounds like the same policy.

Ah, but vacation is different from Floating Holidays. That's what I get. First of the year, 4 days...the remaining 15 days get accrued over the year.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: plainjane on December 20, 2014, 06:18:49 AM
Ah, but vacation is different from Floating Holidays. That's what I get. First of the year, 4 days...the remaining 15 days get accrued over the year.

And they pay you out for floating holidays?  I thought that was the point of companies doing floating holidays, that they weren't bound by vacation day rules.  (I've never worked at a place that had floating holidays)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: RWD on December 20, 2014, 08:37:55 AM
Ah, but vacation is different from Floating Holidays. That's what I get. First of the year, 4 days...the remaining 15 days get accrued over the year.

And they pay you out for floating holidays?  I thought that was the point of companies doing floating holidays, that they weren't bound by vacation day rules.  (I've never worked at a place that had floating holidays)

At my company the floating holidays are just arbitrary days during the year that the company has designated a day off that wouldn't otherwise be considered a holiday. This is usually used to give us a longer weekend when a normal single day holiday lands on a Tuesday or Thursday. For example, we always get January 1st off, but for 2015 we are also getting a floating holiday on January 2nd so that we don't have to come in on just one day before the weekend.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: jordanread on December 20, 2014, 10:36:13 AM
Ah, but vacation is different from Floating Holidays. That's what I get. First of the year, 4 days...the remaining 15 days get accrued over the year.

And they pay you out for floating holidays?  I thought that was the point of companies doing floating holidays, that they weren't bound by vacation day rules.  (I've never worked at a place that had floating holidays)

At my company the floating holidays are just arbitrary days during the year that the company has designated a day off that wouldn't otherwise be considered a holiday. This is usually used to give us a longer weekend when a normal single day holiday lands on a Tuesday or Thursday. For example, we always get January 1st off, but for 2015 we are also getting a floating holiday on January 2nd so that we don't have to come in on just one day before the weekend.
Every place I've had floating holidays they are just like vacation days. They are paid, and can be scheduled whenever. And are bought back the same way when you quit.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Kansas Beachbum on December 21, 2014, 08:02:52 AM
The Mrs. KBB and I both, without hesitation, jumped on a voluntary separation offer put out by our employer...this is the one where they take volunteers before laying off several hundred more who didn't volunteer to get to "the number" they need.  A combination of a pretty generous separation package and a substantial stache made this a no brainer decision for us.  No hard feelings towards the company as it has been very good to us over the years, just time to move on...and having the resources put back that we do made this entirely a lifestyle decision as opposed to a financial one.  Happily unemployed for a couple weeks now.  Cheers all!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Nords on December 21, 2014, 10:50:50 AM
I'll reiterate the story of a poster from Early-Retirement.org about 8-10 years ago.

He'd been pursuing financial independence for years, and was putting the finishing touches on his plan.  He'd tried to discuss FI with his co-workers years before but they weren't receptive and he'd since kept it all a secret.  I don't think he had a pension but he'd saved diligently in his company 401(k) and his IRA and he had everything ready to go.  He'd already contributed to the stereotypical thread on "How much notice should I give when I quit my job?" and had concluded that he only owed his employer the absolute minimum required by the HR rules.  He'd already prepped his turnover checklist and his training handbook, although he wasn't particularly worried about a contact relief.  He'd even figured out how best to replicate his company-issued laptop (on the cheap) so that he'd start ER with familiar computer gear.

Just a few days before he was ready to give notice, the company had a round of "surprise" layoffs.  (Surprise to most of the employees, not so surprising to most of management.)  He was met at the door by an HR rep, escorted to his boss' office, given the "bad" news, and then escorted to clean out his desk.  He was given a generous severance package and even told that he could keep his company-issued laptop.  He was outta there before lunch.

He said the hardest part of the layoff was keeping a straight face and taking it all seriously.  Inside, of course, he was doing the engineer's happy dance...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wolf_Stache on December 22, 2014, 01:06:01 PM
I'll reiterate the story of a poster from Early-Retirement.org about 8-10 years ago.

He'd been pursuing financial independence for years, and was putting the finishing touches on his plan.  He'd tried to discuss FI with his co-workers years before but they weren't receptive and he'd since kept it all a secret.  I don't think he had a pension but he'd saved diligently in his company 401(k) and his IRA and he had everything ready to go.  He'd already contributed to the stereotypical thread on "How much notice should I give when I quit my job?" and had concluded that he only owed his employer the absolute minimum required by the HR rules.  He'd already prepped his turnover checklist and his training handbook, although he wasn't particularly worried about a contact relief.  He'd even figured out how best to replicate his company-issued laptop (on the cheap) so that he'd start ER with familiar computer gear.

Just a few days before he was ready to give notice, the company had a round of "surprise" layoffs.  (Surprise to most of the employees, not so surprising to most of management.)  He was met at the door by an HR rep, escorted to his boss' office, given the "bad" news, and then escorted to clean out his desk.  He was given a generous severance package and even told that he could keep his company-issued laptop.  He was outta there before lunch.

He said the hardest part of the layoff was keeping a straight face and taking it all seriously.  Inside, of course, he was doing the engineer's happy dance...

That is awesome. Thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: hred17 on December 23, 2014, 03:29:52 AM
My story is not quite as dramatic as some and it certainly was not planned as an "FU - I'm outta here!" type of scenario (although I had dreamed of it many times!).

Years ago I was working for the corporate arm of a computer retailer. I had been hired into the HR department and worked for a horrid, horrid, woman. Over the course of the 16 months I worked there, she proceeded to eliminate almost the entire HR generalist team. I ended up taking on the jobs of what had previously been done by six people. My boss always took credit for things I had done, used to not-so-subtly threaten me if I dared to mention her three-hour lunch breaks to anyone senior, etc, etc. The icing on the cake was that I spent my own money and time to get an advanced HR certification for which I had been promised a relevant increase in salary when I completed it. Needless to say, that did not happen.

I was desperate to quit but had not had time to start looking for another job and didn't have as much money saved as I wanted to feel 100% ok leaving without another job lined up. I was so miserable, and lo and behold, I came down with a very nasty case of the flu. This was the week of Thanksgiving. I was off sick from work on the Tuesday and Wednesday (the only non-vacation time off I ever took the whole time I worked there) and then spent the rest of the holiday weekend sick in bed.

Quite randomly, on the Tuesday of that same week (my first day sick at home) I got a phone call from a former colleague about a job opening and was fast tracked through an interview process. I had an offer by the end of the Thanksgiving weekend (it was a start-up so things moved fast and all of my interviews were done via conference calls and references).

On the Monday after Thanksgiving, I went into my bosses office to hand in my two-week notice. She completely flipped out (I think she realized how screwed she was going to be once I left). She proceeded to start yelling at me, accused me of lying about being sick so I could interview (not true), blah, blah, blah.

I calmly stood there during her rant and then asked her when she stopped yelling "if she was done?". She just stared at me. I proceeded to hand her my doctors note from the previous week (the look on her face was priceless) and then told her "that she did not deserve my two weeks and my notice was now effective immediately." I grabbed my purse off my desk and walked out.

Financially, things were a bit tight for a bit but it was the BEST feeling in the whole world to leave that day. I started my new job three weeks later and am still in the same industry today, 12 years later.

Lesson learned? ALWAYS have FU money. :)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Workinghard on December 23, 2014, 04:06:24 AM
It's so much fun reading these stories although I doubt if I'd have the ahem, balls, to do some of them but then maybe again I would.

I'm not sure if this counts or not. I gave my notice six weeks ago. Many times during those six weeks I regretted it and wished I had given two weeks notice, but I wanted to help out over the holidays. I guess because I didn't want to burn my bridges it's not truly an FU story. Anyway, after I gave my notice I did not hear from anyone as to whether or not they would like to have me work per diem. I like the work I do and I like the company. I just don't like be treated as an indentured servant.

The owner of the company texts me occasionally and he's the type a person you can speak frankly with. I did share about the indentured servant feeling. Haha. Recently he asked if I would take a VIP pt. It fell on my day off but I agreed to do so. This was after there was an issue with another patient, who didn't like her nurse, and he asked if I go out there and smooth things over which I did.

Anyway, during the course of different texts, I commented that even though I would no longer be full-time I would still like to work for the company if they were interested in having me. I also gave the names of two people I had spoken with but received no response from. He said it was a given that they still wanted me and they would love to have me continue to see their patients. He apologized for that not been communicated to me. The next day I was called into the office by the two people who had not responded to me previously to discuss my hours when I go Per-diem.

I'm sure they think I am the teachers pet, but over the course of three years he has learned that I go that extra mile with my patients. I will visit them in the hospital, help those that can't drive to doctor appointments, send family sympathy cards when one dies, etc. This is all on my own time because I truly care about the people.

More than likely, my weekly hours will probably be the same, but I can take off when I want to take off, confine my route to in-county, and shorter distances, and have control over how many patients I'm willing to see in a day. No more 16 hour days to get my paperwork done. Although I will lose the vacation time, the 15 days is well worth it for the control factor.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: RyanAtTanagra on December 23, 2014, 10:56:10 AM
I'm not sure if this counts or not...

Not so much an FU story but a good reminder that sometimes being a good person and a good employee can be just as worthwhile in getting what you want at work :-)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Workinghard on December 23, 2014, 02:00:41 PM
I'm not sure if this counts or not...

Not so much an FU story but a good reminder that sometimes being a good person and a good employee can be just as worthwhile in getting what you want at work :-)

True..even if I have to quit to get what I want. Lol.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Taran Wanderer on January 03, 2015, 10:49:00 PM
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Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Prairie Gal on January 04, 2015, 09:20:17 AM
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Good one!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: JLee on January 04, 2015, 10:34:25 AM
Yep good example, FU ability isn't just about money.  It's about being aware you have options, having money being just one of the things that can provide you with an option.  Last time I job searched I realized how many options I have.  Having enough money to tide me over for a bit during a job search + knowing it wouldn't take that long to find something decent if I had to = 'FU money'.

Some peoples FU money limit is $0 because they know they can always get another job, even if it's a different job, which seems to be a freeing mindset that I'm envious of.

I agree with this assessment. I'm a big fan of "keep looking for better jobs constantly. There will eventually be something much better, you just have to be ready when it comes." I moved jobs a lot. I'd usually stick around for a year but because I had been looking for the whole year I had a very good idea of who was hiring and what I was worth. Having another job is freeing in the same way FU money is because it allows you to say "nope, you haven't been treating me the way I want to be treated, so I'm leaving."

When I found my current job (which I'm REALLY happy with) and gave notice at the old one, I was able to say: "you dropped the Employee Stock Purchase Plan this year which is worth over $10k per year to me. Without a big salary increase, you aren't that competitive anymore. Oh and the new company lets me work from home full time." Probably a slightly different feeling than true FU money, but having another job lined up gives you a lot of the same freedom.
Yup. I don't have something else lined up right now, but I am confident I could find something. I was talking to a coworker about a two week vacation I have planned in May, and I mentioned if it doesn't get approved I'll just go find another job.  Her jaw dropped. :P
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: viper155 on January 04, 2015, 10:53:43 AM
I am in, kind of in my second career. I work for two reasons. To cash flow my kids college tuition and because I like to work. Recently I have amassed enough to pay all the tuitions in cash and I have a nice stash of FU money and a  great passive income. I am grateful. My business can get very tense. It is the entertainment business so there are a lot of ego issues. On this last job which lasted 3 months and ended a couple of weeks ago I casually mentioned to my work friends that I was in total FU mode. I worked and walked around like I did not have a care in the world. Everyone knew why including the ball breaking bosses. It was priceless the way that they dealt with me just because they, and everyone, knew of the position I was in. All the guys were just waiting for me to explode and tell people where to go but, like another poster here said, it's better just to have the card up your sleeve and play it to the hilt. Good luck to everyone on this quest!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: h2ogal on January 11, 2015, 11:56:27 AM
This thread is the ultimate illustration of why Financial Independence is so crucial to living a fulfilling and happy life!

Once you have some financial strength, you never have to let yourself be driven to the point where you feel you must say "FU!".   
 
You don't have to take months of abuse before you quit in exasperation.....   You don't have to do anything you feel is unethical...... You never have to betray your own soul by staying in a position that is unhealthy and stressful...

Being financially independent means you go to work voluntarily, conduct yourself with dignity, show compassion to your co-workers and subordinates, and negotiate from a position of strength.   

I don't think you don't need a massive stache built up to do this....Just a reasonable emergency fund, confidence in your own worth, and marketable skills.  Dual incomes, low expenses and a little bravery goes a long way too.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: taylor044 on January 11, 2015, 02:24:30 PM
Loved reading this thread. For my budget, I renamed my emergency fund category to FU... in all capital letters.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: JCfire on January 12, 2015, 08:25:23 AM
This thread is the ultimate illustration of why Financial Independence is so crucial to living a fulfilling and happy life!

Once you have some financial strength, you never have to let yourself be driven to the point where you feel you must say "FU!".   
 
You don't have to take months of abuse before you quit in exasperation.....   You don't have to do anything you feel is unethical...... You never have to betray your own soul by staying in a position that is unhealthy and stressful...

Being financially independent means you go to work voluntarily, conduct yourself with dignity, show compassion to your co-workers and subordinates, and negotiate from a position of strength.   

I don't think you don't need a massive stache built up to do this....Just a reasonable emergency fund, confidence in your own worth, and marketable skills.  Dual incomes, low expenses and a little bravery goes a long way too.

This thread makes me acutely feel my lack of FU money.  I work in a small industry with few possible employers, I am excellent at my work, and a 2014 change at my company made me wish for FU money for at least the last six months.  Reading these stories makes me that much more determined that this the last time I'll have that feeling.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: tyler1215 on January 24, 2015, 07:56:59 PM
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Taran Wanderer on January 24, 2015, 09:00:27 PM
"please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Even if you were older or the manager, that might not get the response that you'd like to get.  It seems like the problem here is that nobody has gotten to the root cause of the "failure".  Could you try explaining that you need to get to root cause, and just installing a new version of the same unit won't do that?  Parts swapping is common in situations like this, but it can cost a lot of money without ever getting to root cause.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Malaysia41 on January 24, 2015, 09:11:13 PM
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Perhaps try the high road.  It's way less stressful. 

A) assume positive intent.  He felt hurt and responded poorly.  No need to get ruffled under the feathers.
B) focus on the solution.  "Before we replace the part again, I'd like to rule out other possibilities like mis-coordination issues."
C) reply directly to him with no one on cc.  Keep A) and B) in mind with your response.

I'm guessing this guy has a very good idea that you don't think much of him.  Perhaps keep on the lookout for some action he takes that's useful so you can feel less resentful toward him.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: MrsCoolCat on January 24, 2015, 10:29:55 PM
As odput said my Horrible Bosses thread/story is an FU in the making... except I'm just starting with investing so way far from FI than I would like.

For those of you familiar with the thorn against my side, every day I probably imagine Mortal Kombat Fatalitying her ass because of the sheer stupidity of her actions. MIND F*CKED 24-7.

MY FU story involves personally going to her boss, the General Counsel of the company, and dropping off the folder of evidence proving that my boss is the most inefficient person I've ever worked with. I'd say that to him (and HR, too, for my imaginary FU story), too. Luckily I don't think anyone would seriously keep my boss if she had to change companies and she "means well" and is nice. SO I will save/spare her and my bridge by not having it burn down in flames. Life is too short to be that cynical. Even for me. :-)

And boy do I have example after example, which I've already outlined in detail in my Horrible Bosses thread. So for now this will all be imaginary and I will continue to build up my Burn Work Book (like from Mean Girls) with all my evidence as therapeutic justice and as an attempt to keep my sanity from the pure MIND F*CK of it all. Thank you. :-D
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: bzzzt on January 25, 2015, 07:25:13 AM
The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Opinions are like assholes (eveyone has one) but egos are poison. Degrees and book smarts don't necessarily make you the expert. I don't have enough fingers and toes to count the times where engineers/architects have been not just wrong but TOTALLY wrong in my experience. I try not to do hang people out to dry, but if they play the "I am the expert/boss!" card, I'll let them choke on their piece of paper instead of politely informing them of their mistake before it snowballs.

However, I'm just a lowly tradesman without a piece of paper informing others how smart I am.

Congrats on building up the FU money, but make sure you're doing it for the right reasons.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: luna on January 25, 2015, 07:57:10 AM
The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Opinions are like assholes (eveyone has one) but egos are poison. Degrees and book smarts don't necessarily make you the expert. I don't have enough fingers and toes to count the times where engineers/architects have been not just wrong but TOTALLY wrong in my experience. I try not to do hang people out to dry, but if they play the "I am the expert/boss!" card, I'll let them choke on their piece of paper instead of politely informing them of their mistake before it snowballs.

However, I'm just a lowly tradesman without a piece of paper informing others how smart I am.

Congrats on building up the FU money, but make sure you're doing it for the right reasons.

This!

Anyone trying to throw their title around instead of the facts will lose my respect pretty much immediately (the typical example in my line of business being "I'm your boss so this is the correct design for this piece of software").

I couldn't care less if you had the opportunity to go to a good university or not. I'd say pretty much half of the people studying computer science with me would never in a lifetime make good programmers. And they still ended up with a comp sci degree. And the best programmer I've ever worked with had a liberal arts degree.

Degrees mean nothing. Facts do.

(Also, I hope you change the attitude of "I know best" before you become a manager. It will be very hard to retain any good people with that way of thinking. A good manager hires people that are expects at what they do, and thus believes that they are better situated to make decisions than the manager himself.)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Tabaxus on January 25, 2015, 09:00:49 AM
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Although there has been an implication along these lines in previous posts:  I won't say people like you suck.  I will say that people who think this way suck, so hopefully you fix how you think.  Discounting "tons of experience from being out in the field" when you are some kid out of college is ridiculous.  You can point to the obvious Gates-type example, but even outside of that kind of obvious example, it is still ridiculous. 

You need to do your job, nothing wrong with that, nothing wrong with calling for something to be done differently from the guy with lots of experience, but appealing to authority (in this case, the authority of a piece of paper) is gross.

I know plenty of grizzled paralegals who know more about the law than freshly-minted lawyers.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Westoftown on January 25, 2015, 09:32:41 AM
Just to play devil's advocate, I'll share an experience of when FU money can actually hurt you.  I had a great job of 8 years - pension, good bonus, etc and I liked it but got bored.  After a couple of key customers went out of business, I got a new boss that I didn't like and ended up travelling way too much.  This was the same time as we had 2 babies.   I was just freaked out by life with all the travel, new family, etc, etc.   I knew I wanted to do something new - and thought that quitting would be a great way to make this happen - it would force me to make a change, even though I didnt have a good idea of what that change looked like!  If I didnt quit, I'd end up staying there and find financial reasons not to leave.

Anyway, long story short I quit on a whim.  6 months later I was in a similar job with slightly lower pay.  I guess it worked out, but given that I'm in the same field - I would have been better off riding out that bad manager/travel storm.  The company was great and now I'd be in a better role.

The moral - if you use your FU powers - make sure you have a plan.   IF you don't take control of your career direction, life will do it for you.  I guess everything works out, we're close to FIRE now and I have a concrete exit plan, SMART goals to get there, etc.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mjs111 on January 25, 2015, 12:49:25 PM
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field

I have a degree and I also manage a team.  Many managers (most? almost all?) would tend to value tons of field experience over a degree. I certainly do when I need to hire.  It's also nice to have a mix: older experienced folks and younger (but talented and hungry) folks. The older guys tend to bring a lot of experience and maturity to the team, and the younger guys bring a lot of creativity to the team.  Years and years of experience leads to good judgement, but judgement also can tend to limit creativity, since you already have pretty defined notions about what works and what doesn't.


Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

I hope, for your sake, that if you become a manager that you lose this attitude or you likely won't be a manager for long.  You'll either be moved out of the position, an unhealthy amount of your team will quit, or some combination of the two will occur.  Another poster said it well: as manager you hire good guys to work for you and then get the heck out of their way, supporting them as best they need to get the job done. Instilling fear in them is never part of the equation.

Mike
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Sofa King on January 25, 2015, 01:06:51 PM

 long story short I quit on a whim.

Don't quit on a "whim". Even if something pisses you off at work don't quit rite away just say you don't feel well and leave work rite then and sleep on your decision for a few days to make sure it's what you really want. I don't see ANY downfalls from having FU $$$$$ if you least do that. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mm1970 on January 25, 2015, 01:09:22 PM
Not an epic FU story - more like frugal habits = financial choices.  I worked for the Dept of State as a Foreign Service officer and really liked my job.  Although I was frequently transferred, I knew that if I didn't like either my supervisor or colleagues, either they or I would be moving on within a couple of years.  Then the world changed and the number of dangerous, unaccompanied tours soared.  The Dept instituted a policy of "fair-share" so that all of us would share the burden of these tours (there aren't many of us - there are fewer FSOs worldwide than full-time musicians with the U.S. Army bands).  I agreed with the policy, but I was a single mother with no one with whom I could have left my daughter.  Boarding school would have been provided, but all kids are different - and mine wouldn't have done well in that environment.  So, having reached the age of 50 with 25 years in, I retired.

My colleagues were taken aback when I told them I didn't plan on getting a full-time job afterwards (pension at age 50 is drastically reduced so most early "retirees" have another full-time job lined up before they take the plunge).  How was I going to survive?  This is where my frugal habits saved me.  While my colleagues had purchased nice houses in the suburbs when they started their careers, I had bought an 850 sq ft fixer-upper within a 5 minute walk to the metro and only one stop to DC.  In addition to saving time (I spent about 35 minutes a day commuting on public transport - my colleagues spent on average 2 1/2 hours), it saved money - $1.40 per trip, vs over $4.00.  When the real estate situation improved, I didn't upgrade.  I also didn't upgrade my 2-dr Toyota despite some urging (a couple of different colleagues actually took me aside and told me that my dented, 17 year old car wasn't part of the image that the U.S. Embassy wanted to project).

When I retired, I sold my house for triple for what I paid for it, moved to the midwest closer to my relatives, and bought a house for cash.  A year later I am working on my own web-based business - it doesn't make any money yet, but I can afford to do what I want.  It's a great feeling.
This is great.  I have a friend who I'm pretty sure is a military version of an FSO (not sure if they have the same title?)  But he has had way too many unaccompanied tours of late, so he's getting out.  And very soon.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: LadyStache on January 25, 2015, 01:10:30 PM
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field

I have a degree and I also manage a team.  Many managers (most? almost all?) would tend to value tons of field experience over a degree. I certainly do when I need to hire.  It's also nice to have a mix: older experienced folks and younger (but talented and hungry) folks. The older guys tend to bring a lot of experience and maturity to the team, and the younger guys bring a lot of creativity to the team.  Years and years of experience leads to good judgement, but judgement also can tend to limit creativity, since you already have pretty defined notions about what works and what doesn't.


Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

I hope, for your sake, that if you become a manager that you lose this attitude or you likely won't be a manager for long.  You'll either be moved out of the position, an unhealthy amount of your team will quit, or some combination of the two will occur.  Another poster said it well: as manager you hire good guys to work for you and then get the heck out of their way, supporting them as best they need to get the job done. Instilling fear in them is never part of the equation.

Mike

I agree with Mike 100%. I also want to add, the reason you're upset is because he emailed you for an explanation. Perhaps he genuinely wanted to know how to do his job better. Perhaps he had no way of knowing that the equipment had been replaced by brand new equipment recently (he is fairly new to your company after all). And if you were going to overrule him on a project he's been working on, it would have been courteous of you to call him to discuss the issue or to take the initiative to coach him on specific things that could be done in the future before requesting replacements. After all, that's what a real leader would do.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Kris on January 25, 2015, 01:20:14 PM
Not an epic FU story - more like frugal habits = financial choices.  I worked for the Dept of State as a Foreign Service officer and really liked my job.  Although I was frequently transferred, I knew that if I didn't like either my supervisor or colleagues, either they or I would be moving on within a couple of years.  Then the world changed and the number of dangerous, unaccompanied tours soared.  The Dept instituted a policy of "fair-share" so that all of us would share the burden of these tours (there aren't many of us - there are fewer FSOs worldwide than full-time musicians with the U.S. Army bands).  I agreed with the policy, but I was a single mother with no one with whom I could have left my daughter.  Boarding school would have been provided, but all kids are different - and mine wouldn't have done well in that environment.  So, having reached the age of 50 with 25 years in, I retired.

My colleagues were taken aback when I told them I didn't plan on getting a full-time job afterwards (pension at age 50 is drastically reduced so most early "retirees" have another full-time job lined up before they take the plunge).  How was I going to survive?  This is where my frugal habits saved me.  While my colleagues had purchased nice houses in the suburbs when they started their careers, I had bought an 850 sq ft fixer-upper within a 5 minute walk to the metro and only one stop to DC.  In addition to saving time (I spent about 35 minutes a day commuting on public transport - my colleagues spent on average 2 1/2 hours), it saved money - $1.40 per trip, vs over $4.00.  When the real estate situation improved, I didn't upgrade.  I also didn't upgrade my 2-dr Toyota despite some urging (a couple of different colleagues actually took me aside and told me that my dented, 17 year old car wasn't part of the image that the U.S. Embassy wanted to project).

When I retired, I sold my house for triple for what I paid for it, moved to the midwest closer to my relatives, and bought a house for cash.  A year later I am working on my own web-based business - it doesn't make any money yet, but I can afford to do what I want.  It's a great feeling.
This is great.  I have a friend who I'm pretty sure is a military version of an FSO (not sure if they have the same title?)  But he has had way too many unaccompanied tours of late, so he's getting out.  And very soon.

This is a great story.  It is fairly amazing how a few well-traced "paths" seem to attract the majority of the traffic, so much so that it's difficult for most people to see that there are other ways to get from A to B. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cinder on January 25, 2015, 03:01:29 PM

 long story short I quit on a whim.

Don't quit on a "whim". Even if something pisses you off at work don't quit rite away just say you don't feel well and leave work rite then and sleep on your decision for a few days to make sure it's what you really want. I don't see ANY downfalls from having FU $$$$$ if you least do that.

The old saying goes... don't run away from something, run to something.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: tyler1215 on January 26, 2015, 06:19:24 PM
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: caliq on January 26, 2015, 06:25:51 PM
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

I think you should follow Twain's advice :)

Edit:  I realized that you're probably feeling like everyone just shit on you, and that's kind of what happened.   So I can see why you came back with a hugely defensive reply.

I just want to offer this -- have you ever thought about the best way to achieve the "results and bottom line" you're looking for?  Has it occurred to you that seeing the employees you supervise as people, approaching them with compassion and sympathy, and to work together with them to solve problems might be the most effective way of achieving those results?  It's very hard to be motivated to fix a problem for a guy who's always treating you like shit; if you developed actual relationships with your underlings, their productivity would probably rise, which would make you look even better to your boss...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cheddar Stacker on January 26, 2015, 06:38:43 PM
I think you should follow Twain's advice :)

I thought the same thing. I know nothing abut you Tyler1215, but your aggressiveness here seems misplaced. And if you ever re-read the second paragraph you just wrote with an editor's eye you might learn to be a bit more humble. Or not, whatever.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Malaysia41 on January 26, 2015, 06:58:41 PM
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

Phew.  I'm happy I don't work with you. 

+1 on Cheddar Stacker's comments, and I'll add this:

In the future, you may want to reconsider posting in a public forum where 'face-punching' is both accepted and encouraged. 

In the investor forums, I got beaten up pretty badly.  I thought I had my shit together.  Ultimately, however, the searing face-punches made me take a second look at my thinking.  And damned it if some of those harsh responders weren't right!
   
Title: Realizing my net-value
Post by: bigalsmith101 on January 26, 2015, 07:00:51 PM
I work as an independent contractor and am regularly on call for emergency based response contracts that include traveling across the country as a prerequisite. Every job requires travel.

I am young, married but with no mortgage (very low rent), no children, no pets, very little debt. My wife works with me often as my assistant, thus saving/earning us more money.

Because we have very little debt to service we can afford to decide which jobs to take, and when to take time off.

Until recently I have specifically contracted to a single company for the entirety of my business. Our relationship has been very beneficial to each of us and there has been no reason to diversify. However, due to circumstances out of my control, I have recently had to subcontract through another company (an affiliate and acquaintance in the industry).

When the time came to make the switch, I began to negotiate the contract rates with the new company. Historically I have received 90% of the contract award while the company I originally contracted with kept 10% as a finders fee. 10% is very low, but I am 95% autonomous, thus they make money for simply giving me the contract. I manage all aspects of the job, freeing capacity for the company to pursue more business.

When making the switch I offered to let the new company keep 15% of the award rate. They were flabbergasted. NO WAY. They would offer a minimum of 30%, they have overhead, upkeep, etc!

I pointed out that what while they may have overhead and upkeep with their other contractors, I bring autonomy to the table, thus greatly reducing all of their overhead. I require no maintenance, am completely self sufficient, AND self funded. Thus they have no upfront cost for contract acquisition.

In lieu of the facts, they unhappily offered a 20/80 split, which I accepted, but only for the FIRST contract.

The next contract recently came up and I was contacted by the new company to take the job. They were eager to capitalize on my capacity as they previously had not had a contractor available, and thus could not to accept these lucrative contracts.  I agreed under the condition that the new contract award split would be 15/85. Having seen my previous performance, they agreed. They had no choice. Take it or leave it.

I'm not even part way close to FI, but have a 12mo emergency fund, thus had the option to take the "FU" position. I did, and it worked.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Knapptyme on January 26, 2015, 09:56:13 PM
I think FU Money is an attitude that can be had without the funds to back it up if you believe in your own skills/potential. My example:

In the summer of 2007, I ran a one-week summer soccer camp for high school kids in my area at my school. I had to set up a separate business entity to do it right, but all my proceeds went to benefit the team I coached at that school because there were no funds for the athletic program. I did this same thing the year before and everything went just fine. This year, however, they wanted me to "rent" the field from the school even though they knew all my proceeds went back to the school's soccer program. They told me it was to cover the cost of mowing the field for the week where they would've just let it keep growing until school started again. I thought this was fairly reasonable, but not the brightest move by any means. (Let it be known that the principal was an absolute tool. She had no clue what she was doing, and this was one more piece of evidence.) Anyway, I arrive on Monday for my soccer camp, and the fields have not been mowed. My first day with the kids is in knee-high grass and weeds. Needless to say, I was pissed, especially if that's what I was paying rent for. I stormed into the office to give her a piece of my mind and left to mow half the field that night myself with my push mower so I wouldn't look like such an idiot the next day. The rest of the week went okay; a parent came and mowed the rest of the field for free. The principal came to collect the rent money from me late in the week; I had a bag of coins for her to count out if she cared.

I realize that's a lot of lead-in if you've read this far, but my tale is about one-third in. After the weekend, I get notified on Monday that the school board would like to talk to me about my behavior and interaction with our principal during that week of soccer camp. Apparently, my reaction to the indignity of the fields not being mowed was a sign of insubordination to them. (This is weird because I was a separate entity that was renting the field from the school as instructed. The fact that I happened to be employed there should not have been a factor.) They set up a meeting where I had an opportunity to apologize and come to terms with being the bad guy in this situation. In this special hearing, I stood firm to my beliefs as a soccer coach, a teacher, and a human being that I was in the right. I gave them a list of reasons why it would be foolish to terminate my contract for the upcoming school year and the difficulty they would face in doing so. It felt really good to let them know what a terrible decision they were about to make. After a brief deliberation, I was welcomed back into the room to hear my fate of termination. Here's the best part, and they didn't know this was coming. My wife also worked there as a teacher and resigned immediately. We were young, had recently bought a house, and had no secure income outside of our teaching gigs. Their only response were mouths agape. The principal had the gall to speak, and in her stupidity uttered towards my wife, "Can I get that in writing?" The middle of July is not an ideal time to find replacements for the English and Math Department Chairs as well as new soccer coaches.

The following year was what we call our "lean" year. Mustachian principles had to be used to survive, not thrive with a large savings rate. I began selling some of my video games, old CD's, and books online as a side gig. I did construction work for my brother. I did some substitute teaching (pretty rough sometimes because I took any and all gigs available). In my new temporary job--as in-school suspension room monitor--I was allowed access to the internet all day, every day in what amounted as my search for a new full-time job. I got hooked up with a teacher head-hunting firm and they found a great opportunity for me in the private sector making twice what I made at my other school. The best part was that my wife got hired on at that new school, too. We doubled our income, moved out of wintery Michigan for Florida, and live biking/walking distance from our employment. As for our bumbling principal, she was demoted back to being a fifth-grade teacher the year we moved and is no longer with the school (I'm not sure why).

Having an FU attitude allowed us to pursue even better opportunities elsewhere. I can tell you that school was so conservative, they never thought anyone would be so "reckless" about their future, and that made all the difference. Now, we're just about 9 years from FI and an option to RE which I will likely take. My wife may continue to teach; she finds it fulfilling.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: expatartist on January 26, 2015, 10:43:36 PM
"If you don't take control of your career direction, life will do it for you."

+1 to the poster above who wrote this.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: DoubleDown on January 27, 2015, 09:48:32 AM
I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead.

Where did you get this idea? Did someone teach this to you, or did you conclude it on your own?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: ender on January 27, 2015, 12:56:52 PM
I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead.

Where did you get this idea? Did someone teach this to you, or did you conclude it on your own?

To be fair, you don't really need it to manage. It generally makes you a poor leader but you can still manage without either compassion or sympathy.

But managing and leading are very, very different things.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Luck12 on January 27, 2015, 01:09:34 PM
As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

Anybody can comment on anything they wish to comment on!  Jack Welch was a big time asshole.   Your management style is one reason a lot of people want FU money so they don't have to put with arrogant and condescending jerk store managers. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dd564 on January 27, 2015, 03:38:57 PM
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Although there has been an implication along these lines in previous posts:  I won't say people like you suck.  I will say that people who think this way suck, so hopefully you fix how you think.  Discounting "tons of experience from being out in the field" when you are some kid out of college is ridiculous.  You can point to the obvious Gates-type example, but even outside of that kind of obvious example, it is still ridiculous. 

You need to do your job, nothing wrong with that, nothing wrong with calling for something to be done differently from the guy with lots of experience, but appealing to authority (in this case, the authority of a piece of paper) is gross.

I know plenty of grizzled paralegals who know more about the law than freshly-minted lawyers.

I'm not sure why the poster feels the need to show up a seasoned veteran with real life experience.  It's a total pr!ck move to try and create conflict when there is no need for some.  I can only assume that due to his age he has an inferiority complex or something which is unusual for engineers.

At best this appears to be someone being a d!ck just for the sake of being a d!ck.  The older dude is probably planning his own FU story for when this kid becomes the "boss".
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: dd564 on January 27, 2015, 03:45:08 PM
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

Oh. I responded to your previous post before reading this.

Now, from your post above, I see that you have a bigger dick than any of us here so you win.
Title: Re: Realizing my net-value
Post by: dandarc on January 27, 2015, 04:16:25 PM
I work as an independent contractor and am regularly on call for emergency based response contracts that include traveling across the country as a prerequisite. Every job requires travel.

I am young, married but with no mortgage (very low rent), no children, no pets, very little debt. My wife works with me often as my assistant, thus saving/earning us more money.

Because we have very little debt to service we can afford to decide which jobs to take, and when to take time off.

Until recently I have specifically contracted to a single company for the entirety of my business. Our relationship has been very beneficial to each of us and there has been no reason to diversify. However, due to circumstances out of my control, I have recently had to subcontract through another company (an affiliate and acquaintance in the industry).

When the time came to make the switch, I began to negotiate the contract rates with the new company. Historically I have received 90% of the contract award while the company I originally contracted with kept 10% as a finders fee. 10% is very low, but I am 95% autonomous, thus they make money for simply giving me the contract. I manage all aspects of the job, freeing capacity for the company to pursue more business.

When making the switch I offered to let the new company keep 15% of the award rate. They were flabbergasted. NO WAY. They would offer a minimum of 30%, they have overhead, upkeep, etc!

I pointed out that what while they may have overhead and upkeep with their other contractors, I bring autonomy to the table, thus greatly reducing all of their overhead. I require no maintenance, am completely self sufficient, AND self funded. Thus they have no upfront cost for contract acquisition.

In lieu of the facts, they unhappily offered a 20/80 split, which I accepted, but only for the FIRST contract.

The next contract recently came up and I was contacted by the new company to take the job. They were eager to capitalize on my capacity as they previously had not had a contractor available, and thus could not to accept these lucrative contracts.  I agreed under the condition that the new contract award split would be 15/85. Having seen my previous performance, they agreed. They had no choice. Take it or leave it.

I'm not even part way close to FI, but have a 12mo emergency fund, thus had the option to take the "FU" position. I did, and it worked.
Next year ask for 90-10.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on January 27, 2015, 08:14:05 PM
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Although there has been an implication along these lines in previous posts:  I won't say people like you suck.  I will say that people who think this way suck, so hopefully you fix how you think.  Discounting "tons of experience from being out in the field" when you are some kid out of college is ridiculous.  You can point to the obvious Gates-type example, but even outside of that kind of obvious example, it is still ridiculous. 

You need to do your job, nothing wrong with that, nothing wrong with calling for something to be done differently from the guy with lots of experience, but appealing to authority (in this case, the authority of a piece of paper) is gross.

I know plenty of grizzled paralegals who know more about the law than freshly-minted lawyers.

I'm not sure why the poster feels the need to show up a seasoned veteran with real life experience.  It's a total pr!ck move to try and create conflict when there is no need for some.  I can only assume that due to his age he has an inferiority complex or something which is unusual for engineers.

At best this appears to be someone being a d!ck just for the sake of being a d!ck.  The older dude is probably planning his own FU story for when this kid becomes the "boss".

Perhaps this is an FU story after all, but told from the perspective of the older engineer.

Ha ha...reminds me of the demotivational poster:
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: oldtoyota on January 28, 2015, 08:20:44 AM

 long story short I quit on a whim.

Don't quit on a "whim". Even if something pisses you off at work don't quit rite away just say you don't feel well and leave work rite then and sleep on your decision for a few days to make sure it's what you really want. I don't see ANY downfalls from having FU $$$$$ if you least do that.

That is what I did. I wanted to resign last fall and waited several months to do it.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: rockstache on January 28, 2015, 08:41:23 AM
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

I didn't respond to the first one, but man....this guy is exactly why I am saving to be FI, so DH and I don't have to put up with someone like that ever becoming our boss.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: gimp on January 28, 2015, 08:09:52 PM
The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Well ain't you a dick and a half. I mean, maybe I shouldn't argue with you, since I don't have the "PE" initials following my name, since I'm just an electrical engineer who doesn't need the government to tell me that I can design things.

Winning an argument by appeal to authority - even if that authority is you (though it's really not, it's the certifying agency granting you license to say you're a PE) - is a maneuver that only works on small children. "I'm your parent and you will do what I say, because I know best." Even that doesn't work very well.

Maybe next time you should have a discussion with this person who is your peer, though arguably knows a hell of a lot more than you do, on the proper steps to take. When my boss doesn't know about something I'm doing, he doesn't come running in to tell me my decision is wrong, he asks me to tell him my decision and why I made it. We will come to an agreement on whether something is the right way to go, because we're on the same page; he knows more than I do in general, but I know more about the specific task on which I'm currently working.

Try to remember that, lest you become the sort of piece of shit boss people leave the company from. "I don't need compassion to lead." No, you don't. You can crack the whip all you like. Just remember that if you're cracking the whip, you damn well better be paying out the nose to make it worthwhile for anyone to stay. I can quit tomorrow and have a job as soon as I come back from a nice vacation. I wouldn't give two thoughts before leaving your employ.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Kris on January 28, 2015, 08:25:19 PM
The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Well ain't you a dick and a half. I mean, maybe I shouldn't argue with you, since I don't have the "PE" initials following my name, since I'm just an electrical engineer who doesn't need the government to tell me that I can design things.

Winning an argument by appeal to authority - even if that authority is you (though it's really not, it's the certifying agency granting you license to say you're a PE) - is a maneuver that only works on small children. "I'm your parent and you will do what I say, because I know best." Even that doesn't work very well.

Maybe next time you should have a discussion with this person who is your peer, though arguably knows a hell of a lot more than you do, on the proper steps to take. When my boss doesn't know about something I'm doing, he doesn't come running in to tell me my decision is wrong, he asks me to tell him my decision and why I made it. We will come to an agreement on whether something is the right way to go, because we're on the same page; he knows more than I do in general, but I know more about the specific task on which I'm currently working.

Try to remember that, lest you become the sort of piece of shit boss people leave the company from. "I don't need compassion to lead." No, you don't. You can crack the whip all you like. Just remember that if you're cracking the whip, you damn well better be paying out the nose to make it worthwhile for anyone to stay. I can quit tomorrow and have a job as soon as I come back from a nice vacation. I wouldn't give two thoughts before leaving your employ.

Teachable moment.

Hope he takes note. + 1.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: TonyPlush on January 28, 2015, 08:35:34 PM
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."
I found it funny that when I googled Jack Welch, this image came up:

(http://i.imgur.com/XWhA3ti.jpg)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: eyePod on January 29, 2015, 07:18:21 AM
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

I think you should follow Twain's advice :)

Edit:  I realized that you're probably feeling like everyone just shit on you, and that's kind of what happened.   So I can see why you came back with a hugely defensive reply.

I just want to offer this -- have you ever thought about the best way to achieve the "results and bottom line" you're looking for?  Has it occurred to you that seeing the employees you supervise as people, approaching them with compassion and sympathy, and to work together with them to solve problems might be the most effective way of achieving those results?  It's very hard to be motivated to fix a problem for a guy who's always treating you like shit; if you developed actual relationships with your underlings, their productivity would probably rise, which would make you look even better to your boss...

I think someone's in line for a good reading of 7 habits of highly effective people.

Now, on the one hand, the non-engineer may be a moron. I've seen plenty of people with tons of "industry experience" who were lazy idiots.

On other hand though, I'm glad that I've never had a manager like you. You sound like an a-hole. And honestly, I'm surprised you're hanging out in an ER forum when you seem like you love the cutthroat idea of business and working for the man.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: OldDogNewTrick on January 29, 2015, 07:42:00 AM
Dependency is too weak a word, slavery too strong a word, but it's somewhere in the middle there.
Servitude?

Peonage -
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Prairie Stash on January 29, 2015, 08:06:23 AM
At this point it's getting funny and sad. Tyler made a mistake, multiple people pile on him and call him various adjectives. The other guy (his coworker) also made a mistake.

From what I read both people in the story took the low approach. Tyler for not consulting (informing, talking to etc.) with the other guy, the other guy for making a public display of it. Tyler screwed up and the other guy cc'd his entire group calling for Tyler to defend himself! Since when do experienced guys publicly ridicule new staff? I'd be hostile too if an experienced guy flaunted how I screwed up to my entire working group. However that doesn't excuse Tyler's actions, it just means both parties are behaving badly. I personally hope Tyler views this as a learning opportunity, it's great this happened. Think how much better his group will be if he learns from this, managers aren't born they learn from all their experiences; both good and bad.

Where I'm from Engineers sign an obligation, it was written by Rudyard Kipling (English author long deceased). In that oath we pledge not to belittle our colleagues. We ask for forgiveness for our mistakes. At the time of the obligation we're reminded that engineers can cause great harm when personal jealousies and pettiness corrupt our work.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: fantabulous on January 31, 2015, 05:10:24 AM
Thought I'd add my own, despite not having any serious FU money or having to say FU to work. Last week I came out as transgender at work to little excitement. Having enough money to cover my debts and enough job skills to find some remote work if need be helped me to get over the whole lack of employment protection concern I had. You might say I said FU to being closeted instead.

Also, to be both foamy and on topic, my bosses were all kinds of supportive in helping me get enough things sorted out before making the big announcement. This let me relatively focus on work without them simply cracking the whip.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Malaysia41 on January 31, 2015, 05:36:40 AM
Thought I'd add my own, despite not having any serious FU money or having to say FU to work. Last week I came out as transgender at work to little excitement. Having enough money to cover my debts and enough job skills to find some remote work if need be helped me to get over the whole lack of employment protection concern I had. You might say I said FU to being closeted instead.

Also, to be both foamy and on topic, my bosses were all kinds of supportive in helping me get enough things sorted out before making the big announcement. This let me relatively focus on work without them simply cracking the whip.

Congratulations fantabulous!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: G-dog on January 31, 2015, 06:15:06 AM
Thought I'd add my own, despite not having any serious FU money or having to say FU to work. Last week I came out as transgender at work to little excitement. Having enough money to cover my debts and enough job skills to find some remote work if need be helped me to get over the whole lack of employment protection concern I had. You might say I said FU to being closeted instead.

Also, to be both foamy and on topic, my bosses were all kinds of supportive in helping me get enough things sorted out before making the big announcement. This let me relatively focus on work without them simply cracking the whip.

I am glad your bosses were supportive. Still a very big step for you A congratulations. I am part of my company's LGBTA group and we are working on some training and education to support this exact scenario.  PM me if you have any thoughts, resources, or advice.
Also, I'd like to find a book or other resource regarding personal finance/FI - is any book you would recommend that maybe covers some issues LGBTA face or deal with more frequently than the general population?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: lizzie on January 31, 2015, 06:47:15 AM
Thought I'd add my own, despite not having any serious FU money or having to say FU to work. Last week I came out as transgender at work to little excitement. Having enough money to cover my debts and enough job skills to find some remote work if need be helped me to get over the whole lack of employment protection concern I had. You might say I said FU to being closeted instead.

Also, to be both foamy and on topic, my bosses were all kinds of supportive in helping me get enough things sorted out before making the big announcement. This let me relatively focus on work without them simply cracking the whip.

Congratulations fantabulous!

+1
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: aschmidt2930 on January 31, 2015, 07:12:49 AM
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.

Is your coworker wrong? Probably, but a response like that is childish whether you have FU money or not.  I
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: marketnonsenses on February 02, 2015, 09:03:29 AM
Not Epic but amusing.
I had a job I didnt like and did not like some of my coworkers. It was weird for me because I am really friendly and get along with almost everyone. I got a new job offer and accepted. I gave a full month notice, in part because I could not start the new job for that long. People immediately started treating me ever worse and being extremely rude. They doubled my work because "You will be gone and dont have to do this anymore. You can do more for the last few weeks to give us a break." It was some odd logic. One person stopping working for days because "if you are going to quit why should I have to work."  I explained to one coworker that I could walk out any time I want and do not need to take this abuse. I was only trying to help them transition. After a few days harassment and hostility I emailed everyone saying  I was not coming back the next day. They freaked out. They claimed they didnt know how to do any of my work or the status of anything (I tried telling them multiple times and showed them where I saved my stuff). They tried demanding that I come back and fulfill my time. I told management that I didnt ow them anything. I told them they just fired 5 people without warning and didnt give them a month.  They said I was a bad employee and tried to discredit me. I laughed about all of it. No clue what happened to them. Not living paycheck to paycheck allowed me to leave weeks early.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cookie78 on February 02, 2015, 09:14:39 AM
Thought I'd add my own, despite not having any serious FU money or having to say FU to work. Last week I came out as transgender at work to little excitement. Having enough money to cover my debts and enough job skills to find some remote work if need be helped me to get over the whole lack of employment protection concern I had. You might say I said FU to being closeted instead.

Also, to be both foamy and on topic, my bosses were all kinds of supportive in helping me get enough things sorted out before making the big announcement. This let me relatively focus on work without them simply cracking the whip.

:D Love stories like this.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Hvillian on February 02, 2015, 09:15:19 AM
People immediately started treating me ever worse and being extremely rude. They doubled my work because "You will be gone and dont have to do this anymore. You can do more for the last few weeks to give us a break." It was some odd logic. One person stopping working for days because "if you are going to quit why should I have to work."  I explained to one coworker that I could walk out any time I want and do not need to take this abuse. I was only trying to help them transition.

Wow, you worked with some crazy people.  Or perhaps small children.  I am glad you got out.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: marketnonsenses on February 02, 2015, 09:33:38 AM
People immediately started treating me ever worse and being extremely rude. They doubled my work because "You will be gone and dont have to do this anymore. You can do more for the last few weeks to give us a break." It was some odd logic. One person stopping working for days because "if you are going to quit why should I have to work."  I explained to one coworker that I could walk out any time I want and do not need to take this abuse. I was only trying to help them transition.

Wow, you worked with some crazy people.  Or perhaps small children.  I am glad you got out.

They are 40-50 year olds who act like children and have high paying jobs. Never been somewhere where so many people slipped though the cracks and ended up with jobs they are wildly unqualified for. There were a couple good ones but on average it was horrible.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: okits on April 30, 2015, 01:46:39 AM
Replying to bump this thread up for newer forum members who haven't seen it.  Very valuable source of encouragement, inspiration, and support.  Thank you everyone who shared their stories.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: okonumiyaki on April 30, 2015, 02:28:20 AM

- is any book you would recommend that maybe covers some issues LGBTA face or deal with more frequently than the general population?

Sorry, can't help it - have you seen the price of a good Broadway show?  (took neice & nephew to Lion King for a major treat - tickets for 4 of us were crazy expensive)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mm1970 on April 30, 2015, 11:36:14 AM
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."
I missed this the first time around.  I agree, you are kind of a d!ck.  Actually compassion is a very good skill to have when leading.

I cannot speak for your particular engineer, but some of the best engineers I've worked with have no degree.

When it comes to the equipment being replaced 3 times, with an engineer who has been there 6 months - my first question would have been, "who was responsible for the first two replacements?"  In my industry, 3 replacements might happen in 3 years, which means this 3rd one would have happened to this guy for the first time - and he had no history of it.

And if it was the same guy - for the people who work for me - I would have asked very leading questions on "have we figured out why it failed last two times? What information did we record the last two times?"  I'm all about root cause and documentation so that we don't make the same mistake twice, and so we don't rely on (faulty) memories.

Oh, and I'm an engineer.  With experience.  And degrees.  But not a jerk.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: FatCat on April 30, 2015, 12:58:13 PM
When it comes to experience vs degrees, one does not necessarily indicate a higher skill level than the other. There are plenty of people with years of experience in doing something in less than optimal ways. There are plenty of people with degrees that aren't very good at translating their academic achievements into solving real world problems. Sometimes the person with more years experience will be better. Sometimes the person with the degree will be better. Try to evaluate someone by their actual skill level rather than degrees or years of experience.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: frugalecon on May 31, 2015, 06:04:50 PM
I sometimes find myself checking out this thread on Sunday nights.

Wonder why??

Seems to have been a shortage of epic stories recently.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Nords on May 31, 2015, 08:25:43 PM
I sometimes find myself checking out this thread on Sunday nights.

Wonder why??

Seems to have been a shortage of epic stories recently.
"Sunday Night Syndrome".

My blog's posts on retiring from the military go through the same surge of hits every Sunday night.

One way to avoid this issue would be clicking on the "Notify" button by a post, but that would just spread the Sunday night review out across the rest of the week...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: happy on June 01, 2015, 03:53:08 AM
Hehe I can believe it. I had a bad case of sunday night blues last night and was on here all hours.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: benjenn on June 01, 2015, 07:06:56 AM
This isn't really an epic FU story but it did make me chuckle when DH said it this weekend.  We're in the countdown to RE the end of July... only 59 days (38 works day!) to go.

As you can imagine, it's getting more and more difficult to trudge along at work for both of us.  He said the way he sees it, one of three things will happen.  1) July 31st will get here and we'll retire and head to the beach; 2) we'll get fired; or 3) someone will do or say something to piss us off and we'll be gone.  Under any of those circumstances, we'll be fine.  :)

The bad thing is that I almost wish for #2 or #3 just because it would mean being done earlier.  LOL.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: LibrarIan on June 01, 2015, 07:22:44 AM
While reading through some of the stories in this thread, I realized that I actually do have one as well. I guess I just never really thought about it much before.

In 2012 I worked for this public library (the #1 system in my whole state). I worked my way up to the coveted position of Young Adult Librarian, meaning I did all the things for teenagers like events, education, school visits, book buying, etc. Not having a MLIS degree, I couldn't *technically* be called a librarian but believe me when I say I did more librarianing than most librarians there (I do have the degree now). I was really good at the job and all my monthly stats showed that.

One day I sat down with my boss in some one-on-one meeting. I asked, when I earned my degree, if my pay would increase. Here's what I was told: Since I was "lucky enough" to get a librarian position without being a librarian, the low-ball pay I was getting was locked into the annual raise cycle. However, if I had been hired as a degree-wielding librarian, I would have been started off higher. Since I was locked in, even if I got a degree at some point, it would have no bearing on my pay. All the effort was going nowhere.

A few weeks later I took a programming aptitude test and passed. Then I got a job interview with an insurance company to do java development and got it, nearly doubling my pay (and they'd teach me coding, pay for transportation and all sorts of other perks). Before I resigned from my library job, I asked once more.

Me   : "Are you sure we can't work out a compromise?"
Boss: "What's done is done. I can't give you more."
Me   : "What if I quit today?" (We were in the middle of our big annual Summer Reading push and were insanely busy)
Boss: "What about all the things you have planned on the calendar? You can't just walk out."
Me   : "Well, since I just got a new job making double the pay since our meeting, it's not really my problem. But I'll finish out the month."
Boss: Blank stare.

My replacement was a degree-holding librarian and got started out making way more than I did, but evidently isn't a favorite in the organization. To this day, my coworkers still ask me if I plan to return.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: asauer on June 01, 2015, 07:54:56 AM
FU money allows me to be really picky when taking new jobs.  A couple years ago, I was recruited for a company to be a founding member of a new division of the org.  Opportunity sounded fun and challenging- starting things is one of my big thrills.  However, right before they made me the offer, they told me there would be travel (I'd asked them NUMEROUS times during the interviews and they said no).  After travelling with work 50% for 8 years I was done.  I said, I wouldn't travel more than 4 weeks per year because I wanted to be home with my family.  So, get this, they came back and increased their offer 20k so that I could "hire a nanny".  I told them that wasn't the point- I wanted to be home with them not have a nanny be home with them.  The SVP kept saying "I don't get it."  Well, that's obvious.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Squirrel away on June 02, 2015, 02:10:15 AM


Me   : "Are you sure we can't work out a compromise?"
Boss: "What's done is done. I can't give you more."
Me   : "What if I quit today?" (We were in the middle of our big annual Summer Reading push and were insanely busy)
Boss: "What about all the things you have planned on the calendar? You can't just walk out."
Me   : "Well, since I just got a new job making double the pay since our meeting, it's not really my problem. But I'll finish out the month."
Boss: Blank stare.



That's hilarious.:D
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mohawkbrah on June 02, 2015, 02:19:10 AM
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

you sound like one of the guys that everyone want FU money to get away from.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: cerebus on June 02, 2015, 04:00:07 AM

you sound like one of the guys that everyone want FU money to get away from.

(https://nwinton.files.wordpress.com/2006/12/respect-my-authority.jpeg)

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: patrickza on June 02, 2015, 06:03:10 AM
Mine wasn't quite epic, but it was a hell of a lot of fun. I did a write-up here http://investorchallenge.co.za/f-you-money/ but to make a long story short, I was looking for a change, so demanded a 50% increase and an extra weeks leave or I'd be out of there. I have a couple of years expenses saved, so enough FU money for me to handle. Got told no and I said thanks, I'll be out of here at month end.

Had the most amazing 4 month holiday in Cape Town. Hiking, biking and paragliding, and only stopped because I got offered double my former rate. Worked out well in the end.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mm1970 on June 02, 2015, 11:04:24 AM


Me   : "Are you sure we can't work out a compromise?"
Boss: "What's done is done. I can't give you more."
Me   : "What if I quit today?" (We were in the middle of our big annual Summer Reading push and were insanely busy)
Boss: "What about all the things you have planned on the calendar? You can't just walk out."
Me   : "Well, since I just got a new job making double the pay since our meeting, it's not really my problem. But I'll finish out the month."
Boss: Blank stare.



That's hilarious.:D
+1
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Ghzbani on June 02, 2015, 07:50:42 PM
FU money allows me to be really picky when taking new jobs.  A couple years ago, I was recruited for a company to be a founding member of a new division of the org.  Opportunity sounded fun and challenging- starting things is one of my big thrills.  However, right before they made me the offer, they told me there would be travel (I'd asked them NUMEROUS times during the interviews and they said no).  After travelling with work 50% for 8 years I was done.  I said, I wouldn't travel more than 4 weeks per year because I wanted to be home with my family.  So, get this, they came back and increased their offer 20k so that I could "hire a nanny".  I told them that wasn't the point- I wanted to be home with them not have a nanny be home with them.  The SVP kept saying "I don't get it."  Well, that's obvious.

Awesome. Just Awesome.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: oinkette on June 04, 2015, 11:54:48 AM
all of the comments to my little tale are beyond amusing. To finish the story, I took the high road and informed our manager about the email. He offered to fire the guy for insubordination. I told the manager to hold off on firing the guy. I'll give him the opportunity to apologize and make things right, but I already have his replacement picked out. When it comes down to it, this is a business. I wouldn't be in the position I'm in unless I was that good. As for my management style, why don't you all Google "Jack Welch". I don't need compassion or sympathy to lead. I need results and a bottom-line, because the second I forget about that then I'll be looking for job and so will everyone else when the company fails. We pursue FIRE to have options ten to twenty years before the average worker. Not because we hate our jobs. Why would anyone punish themselves with a job they hated for ten to fifteen years with their only goal being retirement. Go out and do something with your lives. Make a difference. I know I get to make a difference every day when I go into work.

To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."

you sound like one of the guys that everyone want FU money to get away from.

Agreed. Granted I work in the non-profit sector but I've had bosses that didn't need "compassion or sympathy to lead."  Either they don't last long, or the people under them flee like rats on a sinking ship.  There is a balance.. you should learn it before you become the manager.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: biggrey on June 05, 2015, 08:00:29 AM


To make widely acquisitions and comment on a post with little background information is just asine.  you need to learn to ask questions and collect information before adding your two cents. This thread was set up to share stories, not to collect unsolicited comments. As Mark Twain said "better to remain silent and be thought the fool, than to speak and prove them right."
[/quote]

---------------------------

Based on my read of this forum and the character of the majority of its members, I can assure the OP that we typically do not make "widely acquisitions" about things, nor do we post opinions that are "asine" very frequently. 

I think perhaps the OP should take more of Mark Twain's advice and remain silent in more of his interpersonal dealings, whether real or virtual.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: sisto on June 05, 2015, 01:38:11 PM
I love reading these stories. While I don't have an FU money story, I do have an FU quitting story. I've always earned my own money starting at a young age since I didn't come from much of it. My first W-2 job was at Jack in the Box. At the time the job was ok and I was good at it, learned all of the different stations etc. One day I called the store because I needed to talk to a friend that worked there. The manager answered the phone and was very rude to me and hung up on me and I had no idea why. Turns out when I talked to me friend he had a message for me that my hours were cut for a week and that I needed to talk with the manager if I wanted to know why. So I went in to talk with the manager and found out the whole reason was due to me calling at a really busy time. The guys was a real a'hole about the whole thing and told me if I kept arguing over it he would add another week. I stood straight up from the table told him he could cut my hours forever and walked out. It felt amazing. I arranged a job at the other Jack in the Box across town, but right before I was going to start it got shut down. Turns out the jerk manager had it blocked. Turned out to be fine for me, I got a job at a gas station and learned way more and liked it more anyway. Everything happens for a reason!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: MountainManMustache on June 05, 2015, 02:40:01 PM
For me "U" comes before "I".  FU that is, comes before FI.

I used having FU money (for me the amount was really close to FI, so close that only slight adjustment to lifestyle in ER was necessary if the SHTF), to take risks at my job and begin pushing for what was right for clients and the company, not necessarily right for politics within.

It worked well since after about 2 yrs of this behavior they "eliminated" my job and gave me money not only to leave but a bonus to stick around another month to train the new guy (poor guy got not only my job but it was laid on top of his current job, for a lot less than I was making).

So FU money got me FIRED!  HAHAHA.

Happy to be on FIRE, free and wild like a Honey Badger
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: sisto on June 05, 2015, 04:14:18 PM
For me "U" comes before "I".  FU that is, comes before FI.

I used having FU money (for me the amount was really close to FI, so close that only slight adjustment to lifestyle in ER was necessary if the SHTF), to take risks at my job and begin pushing for what was right for clients and the company, not necessarily right for politics within.

It worked well since after about 2 yrs of this behavior they "eliminated" my job and gave me money not only to leave but a bonus to stick around another month to train the new guy (poor guy got not only my job but it was laid on top of his current job, for a lot less than I was making).

So FU money got me FIRED!  HAHAHA.

Happy to be on FIRE, free and wild like a Honey Badger
I'm hoping to engineer the same departure into FIRE. I work and Mega Corp and they do layoff often trying to downsize in certain areas. There is usually a nice package involved and sometimes they allow people to volunteer which is what I'm hoping will coincide with my FIRE date.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: regulator on June 05, 2015, 04:50:17 PM
I sometimes find myself checking out this thread on Sunday nights.

Wonder why??

Seems to have been a shortage of epic stories recently.
"Sunday Night Syndrome".

My blog's posts on retiring from the military go through the same surge of hits every Sunday night.

One way to avoid this issue would be clicking on the "Notify" button by a post, but that would just spread the Sunday night review out across the rest of the week...

One of my old work buddies referred to it as "Suckday night."
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: galaxie on June 17, 2015, 08:01:40 PM
Not quite FU money, but spending less than I earn has enabled me to take a pay cut in order to go do my dream job.  Nothing wrong with my old job, just the opportunity of a lifetime.  We should still both be able to retire in about 14 years (when I'm 46).

I'm checking back in after a year.  Turns out that enjoying my job leads me to read the MMM forums a lot less frequently.  The job change was totally worth it, and FI is still on track too. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Nords on June 17, 2015, 08:13:27 PM
Not quite FU money, but spending less than I earn has enabled me to take a pay cut in order to go do my dream job.  Nothing wrong with my old job, just the opportunity of a lifetime.  We should still both be able to retire in about 14 years (when I'm 46).

I'm checking back in after a year.  Turns out that enjoying my job leads me to read the MMM forums a lot less frequently.  The job change was totally worth it, and FI is still on track too.
That's a fantastic way to leverage your FU money...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: G-dog on June 17, 2015, 08:16:00 PM
Not quite FU money, but spending less than I earn has enabled me to take a pay cut in order to go do my dream job.  Nothing wrong with my old job, just the opportunity of a lifetime.  We should still both be able to retire in about 14 years (when I'm 46).

I'm checking back in after a year.  Turns out that enjoying my job leads me to read the MMM forums a lot less frequently.  The job change was totally worth it, and FI is still on track too.

That is great - happy for you!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: LaserCat on June 17, 2015, 08:49:36 PM
I don't know if I would call it epic, but having a stache of even just a little bit of FU you money allowed me to break my lease and move to another apartment.

Basically I moved into a new place which I quickly found out had neighbors from hell on all sides.  Pacing, stomping guy who worked nights lived above me, guy who loved bass music every single night on one side, and the arguing couple on the other side.

After attempting but never succeeding to contact my bass loving neighbor and after being told off by asking my above neighbor if he could be a bit quieter after midnight, I'd had enough and I broke my lease and moved after 1 month of being there.  My FU money allowed me to afford that.  If I knew then what I know now, I would have stuck it to my landlord to fix it, and I would have been able to leave without a break lease fee.  (Quiet Enjoyment Laws)

In any case, it was worth every penny to keep my sanity.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Daisy on June 17, 2015, 08:54:40 PM
There is so much attrition at my company after many rounds of layoffs, that HR is now worried too many people are leaving. So they arranged some HR feedback sessions. After attending one and speaking my mind, I keep getting invited to more. I basically regurgitate all of the moaning and groaning in the hallways back to HR. I guess the HR lady likes my feedback as I am having a meeting a week now. It's cutting into my "productive" time.

It's a lot of fun though as I say out loud what others are thinking and they all nod in agreement to the HR lady.

I try to be polite, but honest...with the power of FU money at my back pushing me along.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: iknowiyam on June 18, 2015, 10:50:58 AM
There is so much attrition at my company after many rounds of layoffs, that HR is now worried too many people are leaving. So they arranged some HR feedback sessions. After attending one and speaking my mind, I keep getting invited to more. I basically regurgitate all of the moaning and groaning in the hallways back to HR. I guess the HR lady likes my feedback as I am having a meeting a week now. It's cutting into my "productive" time.

It's a lot of fun though as I say out loud what others are thinking and they all nod in agreement to the HR lady.

I try to be polite, but honest...with the power of FU money at my back pushing me along.

I love this, and I think it's great that they want more of your honesty. I don't know about the company, but that HR person seems to really know her biz.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Shinplaster on June 18, 2015, 11:50:55 AM
I've just binge read this entire thread.  You guys are awesome!

Way back when I was first married, I worked for a national organization in their statistical and information department.  It consisted of 4 people - our psychopathic boss, an economist, me (statistical research) and a secretary.   All of us were good at our jobs, didn't need supervision, but got it anyway from our micromanaging idiot.  He made it his personal goal to have his secretary in tears at least once a day.   We all complained to management about his behaviour, but he could be very charming when he wanted to be, and had totally convinced his bosses that he was irreplaceable.  Finally, his secretary had had enough, found a great government job, and had her FU moment.  She took all of his files, and dumped them all over the office floor, mixed them around a bunch, and walked out.   We gave her a round of applause. 

Fast forward to the new secretary, who was given the task of reorganizing all the dumped files.   While she was doing this, she found evidence that the boss had been billing personal expenses to his travel expenses, etc.   Also that while he claimed he had a Masters Degree from a foreign university, he actually didn't.   What an idiot - who keeps this kind of info in his workplace files?    She decided to sit on it for the moment, since she felt she needed the job and didn't want to rock the boat.   Meanwhile, the appalling behaviour of our boss continued.  We all finally decided we were not going to put up with it anymore, and that we would leave together.  The economist had the perfect excuse - she was going off on maternity leave.   I had a year at least in salary saved, so I was good.  (thanks Dad, for telling me to do that when I was 16).   We all pulled together, and found the secretary a new position.   On our final day, we went to the director of the organization, plunked all the evidence of fraud on his desk, and told him he no longer had a functioning research and information department.  Cue the distress, and pleading to stay.  Um, no.   Two months later, after they finally investigated (I guess fraud is more important than crappy management), that boss was terminated.   The economist on maternity leave was offered (and accepted) his job.   She offered me my job back the first day she returned, but I had already accepted another position (after taking the entire summer off).   We had a great laugh over how things turned out.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mm1970 on June 18, 2015, 11:55:33 AM
There is so much attrition at my company after many rounds of layoffs, that HR is now worried too many people are leaving. So they arranged some HR feedback sessions. After attending one and speaking my mind, I keep getting invited to more. I basically regurgitate all of the moaning and groaning in the hallways back to HR. I guess the HR lady likes my feedback as I am having a meeting a week now. It's cutting into my "productive" time.

It's a lot of fun though as I say out loud what others are thinking and they all nod in agreement to the HR lady.

I try to be polite, but honest...with the power of FU money at my back pushing me along.

I love this, and I think it's great that they want more of your honesty. I don't know about the company, but that HR person seems to really know her biz.
This is great.  I just keep my mouth shut, because if I tell anyone about the grumblings, I'm a complainer and not a team player.  Even if I'm not the one grumbling.  At one point, they considered me the "heart" of the company and would want to know what was going on in the trenches.  And I have this face, people tell me how they are really feeling.

But I guess the truth hurts, and now they'd rather not know.  Oh, and they laid off all the lower levels anyway.  I'm the bottom, so I guess I don't need to be the pulse anymore.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: aspiretoretire on June 18, 2015, 02:51:46 PM
amazing stories
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: nobodyspecial on June 18, 2015, 06:16:49 PM
Quote
It's a lot of fun though as I say out loud what others are thinking and they all nod in agreement to the HR lady.
Left a job once and took the opportunity at the exit interview to tell HR about all the problems working there - including the  complete lack of support/contact/interest from HR.
The HR person confessed that HR dept was totally useless and she was leaving herself at the end of the month ....
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Bearded Man on June 18, 2015, 06:44:39 PM
When I was 19 or so I cut the lock off my locker ready to quit, having already threatened to quite over a $100 bonus I was never paid but was promised. My manager called me while I was in my car leaving the garage and talked me off the ledge, making it good by cutting a check that day.

I was living in an apartment, had 3 months expenses, little skills and few options at the time. I walked off the job at a job a few years ago with a paid off house and several years of savings in the bank, but I was leaving for a better job, with a degree and lot's of skills and credentials. I had a few unjust situations in the past and ended up unemployed for a while but learned a valuable lesson to have a job lined up before you make the switch.

You should be able to stomach it for a few months while you find something acceptable. Or you could take the first thing you get within a week or three out and if it sucks you can bide your time while you hop again. Not ideal on the resume but it happens. During that time at work, you can start to dodge if you like. Call in sick on days you have unpleasant meetings. Book conflicting meetings so you don't have to go, etc. Avoid, avoid avoid to make the job more tolerable until you find something else.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: cripzychiken on June 18, 2015, 07:12:35 PM
So in college, my first job was at a restaurant in the kitchen.  Wings and burgers.  Pretty easy, I was the only person that didn't show up high or smoke on the job (hey I was only 18).

Anyways, in December they post a schedule for the entire month since people leave for vacation.  That's fine. Well, the last week of the schedule was the first week of school.  Plus that Monday the college football team was playing in the national title game.  So first team staff, full 8 people.  By then I was the #2 guy in the kitchen - ran it on the weekdays when the kitchen manager had his days off.  But, I had class that day.  I put in writing that b/c of school I couldn't make that shift.  Printed the letter and my schedule and had all 3 managers sign the paper.  I copied it and sent it to all 3 managers and the owner.  The week before the shift I remind everyone that I"m not going to make it, get someone to replace me.  Put that in writing and everyone signed that too - while saying I was stupid, they wouldn't forget.  Anyways, no one fixes the schedule.  They call me 20 minutes before the game starts and ask my why I didn't show.  I didn't answer (my class ended at 7, game started at 9, I was already drinking).

Next day the owner calls me into his office to talk about my 'lack of dedication'.  He was surprised when I gave him (well picked off his desk) the notice that I would skip the shift for school with all 3 managers signatures on it, then the other reminder.  I smiled, told him if he can't run a business and since he treats his employees like criminals for giving him 4 weeks notice of a missed shift for school reasons, I can't work for him.  I quit on the spot.  Apologized to the kitchen team (it was a slow day so being a man down wouldn't be that bad), took a shot with them and left.

2 months later, I'm working at another restaurant, 2 of the 3 managers from the first one had quit (something about bad management) and were interviewing at the new restaurant.  One of them got the job and about 2 weeks later, I told him that he had to fire a guy that walked out on 2 of his shifts that week or I would walk out, I couldn't deal with the short kitchen and idiots who no-showed.  He said he couldn't, I reminded him that I had quit on the spot before and would again.  He asked me to stay the shift so he wouldn't look bad to his new boss (being down 2 guys with 1 quiting) and asked me to name my price - 6 hours and 3 pitchers of beer later, we closed the restaurant down and he had to drive me home. 

Said he never met a kid with a head on his shoulders before and I shouldn't waste my time in kitchens.  I took his advice and never worked in a kitchen again (well except my own, I love cooking).  Plus, now I got a free round when I head back to where he was working. 

Anyways, sometimes, saying FU is great, but keeping bridges with those with true power matters.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Kitsune on June 22, 2015, 01:27:30 PM
So, I was 25 or so, working as a project manager at a publicly-owned company that was, shall we say, going through some difficult times.

Boss: "So, are you sure that the milestones for these 3 projects were hit in January, and not December?"
Me: "Absolutely. The back-up documentation with the dates is attached to that in the correct place on the server."
Boss: "See, that's a problem. We really need these to have been completed in December. Can you change those documents?"
Me: "... Excuse me?"
Boss, blustering: "Well, *this colleague* and *this colleague* already did it for their projects, so you shouldn't have any issue doing it!" *
Me: "You realize that you're asking me to falsify financial documents for a publicly-owned company for the specific purpose of deceiving investors? Can I have that request in writing?"
Boss: "I could fire you for asking that!!"
Me: "Well, I have a year's worth of living expenses in the bank, and you keep insisting on me using my personal computer for work use so all my work files are on there. You can fire me, but I can confirm right now that it would NOT be in your best interest."
Boss: "... Well, I'm going to go look at options to get the revenue we need aligned to December!"

Conclusion 1: If I have been back-to-the-wall financially like some of my colleagues, I probably wouldn't have felt like I could afford to push back on a blatantly illegal request. Big, big problem.
Conclusion 2: There was a colleague in another department I was close with, and I relayed this information over drinks one night after he resigned for a new job. A month later, he asked me for my resume, and hired me... at 50% more than I had been making at this company.
Conclusion 3: A year later, the crappy company was going under, and Unethical Boss applied for a position as my colleague, which I was doing the initial round of interviews for. Let's just say she didn't get a glowing recommendation...

*Note: Colleague 1 had just bought a condo and was broke to the bone, which was common knowledge. Colleague 2 was supporting her family alone and kept complaining about how broke she was. Obviously they felt they didn't have any other options... But seriously, they did WHAT?!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Zamboni on June 22, 2015, 11:56:50 PM
Wow. Some people don't seem to understand basic business ethics at all.  Or, even if they just don't care about ethics or somehow twist around things enough in their mind to decide something clearly unethical is okay after all, they don't seem to understand that something like that WILL come back to bite them (some way, some how) in the future.

That reminds me: I went round and round with a previous boss who was like that. FU money and general principle kept me from going along with any of her shady schemes, and I found a position in a different department.

To make a long story short it finally came around to bite her in the butt a few months ago. Someone at a very high level of power found out about her unethical practices by accident and the SHTF. I got pulled in and questioned about it during an internal investigation, so I got the gritty details. Thankfully while working with her I had stood my ground and not done any of the unethical things she suggested, and so I was able to recount what she suggested but say I never did any of it in my part of the program. She threw the other person who did her bidding right under the bus! Basically that person's career has been crushed. Somehow, though, my former boss has been slippery enough to survive in her job. Said she didn't know that the other person was doing the unethical things. But I guess the higher ups didn't entirely believe her because they asked me about it and then they shut down her participation in an important project. At least now they know they can't trust any of her numbers, they are no longer making any decisions based upon her numbers, and she got completely removed from that big project.

What she was doing would be a very embarrassing scandal if it leaked out to the press and such a leak would cause collateral damage to innocent people. So, I do worry that she's hanging on somehow (probably because her husband, who works here also and is higher on the food chain, is liked and well respected) and that when eventually there is a change at the top she will start her con game all over again and the new administration will be duped.
Hopefully by then I'll be FIREd!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Geostache on June 23, 2015, 08:00:37 AM
I was working full time while finishing my grad degree. It came time for me to do my research, which required me to have some time off during normal business hours. I proposed three different scenarios to my boss, which would still have me complete my 40 hours a week, but allow me the time I needed during business hours to do my research. Each scenario I proposed was me with a "no." When I pressed for reasons why, my boss replied "I need you here during normal business hours, every day." Which was complete BS, because I was never busy the whole 40 hours a week anyway.

Here's where the FU story came in. During this same conversation, my boss had the cojones to say to me "And I don't think you can afford to not have a job."

I replied with "I'm giving you my two week notice. You'll have an official letter on your desk by the end of the day."

The look on his face was priceless.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: RyanAtTanagra on June 23, 2015, 10:40:08 AM
Wow. Some people don't seem to understand basic business ethics at all.  Or, even if they just don't care about ethics or somehow twist around things enough in their mind to decide something clearly unethical is okay after all, they don't seem to understand that something like that WILL come back to bite them (some way, some how) in the future.

That reminds me: I went round and round with a previous boss who was like that. FU money and general principle kept me from going along with any of her shady schemes, and I found a position in a different department.

I forgot about the ethical side of it.  I used to work for a small software company where I was the only tech support person.  The higher ups trained the sales people to basically tell potential customers that our software would do whatever it is they wanted.  Then they were supposed to stall for 30 days during the money-back period, at which point it was too late for them and we could keep their money.  That plan backfired on them all the time when the customer would get me to help them with installation and would ask me about all these things the software was supposed to do and I would tell them that that was wrong, it absolutely cannot do that.  Then they'd go back angry to their sales guy and demand a refund.  My boss and his boss finally came to me very angry and basically told me I couldn't tell the customer the truth, I had to lie and back up the sales guy.  I just looked at them and said 'no'.  They weren't expecting that and fumbled and tried to tell me the same thing in a different way, which was met with another 'no'.  Repeat a couple times.  Finally they just went away, and I kept doing what I was doing.  Pretty sure most of the sales guys were desperate for a job, or they wouldn't have been working at that shitty company in the first place, which I imagine is why they went along with it.  They were mostly good people and knew it wasn't right.  Like others have said, FU money isn't always about quitting, sometimes it's even more important than that.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Nords on June 23, 2015, 10:47:44 AM
She threw the other person who did her bidding right under the bus! Basically that person's career has been crushed. Somehow, though, my former boss has been slippery enough to survive in her job. Said she didn't know that the other person was doing the unethical things.
That reminds me of the highly dramatized yet enlightening book about psychopaths, "Snakes In Suits". 

They don't hate people.  They hardly have any feelings at all for people.  They just see them as pawns to be moved around as needed to support their plans.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mm1970 on June 23, 2015, 10:55:22 AM
She threw the other person who did her bidding right under the bus! Basically that person's career has been crushed. Somehow, though, my former boss has been slippery enough to survive in her job. Said she didn't know that the other person was doing the unethical things.
That reminds me of the highly dramatized yet enlightening book about psychopaths, "Snakes In Suits". 

They don't hate people.  They hardly have any feelings at all for people.  They just see them as pawns to be moved around as needed to support their plans.
Sadly, I work with someone like that.  The way he treats people is terrible - anyone he sees as "beneath" him.  His boss tried to fire him for cause once and lay him off once, and the upper management saved him because he's of the same ethnic group they are and he's charismatic. He managed to suck up to them big time.

The funny thing is that mid-level management that didn't work closely with him don't understand why we all hate him.  He is incompetent.  He throws people under the bus for his mistakes, he takes credit for everyone else's work.  I mean, I'm still quite flabbergasted that our management doesn't realize it.

Our former manager (who tried to get rid of him) has positioned himself with FU money so that he says "I don't get what I want, I'm gone".
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wilson Hall on June 24, 2015, 12:30:09 PM
I was working full time while finishing my grad degree. It came time for me to do my research, which required me to have some time off during normal business hours. I proposed three different scenarios to my boss, which would still have me complete my 40 hours a week, but allow me the time I needed during business hours to do my research. Each scenario I proposed was me with a "no." When I pressed for reasons why, my boss replied "I need you here during normal business hours, every day." Which was complete BS, because I was never busy the whole 40 hours a week anyway.

Here's where the FU story came in. During this same conversation, my boss had the cojones to say to me "And I don't think you can afford to not have a job."

I replied with "I'm giving you my two week notice. You'll have an official letter on your desk by the end of the day."

The look on his face was priceless.

This is awesome.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Mesmoiselle on August 31, 2015, 06:05:26 PM
Would love to read more stories. I'm going to have FU money in 1.6 months and  am really looking forward to it.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: lbmustache on August 31, 2015, 07:57:28 PM
I've got a story.

I started working for a really shitty company. No 401k, no health insurance, low pay, no separate vacation/sick days: all under a 10 day banner of "PTO." Required to work long hours, was micromanaged all day (chastised for "using the bathroom too much," being "too friendly," amongst other things), all the technology was dated, nothing got done, meanwhile the owner was off tooling around in his expensive cars and homes. The whole thing reminded me of that quote, "are you working to make your dreams come true, or someone else's dreams come true?" It was very clear to me that we were all working in substandard conditions for this ass.

All of my coworkers agreed that it was a shitty place. I kept talking about leaving and people would tell me, "you can't piss people off," "you'll never get hired anywhere else," "I could never leave, how will I pay for x,y,z." Keep in mind that this was a company that didn't pay a whole lot and offered marginal benefits.

I spent over a year being miserable. I had about $10-$12k in the bank. Finally, I was like, you know what - I am young, financially secure, I'm just going to chance it and leave and hope that things work out. I can't waste my one life that I've got in this hellhole. I've got an MA, I've had other jobs, if shit hits the fan I guess I can move back home. So I got the balls to leave. I did things the right way and gave 2 weeks notice rather than walking out with middle fingers raised (which is what I wanted to do!). Once I gave the two weeks notice the atmosphere totally changed in the office. All of my coworkers and boss were being really rude and condescending to me. Like, how dare you think you're better than this company?

4 days into my two weeks notice, I lost it. Completely went off the rails. I had had it - didn't care about the reference (which was probably going to be poor anyway given their attitude), didn't care about making nice - whatever. I threw my keys on my boss's desk and stormed out.

I got hired in a new place right away. Ironically I now work less hours and get paid more. Never looked back. ALL POSSIBLE THANKS TO FU MONEY!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gone Fishing on September 02, 2015, 07:24:51 AM
She threw the other person who did her bidding right under the bus! Basically that person's career has been crushed. Somehow, though, my former boss has been slippery enough to survive in her job. Said she didn't know that the other person was doing the unethical things.
That reminds me of the highly dramatized yet enlightening book about psychopaths, "Snakes In Suits". 

They don't hate people.  They hardly have any feelings at all for people.  They just see them as pawns to be moved around as needed to support their plans.

Current boss is 65 and twice divorced.  He has a slightly younger girlfriend he mentioned he had plans to marry the other day.  While I think he does enjoy her company, I'm convinced he is doing it mostly to have someone to care for him in his old age.  In the conversation he used terms like having his old age care/companionship problem "solved".  Psychopathy is a spectrum and this guy is out there for sure.   
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mm1970 on September 02, 2015, 11:06:11 AM
I've got a story.

I started working for a really shitty company. No 401k, no health insurance, low pay, no separate vacation/sick days: all under a 10 day banner of "PTO." Required to work long hours, was micromanaged all day (chastised for "using the bathroom too much," being "too friendly," amongst other things), all the technology was dated, nothing got done, meanwhile the owner was off tooling around in his expensive cars and homes. The whole thing reminded me of that quote, "are you working to make your dreams come true, or someone else's dreams come true?" It was very clear to me that we were all working in substandard conditions for this ass.

All of my coworkers agreed that it was a shitty place. I kept talking about leaving and people would tell me, "you can't piss people off," "you'll never get hired anywhere else," "I could never leave, how will I pay for x,y,z." Keep in mind that this was a company that didn't pay a whole lot and offered marginal benefits.

I spent over a year being miserable. I had about $10-$12k in the bank. Finally, I was like, you know what - I am young, financially secure, I'm just going to chance it and leave and hope that things work out. I can't waste my one life that I've got in this hellhole. I've got an MA, I've had other jobs, if shit hits the fan I guess I can move back home. So I got the balls to leave. I did things the right way and gave 2 weeks notice rather than walking out with middle fingers raised (which is what I wanted to do!). Once I gave the two weeks notice the atmosphere totally changed in the office. All of my coworkers and boss were being really rude and condescending to me. Like, how dare you think you're better than this company?

4 days into my two weeks notice, I lost it. Completely went off the rails. I had had it - didn't care about the reference (which was probably going to be poor anyway given their attitude), didn't care about making nice - whatever. I threw my keys on my boss's desk and stormed out.

I got hired in a new place right away. Ironically I now work less hours and get paid more. Never looked back. ALL POSSIBLE THANKS TO FU MONEY!
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there.  One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: frugalecon on September 03, 2015, 10:30:53 AM
I've got a story.

I started working for a really shitty company. No 401k, no health insurance, low pay, no separate vacation/sick days: all under a 10 day banner of "PTO." Required to work long hours, was micromanaged all day (chastised for "using the bathroom too much," being "too friendly," amongst other things), all the technology was dated, nothing got done, meanwhile the owner was off tooling around in his expensive cars and homes. The whole thing reminded me of that quote, "are you working to make your dreams come true, or someone else's dreams come true?" It was very clear to me that we were all working in substandard conditions for this ass.

All of my coworkers agreed that it was a shitty place. I kept talking about leaving and people would tell me, "you can't piss people off," "you'll never get hired anywhere else," "I could never leave, how will I pay for x,y,z." Keep in mind that this was a company that didn't pay a whole lot and offered marginal benefits.

I spent over a year being miserable. I had about $10-$12k in the bank. Finally, I was like, you know what - I am young, financially secure, I'm just going to chance it and leave and hope that things work out. I can't waste my one life that I've got in this hellhole. I've got an MA, I've had other jobs, if shit hits the fan I guess I can move back home. So I got the balls to leave. I did things the right way and gave 2 weeks notice rather than walking out with middle fingers raised (which is what I wanted to do!). Once I gave the two weeks notice the atmosphere totally changed in the office. All of my coworkers and boss were being really rude and condescending to me. Like, how dare you think you're better than this company?

4 days into my two weeks notice, I lost it. Completely went off the rails. I had had it - didn't care about the reference (which was probably going to be poor anyway given their attitude), didn't care about making nice - whatever. I threw my keys on my boss's desk and stormed out.

I got hired in a new place right away. Ironically I now work less hours and get paid more. Never looked back. ALL POSSIBLE THANKS TO FU MONEY!
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there. One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.

I would worry about what that level of emotional distress was doing to my physical health. Not only would you be giving up years of your life, but you are probably also on average shortening your life.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Josiecat on September 03, 2015, 10:54:10 AM
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there. One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.

This is so ridiculous.  Get another f-ing job.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Faraday on September 03, 2015, 11:00:42 AM
I'm coming up on a major crossroads in my career/at my company. I've been reluctant to post details about it here in case there are any closet mustachians in my real life that know who I am or might have ways of figuring it out.

Long story short, I've built a nice FU stache, and plan to double it before this crossroads occurs in a few years. It will be nice to have the option to take the road less traveled if I feel the need.

...

Major crossroads! PM Sent...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Chris22 on September 03, 2015, 11:09:05 AM
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there. One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.

This is so ridiculous.  Get another f-ing job.

Or man up and don't cry like a little bitch.  Unless your job is something like hospice nurse for sick kids or putting dogs down, why the hell are you CRYING at work? 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mtn on September 03, 2015, 11:19:44 AM
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there. One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.

This is so ridiculous.  Get another f-ing job.

Or man up and don't cry like a little bitch.  Unless your job is something like hospice nurse for sick kids or putting dogs down, why the hell are you CRYING at work?

Crying on the drive home.

You really seem to be mad at the world lately. Everything ok?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Fishindude on September 03, 2015, 11:37:46 AM
When I was a little younger, dumber and poorer in business we used to chase any reasonable prospect and bid for their business.

Some of the purchasing folks were quite adept at setting up what they considered competitive bidding scenarios where they could compare "apples to apples" in order to get the lowest price possible.   Then as soon as you submit your proposal all communication ceases and they hide from you (unless you are low bid, which is unlikely), and a week or two later you get the Dear John letter telling you thanks for your time, we're going with brand X.   Some buyers are also real hard cases on their terms of doing business; slow pay, damage and delays clauses, give you all the risk, etc.

Now days a sale or two isn't going to make us or break us, so when they start going down the "competitive bidding, apples to apples" road, we frequently just politely explain to them that we are not interested in doing business in this manner and walk away.  Have also turned down quite a bit of business that we didn't like the contract terms on, or made adjustments to the terms.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Chris22 on September 03, 2015, 11:43:30 AM
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there. One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.

This is so ridiculous.  Get another f-ing job.

Or man up and don't cry like a little bitch.  Unless your job is something like hospice nurse for sick kids or putting dogs down, why the hell are you CRYING at work?

Crying on the drive home.

You really seem to be mad at the world lately. Everything ok?

I'm good, living the dream, going on my 17th year in the world not crying at work. 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mtn on September 03, 2015, 11:46:36 AM
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there. One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.

This is so ridiculous.  Get another f-ing job.

Or man up and don't cry like a little bitch.  Unless your job is something like hospice nurse for sick kids or putting dogs down, why the hell are you CRYING at work?

Crying on the drive home.

You really seem to be mad at the world lately. Everything ok?

I'm good, living the dream, going on my 17th year in the world not crying at work.

Why don't you start your first of not judging people, and trying a little sympathy? Or if not that, just not saying anything?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Eric on September 03, 2015, 12:00:44 PM
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there. One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.

This is so ridiculous.  Get another f-ing job.

Or man up and don't cry like a little bitch.  Unless your job is something like hospice nurse for sick kids or putting dogs down, why the hell are you CRYING at work?

Men don't cry?  Or if they do, they're a little bitch?  Jeez, I'm glad I don't care about my machismo like this.  Seems like a terrible way to view life and I certainly wouldn't want to be boxed in by perceptions of how I'm supposed to act just because I'm male.  It's almost if people have different emotional outlets, even men!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Chris22 on September 03, 2015, 12:06:34 PM
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there. One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.

This is so ridiculous.  Get another f-ing job.

Or man up and don't cry like a little bitch.  Unless your job is something like hospice nurse for sick kids or putting dogs down, why the hell are you CRYING at work?

Men don't cry?  Or if they do, they're a little bitch?

If it's over something as insignificant as something at work, correct. 

MOD NOTE: There have been several complaints on this line of threads. I could go through with a big-strike through in red and repaint the thread landscape - but I'm not going to. There is an opportunity here for growth, connection and understanding.

First - I will ask you if these belittling and degrading comments add to the kind of community we want to encourage.
Second - Just today, a friend of mine posted this: 18 Inspiring Men Share What Being Vulnerable Means To Them. As he launches his mission to get these types of conversations started:http://heartmen.net/vulnerable/ (http://heartmen.net/vulnerable/)

I hope you will check it out and come back to posting with a little more empathy, understanding and, yes, vulnerability.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: No Name Guy on September 03, 2015, 12:40:49 PM
...and I watched a co-worker tell the bean counters to go fuck off within the last few days.

Damn it was good.  OK, so this guy was going to retire anyways in the next year or two.  But we're in a business that requires 1/10th hour charging to the various contracts.  This guy is, well, was, being run ragged with 20 different contracts to charge to.  The asshats in bean counting dinged him for supposedly not charging correctly.  Yeah, bullshit.  I've never seen anyone try his level best in a bullshit system.  Anyways, they tagged him for remedial training with his manager.  He sends out his retirement notice - first person on the e-mail is the asshat bean counter in the far off city, 2nd is his manager.

I think Shakespeare was wrong in his assessment.  The first thing we should do is kill all the fucking bean counting accountants.  THEN kill all the lawyers.

[No, no I'm not at all bitter about the bullshit from these fucking, moronic MBA bullshit spewing bean counting penny-wise, million dollar foolish idiots that don't know how to run a company.  They're driving it into the ground - this great American Success Story that was built by engineers and manufacturing workers].

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: JLee on September 03, 2015, 12:46:03 PM
...and I watched a co-worker tell the bean counters to go fuck off within the last few days.

Damn it was good.  OK, so this guy was going to retire anyways in the next year or two.  But we're in a business that requires 1/10th hour charging to the various contracts.  This guy is, well, was, being run ragged with 20 different contracts to charge to.  The asshats in bean counting dinged him for supposedly not charging correctly.  Yeah, bullshit.  I've never seen anyone try his level best in a bullshit system.  Anyways, they tagged him for remedial training with his manager.  He sends out his retirement notice - first person on the e-mail is the asshat bean counter in the far off city, 2nd is his manager.

I think Shakespeare was wrong in his assessment.  The first thing we should do is kill all the fucking bean counting accountants.  THEN kill all the lawyers.

[No, no I'm not at all bitter about the bullshit from these fucking, moronic MBA bullshit spewing bean counting penny-wise, million dollar foolish idiots that don't know how to run a company.  They're driving it into the ground - this great American Success Story that was built by engineers and manufacturing workers].
Heh. Reminds me, we have a hiring freeze right now because the parent company of my division acquired yet another company.  We're still not at the level of staff we should have, yet we're bringing on new customers left and right. But...omg no money because we bought something else, guess we'll leave all the employees at their 150% workload for another few months!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Chris22 on September 03, 2015, 12:52:55 PM
...and I watched a co-worker tell the bean counters to go fuck off within the last few days.

Damn it was good.  OK, so this guy was going to retire anyways in the next year or two.  But we're in a business that requires 1/10th hour charging to the various contracts.  This guy is, well, was, being run ragged with 20 different contracts to charge to.  The asshats in bean counting dinged him for supposedly not charging correctly.  Yeah, bullshit.  I've never seen anyone try his level best in a bullshit system.  Anyways, they tagged him for remedial training with his manager.  He sends out his retirement notice - first person on the e-mail is the asshat bean counter in the far off city, 2nd is his manager.

I think Shakespeare was wrong in his assessment.  The first thing we should do is kill all the fucking bean counting accountants.  THEN kill all the lawyers.

[No, no I'm not at all bitter about the bullshit from these fucking, moronic MBA bullshit spewing bean counting penny-wise, million dollar foolish idiots that don't know how to run a company.  They're driving it into the ground - this great American Success Story that was built by engineers and manufacturing workers].

It's all fun and games until a customer requests an audit of your charges and can find errors and starts disputing the charges, drags you to court, etc etc.  Or God forbid it's a gov't contract you've fucked up on.  Us bean counters aren't making up this shit because we like fucking with people, you know.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Shane on September 03, 2015, 01:05:12 PM
Back on topic here...

On a Monday morning this June I went into work at my job of 10+ years. I was in a good mood and didn't have any intentions of quitting. During the morning meeting something just set me off, and I spoke up in front of everyone and told them I thought that what our organization was doing was WRONG, IMMORAL, and that we should stop! Everyone's jaws just dropped. One of the managers in the meeting said, "Well, I don't think that one of us should be saying things like that. We all need to be on the same page." My supervisor chimed in and just basically repeated the company policy and told everyone that that's what we would be following.

When we walked out of the meeting my supervisor acted like nothing had happened. He gave me a list of a couple of routine things he wanted me to do that day, and I nodded my head and said okay. As soon as my supervisor walked away I  loaded all of my personal things into a vehicle, went back inside, gave everyone a big hug and wished them all a good life. Apparently no one realized I was quitting at the time. They all just thought I was apologizing for my outburst or not being a team player, or something.

When I walked back outside to the parking lot my supervisor was there. I walked up to him, shook his hand and said, "I'm going home." He was like, "What do you mean? Are you sick?" I said, "No, I'm just over it. I've got better things to do with my time. I don't want to be part of this anymore. I'm leaving." I hopped in the car and drove away. I could see my supervisor in the rear view mirror standing there with his jaw dropped.

At our main office I spent about an hour explaining to our director why I was leaving and why I didn't agree with our organization's policies. She was really nice and asked me to reconsider and stay. She proposed various scenarios that might allow me to stay on and continue working, but by that point I was really beyond wanting to continue working for the organization. I just told her I was sorry and that I was ready to move on.

Our director seemed really concerned that I was making an irresponsible, rash decision. She kept reminding me that I needed to think of my wife (SAHM) and young daughter and that I needed to have a job. I explained to her calmly that I had investments and savings, and that we would be fine. I told her that by my calculations my family and I should be able to live comfortably off of our investments indefinitely. At some point, I may choose to take another job or maybe start a business that interests me, but I shouldn't have to. At that point, the director got kind of quiet, and she said, "Wow, I wish I could do that. If I could, I'd quit too."





 
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: trailrated on September 03, 2015, 01:34:48 PM
Back on topic here...

On a Monday morning this June I went into work at my job of 10+ years. I was in a good mood and didn't have any intentions of quitting. During the morning meeting something just set me off, and I spoke up in front of everyone and told them I thought that what our organization was doing was WRONG, IMMORAL, and that we should stop! Everyone's jaws just dropped. One of the managers in the meeting said, "Well, I don't think that one of us should be saying things like that. We all need to be on the same page." My supervisor chimed in and just basically repeated the company policy and told everyone that that's what we would be following.

When we walked out of the meeting my supervisor acted like nothing had happened. He gave me a list of a couple of routine things he wanted me to do that day, and I nodded my head and said okay. As soon as my supervisor walked away I  loaded all of my personal things into a vehicle, went back inside, gave everyone a big hug and wished them all a good life. Apparently no one realized I was quitting at the time. They all just thought I was apologizing for my outburst or not being a team player, or something.

When I walked back outside to the parking lot my supervisor was there. I walked up to him, shook his hand and said, "I'm going home." He was like, "What do you mean? Are you sick?" I said, "No, I'm just over it. I've got better things to do with my time. I don't want to be part of this anymore. I'm leaving." I hopped in the car and drove away. I could see my supervisor in the rear view mirror standing there with his jaw dropped.

At our main office I spent about an hour explaining to our director why I was leaving and why I didn't agree with our organization's policies. She was really nice and asked me to reconsider and stay. She proposed various scenarios that might allow me to stay on and continue working, but by that point I was really beyond wanting to continue working for the organization. I just told her I was sorry and that I was ready to move on.

Our director seemed really concerned that I was making an irresponsible, rash decision. She kept reminding me that I needed to think of my wife (SAHM) and young daughter and that I needed to have a job. I explained to her calmly that I had investments and savings, and that we would be fine. I told her that by my calculations my family and I should be able to live comfortably off of our investments indefinitely. At some point, I may choose to take another job or maybe start a business that interests me, but I shouldn't have to. At that point, the director got kind of quiet, and she said, "Wow, I wish I could do that. If I could, I'd quit too."

That is fucking awesome
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Pooperman on September 03, 2015, 01:45:41 PM
What was the wrong immoral thing?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mm1970 on September 03, 2015, 01:50:37 PM
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there. One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.

This is so ridiculous.  Get another f-ing job.
Yes!  Two of my former coworkers were fired from there for just "not getting along/ not a good fit" (yeah, they weren't assholes?)

Anyway, one of them is back, and she said "I told him to leave.  Please find another job.  It's not worth it."

FWIW, there aren't a ton of jobs in town, and I think he has a family.  But yes, he needs to get looking.

I interviewed at the company and got an offer right then (it was very informal interview).  So many red flags (including, they were firing my friend at the time I was interviewing).  They said "we aren't sure why we have a hard time hiring people "like you.  I mean, well, you know..." (Of middle-ages, meaning mid-30s to mid-50s.)  They have a lot of 20 somethings and some 55+ people.

Well, gee, crappy pay, bad benefits, bad place to live, and you start people with 15 days of PTO (including sick time, vacation, and holidays).  15 days?  I get 34 days right now.  15 days wouldn't even cover half the school days off.  People with kids aren't going to do it unless they are desperate.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: mm1970 on September 03, 2015, 01:52:00 PM
there's a company in town like that. I  shudder.  A couple of friends have worked there. One former coworker still does.  He cries on his hour long drive home every day.

This is so ridiculous.  Get another f-ing job.

Or man up and don't cry like a little bitch.  Unless your job is something like hospice nurse for sick kids or putting dogs down, why the hell are you CRYING at work?
Yeah, on the way home.

Grown men putting you down, yelling at you for being "fucking stupid" all day, emotional abuse?  Tip of the iceberg, or so my friends say.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: G-dog on September 03, 2015, 01:55:36 PM
Back on topic here...

On a Monday morning this June I went into work at my job of 10+ years. I was in a good mood and didn't have any intentions of quitting. During the morning meeting something just set me off, and I spoke up in front of everyone and told them I thought that what our organization was doing was WRONG, IMMORAL, and that we should stop! Everyone's jaws just dropped. One of the managers in the meeting said, "Well, I don't think that one of us should be saying things like that. We all need to be on the same page." My supervisor chimed in and just basically repeated the company policy and told everyone that that's what we would be following.

When we walked out of the meeting my supervisor acted like nothing had happened. He gave me a list of a couple of routine things he wanted me to do that day, and I nodded my head and said okay. As soon as my supervisor walked away I  loaded all of my personal things into a vehicle, went back inside, gave everyone a big hug and wished them all a good life. Apparently no one realized I was quitting at the time. They all just thought I was apologizing for my outburst or not being a team player, or something.

When I walked back outside to the parking lot my supervisor was there. I walked up to him, shook his hand and said, "I'm going home." He was like, "What do you mean? Are you sick?" I said, "No, I'm just over it. I've got better things to do with my time. I don't want to be part of this anymore. I'm leaving." I hopped in the car and drove away. I could see my supervisor in the rear view mirror standing there with his jaw dropped.

At our main office I spent about an hour explaining to our director why I was leaving and why I didn't agree with our organization's policies. She was really nice and asked me to reconsider and stay. She proposed various scenarios that might allow me to stay on and continue working, but by that point I was really beyond wanting to continue working for the organization. I just told her I was sorry and that I was ready to move on.

Our director seemed really concerned that I was making an irresponsible, rash decision. She kept reminding me that I needed to think of my wife (SAHM) and young daughter and that I needed to have a job. I explained to her calmly that I had investments and savings, and that we would be fine. I told her that by my calculations my family and I should be able to live comfortably off of our investments indefinitely. At some point, I may choose to take another job or maybe start a business that interests me, but I shouldn't have to. At that point, the director got kind of quiet, and she said, "Wow, I wish I could do that. If I could, I'd quit too."

Congratulations!

http://giphy.com/gifs/MUeQeEQaDCjE4/html5 (http://giphy.com/gifs/MUeQeEQaDCjE4/html5)

(http://giphy.com/gifs/MUeQeEQaDCjE4/html5)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gone Fishing on September 03, 2015, 02:11:31 PM
Back on topic here...

On a Monday morning this June I went into work at my job of 10+ years. I was in a good mood and didn't have any intentions of quitting. During the morning meeting something just set me off, and I spoke up in front of everyone and told them I thought that what our organization was doing was WRONG, IMMORAL, and that we should stop! Everyone's jaws just dropped. One of the managers in the meeting said, "Well, I don't think that one of us should be saying things like that. We all need to be on the same page." My supervisor chimed in and just basically repeated the company policy and told everyone that that's what we would be following.

When we walked out of the meeting my supervisor acted like nothing had happened. He gave me a list of a couple of routine things he wanted me to do that day, and I nodded my head and said okay. As soon as my supervisor walked away I  loaded all of my personal things into a vehicle, went back inside, gave everyone a big hug and wished them all a good life. Apparently no one realized I was quitting at the time. They all just thought I was apologizing for my outburst or not being a team player, or something.

When I walked back outside to the parking lot my supervisor was there. I walked up to him, shook his hand and said, "I'm going home." He was like, "What do you mean? Are you sick?" I said, "No, I'm just over it. I've got better things to do with my time. I don't want to be part of this anymore. I'm leaving." I hopped in the car and drove away. I could see my supervisor in the rear view mirror standing there with his jaw dropped.

At our main office I spent about an hour explaining to our director why I was leaving and why I didn't agree with our organization's policies. She was really nice and asked me to reconsider and stay. She proposed various scenarios that might allow me to stay on and continue working, but by that point I was really beyond wanting to continue working for the organization. I just told her I was sorry and that I was ready to move on.

Our director seemed really concerned that I was making an irresponsible, rash decision. She kept reminding me that I needed to think of my wife (SAHM) and young daughter and that I needed to have a job. I explained to her calmly that I had investments and savings, and that we would be fine. I told her that by my calculations my family and I should be able to live comfortably off of our investments indefinitely. At some point, I may choose to take another job or maybe start a business that interests me, but I shouldn't have to. At that point, the director got kind of quiet, and she said, "Wow, I wish I could do that. If I could, I'd quit too."

Nice!  Sounds like you may have some things to share in the job secrets thread! (Sorry, but I can't seem to find it at the moment...)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Eric on September 03, 2015, 02:39:42 PM
Nice!  Sounds like you may have some things to share in the job secrets thread! (Sorry, but I can't seem to find it at the moment...)

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/post-secrets-you-know-from-your-previouscurrent-jobs/
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Gone Fishing on September 03, 2015, 02:41:01 PM
Nice!  Sounds like you may have some things to share in the job secrets thread! (Sorry, but I can't seem to find it at the moment...)

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/post-secrets-you-know-from-your-previouscurrent-jobs/

Thanks!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: BlueHouse on September 03, 2015, 02:59:00 PM
Back on topic here...

On a Monday morning this June I went into work at my job of 10+ years. I was in a good mood and didn't have any intentions of quitting. During the morning meeting something just set me off, and I spoke up in front of everyone and told them I thought that what our organization was doing was WRONG, IMMORAL, and that we should stop! Everyone's jaws just dropped. One of the managers in the meeting said, "Well, I don't think that one of us should be saying things like that. We all need to be on the same page." My supervisor chimed in and just basically repeated the company policy and told everyone that that's what we would be following.

When we walked out of the meeting my supervisor acted like nothing had happened. He gave me a list of a couple of routine things he wanted me to do that day, and I nodded my head and said okay. As soon as my supervisor walked away I  loaded all of my personal things into a vehicle, went back inside, gave everyone a big hug and wished them all a good life. Apparently no one realized I was quitting at the time. They all just thought I was apologizing for my outburst or not being a team player, or something.


Signed, Don Draper.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: lhamo on September 03, 2015, 05:37:15 PM
Back on topic here...

On a Monday morning this June I went into work at my job of 10+ years. I was in a good mood and didn't have any intentions of quitting. During the morning meeting something just set me off, and I spoke up in front of everyone and told them I thought that what our organization was doing was WRONG, IMMORAL, and that we should stop! Everyone's jaws just dropped. One of the managers in the meeting said, "Well, I don't think that one of us should be saying things like that. We all need to be on the same page." My supervisor chimed in and just basically repeated the company policy and told everyone that that's what we would be following.

When we walked out of the meeting my supervisor acted like nothing had happened. He gave me a list of a couple of routine things he wanted me to do that day, and I nodded my head and said okay. As soon as my supervisor walked away I  loaded all of my personal things into a vehicle, went back inside, gave everyone a big hug and wished them all a good life. Apparently no one realized I was quitting at the time. They all just thought I was apologizing for my outburst or not being a team player, or something.

When I walked back outside to the parking lot my supervisor was there. I walked up to him, shook his hand and said, "I'm going home." He was like, "What do you mean? Are you sick?" I said, "No, I'm just over it. I've got better things to do with my time. I don't want to be part of this anymore. I'm leaving." I hopped in the car and drove away. I could see my supervisor in the rear view mirror standing there with his jaw dropped.

At our main office I spent about an hour explaining to our director why I was leaving and why I didn't agree with our organization's policies. She was really nice and asked me to reconsider and stay. She proposed various scenarios that might allow me to stay on and continue working, but by that point I was really beyond wanting to continue working for the organization. I just told her I was sorry and that I was ready to move on.

Our director seemed really concerned that I was making an irresponsible, rash decision. She kept reminding me that I needed to think of my wife (SAHM) and young daughter and that I needed to have a job. I explained to her calmly that I had investments and savings, and that we would be fine. I told her that by my calculations my family and I should be able to live comfortably off of our investments indefinitely. At some point, I may choose to take another job or maybe start a business that interests me, but I shouldn't have to. At that point, the director got kind of quiet, and she said, "Wow, I wish I could do that. If I could, I'd quit too."

That is fucking awesome

+1000
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wilson Hall on September 03, 2015, 06:25:21 PM
Back on topic here...

On a Monday morning this June I went into work at my job of 10+ years. I was in a good mood and didn't have any intentions of quitting. During the morning meeting something just set me off, and I spoke up in front of everyone and told them I thought that what our organization was doing was WRONG, IMMORAL, and that we should stop! Everyone's jaws just dropped. One of the managers in the meeting said, "Well, I don't think that one of us should be saying things like that. We all need to be on the same page." My supervisor chimed in and just basically repeated the company policy and told everyone that that's what we would be following.

When we walked out of the meeting my supervisor acted like nothing had happened. He gave me a list of a couple of routine things he wanted me to do that day, and I nodded my head and said okay. As soon as my supervisor walked away I  loaded all of my personal things into a vehicle, went back inside, gave everyone a big hug and wished them all a good life. Apparently no one realized I was quitting at the time. They all just thought I was apologizing for my outburst or not being a team player, or something.


Signed, Don Draper.

ROFL
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Taran Wanderer on September 04, 2015, 12:46:03 AM
...and I watched a co-worker tell the bean counters to go fuck off within the last few days.

Damn it was good.  OK, so this guy was going to retire anyways in the next year or two.  But we're in a business that requires 1/10th hour charging to the various contracts.  This guy is, well, was, being run ragged with 20 different contracts to charge to.  The asshats in bean counting dinged him for supposedly not charging correctly.  Yeah, bullshit.  I've never seen anyone try his level best in a bullshit system.  Anyways, they tagged him for remedial training with his manager.  He sends out his retirement notice - first person on the e-mail is the asshat bean counter in the far off city, 2nd is his manager.

I think Shakespeare was wrong in his assessment.  The first thing we should do is kill all the fucking bean counting accountants.  THEN kill all the lawyers.

[No, no I'm not at all bitter about the bullshit from these fucking, moronic MBA bullshit spewing bean counting penny-wise, million dollar foolish idiots that don't know how to run a company.  They're driving it into the ground - this great American Success Story that was built by engineers and manufacturing workers].

This seems to be going around. Hire, hire, hire for accounting, HR, and sales, but no hiring for engineering and manufacturing people who get things done.  I don't know whether to feel better that I'm not alone or worse because it's happening everywhere.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Squirrel away on September 04, 2015, 03:48:57 AM


Our director seemed really concerned that I was making an irresponsible, rash decision. She kept reminding me that I needed to think of my wife (SAHM) and young daughter and that I needed to have a job. I explained to her calmly that I had investments and savings, and that we would be fine. I told her that by my calculations my family and I should be able to live comfortably off of our investments indefinitely. At some point, I may choose to take another job or maybe start a business that interests me, but I shouldn't have to. At that point, the director got kind of quiet, and she said, "Wow, I wish I could do that. If I could, I'd quit too."

Hopefully you gave her food for thought.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Shane on September 04, 2015, 09:58:05 AM
What was the wrong immoral thing?

Nice!  Sounds like you may have some things to share in the job secrets thread! (Sorry, but I can't seem to find it at the moment...)

http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/post-secrets-you-know-from-your-previouscurrent-jobs/

Thanks!

There aren't really any "secrets" to divulge. It was more a difference of opinion. What my former employer is doing is completely legal according to the letter of the law. They have tons of attorneys they can hide behind that will argue in court for them that they aren't doing anything wrong. Many of my former coworkers, some of whom I have great respect for, believe that their employer is doing the right thing, and I respect their right to disagree with me. I'm just grateful that living a simple life and having FU money allowed me to stand up for what I believe in, and not have to back down from the Man.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: G-dog on September 04, 2015, 12:01:12 PM
This is why law, ethics and morals are really separate things. There may be a huge amount of overlap for all three, but sometimes it is just subjective or an area the law doesn't or can't cover very well.

My ethics teacher tried to drill into us that two people can find two opposite solutions to the same scenario, and both can be ethical because ethics is inherently subjective to some degree (and steeped in cultural, societal, family, and personal history).

Glad you had the means to step up and speak your mind, and leave when your company's values did not align with yours.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: eostache on September 04, 2015, 12:13:34 PM
Back on topic here...

On a Monday morning this June I went into work at my job of 10+ years. I was in a good mood and didn't have any intentions of quitting. During the morning meeting something just set me off, and I spoke up in front of everyone and told them I thought that what our organization was doing was WRONG, IMMORAL, and that we should stop! Everyone's jaws just dropped. One of the managers in the meeting said, "Well, I don't think that one of us should be saying things like that. We all need to be on the same page." My supervisor chimed in and just basically repeated the company policy and told everyone that that's what we would be following.

When we walked out of the meeting my supervisor acted like nothing had happened. He gave me a list of a couple of routine things he wanted me to do that day, and I nodded my head and said okay. As soon as my supervisor walked away I  loaded all of my personal things into a vehicle, went back inside, gave everyone a big hug and wished them all a good life. Apparently no one realized I was quitting at the time. They all just thought I was apologizing for my outburst or not being a team player, or something.

When I walked back outside to the parking lot my supervisor was there. I walked up to him, shook his hand and said, "I'm going home." He was like, "What do you mean? Are you sick?" I said, "No, I'm just over it. I've got better things to do with my time. I don't want to be part of this anymore. I'm leaving." I hopped in the car and drove away. I could see my supervisor in the rear view mirror standing there with his jaw dropped.

At our main office I spent about an hour explaining to our director why I was leaving and why I didn't agree with our organization's policies. She was really nice and asked me to reconsider and stay. She proposed various scenarios that might allow me to stay on and continue working, but by that point I was really beyond wanting to continue working for the organization. I just told her I was sorry and that I was ready to move on.

Our director seemed really concerned that I was making an irresponsible, rash decision. She kept reminding me that I needed to think of my wife (SAHM) and young daughter and that I needed to have a job. I explained to her calmly that I had investments and savings, and that we would be fine. I told her that by my calculations my family and I should be able to live comfortably off of our investments indefinitely. At some point, I may choose to take another job or maybe start a business that interests me, but I shouldn't have to. At that point, the director got kind of quiet, and she said, "Wow, I wish I could do that. If I could, I'd quit too."

Fuckin A!
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Kashmani on September 04, 2015, 12:34:46 PM
...and I watched a co-worker tell the bean counters to go fuck off within the last few days.

Damn it was good.  OK, so this guy was going to retire anyways in the next year or two.  But we're in a business that requires 1/10th hour charging to the various contracts.  This guy is, well, was, being run ragged with 20 different contracts to charge to.  The asshats in bean counting dinged him for supposedly not charging correctly.  Yeah, bullshit.  I've never seen anyone try his level best in a bullshit system.  Anyways, they tagged him for remedial training with his manager.  He sends out his retirement notice - first person on the e-mail is the asshat bean counter in the far off city, 2nd is his manager.

I think Shakespeare was wrong in his assessment.  The first thing we should do is kill all the fucking bean counting accountants.  THEN kill all the lawyers.

[No, no I'm not at all bitter about the bullshit from these fucking, moronic MBA bullshit spewing bean counting penny-wise, million dollar foolish idiots that don't know how to run a company.  They're driving it into the ground - this great American Success Story that was built by engineers and manufacturing workers].

It's all fun and games until a customer requests an audit of your charges and can find errors and starts disputing the charges, drags you to court, etc etc.  Or God forbid it's a gov't contract you've fucked up on.  Us bean counters aren't making up this shit because we like fucking with people, you know.

Us lawyers have been billing in 0.1s of an hour for decades, and many client's don't even allow block billing so that every call or email has to be set out separately. It's annoying, but that is what timekeeping software is for.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Us2bCool on September 04, 2015, 12:42:30 PM
Glad to see this fantastic thread get resurrected. I happily witnessed an epic FU incident over the past few weeks.  "Diane" is one of the most competent people I've ever worked with, but and she has a very strong sense of justice.  "Mike" is not so competent, but got promoted to be Diane's manager in a classic case of "well, we either promote him or we fire him, and we don't have a good enough reason to fire him". 

Diane went on vacation this Summer, with plenty of notice, had it on the calendar, blah blah. That week, things got rough for Mike, and he unloaded his frustrations on his Director, telling him "and left on vacation without telling me she was going to be gone".

When she got back, Director told her about the incident. She went back to her desk and drafted a letter of resignation, handed it to the Director and said "I refuse to have any more interaction with Mike until I'm gone".  True to her word, she left this week, without having another job lined up. 

I don't really know what her financial situation is, but I know what her pay range is and that she enjoys living frugally, so I'd bet my 'stache she has one built up as well.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Adventine on September 04, 2015, 01:03:53 PM
Oh, that must have been so satisfying.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Trudie on September 04, 2015, 03:12:53 PM
...and I watched a co-worker tell the bean counters to go fuck off within the last few days.

Damn it was good.  OK, so this guy was going to retire anyways in the next year or two.  But we're in a business that requires 1/10th hour charging to the various contracts.  This guy is, well, was, being run ragged with 20 different contracts to charge to.  The asshats in bean counting dinged him for supposedly not charging correctly.  Yeah, bullshit.  I've never seen anyone try his level best in a bullshit system.  Anyways, they tagged him for remedial training with his manager.  He sends out his retirement notice - first person on the e-mail is the asshat bean counter in the far off city, 2nd is his manager.

I think Shakespeare was wrong in his assessment.  The first thing we should do is kill all the fucking bean counting accountants.  THEN kill all the lawyers.

[No, no I'm not at all bitter about the bullshit from these fucking, moronic MBA bullshit spewing bean counting penny-wise, million dollar foolish idiots that don't know how to run a company.  They're driving it into the ground - this great American Success Story that was built by engineers and manufacturing workers].

It's all fun and games until a customer requests an audit of your charges and can find errors and starts disputing the charges, drags you to court, etc etc.  Or God forbid it's a gov't contract you've fucked up on.  Us bean counters aren't making up this shit because we like fucking with people, you know.

Yeah from one fucking bean counter to another... I work with a lot of federal regulations in telecommunications where the most minor hock up can either result in an audit or the withholding of payments from the Federal Communications Commission.  I choose which battles to fight, but sometimes wish others understood that it doesn't take all that much frankly to get others up in your business.  Because we get federal payments how people account for their time on projects is important.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Nords on September 04, 2015, 03:18:16 PM
Yeah from one fucking bean counter to another... I work with a lot of federal regulations in telecommunications where the most minor hock up can either result in an audit or the withholding of payments from the Federal Communications Commission.  I choose which battles to fight, but sometimes wish others understood that it doesn't take all that much frankly to get others up in your business.  Because we get federal payments how people account for their time on projects is important.
So one choice would be to make the tracking & compliance system more user-friendly.

Another choice would be to make life hard on the users.

Hmmm.  Tough choice.

C'mon-- who's going to defend a six-minute tracking interval?!?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Trudie on September 04, 2015, 03:28:01 PM
I actually think the systems are user-friendly -- available in real time via computer/mobile.  I rarely have to address this issue with people, and not all issues involve regulated funds.

My issue with this is demonizing "bean counters" for being assholes just trying to split fine hairs to make others' lives difficult or defend things on the basis of "principle."  For instance, in my case certain government agencies that we rely on for funding can be pretty unreasonable when it comes to getting payments or auditing records for payments.

Very recently we had a $45K payment that was due to us from an FCC administrative agency get held up for weeks because when we last paid our regulatory fees bill to them my co-worker fat fingered a number and we underpaid by less than ten cents.  Solving the situation involved a ridiculous detour through a phone tree, then over-nighting a check ($20 courier fee) for ten cents.

We're all cogs in a wheel...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: tyort1 on September 04, 2015, 03:29:57 PM
...and I watched a co-worker tell the bean counters to go fuck off within the last few days.

Damn it was good.  OK, so this guy was going to retire anyways in the next year or two.  But we're in a business that requires 1/10th hour charging to the various contracts.  This guy is, well, was, being run ragged with 20 different contracts to charge to.  The asshats in bean counting dinged him for supposedly not charging correctly.  Yeah, bullshit.  I've never seen anyone try his level best in a bullshit system.  Anyways, they tagged him for remedial training with his manager.  He sends out his retirement notice - first person on the e-mail is the asshat bean counter in the far off city, 2nd is his manager.

I think Shakespeare was wrong in his assessment.  The first thing we should do is kill all the fucking bean counting accountants.  THEN kill all the lawyers.

[No, no I'm not at all bitter about the bullshit from these fucking, moronic MBA bullshit spewing bean counting penny-wise, million dollar foolish idiots that don't know how to run a company.  They're driving it into the ground - this great American Success Story that was built by engineers and manufacturing workers].
Heh. Reminds me, we have a hiring freeze right now because the parent company of my division acquired yet another company.  We're still not at the level of staff we should have, yet we're bringing on new customers left and right. But...omg no money because we bought something else, guess we'll leave all the employees at their 150% workload for another few months!

Sad news Jlee, 150% workload is the new normal.  Get used to it.  :(
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: lhamo on September 04, 2015, 04:27:14 PM
Glad to see this fantastic thread get resurrected. I happily witnessed an epic FU incident over the past few weeks.  "Diane" is one of the most competent people I've ever worked with, but and she has a very strong sense of justice.  "Mike" is not so competent, but got promoted to be Diane's manager in a classic case of "well, we either promote him or we fire him, and we don't have a good enough reason to fire him". 

Diane went on vacation this Summer, with plenty of notice, had it on the calendar, blah blah. That week, things got rough for Mike, and he unloaded his frustrations on his Director, telling him "and left on vacation without telling me she was going to be gone".

When she got back, Director told her about the incident. She went back to her desk and drafted a letter of resignation, handed it to the Director and said "I refuse to have any more interaction with Mike until I'm gone".  True to her word, she left this week, without having another job lined up. 

I don't really know what her financial situation is, but I know what her pay range is and that she enjoys living frugally, so I'd bet my 'stache she has one built up as well.

I <3 Diane.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: happy on September 04, 2015, 04:40:50 PM
+1
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: nobodyspecial on September 04, 2015, 05:21:22 PM
My issue with this is demonizing "bean counters" for being assholes just trying to split fine hairs to make others' lives difficult or defend things on the basis of "principle."  For instance, in my case certain government agencies that we rely on for funding can be pretty unreasonable when it comes to getting payments or auditing records for payments.
So the government bean counters are assholes then ?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Cpa Cat on September 04, 2015, 05:48:27 PM
...and I watched a co-worker tell the bean counters to go fuck off within the last few days.

Damn it was good.  OK, so this guy was going to retire anyways in the next year or two.  But we're in a business that requires 1/10th hour charging to the various contracts. 

When I worked in public accounting, we also had to charge our time in 1/10th of an hour under specific time codes. I was at one firm where each and every week the lady in time of the time entries would call me on my phone and yell at me for charging to the wrong codes. It always came down the same thing: That code can't be charged to that client.

"Tax services 001" was different from "Tax services 002" which was different from "Tax preparation 002" and "Tax advisory 002." There were a bajillion similar codes, all available to select for every client. Sometimes I would try change it, but it would still be wrong, so she'd yell some more.

So my response was, "Well, what code should I use?"

And she'd yell, "I don't know! It's not my job to decide! You'll have to ask your supervisor!" (And of course my supervisor had no idea what I was talking about).

And I'd respond with, "But if you don't know what the right codes are, then how do you know that I'm using wrong ones. You must have a list."

And she would literally yell at me, "YOU CAN'T USE THAT TIME CODE! CHANGE IT TO SOMETHING ELSE!!!" and slam the phone down.

Then during my first review, I was told that I was taking too much time on timekeeping issues. So the next time she called to yell, I said, "I'm sorry, I don't have time for this. You're just going to have to figure it out. If you're having issues, go ahead and ask my supervisor what codes to charge it to."

I never heard anything about it again.

To this day, I marvel that a grown woman thought it was appropriate to yell at someone at work over time codes.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: G-dog on September 04, 2015, 06:01:32 PM
...and I watched a co-worker tell the bean counters to go fuck off within the last few days.

Damn it was good.  OK, so this guy was going to retire anyways in the next year or two.  But we're in a business that requires 1/10th hour charging to the various contracts.  This guy is, well, was, being run ragged with 20 different contracts to charge to.  The asshats in bean counting dinged him for supposedly not charging correctly.  Yeah, bullshit.  I've never seen anyone try his level best in a bullshit system.  Anyways, they tagged him for remedial training with his manager.  He sends out his retirement notice - first person on the e-mail is the asshat bean counter in the far off city, 2nd is his manager.

I think Shakespeare was wrong in his assessment.  The first thing we should do is kill all the fucking bean counting accountants.  THEN kill all the lawyers.

[No, no I'm not at all bitter about the bullshit from these fucking, moronic MBA bullshit spewing bean counting penny-wise, million dollar foolish idiots that don't know how to run a company.  They're driving it into the ground - this great American Success Story that was built by engineers and manufacturing workers].
Heh. Reminds me, we have a hiring freeze right now because the parent company of my division acquired yet another company.  We're still not at the level of staff we should have, yet we're bringing on new customers left and right. But...omg no money because we bought something else, guess we'll leave all the employees at their 150% workload for another few months!

Sad news Jlee, 150% workload is the new normal.  Get used to it.  :(

Too true, though I am not sure it is even new since this was my corporate life for about the last 7-10 years! Got tired of being lied to about hiring or workload allocation relief. Not my problem anymore.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: MoonShadow on September 04, 2015, 06:07:08 PM
I have actually used the phrase, "FU! I quit!", but I didn't actually have any money at the time, and it was quite stressful for my wife until I got another job.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: JLee on September 04, 2015, 10:54:34 PM
...and I watched a co-worker tell the bean counters to go fuck off within the last few days.

Damn it was good.  OK, so this guy was going to retire anyways in the next year or two.  But we're in a business that requires 1/10th hour charging to the various contracts.  This guy is, well, was, being run ragged with 20 different contracts to charge to.  The asshats in bean counting dinged him for supposedly not charging correctly.  Yeah, bullshit.  I've never seen anyone try his level best in a bullshit system.  Anyways, they tagged him for remedial training with his manager.  He sends out his retirement notice - first person on the e-mail is the asshat bean counter in the far off city, 2nd is his manager.

I think Shakespeare was wrong in his assessment.  The first thing we should do is kill all the fucking bean counting accountants.  THEN kill all the lawyers.

[No, no I'm not at all bitter about the bullshit from these fucking, moronic MBA bullshit spewing bean counting penny-wise, million dollar foolish idiots that don't know how to run a company.  They're driving it into the ground - this great American Success Story that was built by engineers and manufacturing workers].
Heh. Reminds me, we have a hiring freeze right now because the parent company of my division acquired yet another company.  We're still not at the level of staff we should have, yet we're bringing on new customers left and right. But...omg no money because we bought something else, guess we'll leave all the employees at their 150% workload for another few months!

Sad news Jlee, 150% workload is the new normal.  Get used to it.  :(
I decided to change my situation instead of getting used to it. I signed an offer letter with a ~$36k raise today.  Even if it's 150% workload, at least now it's 159% pay! ;)
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: golfreak12 on September 04, 2015, 11:10:36 PM
Back before 9/11 I had finished school with an accounting degree but was still working part-time(PT) and making decent money. I had no care in the world. 31 and never had a fun time job before. Life was fun.
When 9/11 came, the money disappeared and I was forced to find a real job. Its been 3 yrs since I've graduated so accounting wasn't really an option for me.
My buddy had parents who owned 25+ McDonalds. He's like, come work for me. I've work at McDonalds when I was younger so I accepted. I started as an assistant manager. After 7 months, I got bored and wanted to go back to my PT job.(I never quit in the first place. Work is picking up again). Shockingly to me, the higher up offer me a GM position. I was like "hell no". I'm good but I know nothing about running a store on my own but the idea of being on charge was too enticing.
My first store my inside a Walmart. Took me some growing pain but I once again I learned quick. I was now a rising star in the company. Made 40K+ which was the most money I've ever made in my life at 32. My store drove me crazy cause it was 24hr cause I would get calls constantly. I've asked repeatedly to close overnight buy they refused.
Then my brother in Cali bought a house and knew I always wanted to live there(I'm in Florida). He said I can come and live with him anytime as he has a room for me. I used this excuse to quit. I've saved about 20K by now and I figured to go to Cali for a year and blow it all. My brother lives in Sacto so my idea was to go snowboarding as much as I could. When I quit, the owner(my friend's dad) even came and talked to me and told me how I have a bright future at the company and I shouldn't leave.

So I go to Sacto and figured I'd be a bum for a year. Guess what ?? Within a week, I got a job as an Assistant manager at McDonalds. There goes the plan to be a bum. This is a smaller franchise with only 7 stores. They were behind the time as I came from a more advanced McDonalds. The things that I knew amazed them. I showed them better ways of doing Scheduling, inventory, food cost, etc......I would sit in monthly meetings only reserved for GMs and made them feel inadequate. After a yr in Cali, I got bored. All my friends were in Fla and decided to head back. Once again, the they tried to get me to stay, telling me their GMs are making high $50K++. Blah.....
I came to Cali with the intention to blow all my savings but after a yr, it grew.
When I decided to go back to Fla, of course I decided to take it easy and do nothing.
Another friend of mine(a McDonalds GM)), knew I was coming back and asked me to help him out a couple of days a week at his store. I was dumb cause he suckered me in. That couple of days a week turned weekly and then after a month he asked me to be his first assistant. I enjoyed working with the guy and didn't want the responsibility of running the store as I accepted. Things were going great until they decided to move my buddy to another store and bring another GM in. Didn't they know we worked as a combo ??
I was like fucked them and went to my back my PT job(yeah I know its a secret PT job). I already got my PT job back so I told them politely fuck you. You can't expect me to work under another GM and told them I already got another job. My last day on the job there, the VP came and talked to me asking me what would it take for me to stay. I told him I wasn't not BSing because I already got another job. I threw out the idea that if they mad me GM instead of bringing in another GM I would stay. He told me that he would get back to me.
The next day he called me and said the store is mine. I was shocked for a 2nd time. I had to tell the PT job that I couldn't continue with the job now.
So I ran that store very well.
As a franchise, the corporation grade us on 3 main things. Customer complaints, yearly in store reviews and mystery shops. Mystery shops was something all the stores take pride in. We also get bonuses for high mystery shop scores. My store had the highest average for the entire franchise and 4th in the Florida region.
So after a year or so at this store, I was about cooked. Trying to keep up the high mystery shop scores and everything else go me stressed out to no end. I even told my buddy(owner's son), I don't know how long I can last.
Then it happened. One month I let one of my manager in charge of the mystery shop periods. I was in my office doing paper work. We just happened to get a bad score when I was in the office. Let me restate that we had the 4th highest average in the entire Florida. I got ridiculed my our president in our voicemail where everyone can hear. He talked about how I was in the office and not helping out etc.......I was so pisssed off to no end. Highest core in the company and 4th in Florida and he's ridiculing me.
I actually used this excuse to quit. Before I was stressed to death but  I didn't know how to quit. I can now used this reason to quit. I think I shocked everyone when I told them I quit.
Everyday, my boss kept telling me the president would like to talk to me at the franchise office but I refused.
My last day, I went to the franchise office to return everything and I run into the president. He's like "golfreak", when you're done with that can you come to my office to talk. I said sure. After I was done, I took off. Didn't say one word. I was not going to give him a chance to convince me to stay. I've tried quitting this company so many times and they somehow convinced to stay everytime.
Weeks after I quit, my buddy(owner's son) and various people told me how pissed the president was cause I ran out on him. Haha.....
After I quit, I had a bit of money saved up so I decided to do nothing again for as long as I can. After 3 weeks, I was bored to death again. I decided to go back to the PT job and see if I can get a job again. Remembered I took the job and quit just over a year ago. Surprisingly, I once again got the PT job again.
This was in 2006 and I still have the same PT job and making more money than I ever did before.
If I didn't get married 4 yrs ago, I could have FIRE by now but I'm helping my wife get through school and once we become a 2 income household, we could probably retire in 10 yrs.
Sorry for the long story.....
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Alternatepriorities on September 05, 2015, 01:35:09 AM
There are people with awesome stories on here...

I worked for a small engineering firm for the first eight years after I finished college and saved about 1/2 my pay over that time. There were financial ups and downs and money was always a little short. In early 2012 the company hit a really rough spot and announced 12.5% pay cuts for everyone (to their credit the owners took a temporary 100% cut). My coworkers were mostly living paycheck to paycheck and one objected mid meeting that he'd loose his house. After the meeting I walked into my bosses office and told him "there are 9 of us in the department, if I leave that's 12.5% for everyone else." He told me I didn't have to do that. I said, "I've saved enough to cover my needs for a decade and I want to see the world." I agreed to stay 2 months finish up the projects I was working on and come back in a year. The week I left they gave everyone back their 12.5%. I spend the next year living out of my carry on backpack. They tracked my progress on a world map in the hall...

When I returned a year later things were still looking a bit shaky so I moved to Alaska. My boss kept telling me I was doing great at my new job but I wasn't enjoying it. Last year after a 12 months and a 25% raise I gave them six weeks notice without anything lined up. They were a little shocked I could give that much notice and seemed to really appreciate it. I took and 800 mile bike trip and then followed my girlfriend to the middle of nowhere Alaska since she needed a job more than I did. Last fall i started a business and then found some interesting local work. Oddly enough I'm making better money now and having a lot more fun at work. I see my 'stache as a polite "no thank you" fund that provides financial flexibility until i reach full FIRE. Hopefully I'll never need it to be a full "F-U" fund but it's nice to know it's there if I do.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: shelivesthedream on September 05, 2015, 02:29:36 AM
Quote from: Alternatepriorities link=topic=18251.msg795475#msg795475
After the meeting I walked into my bosses office and told him "there are 9 of us in the department, if I leave that's 12.5% for everyone else." ... They tracked my progress on a world map in the hall...

Oh wow, I just love this
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Faraday on September 05, 2015, 09:22:34 AM

...After the meeting I walked into my bosses office and told him "there are 9 of us in the department, if I leave that's 12.5% for everyone else." ....

The week I left they gave everyone back their 12.5%. I spend the next year living out of my carry on backpack. They tracked my progress on a world map in the hall...
...

Awesome story!

Kudos to you for recognizing and acting on the opportunity, and kudos to your former employer (at the small business) for being HONEST and actually letting the employees keep the 12.5% windfall you produced!!!

What I love most is that you kept everyone as friends - good enough friends that they tracked you on a map and cared about what you did after you left. That little business full of great people is a rarity in this cold old world.

Time to head over and check out your 'blog ...
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: FIREby35 on September 05, 2015, 11:36:51 AM
I have not read everyone's stories yet, but I do have my own epic FU money story.

I worked at a law firm with 13 attorneys, straight out of law school at 26. I had lots of options because I went to a regionally respected law school and finished near the top of my law class. I rejected many offers for salary positions and chose this firm because it allowed me to create my own practice. We split fees based on various percentages. There was no cap on my earnings.

Fast forward 3.5 years. I was 29 years old. My practice had exploded. There were basically two problems. First, by the time of the FU incident I was making more money than anyone in the firm and I was the youngest person there.  Second, the managing partner and the office administrator were incompetent, bitter and creating a toxic work environment.

A key part of the story is that 6 weeks prior to the FU incident, the managing partner used $10,000 of my money, without permission, to pay all the partners salaries because they had "cash flow issues." They money was paid back a week later. This signaled financial shenanigans on top of being totally, totally toxic.

One day, the managing partner approached me and said she wanted to renegotiate my deal AND audit every case for the appropriate percentage from the prior two years. The renegotiation was ridiculous. The audit was a major, totally unwarranted affront to my integrity - from a person who had just taken $10,000 of my money!

So, I went home with my wife - coincidentally an auditor and accountant. We performed the audit ourselves and ran all the numbers. I discovered that for the prior two years, less than 1% of my income had come from their referrals. I was a major profit center for the firm - generating over $250,000 for the firm over the prior 24 months. And, in fact, the toxic office administrator had intentionally mis-categorized my referrals thereby underpaying me.

Fortunately, I had been on the MMM train since the beginning and had an FU money war-chest of a couple hundred thousand dollars. Interestingly, the MMM choices had been the object of much curiosity since everyone knew I was making a lot but spending very little. Why are you riding your bike to work? Why did you buy such a "modest" house for your income. Why don't you get a new car? Those are actual comments.

So, the FU moment arrived when I delivered a renegotiated contract proposal to the partners. I proposed to pay them a flat monthly fee that amounted to 35% of what they were currently getting. I proposed that if they ever held any of my money without legal authority or permission they pay $1,000 per day for the privilege. Egg on the face of managing partner who had not advised anyone of the $10,000 "cash flow" issue or her proposed audit and renegotiation.

A comment this board will particularly appreciate in response, "We can't take this deal, we'd have to reduce our salaries and our budgets are set to our salaries." Facepalm.

During the wind up phase, the toxic, money stealing office administrator - who had been around long enough to have a way, way over-inflated sense of importance - spoke up during a tense conversation about splitting remaining funds. I looked at her and said, "You have no ownership in this firm, I have never been in business with you and don't want to hear anything you have to say." Hahahahaha. Her jaw dropped. Her upper lip trembled with rage. She didn't say a freaking word. It was the best moment of the entire thing, even better than the contract proposal.

Long story short, I opened my own law firm one week later. I now pay 20% less in overhead. I work dramatically reduced hours because I have actual, dedicated staff for just me - which they would never give me. Also, my gross receipts are up about 10% in the first 12 months. Life is good.

As a post script - the incompetent managing partner hired a guy to fill my office. Remember, that office was earning over $250,000 for the firm in the proceeding 24 months. The guy was paid a salary for six months - rather than have his pay tied to his productivity. Eventually it came out he was a total fraud who lied about being licensed in our state (he did have a different, faraway state). He even filed court documents without the appropriate license. He was fired immediately and the office remains vacant, producing zero profits. Schadenfreude? Yes.

Also as a disclaimer, there are many, many attorneys who are great at servicing their clients but not so good at business. In the event I needed legal help, I would immediately hire any of these attorneys - except the managing partner. They really are competent, professional people - but bad business and money managers. In the end, I maintained great relationships with everyone except the managing partner and the office administrator.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Faraday on September 05, 2015, 12:56:21 PM
I have not read everyone's stories yet, but I do have my own epic FU money story.

...awesome story here...

They really are competent, professional people - but bad business and money managers. In the end, I maintained great relationships with everyone except the managing partner and the office administrator.

So, wait: do the rest of the attorneys realize the financial risk they are taking by being associated with managing partner and her little rat-on-a-leash? Why wouldn't they get messed with the same way you got messed with?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: FIREby35 on September 05, 2015, 01:52:39 PM
I have not read everyone's stories yet, but I do have my own epic FU money story.

...awesome story here...

They really are competent, professional people - but bad business and money managers. In the end, I maintained great relationships with everyone except the managing partner and the office administrator.

So, wait: do the rest of the attorneys realize the financial risk they are taking by being associated with managing partner and her little rat-on-a-leash? Why wouldn't they get messed with the same way you got messed with?

Very good question. This actually does happen. One of my friends, and partner at the firm, has told me at least two stories where exactly this sort of thing is happening. Unfortunately, he is also the one who sets his spending to his salary. Actually told me he would like to leave but doesn't have the funds.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Faraday on September 05, 2015, 08:18:13 PM
I have not read everyone's stories yet, but I do have my own epic FU money story.

...awesome story here...

They really are competent, professional people - but bad business and money managers. In the end, I maintained great relationships with everyone except the managing partner and the office administrator.

So, wait: do the rest of the attorneys realize the financial risk they are taking by being associated with managing partner and her little rat-on-a-leash? Why wouldn't they get messed with the same way you got messed with?

Very good question. This actually does happen. One of my friends, and partner at the firm, has told me at least two stories where exactly this sort of thing is happening. Unfortunately, he is also the one who sets his spending to his salary. Actually told me he would like to leave but doesn't have the funds.

Dear God In Heaven Above...a lawyer...someone with what I regard as a great deal of personal and professional power...can be that STUCK?!?
I guess being a wage slave can happen to ANYone.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: FIREby35 on September 05, 2015, 09:15:16 PM
I have not read everyone's stories yet, but I do have my own epic FU money story.

...awesome story here...

They really are competent, professional people - but bad business and money managers. In the end, I maintained great relationships with everyone except the managing partner and the office administrator.

So, wait: do the rest of the attorneys realize the financial risk they are taking by being associated with managing partner and her little rat-on-a-leash? Why wouldn't they get messed with the same way you got messed with?

Very good question. This actually does happen. One of my friends, and partner at the firm, has told me at least two stories where exactly this sort of thing is happening. Unfortunately, he is also the one who sets his spending to his salary. Actually told me he would like to leave but doesn't have the funds.

Dear God In Heaven Above...a lawyer...someone with what I regard as a great deal of personal and professional power...can be that STUCK?!?
I guess being a wage slave can happen to ANYone.

By the way, I forgot to tell you the "Rat-on-leash" comment made me smile- probably more than is healthy!

You know, I think most lawyers are stuck. Financial saavy doesn't come with high education levels. The author of the Millionaire Next Door has a less popular book, "Stop Acting Rich." In that book, the stats were pretty clear that Lawyers act fancy, but don't manage their money well.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Spiffsome on September 06, 2015, 03:29:49 AM
As a lawyer, I can tell you that we fall onto the same goddamned hedonic treadmill as everyone else. I've got a book called 'The Pinstriped Prison' which describes how big firms deliberately use this effect to keep their new hires from leaving. Give a new graduate a $10,000 loan (referred to as the 'golden handcuffs' - repayable if the graduate leaves in the first year) for office clothes and gear, watch them piss away all of their new income on the flashy lifestyle the partners indulge in, then they realise that they can't leave because they can't save the $10,000  because of their new spending level.

'Millionaire Next Door' describes how the lawyers in their studies were less efficient at accumulating wealth than teachers, because of the inflated lifestyle expectations that come with law firm work. A lot of people are in the legal field because they're motivated by external reward, and law is a great way to get cash and social approval. Once that external reward gets tied to spending as much as you earn, they're stuck.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Paul der Krake on September 06, 2015, 05:45:02 AM
As a lawyer, I can tell you that we fall onto the same goddamned hedonic treadmill as everyone else. I've got a book called 'The Pinstriped Prison' which describes how big firms deliberately use this effect to keep their new hires from leaving. Give a new graduate a $10,000 loan (referred to as the 'golden handcuffs' - repayable if the graduate leaves in the first year) for office clothes and gear, watch them piss away all of their new income on the flashy lifestyle the partners indulge in, then they realise that they can't leave because they can't save the $10,000  because of their new spending level.
I have seen this happen first hand with relocation packages. Dude wouldn't quit over a mere $3,000 that the company paid him to move to the area. Household income over $200k, and worried about $3k? smh
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Jakejake on September 06, 2015, 09:18:35 AM
FU Story from my dad: He worked as a mid level manager in a huge corporation, and had enough years in for a  pension plus FU money. He was informed that he was getting a new supervisor - a guy he's dealt with before that he had no respect for (incompetent, rude, etc). The new supervisor announced that everyone needed to make an appointment to see him individually, to introduce themselves and discuss goals. My dad made his appointment. He walked in carrying a large cardboard box. He said "Hi, my name is __, and these are all my personal things. That's all you need to know about me." And he walked out.

And a couple from me:
1. Working for a micromanaging idiot abusive boss in the federal government, I finally hit the FU point after he followed me into the woman's room to yell at me while I was on the toilet - in a bathroom where the stall doors didn't even close because of the building's foundation settling. I decided for the sake of other employees still stuck there, that I would let his boss know what was happening. We had a staff of maybe 10 people, and one by one they were dropping like flies since he was transferred in. One got a medical disability for mental stress. One had a stroke - on the job. I could see I was starting to have stress related health issues.

He found out I made an appointment with his boss and blew a gasket - claiming that I needed to go through my chain of command if I wanted to talk to his supervisor, like I was seriously going to ask if it was okay with him if I lodged a complaint against him. We ended up having a meeting with his boss, the three of us, because he wouldn't let me go alone.  His boss seemed to think it might be a personality conflict between just us two, with blame to share equally, until the point where I said I already had picked up the paperwork to quit - I showed them the stack of outprocessing papers, and I just thought they needed to know they were losing the whole team because of him being abusive.

My boss lost it when he heard that, and started yelling that this was "just another example of her making a unilateral decision that affected everyone in the office." (Those words are burned into my memory, almost 20 years later!) I asked him, do you mean I should have asked your permission to quit? That was exactly what he meant, that I was overstepping my bounds by making that decision for myself. I'll never forget looking over at his supervisor and seeing her sitting there in stunned silence, with her mouth hanging open.

After the meeting, she found me another job at the same paygrade at the same facility, but a different building. I worked another 5 or so years there and was very happy.

2. In my current job, we unionized a few years ago. For young parents, people at the start of their careers, folks without savings, that's a pretty scary thing because sometimes retribution from management can get ugly. I was able to go in and be the lead negotiator for our contract because if they fired me for it, I just didn't care. And I was more effective than the other two people negotiating on my side because they were too emotionally invested and would create scenes, yelling, using emotional manipulation, going off on tangents about their personal circumstances. I could calmly state "for me this isn't an issue, but I need to stick to this point because the other employees won't sign off on this, and here's why ..."   I got called a communist a couple times by their lawyer (!) but we got the contract signed, and have better working conditions because of it.

In both those things, I didn't actually have to fall back on my FU money, but having it there meant I didn't have anything to lose by making conditions better not just for me, but for the other employees as well.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Faraday on September 06, 2015, 12:39:38 PM
I started reading these stories for the "epicness" of taking control and telling others to shove it, but now I am reading them to reinforce why we do what we do - gaining control over our own lives. For me, these stories have gone from "Hell yeah!" to "Dear God I'm glad I wasn't there". My rush of glee has turned into terror that there are people in this world who get away with that kind of oppression in the office.

I tremble with thankfulness that I've found these forums and that I can build a stash. My employment situation is pretty good compared to those stories, but I've lived through past jobs under pretty similar situations.

In one previous job, the owner of the business would monitor purchases by their employees to determine if they were being "paid too much" in salary. His son would express obvious and direct displeasure at seeing employees have a nice home or car. Seems they had visualized a kind of ranking that everyone had to fall into, that extended all the way to the family's living situation.  Don't want your employees living better than the boss man, no sir!

Of course, being frugal would be ideal in that situation, but you sure wouldn't want info about your stash to get out.

I just need a few more years....just a few....
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: ghsebldr on September 06, 2015, 12:53:15 PM
Sold the nursery and property in SoCal and moved back to Washington to try semi retirement. After starting another nursery to feed my Farmers Market habit it was getting into fall so nothing to do out in the greenhouses.
 I was driving by a Fred Meyer (Kroger) distribution center and they had the normal sign out for help wanted so I decided I'd try it for the holiday season. Got hired on as a temp like everyone else only $12 an hour but I wasn't looking for the money. After a couple of weeks throwing product from pallets to a beltline I was starting to limber up (at 52 yo) and getting in the swing. I mentioned to one of the 20 something regular employees that was a line supervisor that it was starting to feel good working hard for a change. Well a couple of days later I report to my end of the line where there were 12 pallets of stoneware plates and bowls maybe 40 pounds a box but lots of boxes on a 5' tall pallet. Usually they have a person to spell you after a short burst so I cranked them out for about a half hour lifting and tossing when a regular employee walked by with a big smile on his face, I started to notice a couple of the other regulars were watching me work (the regulars didn't have to actually DO anything, they were regular employees) so I looked over to my supervisor and gave her a nod requesting her toward my work area. When she sauntered over she asked if I was getting a good workout, I said I was and needed my second to fill in while I got some water. She just smiled and said that all the other temps were on the other side of the line doing a rush job so I said here work my line for me while I get a drink. She said that supervisors didn't have to do the actual labor that's why they had temps. I looked at her and said that retired people didn't have to either, handed her  my strips of upc codes said see ya and walked away. The regulars were really smiling as I walked by and flipped them off.

 As I was leaving their parking lot I noticed the seasonal help wanted sign in the DHL lot so I pulled over there went in and started 2 days later. Tossing boxes again but was it ever fun. The supervisors were working just as hard as the seasonal employees which was really really hard for 5 hours then the sort was done and everyone went home. Loaded empty 53' trailers from a belt system that came all the way into the truck with you. I had always been a machinist before starting our first nursery so I liked nice straight rows and stacks of freight.
Best hardest job I ever had. I worked that for a few Christmas seasons then DHL got out of the package business. One last note about FU money, After working at DHL for a little over 2 months at our daily pep talk my Station boss called me out  and says HR wanted me to start cashing my damn checks.For the rest of the time there over the 3 years I never cashed a check until the end of the season. My fellow workmates used to kid me about being rich. Far from it but this was all just extra cash. So F u to one company and thank you to the other.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: big_slacker on September 06, 2015, 01:54:27 PM
Great thread, love reading these stories! I have a little bit of $$ but also FU skills. I'm instantly employable if I decide I don't like where I'm working or want to move.

I don't want to post all the details on a public forum, but I worked at a place with a friend as my boss. He is very smart, loyal and I work with him still to this day as a consultant for his own business. We built a great and secure IT network a this place and brought them into the modern era from their former patched together ridiculousness.

His boss was weak and I believe faked/weaseled his way into his position. My buddy's firing was engineered by this guy, and I was passed over for his spot in favor of a blustery, insecure #2.

About a month of both of them asking me to do sloppy work, unethical and in one case illegal things I had enough. Took a book of documentation into the C level exec's office and said I was quitting. After a short meeting going over all the bullshit she asked if I thought this was all coming from the director or the new manager. I said both, but the director hired him right? If anything he's the constant in all the poor decisions around this place.

She did ask me to stay but I said I'll just go work somewhere else thanks. Asked if I would be ok financially doing this. I said no problem, no help needed. So I dropped the grenade and walked out basically. Director got canned and based on linkedin hasn't really done much career wise since.

My buddy and I on the other hand have had plenty of career success since, so the good guys do win sometimes. I've never wanted to be in a position where the douchebags have control. I wonder what the world would be like if everyone had the option?
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Faraday on September 06, 2015, 02:51:30 PM
My buddy and I on the other hand have had plenty of career success since, so the good guys do win sometimes. I've never wanted to be in a position where the douchebags have control. I wonder what the world would be like if everyone had the option?

The world should always be this way. Not that I want employers to get the short end of the stick, but employees need options...way more than they need all the crap they buy with their paychecks. It's horrible to be stuck in a job where you are being mistreated. The world is full of incompetent crazy people who get hired into management positions. How the hell that happens, I just don't know.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: ender on September 06, 2015, 03:06:08 PM
1. Working for a micromanaging idiot abusive boss in the federal government, I finally hit the FU point after he followed me into the woman's room to yell at me while I was on the toilet - in a bathroom where the stall doors didn't even close because of the building's foundation settling. I decided for the sake of other employees still stuck there, that I would let his boss know what was happening. We had a staff of maybe 10 people, and one by one they were dropping like flies since he was transferred in. One got a medical disability for mental stress. One had a stroke - on the job. I could see I was starting to have stress related health issues.

He found out I made an appointment with his boss and blew a gasket - claiming that I needed to go through my chain of command if I wanted to talk to his supervisor, like I was seriously going to ask if it was okay with him if I lodged a complaint against him. We ended up having a meeting with his boss, the three of us, because he wouldn't let me go alone.  His boss seemed to think it might be a personality conflict between just us two, with blame to share equally, until the point where I said I already had picked up the paperwork to quit - I showed them the stack of outprocessing papers, and I just thought they needed to know they were losing the whole team because of him being abusive.

My boss lost it when he heard that, and started yelling that this was "just another example of her making a unilateral decision that affected everyone in the office." (Those words are burned into my memory, almost 20 years later!) I asked him, do you mean I should have asked your permission to quit? That was exactly what he meant, that I was overstepping my bounds by making decision for myself. I'll never forget looking over at his supervisor and seeing her sitting there in stunned silence, with her mouth hanging open.

After the meeting, she found me another job at the same paygrade at the same facility, but a different building. I worked another 5 or so years there and was very happy.

The nice part about people like that is they are pretty easy to give enough rope to hang themselves with.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wolf_Stache on September 06, 2015, 06:00:33 PM
As a lawyer, I can tell you that we fall onto the same goddamned hedonic treadmill as everyone else. I've got a book called 'The Pinstriped Prison' which describes how big firms deliberately use this effect to keep their new hires from leaving. Give a new graduate a $10,000 loan (referred to as the 'golden handcuffs' - repayable if the graduate leaves in the first year) for office clothes and gear, watch them piss away all of their new income on the flashy lifestyle the partners indulge in, then they realise that they can't leave because they can't save the $10,000  because of their new spending level.
I have seen this happen first hand with relocation packages. Dude wouldn't quit over a mere $3,000 that the company paid him to move to the area. Household income over $200k, and worried about $3k? smh

This is my situation right now. I held off on quitting because I wanted to hold out a year so I didn't have to pay them back the money. However, the situation just kept escalating. So put in my resignation last week (should have just done it back in June, but I thought if I could get HR involved things would improve. I was so so wrong).

I have the cash to pay it back, but it does make things tighter for me on looking for a new job, now I have to find something within 2 months instead of 6.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Faraday on September 06, 2015, 06:13:41 PM
As a lawyer, I can tell you that we fall onto the same goddamned hedonic treadmill as everyone else. I've got a book called 'The Pinstriped Prison' which describes how big firms deliberately use this effect to keep their new hires from leaving. Give a new graduate a $10,000 loan (referred to as the 'golden handcuffs' - repayable if the graduate leaves in the first year) for office clothes and gear, watch them piss away all of their new income on the flashy lifestyle the partners indulge in, then they realise that they can't leave because they can't save the $10,000  because of their new spending level.
I have seen this happen first hand with relocation packages. Dude wouldn't quit over a mere $3,000 that the company paid him to move to the area. Household income over $200k, and worried about $3k? smh

This is my situation right now. I held off on quitting because I wanted to hold out a year so I didn't have to pay them back the money. However, the situation just kept escalating. So put in my resignation last week (should have just done it back in June, but I thought if I could get HR involved things would improve. I was so so wrong).

I have the cash to pay it back, but it does make things tighter for me on looking for a new job, now I have to find something within 2 months instead of 6.

Yeah. HR exists to protect MANAGEMENT from lawsuits, not humor the employees. I'm an IT professional who supported HR departments....so I'm not making that shit up. I have a co-worker at the current job who just now discovered that.

So....how are you fixing it. This is a thread of epic stories, not "oh man, I suck so bad...."
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: lhamo on September 06, 2015, 07:03:52 PM
The world is full of incompetent crazy people who get hired into management positions. How the hell that happens, I just don't know.

Because most of the sane people either:

1)  Don't want the management jobs in the first place and refuse to be promoted into them; or
2)  Quickly learn how horrible they are and move back to being a primary contributor as soon as they can; or
3)  Go insane themselves; or
4)  Die from overwork.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: Wolf_Stache on September 07, 2015, 03:52:49 PM
This is my situation right now. I held off on quitting because I wanted to hold out a year so I didn't have to pay them back the money. However, the situation just kept escalating. So put in my resignation last week (should have just done it back in June, but I thought if I could get HR involved things would improve. I was so so wrong).

I have the cash to pay it back, but it does make things tighter for me on looking for a new job, now I have to find something within 2 months instead of 6.

Yeah. HR exists to protect MANAGEMENT from lawsuits, not humor the employees. I'm an IT professional who supported HR departments....so I'm not making that shit up. I have a co-worker at the current job who just now discovered that.

So....how are you fixing it. This is a thread of epic stories, not "oh man, I suck so bad...."

Ok, here is my semi-epic horrible story:

I started at this job at the tail end of February/beginning of March.

Right of the bat there were problems. The person who had previously done this job was still there and training me. His "training" went a bit like this:

Trainer: So I pull this number into this spreadsheet -
Me: Wait, where did you get that number and how do you know to put it there?
trainer: I just know.

Further prodding gets me nowhere. So I basically receive NO training, despite having a trainer. The trainer also gives me a workbook of things that are behind that need to be done ASAP. Some of them are tax returns that are two years past due. Others are things still not done that are related to a merger the company went through the year before I started. I get so sick the first two weeks I'm there that I collapse and am rushed to the emergency room.

Meanwhile, my boss keeps dropping more and more duties on me. My first week I took over all cash forecasting, all the fixed asset stuff, Construction licenses, and became their key user for the new EPR system that was supposed to be going live May 1st.

By April I was in charge of:

By the end of May, go live had been pushed back to October 1st. Meanwhile I was given new duties on TOP of all the duties listed above:

By June I had the following duties ADDED To my plate, and remember I'm STILL in charge of everything above as well:

In the middle of June one day I get so stressed out that I basically have a complete meltdown at work. I go to my boss, begging for help where I'm told I'm just 'not working hard enough.' I walked out of her office, went in the bathroom and cried for an hour. I was VERY VERY tempted to just walk away that day and never come back, but the aforementioned 'golden handcuffs' convinces me to stay and try to get things under control. At this point I've not even been there 4 months and had two breakdowns.

In July I have another meeting with my boss where I tell her I'm overloaded, and ask her to give me priorities. She refuses, tells me 'everything' is a priority and reiterates that the reason I'm behind is that I'm not working enough and not working hard enough. Also, she gives me a list of more duties that she's going to be transferring over to me in the near future.

I begin to cope by literally dropping every task that someone is not asking me for right at that moment, but I'm enough of a stickler that the undone tasks are stressing me out.

At the beginning of Aug I go to HR, and ask them to moderate a meeting between me and my boss. During that meeting, I'm VERY honest with the fact that I haven't been doing a lot of tasks on my list simply because of the lack of time. She FREAKS OUT about the merger related tasks that still aren't done, and insists I do them NOW. She does finally agree to take ONE tasks off my list of duties, but since it is one of the things I hadn't been doing it doesn't affect my workload in any way.

Later in the month she uses the excuse that she took that one task off my list to try and give me three more tasks.

I write a resignation later, and on August 26th go in with the letter in hand to try and have one more conversation with her about my workload.

Now, remember, it is a month before go live. Because of my crazy task list above I've had time to do zero training and written zero documentation and zero procedures. I'm the ONLY one in the department that even knows how to log into the new system.

She doesn't budge so I hand her the letter with my last day as Sept 11th. She FREAKS OUT, but finally calms down long enough to ask if I'll stay until after go live if she takes everything off my tasks list except the training, documentation, and procedure documentation.

So it all works out for me. I have a job for 2 more months, time to job hunt, and since the amount I have to pay back is prorated  it means that I'll only have to pay back about 1/4 of the starting bonus.

After the announcement went out that I was quitting, IT (whom I'd been working closely with on the new system implementation - BTW their jaws hit the floor when I repeated my bosses claim that I wasn't 'working hard enough') offered me a job with them for $25K more a year than I'd been making in accounting. I declined, because F*** this company.
Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: lhamo on September 07, 2015, 04:12:24 PM

After the announcement went out that I was quitting, IT (whom I'd been working closely with on the new system implementation - BTW their jaws hit the floor when I repeated my bosses claim that I wasn't 'working hard enough') offered me a job with them for $25K more a year than I'd been making in accounting. I declined, because F*** this company.

Good for you!  Ask the IT guys to help you network.  I bet you'll find something better/better paying in no time.  And if you do, I would leave ASAP.  This place doesn't deserve any more of your time.

Title: Re: Epic FU money stories
Post by: tyort1 on September 08, 2015, 05:48:37 PM
This is my situation right now. I held off on quitting because I wanted to hold out a year so I didn't have to pay them back the money. However, the situation just kept escalating. So put in my resignation last week (should have just done it back in June, but I thought if I could get HR involved things would improve. I was so so wrong).

I have the cash to pay it back, but it does make things tighter for me on looking for a new job, now I have to find something within 2 months instead of 6.

Yeah. HR exists to protect MANAGEMENT from lawsuits, not humor the employees. I'm an IT professional who supported HR departments....so I'm not making that shit up. I have a co-worker at the current job who just now discovered that.

So....how are you fixing it. This is a thread of epic stories, not "oh man, I suck so bad...."

Ok, here is my semi-epic horrible story:

I started at this job at the tail end of February/beginning of March.

Right of the bat there were problems. The person who had previously done this job was still there and training me. His "training" went a bit like this:

Trainer: So I pull this number into this spreadsheet -
Me: Wait, where did you get that number and how do you know to put it there?
trainer: I just know.

Further prodding gets me nowhere. So I basically receive NO training, despite having a trainer. The trainer also gives me a workbook of things that are behind that need to be done ASAP. Some of them are tax returns that are two years past due. Others are things still not done that are related to a merger the company went through the year before I started. I get so sick the first two weeks I'm there that I collapse and am rushed to the emergency room.

Meanwhile, my boss keeps dropping more and more duties on me. My first week I took over all cash forecasting, all the fixed asset stuff, Construction licenses, and became their key user for the new EPR system that was supposed to be going live May 1st.

By April I was in charge of:
  • Cash Forecasting
  • Construction Licenses
  • All Fixed assets, including Construction in Progress, gathering backup documentation for all FA purchases, and disposals
  • Approval of all FA invoices before they are paid and reporting on all outstanding FA Purchase Orders
  • Depreciation Forecasting
  • Depreciation monthly entries
  • Monthly prepaid allocations
  • Reconciling all Inter-company accounts at the end of each month (this place has about a dozen different offshoots in Europe, Asia, America, Africa, etc)
  • Sales tax for all 50 states including registration, renewals, and filings

By the end of May, go live had been pushed back to October 1st. Meanwhile I was given new duties on TOP of all the duties listed above:
  • all the User acceptance testing assignments
  • all the system master data validations
  • writing all the procedures & documentation
  • the assignment to train everyone in finance on how to use the new system

By June I had the following duties ADDED To my plate, and remember I'm STILL in charge of everything above as well:
  • Credit Card management of all corporate credit cards
  • Registering fleet vehicles with the Dept of Motor Vehicles
  • Signing off on all outgoing ACH and WIRE payments
  • Filling out the monthly Financial Statement package
  • Management of all corporate insurance

In the middle of June one day I get so stressed out that I basically have a complete meltdown at work. I go to my boss, begging for help where I'm told I'm just 'not working hard enough.' I walked out of her office, went in the bathroom and cried for an hour. I was VERY VERY tempted to just walk away that day and never come back, but the aforementioned 'golden handcuffs' convinces me to stay and try to get things under control. At this point I've not even been there 4 months and had two breakdowns.

In July I have another meeting with my boss where I tell her I'm overloaded, and ask her to give me priorities. She refuses, tells me 'everything' is a priority and reiterates that the reason I'm behind is that I'm not working enough and not working hard enough. Also, she gives me a list of more duties that she's going to be transferring over to me in the near future.

I begin to cope by literally dropping every task that someone is not asking me for right at that moment, but I'm enough of a stickler that the undone tasks are stressing me out.

At the beginning of Aug