Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 684890 times)

Raay

  • Guest
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #400 on: December 09, 2014, 02:46:44 PM »
Zamboni and farmstache, I see your point ("this is not what I signed up for"), but still I wouldn't condone developing a FU attitude - I guess I dislike that it implicitly (and perhaps somewhat paradoxically) puts you into a "vengeful victim" position rather than at eye level with your employer.

To put it another way, I don't like the idea of tit for tat taken to such extremes - if someone is an asshole to you, it doesn't automatically justify  being asshole to them (I'd say it's not honorable) or worse yet, toward the company (as in case of a single asshole manager - by making a FU exit you might be striking not so much against that particular person, but more against the organization, which may or may not be at fault for your "misfortune"). To put it even shorter, it's childish behavior.

RyanAtTanagra

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 842
  • Location: San Francisco, CA
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #401 on: December 09, 2014, 04:23:27 PM »
Zamboni and farmstache, I see your point ("this is not what I signed up for"), but still I wouldn't condone developing a FU attitude - I guess I dislike that it implicitly (and perhaps somewhat paradoxically) puts you into a "vengeful victim" position rather than at eye level with your employer.

I think you're looking at it too far on that end of the spectrum.  FU money isn't so you can treat your employer poorly, it's so you don't have to put up with your employer treating YOU poorly.  Before getting into personal finance I was in debt and broke feeling stuck working for a shitty company and a shitty boss.  Once I got my finances under control, nothing about how I treated my company or did my job changed, but it let me see a way out, so I did, burning no bridges and having an open offer to come back.  That's how I read most of the stories here.  Maybe having FU money is like having power, where it can show you what kind of person you are?

Bikeguy

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 116
  • Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #402 on: December 09, 2014, 05:00:12 PM »
Wanted to point out that non competes for employees are illegal in California.   So,  if you move to California,  your non compete won't apply.
If you're FI, why are you still selling days of your life?  You only have so many, and if you have enough money, you're trading them for something you don't need.

SwordGuy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3366
  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
    • Flipping Fayetteville
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #403 on: December 09, 2014, 06:34:45 PM »
Depends on whether the non-compete has a clause in it stating the court of jurisdiction is somewhere else...

iamsoners

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 176
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #404 on: December 09, 2014, 09:09:41 PM »
Wow, great thread. I've got one, and it involves the entire Board of Directors of our organization...

My first job out of college was working for a rapidly growing non-profit.  It grew way faster than management had the capacity or brains to deal with. After 12 weeks as a temp, they hired me to run an entire department (fresh out of college, with a degree in history which I assure you was entirely unrelated to the task at hand).

In the beginning the work had a sense of urgency to it and I enjoyed essentially getting thrown into the deep end and learning how to swim in my field. But the leaders of this organization were crazy--narcissistic, lazy, fought with each other over everything, were working kick backs, you name it. Job dissatisfaction was high and so was turn-over (about 50% per year).

At one point I quit my job and stayed on as a consultant. My new job didn't pan out and I still really cared about the cause and had hope for changes in the organization (the Board had just fired the E.D.) so I negotiated to come back--at twice what my starting salary had been 24 months prior.

I stayed for another 2 years and though the organization never got better or more effective. It was boring and easy but the money was ridiculous for my age and being a non-profit so I stuck around, saving something like 65%.

But it was crushing my idealism to see these absolute idiots squander so much money, pick fights with each other, and generally do nothing to address our stated mission. One guy, "Tony" was particularly tedious and terrible--farming work out to other departments, taking credit for things he didn't do, boring the shit out of us with his slide-show presentations of photographs from his most recent vacations (which were mandatory!!), doing inane shit like making everyone with an Associate job title carry his 30 houseplants across the office when he moved to a bigger office, always asking the youngest woman in the office to get him a sandwich (that kinda crap makes me mad--you have an assistant, don't take advantage of the new kids). Oh and he organized an all staff retreat led by EST (which may or may not be a cult depending on who you talk to). Honestly--it wasn't the straight up stealing stuff I'd seen previous senior staff do but it was enough to be annnnnnnnnooooyyying but not really my problem since it was in another department.

Then, it just so happened that the day I went to put in my resignation, the E.D. also announced his departure. The Board of Directors of the organization was meeting in person and called us in towards the end of the day to let us know that "Tony" would manage things for the forseeable future (probably a year, maybe forever).  After 25 years of shit jobs, this was finally Tony's big break!

The Board benignly asked if anyone had any questions or concerns.... I raise my hand and politely ask why this guy is being promoted when all of his direct reports have filed complaints against him, their department never meets their targets and he took us all to his cult meeting?  I'm not joking when I say I said it in the politest possible tone. He was sitting 5 feet from me. This set off an hour of others piling on their complaints about why he shouldn't lead the organization.

Ultimately the Board continued with their plan to place him as interim director--which only shows how f'ed up the whole place was. But it felt good to tell them all the crap that was happening under their watch and it did probably prevent him from becoming the permanent ED.

Several years on from that, I probably wouldn't do it again today--it's not worth any professional consequences and it's not as important to me to prove my rightness by being mean.

iamsoners

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 176
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #405 on: December 09, 2014, 09:17:14 PM »
As an aside, I also witnessed another pretty badass departure from the same organization.  Our first ED had some actual psychological problems--narcissism high among them. He went through assistants at a pretty fast clip--probably one per month.  At one point we hired a new assistant. He came into work two days, everything seemed as ok as it could be given the crazy boss. The weekend passed, Monday came, everyone said hey, "where's new assistant"?  I sat in the cube next to him. Tuesday: Hey, has anyone seen new assistant?  Wednesday: Someone should call new assistant...

It took the company two weeks to realize new assistant was never coming back.

Also at the same company:
-woman gives her resignation and two weeks notice in protest of them firing one of her friends. Over the next two weeks she files a major complaint with the BBB and gathers confidential info about the org which she then uses to start an "anonymous" blog criticizing the organization--it was well read amongst staff and the entire community of our work.
-man gets fired. deletes all of the files off of his computer before walking out. We had no system to deal with that... the files were literally just gone.

halftimer

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 79
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #406 on: December 09, 2014, 10:31:02 PM »
I have 2 related stories of being willing to end a job when the circumstances merited:
1. My long time office was moving to another city, and offered to fund my relocation with them. After considering all the options, I said no but helped train my replacement and accepted a lovely severance/parting package. I took a few months off without even looking for another job, then decided to try out temping.
2. The agency put me in a 'temp to hire' position that started off ok, but my coworkers were horrible. After a particularly bad day I realized there was no reason for me to continue. I called the agency and asked how much notice was needed to quit. "None" (Mental high-five!) But the next day when the agency relayed to the company that I would not be returning, the big boss asked for permission to contact me. I consented and explained why I didn't want to continue, then he explained that my coworkers were "known bullies" but that he planned to close that department in 2 months. They had not yet given the layoff notices, but if I was willing to keep that information confidential they wanted me to continue on during the transition, then afterwards in a better position. I admit it was a lovely feeling going back into work the day after that - having the bullies speculate on why I was not there the day before and then continue with their grumbling - while I smiled with the knowledge that they had 10 years tenure and were about to get rightfully fired, while I was invited to stay in a bought out contract. I continued with that job for a few years with advancing responsibilities and never regretted my early meeting with the boss at the time when I 'quit'.

jprince7827

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 148
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #407 on: December 10, 2014, 10:11:09 AM »
I have 2 related stories of being willing to end a job when the circumstances merited:
1. My long time office was moving to another city, and offered to fund my relocation with them. After considering all the options, I said no but helped train my replacement and accepted a lovely severance/parting package. I took a few months off without even looking for another job, then decided to try out temping.
2. The agency put me in a 'temp to hire' position that started off ok, but my coworkers were horrible. After a particularly bad day I realized there was no reason for me to continue. I called the agency and asked how much notice was needed to quit. "None" (Mental high-five!) But the next day when the agency relayed to the company that I would not be returning, the big boss asked for permission to contact me. I consented and explained why I didn't want to continue, then he explained that my coworkers were "known bullies" but that he planned to close that department in 2 months. They had not yet given the layoff notices, but if I was willing to keep that information confidential they wanted me to continue on during the transition, then afterwards in a better position. I admit it was a lovely feeling going back into work the day after that - having the bullies speculate on why I was not there the day before and then continue with their grumbling - while I smiled with the knowledge that they had 10 years tenure and were about to get rightfully fired, while I was invited to stay in a bought out contract. I continued with that job for a few years with advancing responsibilities and never regretted my early meeting with the boss at the time when I 'quit'.

Oh, that's just delicious. Well played, sir.

BlueHouse

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2574
  • Location: WDC
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #408 on: December 10, 2014, 02:05:17 PM »
Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.
When I was a college student working as a waitress, I thought it was so much fun!  I couldn't understand how or why the older servers had such negative attitudes or allowed the random bad customer to get under their skin.  Then I realized that the difference in attitudes was because I had choices in my life.  I was in college, working toward any number of better opportunities.  The older servers were single moms or people with no education, struggling to pay the rent or a kid's medical bill.  Not a lot of choice for them. 
While I'm sure you treat your employees with respect and dignity, not everyone does.  And it often seems that those who supervise the people with fewer choices are sometimes complete jerks. 

As I write this, I am remembering a certain Labor Day weekend where the restaurant manager tried to strong-arm me into working a single shift in the middle of the weekend, despite me giving notice weeks in advance that I wouldn't work that weekend.  I was able to say "no thanks" with the knowledge that it could get me sacked.  It didn't, but it did force the lady with kids to cancel her plans to cover the shifts.
 
Education or savings or plans = options=choice
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

Paul der Krake

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3598
  • Age: 9
  • Location: WA
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #409 on: December 10, 2014, 04:42:31 PM »
Unless you were kidnapped and forced into slave labor, an bad employment contract is by your choice and by your fault to a great extent. Staying longer than you like and sacrificing your ethics and work morale just for the paycheck (or maybe for your children's sake or what not) demonstrates that you were probably not worth hiring in the first place.
When I was a college student working as a waitress, I thought it was so much fun!  I couldn't understand how or why the older servers had such negative attitudes or allowed the random bad customer to get under their skin.  Then I realized that the difference in attitudes was because I had choices in my life.  I was in college, working toward any number of better opportunities.  The older servers were single moms or people with no education, struggling to pay the rent or a kid's medical bill.  Not a lot of choice for them. 
While I'm sure you treat your employees with respect and dignity, not everyone does.  And it often seems that those who supervise the people with fewer choices are sometimes complete jerks. 

As I write this, I am remembering a certain Labor Day weekend where the restaurant manager tried to strong-arm me into working a single shift in the middle of the weekend, despite me giving notice weeks in advance that I wouldn't work that weekend.  I was able to say "no thanks" with the knowledge that it could get me sacked.  It didn't, but it did force the lady with kids to cancel her plans to cover the shifts.
 
Education or savings or plans = options=choice
This is true for a lot of other, non-employment related things. It's a whole mindset and explains why many members of this board think that tinkering with their cars or going camping is fun.

iris lily

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2449
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #410 on: December 10, 2014, 08:10:44 PM »
...--it's not worth any professional consequences and it's not as important to me to prove my rightness by being mean.

It's not mean if it was truthful. That you had the position to say it (because you were skipping out the next day) was golden. Your colleague will forever remember that.

BlueHouse

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2574
  • Location: WDC
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #411 on: December 12, 2014, 12:07:16 PM »
I looked him in the eye and stated: You're a Dick.
I've been daydreaming about doing this all week long. I said it out loud about 100 times in my car.  problem is that I'm getting to my goal so much faster with this job than I would with another, so I'm going to have to suck it up a few more years.
I also started thinking that if I did this in front of a few witnesses and the guy really was being a dick, I bet he wouldn't say anything to get me fired either. If his behavior were called into question, I'm guessing he would be mortified for other people to know how he behaves. Anyway, this is my new exit strategy once the house is paid off. 
Thanks for making my day! 
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

vern

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 519
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #412 on: December 12, 2014, 08:00:37 PM »
"And what hurts is the steadily diminishing humanity of those fighting to hold jobs they don’t want but fear the alternative worse. People simply empty out. They are bodies with fearful and obedient minds. The color leaves the eye. The voice becomes ugly. And the body. The hair. The fingernails. The shoes. Everything does.

As a young man I could not believe that people could give their lives over to those conditions. As an old man, I still can’t believe it. What do they do it for? Sex? TV? An automobile on monthly payments? Or children? Children who are just going to do the same things that they did?

Early on, when I was quite young and going from job to job I was foolish enough to sometimes speak to my fellow workers: “Hey, the boss can come in here at any moment and lay all of us off, just like that, don’t you realize that?”

They would just look at me. I was posing something that they didn’t want to enter their minds.

Now in industry, there are vast layoffs (steel mills dead, technical changes in other factors of the work place). They are layed off by the hundreds of thousands and their faces are stunned:

“I put in 35 years…”

“It ain’t right…”

“I don’t know what to do…”

They never pay the slaves enough so they can get free, just enough so they can stay alive and come back to work. I could see all this. Why couldn’t they? I figured the park bench was just as good or being a barfly was just as good. Why not get there first before they put me there? Why wait?

I just wrote in disgust against it all, it was a relief to get the shit out of my system. And now that I’m here, a so-called professional writer, after giving the first 50 years away, I’ve found out that there are other disgusts beyond the system.

I remember once, working as a packer in this lighting fixture company, one of the packers suddenly said: “I’ll never be free!”

One of the bosses was walking by (his name was Morrie) and he let out this delicious cackle of a laugh, enjoying the fact that this fellow was trapped for life."

Bukowski
"Of my fifty-seven years I have applied at least thirty to forgetting most of what I had learned or read, and since I succeeded in this I have acquired a certain ease and cheer which I should never again like to be without."  World Chess Champion Emanuel Lasker

nancyjnelson

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 50
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #413 on: December 14, 2014, 12:32:35 PM »
Not an epic FU story - more like frugal habits = financial choices.  I worked for the Dept of State as a Foreign Service officer and really liked my job.  Although I was frequently transferred, I knew that if I didn't like either my supervisor or colleagues, either they or I would be moving on within a couple of years.  Then the world changed and the number of dangerous, unaccompanied tours soared.  The Dept instituted a policy of "fair-share" so that all of us would share the burden of these tours (there aren't many of us - there are fewer FSOs worldwide than full-time musicians with the U.S. Army bands).  I agreed with the policy, but I was a single mother with no one with whom I could have left my daughter.  Boarding school would have been provided, but all kids are different - and mine wouldn't have done well in that environment.  So, having reached the age of 50 with 25 years in, I retired.

My colleagues were taken aback when I told them I didn't plan on getting a full-time job afterwards (pension at age 50 is drastically reduced so most early "retirees" have another full-time job lined up before they take the plunge).  How was I going to survive?  This is where my frugal habits saved me.  While my colleagues had purchased nice houses in the suburbs when they started their careers, I had bought an 850 sq ft fixer-upper within a 5 minute walk to the metro and only one stop to DC.  In addition to saving time (I spent about 35 minutes a day commuting on public transport - my colleagues spent on average 2 1/2 hours), it saved money - $1.40 per trip, vs over $4.00.  When the real estate situation improved, I didn't upgrade.  I also didn't upgrade my 2-dr Toyota despite some urging (a couple of different colleagues actually took me aside and told me that my dented, 17 year old car wasn't part of the image that the U.S. Embassy wanted to project).

When I retired, I sold my house for triple for what I paid for it, moved to the midwest closer to my relatives, and bought a house for cash.  A year later I am working on my own web-based business - it doesn't make any money yet, but I can afford to do what I want.  It's a great feeling. 
« Last Edit: December 14, 2014, 12:35:03 PM by nancyjnelson »

Liberty Stache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 669
  • Location: Boston, Massachusetts
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #414 on: December 15, 2014, 02:48:04 PM »
Not an epic FU story - more like frugal habits = financial choices.  I worked for the Dept of State as a Foreign Service officer and really liked my job.  Although I was frequently transferred, I knew that if I didn't like either my supervisor or colleagues, either they or I would be moving on within a couple of years.  Then the world changed and the number of dangerous, unaccompanied tours soared.  The Dept instituted a policy of "fair-share" so that all of us would share the burden of these tours (there aren't many of us - there are fewer FSOs worldwide than full-time musicians with the U.S. Army bands).  I agreed with the policy, but I was a single mother with no one with whom I could have left my daughter.  Boarding school would have been provided, but all kids are different - and mine wouldn't have done well in that environment.  So, having reached the age of 50 with 25 years in, I retired.

My colleagues were taken aback when I told them I didn't plan on getting a full-time job afterwards (pension at age 50 is drastically reduced so most early "retirees" have another full-time job lined up before they take the plunge).  How was I going to survive?  This is where my frugal habits saved me.  While my colleagues had purchased nice houses in the suburbs when they started their careers, I had bought an 850 sq ft fixer-upper within a 5 minute walk to the metro and only one stop to DC.  In addition to saving time (I spent about 35 minutes a day commuting on public transport - my colleagues spent on average 2 1/2 hours), it saved money - $1.40 per trip, vs over $4.00.  When the real estate situation improved, I didn't upgrade.  I also didn't upgrade my 2-dr Toyota despite some urging (a couple of different colleagues actually took me aside and told me that my dented, 17 year old car wasn't part of the image that the U.S. Embassy wanted to project).

When I retired, I sold my house for triple for what I paid for it, moved to the midwest closer to my relatives, and bought a house for cash.  A year later I am working on my own web-based business - it doesn't make any money yet, but I can afford to do what I want.  It's a great feeling.

Outstanding. I love it.
"Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright" ~Benjamin Franklin, The Way to Wealth

RyanAtTanagra

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 842
  • Location: San Francisco, CA
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #415 on: December 15, 2014, 03:06:40 PM »
Not an epic FU story - more like frugal habits = financial choices.
...

Yep good example, FU ability isn't just about money.  It's about being aware you have options, having money being just one of the things that can provide you with an option.  Last time I job searched I realized how many options I have.  Having enough money to tide me over for a bit during a job search + knowing it wouldn't take that long to find something decent if I had to = 'FU money'.

Some peoples FU money limit is $0 because they know they can always get another job, even if it's a different job, which seems to be a freeing mindset that I'm envious of.

nawhite

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1021
  • Location: An RV somewhere in the West
    • The Reckless Choice
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #416 on: December 16, 2014, 09:46:26 AM »
Yep good example, FU ability isn't just about money.  It's about being aware you have options, having money being just one of the things that can provide you with an option.  Last time I job searched I realized how many options I have.  Having enough money to tide me over for a bit during a job search + knowing it wouldn't take that long to find something decent if I had to = 'FU money'.

Some peoples FU money limit is $0 because they know they can always get another job, even if it's a different job, which seems to be a freeing mindset that I'm envious of.

I agree with this assessment. I'm a big fan of "keep looking for better jobs constantly. There will eventually be something much better, you just have to be ready when it comes." I moved jobs a lot. I'd usually stick around for a year but because I had been looking for the whole year I had a very good idea of who was hiring and what I was worth. Having another job is freeing in the same way FU money is because it allows you to say "nope, you haven't been treating me the way I want to be treated, so I'm leaving."

When I found my current job (which I'm REALLY happy with) and gave notice at the old one, I was able to say: "you dropped the Employee Stock Purchase Plan this year which is worth over $10k per year to me. Without a big salary increase, you aren't that competitive anymore. Oh and the new company lets me work from home full time." Probably a slightly different feeling than true FU money, but having another job lined up gives you a lot of the same freedom.
We live in an RV full time while still working remotely. Check it out at http://therecklesschoice.com

mtn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1265
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #417 on: December 16, 2014, 10:54:18 AM »
My “FU” story really isn’t much of one, and it hasn’t been completed yet. I accepted a position with a different company—more money, for the most part better benefits, and hopefully a better situation in terms of the work environment. I’m only giving a week of notice because I need to be employed on the 1st of the year—I get 4 extra days of vacation paid out, and the 401k match. I’m sorely tempted to leave sooner, or take a sick day or two in that week, but I don’t want to burn any bridges. I cannot wait to get out of here though, and if they start treating me poorly during that last week, I’ll just walk out. I’ll have everything out of my desk by then, so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).

CommonCents

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2396
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #418 on: December 17, 2014, 01:03:22 PM »
My “FU” story really isn’t much of one, and it hasn’t been completed yet. I accepted a position with a different company—more money, for the most part better benefits, and hopefully a better situation in terms of the work environment. I’m only giving a week of notice because I need to be employed on the 1st of the year—I get 4 extra days of vacation paid out, and the 401k match. I’m sorely tempted to leave sooner, or take a sick day or two in that week, but I don’t want to burn any bridges. I cannot wait to get out of here though, and if they start treating me poorly during that last week, I’ll just walk out. I’ll have everything out of my desk by then, so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).

If you know now, why not give notice now?  That'd make 2 weeks notice (which is fairly standard) rather than 1 and help to not burn bridges as you say you don't wish to do?

Holyoak

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 249
  • Age: 51
  • Location: W. PA
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #419 on: December 17, 2014, 01:45:29 PM »
Quote
FU money isn't so you can treat your employer poorly, it's so you don't have to put up with your employer treating YOU poorly.  Before getting into personal finance I was in debt and broke feeling stuck working for a shitty company and a shitty boss.

Yep, 100%.  How about this for a company and boss; he even signed it:



My FU money story was I was getting sick of one of the pilots being a total dick to me, and the other workers...  Rolling eyes, racial/religious comments, completely crap attitude and treatment to us 'lessers" who service/fuel the aircraft.  I did the gig to stay busy, and was fully FI at the time. One day I walked right up to him with nearly every employee present, and told him:

"You're a fucking punk", got the "what did you say", to which I repeated the same, and the boss/owner told me to go home and not return.  I did just that, filed and won my unemployment comp claim, despite the owner/boss stating to the UC committee that he felt I was going to punch a-hole and had witnesses (total lie, playing I got nothing better than to pull the workplace violence card).  Funny too when I reported my initial claim, I was flatly denied because it showed I had two entire quarters of no wages...  Seems douchebag was not reporting my earnings to the state!!!  What a dishonest asshat, and I hope they/IRS nailed him for it.

How sweet it felt to draw a $92/week unemployment check, knowing it made a-holes head explode.

Bikeguy

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 116
  • Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #420 on: December 17, 2014, 04:59:19 PM »


so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).

I don't think so.   Had a coworker give two weeks notice before Christmas.   You had to work the first day of the next year to get profit sharing.   He said he was quitting Jan 2.  Got a certified letter stating" Thanks for letting us know you want to quit.   Your last day is Dec 23".  Cost him $17K.

If you're FI, why are you still selling days of your life?  You only have so many, and if you have enough money, you're trading them for something you don't need.

mtn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1265
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #421 on: December 18, 2014, 06:20:07 AM »
My “FU” story really isn’t much of one, and it hasn’t been completed yet. I accepted a position with a different company—more money, for the most part better benefits, and hopefully a better situation in terms of the work environment. I’m only giving a week of notice because I need to be employed on the 1st of the year—I get 4 extra days of vacation paid out, and the 401k match. I’m sorely tempted to leave sooner, or take a sick day or two in that week, but I don’t want to burn any bridges. I cannot wait to get out of here though, and if they start treating me poorly during that last week, I’ll just walk out. I’ll have everything out of my desk by then, so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).

If you know now, why not give notice now?  That'd make 2 weeks notice (which is fairly standard) rather than 1 and help to not burn bridges as you say you don't wish to do?

If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first. Basically, this:



so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).

I don't think so.   Had a coworker give two weeks notice before Christmas.   You had to work the first day of the next year to get profit sharing.   He said he was quitting Jan 2.  Got a certified letter stating" Thanks for letting us know you want to quit.   Your last day is Dec 23".  Cost him $17K.

But for that point, it is in our HR manual that if we resign and they have us leave earlier, they are to pay us for either 2 weeks or through the date we give, whichever is less.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2014, 06:21:59 AM by mtn »

plainjane

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1248
    • Join us at CM*TO - enter the bunk lottery!
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #422 on: December 18, 2014, 07:07:19 AM »
If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first.

It's very odd that you would get 4 days accrued based on just one more week of work.  Generally one accrues vacation at a steady rate throughout the year.

In my industry people talk, so giving only a week of notice would be a CLM overall, not just if you wanted to go back to the original company.  Really think this through.

so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).
I don't think so.   Had a coworker give two weeks notice before Christmas.   You had to work the first day of the next year to get profit sharing.   He said he was quitting Jan 2.  Got a certified letter stating" Thanks for letting us know you want to quit.   Your last day is Dec 23".  Cost him $17K.
But for that point, it is in our HR manual that if we resign and they have us leave earlier, they are to pay us for either 2 weeks or through the date we give, whichever is less.
[/quote]

In almost every region you need to be paid out the two weeks (or whatever your minimum notice is), but they have absolutely no reason to pay you out a bonus after you have said you are leaving, even if it was previously established you'd be getting one.  Salary and bonus/profit sharing are two very separate things.  Make sure any bonus you're expecting is dropped into your account before you give notice.
Using procrastination to my advantage since 2001.

Philociraptor

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 794
  • Age: 28
  • Location: DFW, TX
  • FIRE Deadline: May 2029
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #423 on: December 18, 2014, 07:14:15 AM »
If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first.

It's very odd that you would get 4 days accrued based on just one more week of work.  Generally one accrues vacation at a steady rate throughout the year.

In my industry people talk, so giving only a week of notice would be a CLM overall, not just if you wanted to go back to the original company.  Really think this through.

so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).
I don't think so.   Had a coworker give two weeks notice before Christmas.   You had to work the first day of the next year to get profit sharing.   He said he was quitting Jan 2.  Got a certified letter stating" Thanks for letting us know you want to quit.   Your last day is Dec 23".  Cost him $17K.
But for that point, it is in our HR manual that if we resign and they have us leave earlier, they are to pay us for either 2 weeks or through the date we give, whichever is less.

In almost every region you need to be paid out the two weeks (or whatever your minimum notice is), but they have absolutely no reason to pay you out a bonus after you have said you are leaving, even if it was previously established you'd be getting one.  Salary and bonus/profit sharing are two very separate things.  Make sure any bonus you're expecting is dropped into your account before you give notice.

And this is why if I get a new job I won't be giving notice until Jan 1.

« Last Edit: December 18, 2014, 07:51:11 AM by Philociraptor »

mtn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1265
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #424 on: December 18, 2014, 07:47:21 AM »
If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first.

It's very odd that you would get 4 days accrued based on just one more week of work.  Generally one accrues vacation at a steady rate throughout the year.

In my industry people talk, so giving only a week of notice would be a CLM overall, not just if you wanted to go back to the original company.  Really think this through.

so I hope that they just tell me to leave that day (they’d have to pay me through the date I give).
I don't think so.   Had a coworker give two weeks notice before Christmas.   You had to work the first day of the next year to get profit sharing.   He said he was quitting Jan 2.  Got a certified letter stating" Thanks for letting us know you want to quit.   Your last day is Dec 23".  Cost him $17K.
But for that point, it is in our HR manual that if we resign and they have us leave earlier, they are to pay us for either 2 weeks or through the date we give, whichever is less.

In almost every region you need to be paid out the two weeks (or whatever your minimum notice is), but they have absolutely no reason to pay you out a bonus after you have said you are leaving, even if it was previously established you'd be getting one.  Salary and bonus/profit sharing are two very separate things.  Make sure any bonus you're expecting is dropped into your account before you give notice.
[/quote]

I think you're missing/mis-interpretting some of this:
  • My new job starts January 12. My last day at my current job will be January 9, unless they tell me to leave earlier.
  • If they tell me to leave earlier, they have to pay me what I would have earned for either a. Two Weeks, or b. through the date I gave. This is in the HR manual, their own policy.
  • If I gave them a 2 week notice, they could show me the door on December 30th and I would be paid through January 9th. I would not get my 401k match, nor would I get my accrued vacation.
  • My accrued vacation is actually 1 day of accrued vacation, and 3 floating Holidays that are disperssed on the 1st. These are mine, and I will be paid for them, again, per the HR manual.
  • There will be no bonus. I am missing that by a few months.


eyePod

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 967
    • Flipping A Dollar
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #425 on: December 18, 2014, 12:52:26 PM »
Quote
She demanded two weeks notice, which still included me missing class to come to work.  I said, nope!  I could not believe that I didn't get fired for mouthing off to her.

Wow, she was a moron.  I think my response to that would have been "Okay, you drive a hard bargain, M'am, so even though I just quit, my last day will actually be two weeks from today instead of tonight.  And you are right:  I will be here on Tuesdays as well."  Then I would just have never come back. 

I find myself explaining the concept of "Nobody HAS TO do ANYTHING when it comes to a job" to people on a regular basis.  We've had more than one person just stop showing up, or email a resignation letter while they are on vacation (with the last day of work conveniently falling on a future date that they are still on vacation), or agree to take on a big project and then turn around and put an "I resign effective immediately" letter under the boss's door after hours, yet somehow the illusion that people have to keep coming into the office until they are given permission to leave persists.

I felt bad about my situation at my previous company but it's similar to this. Terrible morale, tough work that requires a lot of off-shift. No opportunities to move up whatsoever. Layoffs abound and all the top performers left to mop up. Plus there were tons of reorganizations (I went from one manager in 3.5 years to have that one plus 3 new ones in one year, and not due to performance). My wife got an internship in another state and once she accepted, I started looking. We've moved, I got a job before her start time, I got a bigger pay increase than I've ever had, and I'm doing much more satisfying work with a better schedule.

I did kind of blame my wife for it all, but the thing that made it tough was I got the offer 2 weeks after a round of layoffs. If I knew I was going to get it, I could have left, taken a severance, and saved someone else from getting laid off. But I guess that's the way the cookie crumbles.
I blog on items flipped for a profit on eBay:
Flipping A Dollar

I made 6.5k in profits in 2015!

Sibley

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2132
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Chicago, IL
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #426 on: December 19, 2014, 12:14:56 PM »
Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville

While larger rounds incapacitate a target more reliably than the smaller 5.56, they are also much heavier to hump over the mountains. Being able to lay down a more ferocious volume of fire can be well worth the decrease in stopping power, especially when you have encountered a frisky opponent. Utilize your SAW gunner to suppress incoming fire, while your assault team maneuvers to better overrun the enemy position. If bounding proves difficult, remember, 5.56 can penetrate cover like Swiss cheese, although you will still be prudent to continuously engage targets until all teams have swept the objective area.

Also, utilizing air and artillery support can shorten the effort, along with conserving your ammo. Definitely remember to sweep the kill zone afterward to eliminate survivors or take captives, mission depending. Once area is swept and the reports sent up, hopefully you can CM.

Or maybe you snore/steal blankets/thrash around/something else equally annoying in your sleep and she's tired of it.

frugalnacho

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2864
  • Age: 34
  • Location: Madison Heights, Michigan
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #427 on: December 19, 2014, 12:25:11 PM »
Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville

While larger rounds incapacitate a target more reliably than the smaller 5.56, they are also much heavier to hump over the mountains. Being able to lay down a more ferocious volume of fire can be well worth the decrease in stopping power, especially when you have encountered a frisky opponent. Utilize your SAW gunner to suppress incoming fire, while your assault team maneuvers to better overrun the enemy position. If bounding proves difficult, remember, 5.56 can penetrate cover like Swiss cheese, although you will still be prudent to continuously engage targets until all teams have swept the objective area.

Also, utilizing air and artillery support can shorten the effort, along with conserving your ammo. Definitely remember to sweep the kill zone afterward to eliminate survivors or take captives, mission depending. Once area is swept and the reports sent up, hopefully you can CM.

Or maybe you snore/steal blankets/thrash around/something else equally annoying in your sleep and she's tired of it.

I've been pitching the separate beds idea for awhile but my wife won't go for it.  It's nice to have that special someone there...but it definitely lowers my quality of sleep.  A nice comfortable bed to myself is so much better, and I sleep so much better when I am alone. 

Pooperman

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2702
  • Age: 27
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #428 on: December 19, 2014, 01:07:28 PM »
Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville

While larger rounds incapacitate a target more reliably than the smaller 5.56, they are also much heavier to hump over the mountains. Being able to lay down a more ferocious volume of fire can be well worth the decrease in stopping power, especially when you have encountered a frisky opponent. Utilize your SAW gunner to suppress incoming fire, while your assault team maneuvers to better overrun the enemy position. If bounding proves difficult, remember, 5.56 can penetrate cover like Swiss cheese, although you will still be prudent to continuously engage targets until all teams have swept the objective area.

Also, utilizing air and artillery support can shorten the effort, along with conserving your ammo. Definitely remember to sweep the kill zone afterward to eliminate survivors or take captives, mission depending. Once area is swept and the reports sent up, hopefully you can CM.

Or maybe you snore/steal blankets/thrash around/something else equally annoying in your sleep and she's tired of it.

I've been pitching the separate beds idea for awhile but my wife won't go for it.  It's nice to have that special someone there...but it definitely lowers my quality of sleep.  A nice comfortable bed to myself is so much better, and I sleep so much better when I am alone.

Have you tried separate blankets? It helps a lot.

Sibley

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2132
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Chicago, IL
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #429 on: December 19, 2014, 01:19:42 PM »
Dear Navy SEAL,

I am a happily married man with a warm and loving wife who is also my best friend. We've been together for 17 years and couldn't be happier. But lately she says she wants separate beds. I'm reeling! We're barely in our 40s, and in my mind separate sleeping is for seniors. Am I making too much of this? Help!

—Anxious In Andersonville

While larger rounds incapacitate a target more reliably than the smaller 5.56, they are also much heavier to hump over the mountains. Being able to lay down a more ferocious volume of fire can be well worth the decrease in stopping power, especially when you have encountered a frisky opponent. Utilize your SAW gunner to suppress incoming fire, while your assault team maneuvers to better overrun the enemy position. If bounding proves difficult, remember, 5.56 can penetrate cover like Swiss cheese, although you will still be prudent to continuously engage targets until all teams have swept the objective area.

Also, utilizing air and artillery support can shorten the effort, along with conserving your ammo. Definitely remember to sweep the kill zone afterward to eliminate survivors or take captives, mission depending. Once area is swept and the reports sent up, hopefully you can CM.

Or maybe you snore/steal blankets/thrash around/something else equally annoying in your sleep and she's tired of it.

I've been pitching the separate beds idea for awhile but my wife won't go for it.  It's nice to have that special someone there...but it definitely lowers my quality of sleep.  A nice comfortable bed to myself is so much better, and I sleep so much better when I am alone.

Have you tried separate blankets? It helps a lot.

I know multiple happy couples, various ages, that always or frequently have separate beds. One couple has 2 twin beds pushed up against each other, separate sheets/blankets. Works great for them - one bed is soft, the other is hard as a rock apparently.

Bikeguy

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 116
  • Location: Ann Arbor, MI
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #430 on: December 19, 2014, 02:07:32 PM »


If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first.

It's very odd that you would get 4 days accrued based on just one more week of work.  Generally one accrues vacation at a steady rate throughout the year.

In my industry,  vacation is accrued quarterly.   Sounds like the same policy.

If you're FI, why are you still selling days of your life?  You only have so many, and if you have enough money, you're trading them for something you don't need.

jordanread

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6325
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Colorado Springs
  • Live Long, Live Free, Drop Dead
    • Frugal FIRE Show
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #431 on: December 19, 2014, 02:10:06 PM »
If I give 2 weeks now, they could release me on December 30th and I'd be out my 401k match and 4 more days of accrued vacation. That amounts to a little more than I'd like to kiss goodbye; especially since I don't expect to ever come back here (although wouldn't be against it). I have to look out for myself first.

It's very odd that you would get 4 days accrued based on just one more week of work.  Generally one accrues vacation at a steady rate throughout the year.

In my industry,  vacation is accrued quarterly.   Sounds like the same policy.

Ah, but vacation is different from Floating Holidays. That's what I get. First of the year, 4 days...the remaining 15 days get accrued over the year.
Join the cycling challenge!
Get in shape in 2017!
Frugal FIRE - Episode 2

"Mustachians rarely sit back and let things happen to them. Mustachians go out and happen to things."

CM*TO - Ticket Lottery

plainjane

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1248
    • Join us at CM*TO - enter the bunk lottery!
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #432 on: December 20, 2014, 06:18:49 AM »
Ah, but vacation is different from Floating Holidays. That's what I get. First of the year, 4 days...the remaining 15 days get accrued over the year.

And they pay you out for floating holidays?  I thought that was the point of companies doing floating holidays, that they weren't bound by vacation day rules.  (I've never worked at a place that had floating holidays)
Using procrastination to my advantage since 2001.

RWD

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1631
  • Location: Mississippi
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #433 on: December 20, 2014, 08:37:55 AM »
Ah, but vacation is different from Floating Holidays. That's what I get. First of the year, 4 days...the remaining 15 days get accrued over the year.

And they pay you out for floating holidays?  I thought that was the point of companies doing floating holidays, that they weren't bound by vacation day rules.  (I've never worked at a place that had floating holidays)

At my company the floating holidays are just arbitrary days during the year that the company has designated a day off that wouldn't otherwise be considered a holiday. This is usually used to give us a longer weekend when a normal single day holiday lands on a Tuesday or Thursday. For example, we always get January 1st off, but for 2015 we are also getting a floating holiday on January 2nd so that we don't have to come in on just one day before the weekend.

jordanread

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6325
  • Age: 32
  • Location: Colorado Springs
  • Live Long, Live Free, Drop Dead
    • Frugal FIRE Show
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #434 on: December 20, 2014, 10:36:13 AM »
Ah, but vacation is different from Floating Holidays. That's what I get. First of the year, 4 days...the remaining 15 days get accrued over the year.

And they pay you out for floating holidays?  I thought that was the point of companies doing floating holidays, that they weren't bound by vacation day rules.  (I've never worked at a place that had floating holidays)

At my company the floating holidays are just arbitrary days during the year that the company has designated a day off that wouldn't otherwise be considered a holiday. This is usually used to give us a longer weekend when a normal single day holiday lands on a Tuesday or Thursday. For example, we always get January 1st off, but for 2015 we are also getting a floating holiday on January 2nd so that we don't have to come in on just one day before the weekend.
Every place I've had floating holidays they are just like vacation days. They are paid, and can be scheduled whenever. And are bought back the same way when you quit.

« Last Edit: December 20, 2014, 10:53:55 AM by jordanread »
Join the cycling challenge!
Get in shape in 2017!
Frugal FIRE - Episode 2

"Mustachians rarely sit back and let things happen to them. Mustachians go out and happen to things."

CM*TO - Ticket Lottery

Kansas Beachbum

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 181
  • Location: Kansas City Metro
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #435 on: December 21, 2014, 08:02:52 AM »
The Mrs. KBB and I both, without hesitation, jumped on a voluntary separation offer put out by our employer...this is the one where they take volunteers before laying off several hundred more who didn't volunteer to get to "the number" they need.  A combination of a pretty generous separation package and a substantial stache made this a no brainer decision for us.  No hard feelings towards the company as it has been very good to us over the years, just time to move on...and having the resources put back that we do made this entirely a lifestyle decision as opposed to a financial one.  Happily unemployed for a couple weeks now.  Cheers all!
At a moment like this I can't help but wonder...what would Jimmy Buffett do?

Nords

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3009
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Oahu
    • Military Retirement & Financial Independence blog
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #436 on: December 21, 2014, 10:50:50 AM »
I'll reiterate the story of a poster from Early-Retirement.org about 8-10 years ago.

He'd been pursuing financial independence for years, and was putting the finishing touches on his plan.  He'd tried to discuss FI with his co-workers years before but they weren't receptive and he'd since kept it all a secret.  I don't think he had a pension but he'd saved diligently in his company 401(k) and his IRA and he had everything ready to go.  He'd already contributed to the stereotypical thread on "How much notice should I give when I quit my job?" and had concluded that he only owed his employer the absolute minimum required by the HR rules.  He'd already prepped his turnover checklist and his training handbook, although he wasn't particularly worried about a contact relief.  He'd even figured out how best to replicate his company-issued laptop (on the cheap) so that he'd start ER with familiar computer gear.

Just a few days before he was ready to give notice, the company had a round of "surprise" layoffs.  (Surprise to most of the employees, not so surprising to most of management.)  He was met at the door by an HR rep, escorted to his boss' office, given the "bad" news, and then escorted to clean out his desk.  He was given a generous severance package and even told that he could keep his company-issued laptop.  He was outta there before lunch.

He said the hardest part of the layoff was keeping a straight face and taking it all seriously.  Inside, of course, he was doing the engineer's happy dance...
Author of "The Military Guide to Financial Independence and Retirement".   All royalties (and writing revenue) donated to military charities.
I don't read every post, so please PM or e-mail me to get my attention...

Wolf_Stache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 933
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Portland
    • Flower's Fang
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #437 on: December 22, 2014, 01:06:01 PM »
I'll reiterate the story of a poster from Early-Retirement.org about 8-10 years ago.

He'd been pursuing financial independence for years, and was putting the finishing touches on his plan.  He'd tried to discuss FI with his co-workers years before but they weren't receptive and he'd since kept it all a secret.  I don't think he had a pension but he'd saved diligently in his company 401(k) and his IRA and he had everything ready to go.  He'd already contributed to the stereotypical thread on "How much notice should I give when I quit my job?" and had concluded that he only owed his employer the absolute minimum required by the HR rules.  He'd already prepped his turnover checklist and his training handbook, although he wasn't particularly worried about a contact relief.  He'd even figured out how best to replicate his company-issued laptop (on the cheap) so that he'd start ER with familiar computer gear.

Just a few days before he was ready to give notice, the company had a round of "surprise" layoffs.  (Surprise to most of the employees, not so surprising to most of management.)  He was met at the door by an HR rep, escorted to his boss' office, given the "bad" news, and then escorted to clean out his desk.  He was given a generous severance package and even told that he could keep his company-issued laptop.  He was outta there before lunch.

He said the hardest part of the layoff was keeping a straight face and taking it all seriously.  Inside, of course, he was doing the engineer's happy dance...

That is awesome. Thanks for sharing.

hred17

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 20
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #438 on: December 23, 2014, 03:29:52 AM »
My story is not quite as dramatic as some and it certainly was not planned as an "FU - I'm outta here!" type of scenario (although I had dreamed of it many times!).

Years ago I was working for the corporate arm of a computer retailer. I had been hired into the HR department and worked for a horrid, horrid, woman. Over the course of the 16 months I worked there, she proceeded to eliminate almost the entire HR generalist team. I ended up taking on the jobs of what had previously been done by six people. My boss always took credit for things I had done, used to not-so-subtly threaten me if I dared to mention her three-hour lunch breaks to anyone senior, etc, etc. The icing on the cake was that I spent my own money and time to get an advanced HR certification for which I had been promised a relevant increase in salary when I completed it. Needless to say, that did not happen.

I was desperate to quit but had not had time to start looking for another job and didn't have as much money saved as I wanted to feel 100% ok leaving without another job lined up. I was so miserable, and lo and behold, I came down with a very nasty case of the flu. This was the week of Thanksgiving. I was off sick from work on the Tuesday and Wednesday (the only non-vacation time off I ever took the whole time I worked there) and then spent the rest of the holiday weekend sick in bed.

Quite randomly, on the Tuesday of that same week (my first day sick at home) I got a phone call from a former colleague about a job opening and was fast tracked through an interview process. I had an offer by the end of the Thanksgiving weekend (it was a start-up so things moved fast and all of my interviews were done via conference calls and references).

On the Monday after Thanksgiving, I went into my bosses office to hand in my two-week notice. She completely flipped out (I think she realized how screwed she was going to be once I left). She proceeded to start yelling at me, accused me of lying about being sick so I could interview (not true), blah, blah, blah.

I calmly stood there during her rant and then asked her when she stopped yelling "if she was done?". She just stared at me. I proceeded to hand her my doctors note from the previous week (the look on her face was priceless) and then told her "that she did not deserve my two weeks and my notice was now effective immediately." I grabbed my purse off my desk and walked out.

Financially, things were a bit tight for a bit but it was the BEST feeling in the whole world to leave that day. I started my new job three weeks later and am still in the same industry today, 12 years later.

Lesson learned? ALWAYS have FU money. :)
« Last Edit: December 23, 2014, 03:38:01 AM by hred17 »

Workinghard

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #439 on: December 23, 2014, 04:06:24 AM »
It's so much fun reading these stories although I doubt if I'd have the ahem, balls, to do some of them but then maybe again I would.

I'm not sure if this counts or not. I gave my notice six weeks ago. Many times during those six weeks I regretted it and wished I had given two weeks notice, but I wanted to help out over the holidays. I guess because I didn't want to burn my bridges it's not truly an FU story. Anyway, after I gave my notice I did not hear from anyone as to whether or not they would like to have me work per diem. I like the work I do and I like the company. I just don't like be treated as an indentured servant.

The owner of the company texts me occasionally and he's the type a person you can speak frankly with. I did share about the indentured servant feeling. Haha. Recently he asked if I would take a VIP pt. It fell on my day off but I agreed to do so. This was after there was an issue with another patient, who didn't like her nurse, and he asked if I go out there and smooth things over which I did.

Anyway, during the course of different texts, I commented that even though I would no longer be full-time I would still like to work for the company if they were interested in having me. I also gave the names of two people I had spoken with but received no response from. He said it was a given that they still wanted me and they would love to have me continue to see their patients. He apologized for that not been communicated to me. The next day I was called into the office by the two people who had not responded to me previously to discuss my hours when I go Per-diem.

I'm sure they think I am the teachers pet, but over the course of three years he has learned that I go that extra mile with my patients. I will visit them in the hospital, help those that can't drive to doctor appointments, send family sympathy cards when one dies, etc. This is all on my own time because I truly care about the people.

More than likely, my weekly hours will probably be the same, but I can take off when I want to take off, confine my route to in-county, and shorter distances, and have control over how many patients I'm willing to see in a day. No more 16 hour days to get my paperwork done. Although I will lose the vacation time, the 15 days is well worth it for the control factor.

RyanAtTanagra

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 842
  • Location: San Francisco, CA
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #440 on: December 23, 2014, 10:56:10 AM »
I'm not sure if this counts or not...

Not so much an FU story but a good reminder that sometimes being a good person and a good employee can be just as worthwhile in getting what you want at work :-)

Workinghard

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 637
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #441 on: December 23, 2014, 02:00:41 PM »
I'm not sure if this counts or not...

Not so much an FU story but a good reminder that sometimes being a good person and a good employee can be just as worthwhile in getting what you want at work :-)

True..even if I have to quit to get what I want. Lol.

Taran Wanderer

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 479
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #442 on: January 03, 2015, 10:49:00 PM »
.
"Incidentally, ten years ago I thought I wanted a Mercedes. Now I just want a nap and a cup of coffee."
  - Kashmani in Defining 'Rich'

Prairie Gal

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 819
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #443 on: January 04, 2015, 09:20:17 AM »

JLee

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3988
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #444 on: January 04, 2015, 10:34:25 AM »
Yep good example, FU ability isn't just about money.  It's about being aware you have options, having money being just one of the things that can provide you with an option.  Last time I job searched I realized how many options I have.  Having enough money to tide me over for a bit during a job search + knowing it wouldn't take that long to find something decent if I had to = 'FU money'.

Some peoples FU money limit is $0 because they know they can always get another job, even if it's a different job, which seems to be a freeing mindset that I'm envious of.

I agree with this assessment. I'm a big fan of "keep looking for better jobs constantly. There will eventually be something much better, you just have to be ready when it comes." I moved jobs a lot. I'd usually stick around for a year but because I had been looking for the whole year I had a very good idea of who was hiring and what I was worth. Having another job is freeing in the same way FU money is because it allows you to say "nope, you haven't been treating me the way I want to be treated, so I'm leaving."

When I found my current job (which I'm REALLY happy with) and gave notice at the old one, I was able to say: "you dropped the Employee Stock Purchase Plan this year which is worth over $10k per year to me. Without a big salary increase, you aren't that competitive anymore. Oh and the new company lets me work from home full time." Probably a slightly different feeling than true FU money, but having another job lined up gives you a lot of the same freedom.
Yup. I don't have something else lined up right now, but I am confident I could find something. I was talking to a coworker about a two week vacation I have planned in May, and I mentioned if it doesn't get approved I'll just go find another job.  Her jaw dropped. :P

viper155

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 258
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #445 on: January 04, 2015, 10:53:43 AM »
I am in, kind of in my second career. I work for two reasons. To cash flow my kids college tuition and because I like to work. Recently I have amassed enough to pay all the tuitions in cash and I have a nice stash of FU money and a  great passive income. I am grateful. My business can get very tense. It is the entertainment business so there are a lot of ego issues. On this last job which lasted 3 months and ended a couple of weeks ago I casually mentioned to my work friends that I was in total FU mode. I worked and walked around like I did not have a care in the world. Everyone knew why including the ball breaking bosses. It was priceless the way that they dealt with me just because they, and everyone, knew of the position I was in. All the guys were just waiting for me to explode and tell people where to go but, like another poster here said, it's better just to have the card up your sleeve and play it to the hilt. Good luck to everyone on this quest!

h2ogal

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 224
  • Location: FingerLakes
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #446 on: January 11, 2015, 11:56:27 AM »
This thread is the ultimate illustration of why Financial Independence is so crucial to living a fulfilling and happy life!

Once you have some financial strength, you never have to let yourself be driven to the point where you feel you must say "FU!".   
 
You don't have to take months of abuse before you quit in exasperation.....   You don't have to do anything you feel is unethical...... You never have to betray your own soul by staying in a position that is unhealthy and stressful...

Being financially independent means you go to work voluntarily, conduct yourself with dignity, show compassion to your co-workers and subordinates, and negotiate from a position of strength.   

I don't think you don't need a massive stache built up to do this....Just a reasonable emergency fund, confidence in your own worth, and marketable skills.  Dual incomes, low expenses and a little bravery goes a long way too.

taylor044

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 2
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #447 on: January 11, 2015, 02:24:30 PM »
Loved reading this thread. For my budget, I renamed my emergency fund category to FU... in all capital letters.

JCfire

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 145
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #448 on: January 12, 2015, 08:25:23 AM »
This thread is the ultimate illustration of why Financial Independence is so crucial to living a fulfilling and happy life!

Once you have some financial strength, you never have to let yourself be driven to the point where you feel you must say "FU!".   
 
You don't have to take months of abuse before you quit in exasperation.....   You don't have to do anything you feel is unethical...... You never have to betray your own soul by staying in a position that is unhealthy and stressful...

Being financially independent means you go to work voluntarily, conduct yourself with dignity, show compassion to your co-workers and subordinates, and negotiate from a position of strength.   

I don't think you don't need a massive stache built up to do this....Just a reasonable emergency fund, confidence in your own worth, and marketable skills.  Dual incomes, low expenses and a little bravery goes a long way too.

This thread makes me acutely feel my lack of FU money.  I work in a small industry with few possible employers, I am excellent at my work, and a 2014 change at my company made me wish for FU money for at least the last six months.  Reading these stories makes me that much more determined that this the last time I'll have that feeling.

tyler1215

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 39
Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #449 on: January 24, 2015, 07:56:59 PM »
I don't have an FU story but after this past week, I want to get to that point more than ever.

I work as an engineer and about six months ago we hired another "engineer". I use the quotes because he does not have an engineering degree, just tons of experience from being out in the field. This past week we had a piece of equipment that had failed in the field and has been replaced three time prior by an exact copy but new piece of equipment each time. The "engineer" had called for it to be replaced again and I told the field guys to leave it until someone proves the equipment is truly defective, and not actually miscoordinating. The "engineer" sent me an email and included the guys in my group as well. He asked me to explain to him why I superseded his judgement. Side note, he and I are the same level and pay but he is twice my age. With FU money, I would be able to respond back with "please find attached a copy of MY engineering degree for your reference. If you need further explanation, please note the PE initials following my name. They roughly translate to I am the expert!"

Until the moment I have FU money, I have to bite my tongue and play the politics to keep building up my FU fund. Or wait two years when I'm the engineering manager and then he'll be thinking twice about what he says.