Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 1844997 times)

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3750 on: March 29, 2021, 11:11:00 AM »
I think he should contact BOTH the environmental dept for hazmat dumping AND the labor board for non-payment.   Let his prior employer decide whether he wants to own up to the hazmat dumping and pay those fines or claim the coins aren't from him and PAY THE WAGES AGAIN.

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SwordGuy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3751 on: March 29, 2021, 01:25:55 PM »
I think he should contact BOTH the environmental dept for hazmat dumping AND the labor board for non-payment.   Let his prior employer decide whether he wants to own up to the hazmat dumping and pay those fines or claim the coins aren't from him and PAY THE WAGES AGAIN.

I like the way you think

You know, if he had just been paid in pennies that would be bad enough.   Petty and vile.  And if this fellow NEEDED that money right away to pay his rent or buy food it would have been even worse.

But coating the coins in hazmat liquids is beyond petty and vile.  It is absolutely worthy of retaliation.

FYI, the fellow should keep the dirty liquid he's using to wash off the pennies with.   If the employer decides to acknowledge that those were the wages, the employee return that skanky water in said wheelbarrow to his old employer because he, the employee, is an honest fellow and doesn't want to be paid anything he wasn't owed.   Of course, the wheelbarrow is so unwieldy, what with the wheels flattened from the weight of the pennies; it would be a shame if he accidentally spilled the liquid all over the lobby.

SwordGuy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3752 on: March 29, 2021, 01:27:30 PM »
After all, he wouldn't want to be accused of taking office supplies home with him!

At times like these it's important to keep the moral high ground, especially when the lower ground is flooded with skanky, oily water.

LennStar

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3753 on: March 30, 2021, 05:20:40 AM »
Not office supplies, work material.

People on the internet are talking about the employer who sent a man his final paycheck in the form of "motor-fluid-covered pennies"

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/25/business/auto-shop-pennies.html

The employer's quote about how he "cannot remember" if he dropped off five hundred pounds of pennies somewhere is breath-taking.
As later written in the article (contrary the the first fat paragraph) even after Trump this is likely an environmental protection law violation. Was my first thought.

But I think it is interesting that there is no rule regarding to the form of payment.
How is it in the US? In Germany shops don't have to accept bills above 100€ (for small amounts) or heaps of cents. It should also go the other way.

Saying that, maybe someone wants to pay for his next repair in pennies? Securely deposited inside a block of concrete.

I think he should contact BOTH the environmental dept for hazmat dumping AND the labor board for non-payment.   Let his prior employer decide whether he wants to own up to the hazmat dumping and pay those fines or claim the coins aren't from him and PAY THE WAGES AGAIN.

I like the way you think

Me too.

AlanStache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3754 on: March 30, 2021, 08:54:12 AM »
I just looked it up and in the US you can pay your federal taxes in cash at various gas and continent stations; if you showed up at 7-11 with a bucket of oil covered pennies to pay your 500$ tax bill (or to buy a cup of coffee) the clerk would tell you to pound sand.  Cash has utility for two reasons 1) we all agree to use it, 2) you can pay our taxes with it.  Oil covered pennies fail both those marks so I think you could make a case that he was not paid.  The point of money is to be a usable intermediate unit for exchange.  IANAL and all that...

NumberJohnny5

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3755 on: March 30, 2021, 09:58:37 AM »
The last time I looked this up (it's been a while), the technicality was that US currency was to be accepted for all DEBTS. A store could refuse to take a wheelbarrow of pennies. A gas station...I suppose it would depend. Have you already pumped gas? If so, I guess they have to accept it (assuming it's not hazardous waste). It's become more and more common for stations to require you to prepay for fuel, so they could refuse your twenty rolls of pennies if they wanted (no debt = no requirement to accept legal currency as payment).

The employer had a debt to the employee in the amount of $500. I don't reckon there's any legal requirement to NOT pay in pennies. That said, if the employer clearly stated they don't remember dropping off $500 of pennies via a wheelbarrow full of oil, I too would assume that they in fact did not do so. Had they paid via check, they'd have a copy of the cancelled check. Direct deposit, they can get a printout from their bank showing that the wages were indeed paid to the employee. Wheelbarrow just left out front...um...if "I" were the owner of a business and was paying employees legal wages in cash...I'd at least have them sign off stating they got the correct amount of money. Did they at least pull an Amazon and take a photo of the wheelbarrow by the front door? If not...one can make the assumption that the two things are related (wheelbarrow full of pennies plus payment stub on top), but if the employer denies knowledge...I would immediately assume they are NOT related (because there's no way they would forget a mode of payment that far removed from the norm). It's possible that the employer had someone drop off the last paycheck in cash, in a nice sealed envelope. Someone else comes along interested in the wheelbarrow full of money, decides against stealing it when they realize it's covered in oil, but happily takes the envelope full of cash (discarding the paystub in the process). The employer has not ensured that the payment was received by the proper recipient, so they need to re-issue the payment, preferably via a method that can be traced better than cash.

That's my two (oil-free) cents.

LennStar

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3756 on: March 31, 2021, 04:15:10 AM »
I just looked it up and in the US you can pay your federal taxes in cash at various gas and continent stations; if you showed up at 7-11 with a bucket of oil covered pennies to pay your 500$ tax bill (or to buy a cup of coffee) the clerk would tell you to pound sand.  Cash has utility for two reasons 1) we all agree to use it, 2) you can pay our taxes with it.  Oil covered pennies fail both those marks so I think you could make a case that he was not paid.  The point of money is to be a usable intermediate unit for exchange.  IANAL and all that...

Actually 1) comes from 2)
That is how money came into existance: States (governments/kings) wanted to pay soldiers. But paying them in hens is a hassle and quite dirty. So they created money. But what should soldiers do with money if nobody wanted it?
So the kings decided that taxes had to be paid with money, turning their realms economy into a money-seeking society. Since only soldier had money, the economy turned into an army-supporting enterprise.

At least that is what archeoligists and ethnologists will tell you. Most economists will do a very different story.
And btw. don't try to tell that to those "government is always bad and we do money without them" guys.

grantmeaname

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3757 on: March 31, 2021, 06:00:12 AM »
yeah, that's totally false

Sibley

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3758 on: March 31, 2021, 10:44:32 AM »
I just looked it up and in the US you can pay your federal taxes in cash at various gas and continent stations; if you showed up at 7-11 with a bucket of oil covered pennies to pay your 500$ tax bill (or to buy a cup of coffee) the clerk would tell you to pound sand.  Cash has utility for two reasons 1) we all agree to use it, 2) you can pay our taxes with it.  Oil covered pennies fail both those marks so I think you could make a case that he was not paid.  The point of money is to be a usable intermediate unit for exchange.  IANAL and all that...

Actually 1) comes from 2)
That is how money came into existance: States (governments/kings) wanted to pay soldiers. But paying them in hens is a hassle and quite dirty. So they created money. But what should soldiers do with money if nobody wanted it?
So the kings decided that taxes had to be paid with money, turning their realms economy into a money-seeking society. Since only soldier had money, the economy turned into an army-supporting enterprise.

At least that is what archeoligists and ethnologists will tell you. Most economists will do a very different story.
And btw. don't try to tell that to those "government is always bad and we do money without them" guys.

I believe that it was far more complicated than that, but it was certainly part of it. There's ample evidence of societies that had both physical money (coins) and extensive bartering, and both were necessary and valuable parts of the system. And I am aware of instances where taxes, or equivalent to taxes, were paid with labor or goods. Lower classes may not have had money and existed purely on a barter system, while the upper classes did have coin, but that doesn't mean that barter wasn't important either.

As for the archaeologists vs economists - both are interesting and valuable, but they're not looking at things in the same way, or for the same things. It's a weakness. Society is not black and white, and when you try to view it that way you will likely come to the wrong conclusion. A holistic approach, which considers many needs and influences, is much better for a fuller understanding. Or at least as much as we're able to understand of a society that existed hundreds or thousands of years ago.

BicycleB

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3759 on: March 31, 2021, 02:59:13 PM »
I just looked it up and in the US you can pay your federal taxes in cash at various gas and continent stations
"Your federal taxes" meaning "federal tax on gasoline"? Or "your federal income tax"?

I've heard of convenience stores offering to cash tax refund checks. Is that what you mean?

I'm assuming "continent station" is typo for "convenience store".

dandarc

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3760 on: March 31, 2021, 03:14:19 PM »
You can pay your income taxes in cash at various retail stores around the country:

https://www.irs.gov/payments/pay-with-cash-at-a-retail-partner

simmias

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3761 on: March 31, 2021, 03:16:47 PM »
You guys tell the best Epic FU money stories!

Taran Wanderer

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3762 on: March 31, 2021, 06:52:54 PM »
This is definitely my favorite thread on the MMM Forum.

BicycleB

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3763 on: March 31, 2021, 07:40:15 PM »
You can pay your income taxes in cash at various retail stores around the country:

https://www.irs.gov/payments/pay-with-cash-at-a-retail-partner

I did not know that! (Obviously.) Sorry for the hijack, ya'll. Here's a true story for your trouble.

ETA: Did I tell this one before?? Long ago I meant not to tell it, to maintain anonymity. After writing this, it occurred to me that I've gotten slack lately and may have told it - probably in this very thread! But I can't find it. Anyway, enjoy this telling of the tale.

***

Sometimes it doesn't take a lot of cash to say FU to an employer. Sometimes it just takes a conscience, or a couple months' pay in the bank. That was my situation when I took down a multimillion dollar securities fraud.

I didn't know at first that I was working for crooks. I was just an early 20something with no job who answered an ad for "unlimited pay, make your own hours", aka commission sales. The product in that pre-internet era was a buying club membership for home furnishings. They trained you to make this hour long scripted pitch from a flip book, face to face with a customer at their home, to explain how their $700 lifetime membership would save them thousands of dollars on all the furniture purchases they'd make for the rest of their lives. If they bit, they could visit the showroom forever, peruse paper catalogs, and order from All The Major Manufacturers at wholesale pricing, meaning 50% off retail catalog price (though they had to pay 10% service fee).

Not as crazy as it sounds now, depending on the customer's purchasing habits, because retail was stodgy then and plenty of people would get at least some savings from it over time. Still a tough sell, but I closed a few before giving up the ghost. By then the owners had recognized other talents in me, and I became the Accounts Payable Manager at the princely rate of $4.25/hour. Hey, it was 90 cents above minimum wage!

The original proposition was legit, I soon found, in that real customers who had bought memberships would come in and order stuff. They'd pick out $3200 of furniture and write a $1600 check, and their furniture would be shipped to the store, and they'd come pick it up. They were happy enough, the business did what it said, all good.

It took me a while to detect the flaw - because it wasn't in the core business. It was in the execution that the owners had slipped from legitimate creativity into dubious schemes and, eventually, trouble. At first they’d done great in volume of membership sales, raking in cash from memberships. In our rural area, it more than paid the cost of a nice showroom with a little warehouse in the back and couple of clerks. When sales slowed, they hired new people (like me) to beat the bushes, maybe sell a few friends. Then came the fatal brainstorm: financing.

$700 was a lot for a membership, so they arranged a credit line where the customer could just make monthly payments until the $700 was paid off. The owners got $700 up front in commissions and hired a "Finance Manager" to handle the paperwork. The lender got paid over time, everyone happy. Interest was an ungodly 24%, but once the dotted line was signed, who cared?

I think the trouble began when they realized how much money 24% was. Wanting a slice, they started putting out ads in local newspaper of our rural area offering high interest to individuals, so that they could use the borrowed money to finance the contracts. “High” for the individuals might be 10% - a lot better than a savings account, better than bonds even back then, but enough to leave the owners a fat 14% profit. Perhaps a legitimate deal there too. Creative, eh?

By the time I started, they’d fallen behind on paying suppliers, maybe by spending a little too much on motorcycles and flying lessons, which was why I was hired. “Managing” the accounts receivable turned out to mean persuading angry furniture makers to send us the customers’ furniture when we hadn’t paid for the last batch yet! Once I understood, I showed backbone by proposing a deal of my own. “I’ll get us off hold,” I told the owners, “but you have to give me the service fee to use against our back bills.” I didn’t mean me personally, I mean my department got the money to use for catching up. It took a month or two to get the hang of persuading the suppliers and getting actual shipments in, but it worked. Slowly but surely, I was working down the backlog, getting all the orders filled, reducing what we owed. Until I realized nobody was selling memberships any more.

I’d been one of the last people to sell any memberships. A few people tried after me, but failed as quickly as I had, and no else was starting. The owners weren’t selling any either. But in the newspaper, there were ads where they were borrowing money for new contracts. Where was the money going?

I started asking questions to the nice ol’ country lady at the front desk who’d been there for years. Yep, there were people coming in and depositing money for the financing. Little old ladies putting in tens of thousands of dollars sometimes. Were any memberships being sold? Haven’t seen any lately. Well if there’s no sales, how will they pay back the promissory notes to the little old ladies?

“I don’t know,” she replied. “What are you thinking?”

I gulped and finally said, Well, they’re not getting any money from my department because we’re just catching up. I guess someday the service fees would be something, but it doesn’t seem like enough to pay the whole business. Honestly, I think I need to write a letter to the state that they’re taking people’s money and probably can’t pay it back.

“Well, are you gonna write ‘em?”

If they’re able to pay it back, interrupting them would make the whole thing to fall apart, and actually cause them not to pay the little old ladies. Have they gone up and down in sales before, or just gradually sold less and less? Less and less, she said. Well, I probably better write the state. I’ve never done anything like this before, I guess it’ll take a few days.

“Keep me posted,” she said.

Shortly thereafter, the owners began a new sales campaign. Activity buzzed all around. I delayed my letter and told the lady. But then, after a few weeks, they ran out of energy. “I’m gonna have to write,” I finally said. “Keep me posted,” again.

Three days later, having written fifteen pages longhand at home in the evenings but not yet sent the letter, I looked up from my desk to see three huge dudes in blue uniforms at the showroom door. They were state police, and they wanted to see the Treasurer. Shortly thereafter, I arrived at work in the morning to find padlocks on the door. The owners were sentenced to sixteen months in state prison for securities fraud. As I understand it, the promissory notes they gave the individual lenders should have been registered as securities but weren't.

Eventually I realized how the cards collapsed. The clerk lady had told her buddy, the finance manager, that the jig was up. Figuring it was better to report than be one of the people charged, Finance Manager reported to the state. I don’t think the little old ladies were ever paid.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2021, 10:42:39 PM by BicycleB »

SwordGuy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3764 on: April 01, 2021, 06:09:43 AM »
So, here's an epic FU story I just remembered.

Back in the 1980s or 90s a dear friend of mine worked for a factory in Texas.   The management of the firm got a brilliant idea from the good idea fairy and implemented it in secret.

They were going to cut their labor costs big time!

Basically, everyone came to work Monday morning to discover they no longer worked for the company.   The company had hired an employee leasing firm to provide employees for them, so now they worked for this employee leasing firm -- for less pay and benefits.

Three fourths of the employees at the factory walked off the job that morning and didn't come back.
 

Alternatepriorities

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3765 on: April 01, 2021, 11:36:47 AM »
More of a funny exit than an FU story...

A friend is retiring from the navy after 20 years and they do exit counseling to help people transition to civilian life. Coordinating this for others has been his job for the last couple of years so he knows system.

He just sent me this summary of today's remote session.

It took an hour to introduce ourselves because none of the 20 people could figure out their mic or video or they were distracted when their turn came - even though we went alphabetically down the roster on the left side of the screen... Please introduce yourself and tell us using nonnavy terms what you do now and what you will do when you are out.

His answer:
I’m _____ I herd deaf cats with a squirt gun and plan to continue that when I get out by transitioning to be a stay at home dad.

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3766 on: April 01, 2021, 11:42:47 AM »
So, here's an epic FU story I just remembered.

Back in the 1980s or 90s a dear friend of mine worked for a factory in Texas.   The management of the firm got a brilliant idea from the good idea fairy and implemented it in secret.

They were going to cut their labor costs big time!

Basically, everyone came to work Monday morning to discover they no longer worked for the company.   The company had hired an employee leasing firm to provide employees for them, so now they worked for this employee leasing firm -- for less pay and benefits.

Three fourths of the employees at the factory walked off the job that morning and didn't come back.
 
This is pretty glorious

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3767 on: April 01, 2021, 11:45:05 AM »
What happened to the factory?  I would hope something horrible, but I suspect probably a few days lost productivity until they staffed back up again?

It's sad the amount of bullshit that wouldn't happen if everyone just had some FU money and didn't put up with it.  Or maybe there'd be way more bullshit because some people would just be assholes w/ their FU money?

swashbucklinstache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3768 on: April 01, 2021, 11:56:06 AM »
It's 1000% them fishing for people who'll feel bad and pick up the slack, not wanting to use political points with other C suites if they don't have to, not $.
I'm baffled by this. Why does it cost anyone political points to fill a staffing need?  Can't someone just say to whoever has the authority, "Swashbucklinstache would be a great fit to lead tasks X, y, and Z, so I propose we offer her $300k and the title Chief Sub-Panjandrum if she will accept those responsibilities"?
You're not wrong, it isn't at all rational. Life and times of a consultancy though at this level. Asking for anything at all from another group, HR to literally do their job in this case, requires a political trade-off. It also requires the C suit to spend 10 consecutive minutes focusing on the division they run instead of how they can get promoted or an extra half percent on their bonus, (or actual more important things, to be fair) which probably explains the 9 month wait time. We bill our time in 6 minute increments and our company #2 starts her day by reviewing yesterday's numbers...

Not a surprise FI is on the mind, nor that more sanely run startups are eating our lunch.
Well, another week goes by. Through three relevant meetings I've heard:
A) separately, HR might make everyone doing your current role equal to your role, even for people doing versions 10% as complicated (roles I groomed them into and gave away 5+ years and 3 promotions ago)
B) in plans and meetings I've heard you're being put down as doing & owning the new roles, with the old people in as backup
C) we just did annual goals so I'm sure taking these roles was in yours
D) has this gone so far that you're just doing this now? I don't think we'll get any backing from (c suit requesting it who oversees these roles) on anything related to this but let me know if you need anything and I can try my best.

I did my boss a favor and let him know that under no circumstances will I be accepting these roles without title and compensation addressed, in line with my latest email from fall 2020, and that if I'm in any meeting where someone describes me as "role X lead" I will be speaking up to correct them regardless of who is in attendance.

Happy Monday everyone.

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3769 on: April 01, 2021, 12:15:59 PM »
I did my boss a favor and let him know that under no circumstances will I be accepting these roles without title and compensation addressed, in line with my latest email from fall 2020, and that if I'm in any meeting where someone describes me as "role X lead" I will be speaking up to correct them regardless of who is in attendance.

Niiiiice, what was his reply?

swashbucklinstache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3770 on: April 01, 2021, 12:39:44 PM »
I did my boss a favor and let him know that under no circumstances will I be accepting these roles without title and compensation addressed, in line with my latest email from fall 2020, and that if I'm in any meeting where someone describes me as "role X lead" I will be speaking up to correct them regardless of who is in attendance.

Niiiiice, what was his reply?
He said he'll take it to the C suit. 37th time's the charm, here's hoping.

Soon enough there'll be a day of reckoning when the internal client stops getting their needs met. I hope my boss is CYAing appropriately...

Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3771 on: April 01, 2021, 04:16:22 PM »
What happened to the factory?  I would hope something horrible, but I suspect probably a few days lost productivity until they staffed back up again?

It's sad the amount of bullshit that wouldn't happen if everyone just had some FU money and didn't put up with it.  Or maybe there'd be way more bullshit because some people would just be assholes w/ their FU money?

If 3/4 of the people is an accurate amount that left, I would be surprised if the factory continued. Factory work can be very hard to staff for and for retention, regardless of solid pay. Add to that the amount of knowledge that would be lost (knowledge is a big commodity in manufacturing, especially floor knowledge on how to keep equipment running with all of its quirks), and I wouldn't be surprised if the factory never opened back up again. It certainly could, but this could be a death blow.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3772 on: April 01, 2021, 10:33:08 PM »
It's 1000% them fishing for people who'll feel bad and pick up the slack, not wanting to use political points with other C suites if they don't have to, not $.
I'm baffled by this. Why does it cost anyone political points to fill a staffing need?  Can't someone just say to whoever has the authority, "Swashbucklinstache would be a great fit to lead tasks X, y, and Z, so I propose we offer her $300k and the title Chief Sub-Panjandrum if she will accept those responsibilities"?
You're not wrong, it isn't at all rational. Life and times of a consultancy though at this level. Asking for anything at all from another group, HR to literally do their job in this case, requires a political trade-off. It also requires the C suit to spend 10 consecutive minutes focusing on the division they run instead of how they can get promoted or an extra half percent on their bonus, (or actual more important things, to be fair) which probably explains the 9 month wait time. We bill our time in 6 minute increments and our company #2 starts her day by reviewing yesterday's numbers...

Not a surprise FI is on the mind, nor that more sanely run startups are eating our lunch.
Well, another week goes by. Through three relevant meetings I've heard:
A) separately, HR might make everyone doing your current role equal to your role, even for people doing versions 10% as complicated (roles I groomed them into and gave away 5+ years and 3 promotions ago)
B) in plans and meetings I've heard you're being put down as doing & owning the new roles, with the old people in as backup
C) we just did annual goals so I'm sure taking these roles was in yours
D) has this gone so far that you're just doing this now? I don't think we'll get any backing from (c suit requesting it who oversees these roles) on anything related to this but let me know if you need anything and I can try my best.

I did my boss a favor and let him know that under no circumstances will I be accepting these roles without title and compensation addressed, in line with my latest email from fall 2020, and that if I'm in any meeting where someone describes me as "role X lead" I will be speaking up to correct them regardless of who is in attendance.

Happy Monday everyone.
This one is definitely popcorn-worthy.  I want to know what happens next!

BikeFanatic

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3773 on: April 03, 2021, 01:05:33 AM »
Quote
Leadership was totally floored when I resigned and started panicking over an upcoming big important meeting with the shit client. They wanted me to still attend.  I said nopey nope nope.

Epic!
I love that ending, what a bunch of dicks!

I wish I had an epic story, I felt so burnt out, and there was undue stress and some toxic people at my job, but mostly professional  with drama I'd say. I gave 2 weeks notice and said I will not consider any part time offers. That was January six months into a OMY senario.

Boll weevil

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3774 on: April 05, 2021, 09:25:29 AM »
This one doesn’t fit into the typical employee bucks the employer narrative, but there’s still a good-humored FU in here.

We’re represented by a union, but work in a right-to-work/open shop state, so membership typically runs in the 25-35% range. But around contract negotiation time, the union goes on a big membership drive to try to have a better negotiating position (they’re typically able to get it up to 60-70% through the vote, and then it promptly falls back to usual levels until the next negotiation).

So a few years ago during one of those drives, they ask (coworker) to join. He keeps saying no, and eventually throws out that if the recruiter can get (lead, who isn’t at his desk but sits right across the aisle from (coworker)) to join, he’ll join too.

I’m not sure if (lead) is against all unions in general, but he has been fairly vocal about how he sees out union as worthless, so (coworker) had good reason to believe it wouldn’t happen.

So the recruiter comes back when (lead) is around and does his typical pitch, and (lead) of course says no. So then the recruiter mentions that the main reason he’s asking is that (coworker) said he’d join if (lead) did.

And (lead) says “Oh, in that case, sign me up.”

I heard about it later, and in that conversation (lead) said something to the effect of “That’ll teach (coworker) not to try to hide behind others on stuff like that.”

dandarc

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3775 on: April 05, 2021, 09:53:08 AM »
That's a great one. They "Hold-my-beer"-ed each other into a smart decision.

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3776 on: April 05, 2021, 10:08:27 AM »
“That’ll teach (coworker) not to try to hide behind others on stuff like that.”

Now we need an Awesome Levels of FU Pettiness thread

scottish

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3777 on: April 05, 2021, 03:13:23 PM »
“That’ll teach (coworker) not to try to hide behind others on stuff like that.”

Now we need an Awesome Levels of FU Pettiness thread

Maybe (coworker) learned how to say "Nopey nope nope nope" since then.

fuzzy math

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3778 on: April 06, 2021, 08:46:22 AM »
I have an epic FU story, but I did not have the FU money at the time to back it up, and its something that has come back to bite me in the ass over the years (small field). I still don't care and I'd do it the same way.

I worked for a private medical group that consisted of 11 people, with 5 of them being partners. They made all the decisions, they directed the employees when to work, they made 2x as much for the same job and they took 8 weeks of vacation a year while offering the employees 4. Basically any time a partner called you, you'd be getting reamed out, or told for whatever reason why you were to be the one doing the work that day while they sat on their asses.

I'd worked for this company for 3 years when things started going south. Partners were grumpy, they started acting real nervous. The company party was canceled, they had a meeting and told us there were financial problems. One of the partners was a dolt and had been put in charge of a contract that none of the other partners wanted to do. Dolt proceeded to generally fuck things up and they lost the contract. It had provided over 4 FTEs and they were sweating it. They didn't want to get rid of anyone because that would mean they'd have to do more work, so I think they slowly let the company coffers run dry.

A few months pass, and they let us know that they're going to have to let go of 2 people. They're "going to start asking around and soliciting feedback on everyone" so just hold tight and wait to see if you're listed as either of the 2 people (out of 6 employees) getting canned. I've been watching this, and having asked a lot of questions am acutely aware that canning 2 people will not make up for the loss of 4 FTEs.

At this time I'm pregnant, and one of the Doctors we work with invites me to their Christmas party because we're fairly friendly. Since the party is hosted at his partner physician's house, I pull him aside and ask if I can come to the party because I was invited by physician 1 and I didn't want to crash his house without him knowing I'm coming. It turns into this HUGE shitstorm where he's apologizing because he accidentally snubbed our entire group, he hadn't intended to forget us etc. He calls the partners to apologize and invite them, and I'm hung out to dry. The partners call ME, tell me that I've embarrassed the entire group, we could lose more contracts as a result of this etc etc. Later on that week in the middle of a clinical day I get told that I'm being pulled out of my patient assignment to have a meeting with all of the partners. I thought I was going to be fired on the spot. I called my husband, had him run to walmart and buy me a voice recorder and go to this meeting. In the end they just grilled me, harassed me about what an embarrassment I was and let me go back to taking care of my patient. I was totally fried, terrified, shaking etc.

Incident 2 regarding this employer. When I announced that I was pregnant, things had already started to go bad financially. They were obviously very annoyed that I'd dared to have another child (already had 1 baby while employed there), and when I told them my intent to take 7 weeks off and return like the previous time, I was told "you do not tell us what you will be taking. you can ask and we will let you know what's allowed. we did not appreciate your attitude and your assumption that you could do that stretch of time". I got a ton of shit over the phone, had multiple partners calling me, this one particular lady was horribly bitchy and was always tasked with being the awful disciplinarian with everyone. So I cry on the phone, say I don't understand why its a problem this time, and they let me know that 2 of the partners had already scheduled vacation for my anticipated leave time and that I must be back because they could not change their plans and we had to have enough people to cover our patient needs. I was also told that since vacation accrues during the year and cannot roll over to the next, I hadn't already earned the time or the right to be off for the current year.

The partners finally name 1 person who is going to be canned and give her 2 months notice so she can find a new job. They tell everyone that they like us all so much its so hard to decide that they just can't pick a 2nd person. I'm sitting there pregnant, evaluating the 2 incidents I listed above and realizing there's a good chance that they want me gone, but legally can't get rid of me while pregnant. So I have my baby, go on leave, interview for jobs while on maternity leave. The horrible bitch lady's oldest son is getting married on a Saturday so I give my notice to quit 2 days beforehand. I send them all an email titled "new employment" that says "I've taken a new job, my last day is X" and nothing else. A shit storm of phone calls occur and everyone's telling me I can't just give notice via email, that I'm burning my bridges, this is a small field and everyone knows everyone and it could hurt me etc. I know it ruined bitch lady's ability to relax and enjoy her precious poopsie's wedding and I would do it again IN A HEARTBEAT.

I know I should have done something legally regarding the pregnancy leave but I figured no matter what happened (if I had pursued something) they would have had justification for getting rid of me as the 2nd person. I let it go because I was naive and just wanted out. These people also harassed a coworker when she was assigned jury duty (also illegal!)

A follow up to the company - a 3rd employee left when I did and they were down to 8 employees. They never rehired, they clearly didn't have the money. The hospitals eventually got sick of them and told them their contracts weren't being renewed. The company folded and the partners all went to work as hospital employees with a fraction of the money or benefits they had earned by stiffing us employees. Good riddance to them. I still get nervous when I visit friends in that old town that I might run into bitch lady at Target or something, and whether I'd be ready to tell her off that I should have sued her.
« Last Edit: April 06, 2021, 09:00:16 AM by fuzzy math »

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3779 on: April 06, 2021, 02:47:39 PM »
You can pay your income taxes in cash at various retail stores around the country:

https://www.irs.gov/payments/pay-with-cash-at-a-retail-partner

I did not know that! (Obviously.) Sorry for the hijack, ya'll. Here's a true story for your trouble.

ETA: Did I tell this one before?? Long ago I meant not to tell it, to maintain anonymity. After writing this, it occurred to me that I've gotten slack lately and may have told it - probably in this very thread! But I can't find it. Anyway, enjoy this telling of the tale.

***

Sometimes it doesn't take a lot of cash to say FU to an employer. Sometimes it just takes a conscience, or a couple months' pay in the bank. That was my situation when I took down a multimillion dollar securities fraud.

I didn't know at first that I was working for crooks. I was just an early 20something with no job who answered an ad for "unlimited pay, make your own hours", aka commission sales. The product in that pre-internet era was a buying club membership for home furnishings. They trained you to make this hour long scripted pitch from a flip book, face to face with a customer at their home, to explain how their $700 lifetime membership would save them thousands of dollars on all the furniture purchases they'd make for the rest of their lives. If they bit, they could visit the showroom forever, peruse paper catalogs, and order from All The Major Manufacturers at wholesale pricing, meaning 50% off retail catalog price (though they had to pay 10% service fee).

Not as crazy as it sounds now, depending on the customer's purchasing habits, because retail was stodgy then and plenty of people would get at least some savings from it over time. Still a tough sell, but I closed a few before giving up the ghost. By then the owners had recognized other talents in me, and I became the Accounts Payable Manager at the princely rate of $4.25/hour. Hey, it was 90 cents above minimum wage!

The original proposition was legit, I soon found, in that real customers who had bought memberships would come in and order stuff. They'd pick out $3200 of furniture and write a $1600 check, and their furniture would be shipped to the store, and they'd come pick it up. They were happy enough, the business did what it said, all good.

It took me a while to detect the flaw - because it wasn't in the core business. It was in the execution that the owners had slipped from legitimate creativity into dubious schemes and, eventually, trouble. At first they’d done great in volume of membership sales, raking in cash from memberships. In our rural area, it more than paid the cost of a nice showroom with a little warehouse in the back and couple of clerks. When sales slowed, they hired new people (like me) to beat the bushes, maybe sell a few friends. Then came the fatal brainstorm: financing.

$700 was a lot for a membership, so they arranged a credit line where the customer could just make monthly payments until the $700 was paid off. The owners got $700 up front in commissions and hired a "Finance Manager" to handle the paperwork. The lender got paid over time, everyone happy. Interest was an ungodly 24%, but once the dotted line was signed, who cared?

I think the trouble began when they realized how much money 24% was. Wanting a slice, they started putting out ads in local newspaper of our rural area offering high interest to individuals, so that they could use the borrowed money to finance the contracts. “High” for the individuals might be 10% - a lot better than a savings account, better than bonds even back then, but enough to leave the owners a fat 14% profit. Perhaps a legitimate deal there too. Creative, eh?

By the time I started, they’d fallen behind on paying suppliers, maybe by spending a little too much on motorcycles and flying lessons, which was why I was hired. “Managing” the accounts receivable turned out to mean persuading angry furniture makers to send us the customers’ furniture when we hadn’t paid for the last batch yet! Once I understood, I showed backbone by proposing a deal of my own. “I’ll get us off hold,” I told the owners, “but you have to give me the service fee to use against our back bills.” I didn’t mean me personally, I mean my department got the money to use for catching up. It took a month or two to get the hang of persuading the suppliers and getting actual shipments in, but it worked. Slowly but surely, I was working down the backlog, getting all the orders filled, reducing what we owed. Until I realized nobody was selling memberships any more.

I’d been one of the last people to sell any memberships. A few people tried after me, but failed as quickly as I had, and no else was starting. The owners weren’t selling any either. But in the newspaper, there were ads where they were borrowing money for new contracts. Where was the money going?

I started asking questions to the nice ol’ country lady at the front desk who’d been there for years. Yep, there were people coming in and depositing money for the financing. Little old ladies putting in tens of thousands of dollars sometimes. Were any memberships being sold? Haven’t seen any lately. Well if there’s no sales, how will they pay back the promissory notes to the little old ladies?

“I don’t know,” she replied. “What are you thinking?”

I gulped and finally said, Well, they’re not getting any money from my department because we’re just catching up. I guess someday the service fees would be something, but it doesn’t seem like enough to pay the whole business. Honestly, I think I need to write a letter to the state that they’re taking people’s money and probably can’t pay it back.

“Well, are you gonna write ‘em?”

If they’re able to pay it back, interrupting them would make the whole thing to fall apart, and actually cause them not to pay the little old ladies. Have they gone up and down in sales before, or just gradually sold less and less? Less and less, she said. Well, I probably better write the state. I’ve never done anything like this before, I guess it’ll take a few days.

“Keep me posted,” she said.

Shortly thereafter, the owners began a new sales campaign. Activity buzzed all around. I delayed my letter and told the lady. But then, after a few weeks, they ran out of energy. “I’m gonna have to write,” I finally said. “Keep me posted,” again.

Three days later, having written fifteen pages longhand at home in the evenings but not yet sent the letter, I looked up from my desk to see three huge dudes in blue uniforms at the showroom door. They were state police, and they wanted to see the Treasurer. Shortly thereafter, I arrived at work in the morning to find padlocks on the door. The owners were sentenced to sixteen months in state prison for securities fraud. As I understand it, the promissory notes they gave the individual lenders should have been registered as securities but weren't.

Eventually I realized how the cards collapsed. The clerk lady had told her buddy, the finance manager, that the jig was up. Figuring it was better to report than be one of the people charged, Finance Manager reported to the state. I don’t think the little old ladies were ever paid.
Hmmm, this sounds a bit familiar, but for a slightly different reason. Wasn't part of this scheme that the prices quoted did not include freight? So the customer paid cost +freight, which isn't quite the same as 50% savings?

BicycleB

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3780 on: April 06, 2021, 03:37:37 PM »

Hmmm, this sounds a bit familiar, but for a slightly different reason. Wasn't part of this scheme that the prices quoted did not include freight? So the customer paid cost +freight, which isn't quite the same as 50% savings?


Freight from manufacturer to our showroom / warehouse was included. So was our labor (including mine) for unloading from the manufacturer's delivery truck into our warehouse, and if requested by the customer, from our warehouse floor onto the customer's pickup truck. We only had one warehouse guy so I helped him load stuff! Customers aka members just paid 10% service fee on the 50% of retail list.

It might sound like something else that did have a freight charge though. Or maybe I mis-explained before somewhere?

Anyway, when I saw the police and the padlock, it seemed epic to me. As did the newspaper story where they were sentenced to actual jail time.

Model96

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3781 on: April 06, 2021, 05:38:20 PM »
This one doesn’t fit into the typical employee bucks the employer narrative, but there’s still a good-humored FU in here.

We’re represented by a union, but work in a right-to-work/open shop state, so membership typically runs in the 25-35% range. But around contract negotiation time, the union goes on a big membership drive to try to have a better negotiating position (they’re typically able to get it up to 60-70% through the vote, and then it promptly falls back to usual levels until the next negotiation).

So a few years ago during one of those drives, they ask (coworker) to join. He keeps saying no, and eventually throws out that if the recruiter can get (lead, who isn’t at his desk but sits right across the aisle from (coworker)) to join, he’ll join too.

I’m not sure if (lead) is against all unions in general, but he has been fairly vocal about how he sees out union as worthless, so (coworker) had good reason to believe it wouldn’t happen.

So the recruiter comes back when (lead) is around and does his typical pitch, and (lead) of course says no. So then the recruiter mentions that the main reason he’s asking is that (coworker) said he’d join if (lead) did.

And (lead) says “Oh, in that case, sign me up.”

I heard about it later, and in that conversation (lead) said something to the effect of “That’ll teach (coworker) not to try to hide behind others on stuff like that.”

Some sad people and practices at that workplace......

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3782 on: April 07, 2021, 10:44:24 AM »
I have an epic FU story, but I did not have the FU money at the time to back it up, and its something that has come back to bite me in the ass over the years (small field). I still don't care and I'd do it the same way.

I worked for a private medical group that consisted of 11 people, with 5 of them being partners.
*snip*

Okay, I found this a bit hard to follow because I'm not in the medical field, but my OB/GYN office has a similar setup (private medical office that does work AT the hospital, but not FOR the hospital).  So,  I can kinda sorta maybe understand the dynamics here.

I think you absolutely handled it in the best way possible, considering the circumstances.  Fuck 'em.

swashbucklinstache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3783 on: April 07, 2021, 02:09:39 PM »
It's 1000% them fishing for people who'll feel bad and pick up the slack, not wanting to use political points with other C suites if they don't have to, not $.
I'm baffled by this. Why does it cost anyone political points to fill a staffing need?  Can't someone just say to whoever has the authority, "Swashbucklinstache would be a great fit to lead tasks X, y, and Z, so I propose we offer her $300k and the title Chief Sub-Panjandrum if she will accept those responsibilities"?
You're not wrong, it isn't at all rational. Life and times of a consultancy though at this level. Asking for anything at all from another group, HR to literally do their job in this case, requires a political trade-off. It also requires the C suit to spend 10 consecutive minutes focusing on the division they run instead of how they can get promoted or an extra half percent on their bonus, (or actual more important things, to be fair) which probably explains the 9 month wait time. We bill our time in 6 minute increments and our company #2 starts her day by reviewing yesterday's numbers...

Not a surprise FI is on the mind, nor that more sanely run startups are eating our lunch.
Well, another week goes by. Through three relevant meetings I've heard:
A) separately, HR might make everyone doing your current role equal to your role, even for people doing versions 10% as complicated (roles I groomed them into and gave away 5+ years and 3 promotions ago)
B) in plans and meetings I've heard you're being put down as doing & owning the new roles, with the old people in as backup
C) we just did annual goals so I'm sure taking these roles was in yours
D) has this gone so far that you're just doing this now? I don't think we'll get any backing from (c suit requesting it who oversees these roles) on anything related to this but let me know if you need anything and I can try my best.

I did my boss a favor and let him know that under no circumstances will I be accepting these roles without title and compensation addressed, in line with my latest email from fall 2020, and that if I'm in any meeting where someone describes me as "role X lead" I will be speaking up to correct them regardless of who is in attendance.

Happy Monday everyone.
This one is definitely popcorn-worthy.  I want to know what happens next!
Well, so far today I've heard from the internal client that they really want someone in this role ASAP,  with a response rom my to-be peer that they've seen me put in the role on paper already. The client is politically savvy enough to see what's happening and quickly changed the subject.

Later in the meeting they asked me to follow up with the person currently in the role about getting a name assigned to some task, with organizing such things being a key part of the role.  Current role-ee (-er?) gave an answer essentially indicating they're not considering themselves accountable for getting the answer any longer, indirectly implying that it was up to me. My to-be peer, who is a nice person but sometimes misses the subtlety (see above) IMs me innocently suggesting that, no joke, I might be a good fit for doing that task if we don't have a name.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2021, 02:13:22 PM by swashbucklinstache »

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3784 on: April 07, 2021, 03:07:45 PM »
Well, so far today I've heard from the internal client that they really want someone in this role ASAP,  with a response rom my to-be peer that they've seen me put in the role on paper already. The client is politically savvy enough to see what's happening and quickly changed the subject.

Later in the meeting they asked me to follow up with the person currently in the role about getting a name assigned to some task, with organizing such things being a key part of the role.  Current role-ee (-er?) gave an answer essentially indicating they're not considering themselves accountable for getting the answer any longer, indirectly implying that it was up to me. My to-be peer, who is a nice person but sometimes misses the subtlety (see above) IMs me innocently suggesting that, no joke, I might be a good fit for doing that task if we don't have a name.

I assume/hope your responses have been either silence or 'this is not my responsibility'?

swashbucklinstache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3785 on: April 07, 2021, 03:50:52 PM »
Well, so far today I've heard from the internal client that they really want someone in this role ASAP,  with a response rom my to-be peer that they've seen me put in the role on paper already. The client is politically savvy enough to see what's happening and quickly changed the subject.

Later in the meeting they asked me to follow up with the person currently in the role about getting a name assigned to some task, with organizing such things being a key part of the role.  Current role-ee (-er?) gave an answer essentially indicating they're not considering themselves accountable for getting the answer any longer, indirectly implying that it was up to me. My to-be peer, who is a nice person but sometimes misses the subtlety (see above) IMs me innocently suggesting that, no joke, I might be a good fit for doing that task if we don't have a name.

I assume/hope your responses have been either silence or 'this is not my responsibility'?
Yep. Still developing of course, but silence to the person currently in the role and joking deflecting to the to-be peer, just because they're not politically savvy/important enough to hear the truth honestly and were genuinely trying to be helpful, like a doe in the woods on their first "opening day". I am starting to tire of repeatedly being put in a position where the truth is "no one knows, because my great-grandboss can't answer a simple question in 10 months" to a politically connected internal client of his, who already knows that's the answer but benefits from me being the one to say it out loud. I think I'll let my boss know that tomorrow and re-verbalize that I've bit my tongue for the last time on the matter and he should engage in serious CYA now if he hasn't already. My CYA is a lot of money in the bank and a paper trail for good measure. Of course, I'd make the point politely and professionally or just stop attending meetings, no sense being rash. Unlike this absolute legend: https://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/news/city-comptroller-i-said-no-to-filner-credit-card-expenses/

Quote
Whitfield said he did not have any problem denying the mayor’s office’s requests. He said the best advice he’s received came from his boss from his first job: Always put some money away so that you have the independence to say no, even to people above you.

“I’ve got a lot of fucking money in the bank,” Whitfield said. “It allows me to sleep at night. It allows me to do my job with a whole lot integrity and not worry about losing it.”

If you ever wonder why your boss doesn't accomplish anything and doesn't "get it" it might be because she/he's dealing with stuff like this all day. Suppose that may well be what's going on in my great-grandboss's world as well in this situation too. At some point though you need to tell your boss to get out of the way because you have decisions to make. Or maybe the great-grandboss doesn't want the role filled by his team at all. Who knows. I don't and I'm also done caring.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2021, 03:54:08 PM by swashbucklinstache »

Blackeagle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3786 on: April 07, 2021, 05:01:54 PM »
https://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/news/city-comptroller-i-said-no-to-filner-credit-card-expenses/

Quote
Whitfield said he did not have any problem denying the mayor’s office’s requests. He said the best advice he’s received came from his boss from his first job: Always put some money away so that you have the independence to say no, even to people above you.

“I’ve got a lot of fucking money in the bank,” Whitfield said. “It allows me to sleep at night. It allows me to do my job with a whole lot integrity and not worry about losing it.”

That’s a pretty epic FU money story!

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3787 on: April 07, 2021, 07:53:34 PM »
Lol, the SD mayor is clearly corrupt, but the Comptroller also sounds like a pain in the ass. Glad he has FU money to enable being a pain in the ass, but he seems like the kind of guy who makes other people wish they had their own FU money.

I work with someone who "questions every expense" for our department. It just gets really old having to explain things like why I used colored paper for a particular batch of copies because she's just stopping by to make sure I know that "colored paper costs more than white paper." Umm, yeah, I'm aware, but I get paid so much that the time I just spent justifying my easily justifiable use of the colored paper for that task last week has now wiped out all of the pennies you "saved" our employer for the entire year with your pettiness. She's also convinced that employees are stealing the dry ice because less get signed out than gets delivered each week. She doesn't understand the concepts of sublimation and thermal energy . . . she wanted to actually install a camera in the area where the dry ice is stored to catch the culprits.

Lol, some day I should submit my resignation letter on colored paper. Pink!

LennStar

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3788 on: April 08, 2021, 03:57:06 AM »
Lol, the SD mayor is clearly corrupt, but the Comptroller also sounds like a pain in the ass. Glad he has FU money to enable being a pain in the ass, but he seems like the kind of guy who makes other people wish they had their own FU money.

I work with someone who "questions every expense" for our department. It just gets really old having to explain things like why I used colored paper for a particular batch of copies because she's just stopping by to make sure I know that "colored paper costs more than white paper." Umm, yeah, I'm aware, but I get paid so much that the time I just spent justifying my easily justifiable use of the colored paper for that task last week has now wiped out all of the pennies you "saved" our employer for the entire year with your pettiness. She's also convinced that employees are stealing the dry ice because less get signed out than gets delivered each week. She doesn't understand the concepts of sublimation and thermal energy . . . she wanted to actually install a camera in the area where the dry ice is stored to catch the culprits.

Lol, some day I should submit my resignation letter on colored paper. Pink!

What does she think people do with the dry ice? Do a Corona-party every week? What do you do with that stuff privately?

Any yeas, I have seen (and heard a lot) about paper usage tracking. Somehow they never seem to realize that even if they prevent every private printout their wage alone is more expensive. Generally people have the moral thinking that 2 pages a month because it just happend is okay, but not 20 and don't do that at work.

Or the all-time favorite of the genious controller who insisted on thinner toilet paper and was then surprised that people used more. 

swashbucklinstache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3789 on: April 08, 2021, 06:59:24 AM »
Lol, the SD mayor is clearly corrupt, but the Comptroller also sounds like a pain in the ass. Glad he has FU money to enable being a pain in the ass, but he seems like the kind of guy who makes other people wish they had their own FU money.

I work with someone who "questions every expense" for our department. It just gets really old having to explain things like why I used colored paper for a particular batch of copies because she's just stopping by to make sure I know that "colored paper costs more than white paper." Umm, yeah, I'm aware, but I get paid so much that the time I just spent justifying my easily justifiable use of the colored paper for that task last week has now wiped out all of the pennies you "saved" our employer for the entire year with your pettiness. She's also convinced that employees are stealing the dry ice because less get signed out than gets delivered each week. She doesn't understand the concepts of sublimation and thermal energy . . . she wanted to actually install a camera in the area where the dry ice is stored to catch the culprits.

Lol, some day I should submit my resignation letter on colored paper. Pink!

What does she think people do with the dry ice? Do a Corona-party every week? What do you do with that stuff privately?

Any yeas, I have seen (and heard a lot) about paper usage tracking. Somehow they never seem to realize that even if they prevent every private printout their wage alone is more expensive. Generally people have the moral thinking that 2 pages a month because it just happend is okay, but not 20 and don't do that at work.

Or the all-time favorite of the genious controller who insisted on thinner toilet paper and was then surprised that people used more.
The answer to what you do at home with dry ice is always putting dish soap on it and running water over it or doing a ribbon seal like this:
https://youtu.be/tM9mi-5t_Ug


But the penny counter reminds me of when my university finally got rid of the job of going to every dorm and turning on/off the ability to either make or track the time used for long distance phone calls. Paying the department to do that cost much more than just letting everyone use it.


I do think in the SD case it was more 10k handbags, things for around the house, and first class travel upgrades if I recall correctly.

Sandi_k

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3790 on: April 08, 2021, 11:08:37 AM »

But the penny counter reminds me of when my university finally got rid of the job of going to every dorm and turning on/off the ability to either make or track the time used for long distance phone calls. Paying the department to do that cost much more than just letting everyone use it.


OMG, yes. One of my first jobs at my university was compiling and "billing" faculty for the faxes they sent out over the departmental machine. It took 20 hours per month to do the billing, and netted probably $50 back to the department's coffers.

When I became manager in a different unit a few years later, I unilaterally stopped the practice of charging for faxes, and became beloved by the faculty, *and* the staff who had been undertaking that task for years.

Malee55

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3791 on: April 12, 2021, 09:50:45 PM »
I have never considered having FU money because I have always loved my job (I am a nurse). However I look back at my career and I know that I have not applied for promotion because I did not want the extra stress and did not need more money. The extra money was minute and to me definitely not worth it. Having that option is so worth it.

draco44

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3792 on: April 12, 2021, 09:57:02 PM »
I have never considered having FU money because I have always loved my job (I am a nurse). However I look back at my career and I know that I have not applied for promotion because I did not want the extra stress and did not need more money. The extra money was minute and to me definitely not worth it. Having that option is so worth it.

I like this. It's preemptively saying FU to a job that wouldn't be good for you. The cleanest exit of all.

AMandM

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3793 on: April 18, 2021, 07:26:45 PM »
I am starting to tire of repeatedly being put in a position where the truth is "no one knows, because my great-grandboss can't answer a simple question in 10 months" to a politically connected internal client of his, who already knows that's the answer but benefits from me being the one to say it out loud. I think I'll let my boss know that tomorrow and re-verbalize that I've bit my tongue for the last time on the matter and he should engage in serious CYA now if he hasn't already.

It's been almost two weeks! Anything new? Maybe you're not updating the forum because you're off on a beach somewhere enjoying your FU money ;-)

swashbucklinstache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3794 on: April 19, 2021, 06:27:11 AM »
I am starting to tire of repeatedly being put in a position where the truth is "no one knows, because my great-grandboss can't answer a simple question in 10 months" to a politically connected internal client of his, who already knows that's the answer but benefits from me being the one to say it out loud. I think I'll let my boss know that tomorrow and re-verbalize that I've bit my tongue for the last time on the matter and he should engage in serious CYA now if he hasn't already.

It's been almost two weeks! Anything new? Maybe you're not updating the forum because you're off on a beach somewhere enjoying your FU money ;-)
Sadly I'm getting 2-3 'requests' a day and didn't want to just spam the thread everyday!

The latest reading between the lines is that I think the great-grandboss is going to declare my boss accountable for these roles to not deal with it. For me that means that since it will then be a direct line up from me, as opposed to now where my "uncle" is accountable, it is more of a "reassignment" than a "we're interested in you taking on this stretch role if you're interested" deal. That should mean it is a little harder to say FU to my immediate boss than the faceless C suit, and doubly so because I'm senior enough in a fluid enough industry that this isn't really an inappropriate/uncommon sort of thing. (Consulting job descriptions are basically "get it done, level appropriately").

I proactively nipped that in the bud with my boss and made it clear that I do not care who is accountable for the role, my questions still stand. In the meantime I continue to take on the pieces that are interesting to me and either ignore, say no to, or do the others as slowly as possible.

The bigger piece is that, unfortunately, my main project work ends 6/30. We're a billable industry where you eat what you kill and I don't yet have anything lined up. So the closer we creep to that day the closer we get to me not really being able to say no, because I'd then be saying "instead of doing this role I would prefer to instead do nothing and still get paid for it." So I'm talking with my boss this week to try to find other project opportunities. If I get defaulted into the role I will still push for $$ up front and will make it very clear that I'm unhappy with being backdoored into things if we get there. It sucks, because this is a role that could be fun (strategy and process creation) and have outsized returns (growth) if a happy and motivated employee does it and "kept the lights on" returns if they're not.

I've also spent the weekend getting my resume in shape. My industry, tech/data, is on fire right now. I could credibly apply to senior individual contributor roles at better companies, senior analytics or product manager roles at peer companies, or associate/director of analytics positions at smaller companies. I got pinged last week by a big tech recruiter for a data science position that would double my total comp. We're talking this week. I'm not competitive really and they hand out interviews like candy but you only need one to say yes...

For context, I'm at 835k which is a 2.9% WR for my current expenses (24k avg. the last 8 years). My FIRE plans are atypical though, as they're either "I have no idea, I'm only 32, let's not lock us in to < 40k a year before life events" or "spend a few years AirBnbing in city centers where housing alone takes you to 4.5% WR, plus some seed money gifted for others' retirement, so maybe 1.3-1.6mm?" I'm saving 115k a year, so it would be ideal if this company would just stay reasonable for the next 1-3 years...
« Last Edit: April 19, 2021, 06:29:59 AM by swashbucklinstache »

alcon835

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3795 on: April 19, 2021, 07:49:51 AM »
...I'm saving 115k a year, so it would be ideal if this company would just stay reasonable for the next 1-3 years...

That, right there, is the hard part about being so close to full Financial Independance when you're young. In my experience, the devil you know is often worse than the devil you don't - since you can vet for and negotiate against the things you don't like. I say, keep interviewing and looking at the options that are out there. No reason to be unhappy and forced into something you shouldn't be doing.

You aren't simply a cog to be moved around at your boss' (or boss' boss') desires. You are hired to fulfill a role and you enjoy it. More, you're willing to make the move and provide meaningfully higher ROI to your company. There is, quite honestly, no reason for them to force you into this without more pay.

And if you really do like it, then maybe showing them an offer from another company will be enough for them to write the check for your transition.

swashbucklinstache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3796 on: April 19, 2021, 09:27:32 AM »
...I'm saving 115k a year, so it would be ideal if this company would just stay reasonable for the next 1-3 years...

That, right there, is the hard part about being so close to full Financial Independance when you're young. In my experience, the devil you know is often worse than the devil you don't - since you can vet for and negotiate against the things you don't like. I say, keep interviewing and looking at the options that are out there. No reason to be unhappy and forced into something you shouldn't be doing.

You aren't simply a cog to be moved around at your boss' (or boss' boss') desires. You are hired to fulfill a role and you enjoy it. More, you're willing to make the move and provide meaningfully higher ROI to your company. There is, quite honestly, no reason for them to force you into this without more pay.

And if you really do like it, then maybe showing them an offer from another company will be enough for them to write the check for your transition.
Yep, exactly this. The company is essentially totally recession proof as well, and a lot of my value is accrued middle management company-specific knowledge. Even more, if I say no to these roles it will kill career progression here but it's very unlikely there'd be any further consequence. So I'm looking, but the deal would have to be sweet to jump. As little as another year or two could totally remove $ from the equation.

elysianfields

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3797 on: April 19, 2021, 09:16:45 PM »
Another bonus of being a Mustachian and ex-Boglehead is that at my current employer, I complained about our crappy 401k. The owners told me to write up a paper showing proof, which convinced them. Ended up moving the 401k to Guideline, reducing employer fees/costs by 77%.

That is the bomb, @jinga nation , way to implement a win-win!

bluebelle

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3798 on: April 20, 2021, 11:44:46 AM »
I have to wait for the lawsuits to settle before I give any details, but I never thought I'd have a story for this thread.   It's not in my nature to burn bridges on the way out, but the company fired the first salvo.   And it may not be 'epic', but having FU money has certainly given me the safety net to do what is right for my health.

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #3799 on: April 20, 2021, 11:47:16 AM »
I have to wait for the lawsuits to settle before I give any details, but I never thought I'd have a story for this thread.   It's not in my nature to burn bridges on the way out, but the company fired the first salvo.   And it may not be 'epic', but having FU money has certainly given me the safety net to do what is right for my health.

I don't know how it can fail to be epic with lawsuits involved.  Can't wait to hear it.