Author Topic: Epic FU money stories  (Read 713595 times)

fattest_foot

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1700 on: May 17, 2017, 11:39:59 AM »
My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.

mtn

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1701 on: May 17, 2017, 12:15:16 PM »
My boss was a complete jerk about my having a random day off on the school holidays. I had spent a small fortune on tickets for a musical for all of us (4). He wasn't going to approve my leave. The office manager convinced him to allow it as I already had the tickets. Apparently I was taking advantage of him. I decided then that any random days off I need, I'll be calling in sick. No one will be put out by my not being there. Maybe someone might have to take a message but seriously, i get maybe one phone call a month if I'm lucky. I work via email. My work is not generally time sensitive. The only reason for him to be like this is that he's a control freak.

This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.

"Not feeling good"

I didn't say I'm not feeling good because I'm feeling bad about my dog. I just said I'm not feeling good. Not a lie!

My boss mentioned that he took a mental health day the other day. Made me feel good about it. I've done it once before at this company--not because I was sick or stressed or needed a day away, I had just slept terribly and didn't want to go in. I wouldn't have been an asset that day anyways.

PhrugalPhan

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1702 on: May 17, 2017, 12:29:11 PM »
This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.
Employers can be crazy on the "rules".  Where I work they allow you to donate sick leave to other workers (as well you can use it to take care of family members).  So about 6 years ago my co-worker buddy "R" was going to get surgery where he couldn't drive and would need therapy multiple times a week.   So I was going to pick him up on the way to work, and then leave an hour early on therapy days to drop him off at the therapist (his wife would pick him up later). 

So I apply to donate sick time for the days I would be leaving work early to take him to therapy.  Sorry, no can do, that's not allowed.  You can donate sick leave, but you can't use sick leave to help a co-worker.  After being in a meeting with my buddy and some higher ups apologizing and saying they would look into what else could be done, I finally say forget it I will just use my annual leave on the days I leave early for him.   Afterwards R comes up to me and looks worried about what I said in the meeting.  I tell him not to worry about it, if I feel the need, I will just call in sick on a day I want to take off, and everything will be the same in the end, except now they can feel great about following the rules.

So yeah, I have learned to be quiet in certain situations.  It doesn't help anything when they are crazy about the rules.

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1703 on: May 17, 2017, 12:39:30 PM »
^Good for you!^ I hope your friend is fine now.
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BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1704 on: May 17, 2017, 12:43:13 PM »
This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.
Employers can be crazy on the "rules".  Where I work they allow you to donate sick leave to other workers (as well you can use it to take care of family members).  So about 6 years ago my co-worker buddy "R" was going to get surgery where he couldn't drive and would need therapy multiple times a week.   So I was going to pick him up on the way to work, and then leave an hour early on therapy days to drop him off at the therapist (his wife would pick him up later). 

So I apply to donate sick time for the days I would be leaving work early to take him to therapy.  Sorry, no can do, that's not allowed.  You can donate sick leave, but you can't use sick leave to help a co-worker.  After being in a meeting with my buddy and some higher ups apologizing and saying they would look into what else could be done, I finally say forget it I will just use my annual leave on the days I leave early for him.   Afterwards R comes up to me and looks worried about what I said in the meeting.  I tell him not to worry about it, if I feel the need, I will just call in sick on a day I want to take off, and everything will be the same in the end, except now they can feel great about following the rules.

So yeah, I have learned to be quiet in certain situations.  It doesn't help anything when they are crazy about the rules.
It took me a really long time to stop trying to "fix" what's broken in places like this and just do my own thing and keep quiet about it. 
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

mm1970

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1705 on: May 17, 2017, 04:42:06 PM »
This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.
Employers can be crazy on the "rules".  Where I work they allow you to donate sick leave to other workers (as well you can use it to take care of family members).  So about 6 years ago my co-worker buddy "R" was going to get surgery where he couldn't drive and would need therapy multiple times a week.   So I was going to pick him up on the way to work, and then leave an hour early on therapy days to drop him off at the therapist (his wife would pick him up later). 

So I apply to donate sick time for the days I would be leaving work early to take him to therapy.  Sorry, no can do, that's not allowed.  You can donate sick leave, but you can't use sick leave to help a co-worker.  After being in a meeting with my buddy and some higher ups apologizing and saying they would look into what else could be done, I finally say forget it I will just use my annual leave on the days I leave early for him.   Afterwards R comes up to me and looks worried about what I said in the meeting.  I tell him not to worry about it, if I feel the need, I will just call in sick on a day I want to take off, and everything will be the same in the end, except now they can feel great about following the rules.

So yeah, I have learned to be quiet in certain situations.  It doesn't help anything when they are crazy about the rules.
It took me a really long time to stop trying to "fix" what's broken in places like this and just do my own thing and keep quiet about it.
Yes.  I'm exempt.  At a job long ago and far away, I worked long hours.  And if I needed to leave early, or go to the doctor, I didn't take vacation or sick time ... why would I?  Back then, I easily worked 45-47 hours a week.  Our time card system (because we charged to contracts) was online.  It only cared if the total was 80 in 2 weeks.  Back then, sick time was separate, and unlimited.

I had coworkers whose bosses were sticklers.  As in, they would require their employees to take vacation if they left 2 hours early on a Friday.  Now mind you, these same coworkers would still have 95 hours of work on the books for the 2 weeks.  I simply said "just fill in what you worked and submit".  "But when I asked my boss, he said..."  Oh hon, that's your problem.  Don't ask, just do.  The computer doesn't care where the hours come from.  Is it more than 80?  Does your boss REALLY look to see that each day is >8, or does he see 95 and hit submit?

Took several years before they finally pulled the trigger and stopped taking an hour or two of vacation.

GreenSheep

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1706 on: May 18, 2017, 11:26:20 AM »
So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.

This is so true. The more you tell people, the more ammunition they have against you, even if you've done nothing wrong. It's amazing how people twist things for their own benefit or just because their favorite pastime is Being Offended.

It's also helpful to keep your mouth shut if you want to look really smart. I have a friend who's a neurosurgeon who thinks I'm super smart simply because when we were in school together, I only spoke up if I was 100% sure I knew the right answer, while other people just blurted out whatever came to mind for every question.

scottish

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1707 on: May 18, 2017, 03:35:29 PM »
So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.

This is so true. The more you tell people, the more ammunition they have against you, even if you've done nothing wrong. It's amazing how people twist things for their own benefit or just because their favorite pastime is Being Offended.

It's also helpful to keep your mouth shut if you want to look really smart. I have a friend who's a neurosurgeon who thinks I'm super smart simply because when we were in school together, I only spoke up if I was 100% sure I knew the right answer, while other people just blurted out whatever came to mind for every question.

This.   Better to look calm and remain silent until you have something to say that will have a meaningful impact.

Nudelkopf

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1708 on: May 18, 2017, 11:51:15 PM »
Meh, I have zero qualms about calling in sick. As a teacher we don't get to choose when to have annual leave, so if something comes up during term, I just call and say, "I'm not coming in today. I'm using sick leave." It's not like they're gonna ask for proof.

tickledginger

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1709 on: May 23, 2017, 09:36:12 AM »
I'd been holding off on posting to this thread, dreaming of the day where I could tell my own epic FU story. Now, of course, the tale is over - but I can't share details for privacy reasons!

Essentially, we're yet another successful tale of how that FU money supports freedom. My spouse has been holding down a survival job for years that has slowly tipped over from useful and supportive to an absolute nightmare. Spouse, despite his training and desire to pursue his artisic dreams, has an incredible work ethic and just. would. not. leave. There were all sorts of justifications - the health insurance, the other benefits, his retirement fund...all of which really were representing his fear that he didn't deserve a better job. It took almost a year, but I finally convinced him that this job was detrimental to his health and our marriage. I even used language from this thread, telling him that yes, eventually he'd have to have a job, but he didn't have to have THIS job! We set a FU fund goal and set a timeline, after which he had to leave this employer...if not for him, for my sanity! (I was going to grad school full time and working full time. It's been a serious couple of years.) And right after I submitted my thesis, he did it!

Our happy ending(ish - we're still adjusting to our new world, so it's not an ending) is that the FU fund gave him the confidence to leave and even negotiate favorable terms. Knowing that he could just walk away was so empowering, and has also jumpstarted his creative pursuits. He's got an opportunity to think and breathe for the first time in almost fifteen years, and I can already see the improvement in his mental and physical health. Our marriage is stronger. I'm about to graduate, and it feels like we have possibilities and are in charge of our future. Thanks to planning and frugality and that crucial FU fund, we are able to focus on the things that really matter...and one day, I look forward to sharing this story with glorious details!

I remain grateful to this thread for the inspiration. Thanks, all!

Laura33

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1710 on: May 23, 2017, 10:06:50 AM »
. . . .

Congratulations!  Wow, what a relief for you! 

I will have to tell my DH that he has done good in this world and his words will live on after him.  :-)
Laugh while you can, monkey-boy

runewell

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1711 on: May 23, 2017, 10:48:05 AM »

This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.

Sick leave probably has a specific definition of what it is intended for.  If taking your animal to the vet does not fall under the definition, then you should not have done what you did. 
Please leave Dicey out of this! Have you not been paying any attention? Trolls are not welcome here!

NESailor

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1712 on: May 23, 2017, 11:28:21 AM »

This kind of reminds me of a couple years ago where I had to take my dog to the vet so I used sick leave.

I was honest about it, and said that was the reason, and my supervisor threw a fit about how I couldn't use sick leave for that purpose. Had I just not said anything though, she would have been none the wiser and approved it.

So now I just keep my mouth shut. In fact, in general, I've learned that in the workplace it's probably best not to be forthcoming with personal information.


Sick leave probably has a specific definition of what it is intended for.  If taking your animal to the vet does not fall under the definition, then you should not have done what you did.

Hahaha, exactly.  Look, you even get reprimanded on an Internet forum when you don't ;).  I had an HR colleague tell me one thing that's stuck with me since then: "when you need to go, you tell, not ask"   And it's a rule I follow to this day.  Fortunately, for a salaried finance professional this is not a big deal.  Work gets done on time and in acceptable quality so when I need time for whatever, I just take it.  If I'm really gone out of town for fun I'll make that "vacation".

Liberty Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1713 on: May 23, 2017, 01:22:49 PM »
Having a really shitty day at work right now... would love to hear some more stories if anyone has one!

I'll give you one too. This one might even help you out...

A few months back my direct manager mentioned to me that he wanted me to take on a Really Shitty Responsibility (RSR) on top of my current work load. I've watched this specific RSR make three of my peers leave the company/leave the work group. I obviously wanted nothing to do with this RSR and it looked like I didn't really have a choice. I had pre-aligned with my DW that I'd leave the company if I got RSR. Before he had the change to formally give me the RSR, I had a conversation with the executive sponsor (ES) on the company's largest project which I am working on and kinda-sorta dotted line report to him. I told the ES that I was getting the RSR and that while I really enjoyed working on the large project and at the company, I probably wouldn't last at the company for very long after I got the RSR. He had personally saw what the RSR did to two out of the three other peers and understood completely.

Within a week, ES went to the CEO of the company and stated that one of his major project risks was needing to keep me focused on the large project. The CEO gave direction to my direct management to NOT give me the RSR. To this day my manager hasn't a clue that I influenced the ES to make this happen.

Morals of the story:
-Don't be afraid to walk away from a job once you have a level of FU money.
-There is typically someone around you in the organization that has interests that align with yours, learn to leverage them.

I apologize for the boasting but I can't exactly talk about this anywhere else.

It turns out that there was a second part to this story that I didn't realize at the time. Fast forward to today, my manager unexpectedly gives me a large, off cycle raise. Apparently, when my line leadership got wind that I might leave they decided to throw more money at me as a retention plan even though I didn't have a competing offer.

So ... I avoided the RSR and was given more money?? Turns out that's one of the many benefits of FU money...
"Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright" ~Benjamin Franklin, The Way to Wealth

BlueHouse

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1714 on: May 23, 2017, 02:04:00 PM »
I apologize for the boasting but I can't exactly talk about this anywhere else.

It turns out that there was a second part to this story that I didn't realize at the time. Fast forward to today, my manager unexpectedly gives me a large, off cycle raise. Apparently, when my line leadership got wind that I might leave they decided to throw more money at me as a retention plan even though I didn't have a competing offer.

So ... I avoided the RSR and was given more money?? Turns out that's one of the many benefits of FU money...
This just made my day.  Thanks for sharing!
Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand

Dicey

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1715 on: May 23, 2017, 04:44:10 PM »
I apologize for the boasting but I can't exactly talk about this anywhere else.

It turns out that there was a second part to this story that I didn't realize at the time. Fast forward to today, my manager unexpectedly gives me a large, off cycle raise. Apparently, when my line leadership got wind that I might leave they decided to throw more money at me as a retention plan even though I didn't have a competing offer.

So ... I avoided the RSR and was given more money?? Turns out that's one of the many benefits of FU money...
This just made my day.  Thanks for sharing!
Yup. Funny I don't consider stating facts, particularly in this context, boasting. Carry on, good Liberty Stache. And congratulations on that raise. You know what to do with it. Feel free to share the details if you wish. That won't be considered boasting here, either.
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pennyhandlebar

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1716 on: May 24, 2017, 02:38:19 AM »
I don't think this story qualifies as "epic," but it was definitely a reminder of how nice it is to not be dependent on a salary. As background, my wife and I are about 75% of the way to our target number -- we still have a ways to go, but one of us being out of work for few months (or even a year) would not be a big deal.

My company, which we'll call "Boutique Inc" has been acquired by a much larger company we'll call "Mega Co." The acquisition went through years ago, and change was pretty minimal for several years after the transaction closed. But now, Mega Co is working on rolling out standardized systems and processes across all its acquisitions globally. In theory, this makes sense and will be a positive change, but some of the global systems and processes are inferior to our existing solutions. For example, the SLAs for Mega Co's approach to one business critical process  would have gotten Boutique Inc's vendors laughed out of the room.

With that background, you can understand there was some tension in the air as we gathered in the conference room for a global conference call covering additional new systems and processes that would be rolled out at Boutique Inc. A number of people raised objections with our leaders from Mega Co during the call and tempers were getting a bit strained. One of my coworkers unfortunately asked a perfectly innocuous question that -- apparently -- was the final straw, because it triggered an angry speech about Boutique Inc's substandard financial performance (this is true, we are not having a great year), and a statement that Mega Co's processes would help us return to profitability and keep Mega Co from closing Boutique Inc down.

When this speech concluded, I said something smart to the effect of "Gee, Boutique Inc is such a badly run business that it would be ridiculous to acquire us!" I didn't realize when I said this that our conference room mic was on -- I thought we were on mute. Fortunately or not, I wasn't close enough to the mic for it to pick me up though. :-)

Immediately after this call, a number of the junior staff were worried about their jobs, and I realized I was completely unworried. I think there's some more mature perspective to thank, but being 75% of the way to FIRE has to help too!

APowers

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1717 on: June 02, 2017, 10:59:14 PM »
Not epic, but still a little bit exciting.

A couple months ago, I asked my boss at Domino's to take me off the schedule, as I have a house to remodel, and over full-time projects at my day job. I told him that I'd be available to come in if they had someone call in sick and they couldn't find anyone else.

They called me a couple days ago to come in; it didn't conflict with what I had going on, so I agreed. About an hour into the shift, the shift manager asked which of us closers (me and the other scheduled closing driver) was going to drive the company car....

The company car. This franchise has a company car, which the owner requires to be driven daily. It's terrible. Relatively uncomfortable, no cupholder large enough for my drink, no flashlight/spotlight for finding house numbers in the dark, TINTED WINDOWS (seriously, who puts tinted windows in a late-night pizza delivery vehicle?), and no mileage reimbursement (important, since I drive a Civic and actually make money on this). AND, the last time I drove it, I had two separate orders of pizza slip off the seat onto the floor (no, I wasn't braking hard); I already hated driving it, but after that incident, I decided I was not driving it again.

I calmly told her that I was not going to drive it (citing the most relevant-to-the-business reason of "I'm not driving a car that throws pizzas off the seat; that's bad customer service"). I thought about it as I was refusing-- what's the worst that can happen? They cut my hours...to what, zero? I'm already there. They fire me....and then the whole closing shift is screwed over by being shorthanded? I don't have to be there, but they need me.

It's not because I have enough money in the bank to not need a job, but being in a position where my other job is already giving me over full-time hours, meant I had power to make this job not suck. Seriously, though-- delivering pizzas is fun. Driving the company car is...not fun.

Epilogue...they also called me the next day, and the shift manager, in trying to convince me to come in, specifically said "I promise I won't ask you to drive the company car."


radram

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1718 on: June 03, 2017, 05:59:01 AM »
Not epic, but still a little bit exciting.

A couple months ago, I asked my boss at Domino's to take me off the schedule, as I have a house to remodel, and over full-time projects at my day job. I told him that I'd be available to come in if they had someone call in sick and they couldn't find anyone else.

They called me a couple days ago to come in; it didn't conflict with what I had going on, so I agreed. About an hour into the shift, the shift manager asked which of us closers (me and the other scheduled closing driver) was going to drive the company car....

The company car. This franchise has a company car, which the owner requires to be driven daily. It's terrible. Relatively uncomfortable, no cupholder large enough for my drink, no flashlight/spotlight for finding house numbers in the dark, TINTED WINDOWS (seriously, who puts tinted windows in a late-night pizza delivery vehicle?), and no mileage reimbursement (important, since I drive a Civic and actually make money on this). AND, the last time I drove it, I had two separate orders of pizza slip off the seat onto the floor (no, I wasn't braking hard); I already hated driving it, but after that incident, I decided I was not driving it again.

I calmly told her that I was not going to drive it (citing the most relevant-to-the-business reason of "I'm not driving a car that throws pizzas off the seat; that's bad customer service"). I thought about it as I was refusing-- what's the worst that can happen? They cut my hours...to what, zero? I'm already there. They fire me....and then the whole closing shift is screwed over by being shorthanded? I don't have to be there, but they need me.

It's not because I have enough money in the bank to not need a job, but being in a position where my other job is already giving me over full-time hours, meant I had power to make this job not suck. Seriously, though-- delivering pizzas is fun. Driving the company car is...not fun.

Epilogue...they also called me the next day, and the shift manager, in trying to convince me to come in, specifically said "I promise I won't ask you to drive the company car."

Great story. Did you go back? Would you go back in the future?

Freedomin5

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1719 on: June 03, 2017, 08:01:10 AM »
Finally have one to contribute.

A few years ago, the company was acquired. They wanted all employees to sign new contracts with the new company as old company technically no longer existed. Many of us were contract employees at the time and paid only for the hours we work. The good consultants were working many hours and billing for more hours. The incompetent ones were working fewer hours and billing less.

So new company decides they want everyone on salary. Except they set the salary structure based on averaging the billing hours of all employees. This meant that the good ones were offered packages that were worth a lot less than they were currently making, and the incompetent ones were offered packages that were a lot more lucrative than their current situation.

You can probably predict what happened. The bad ones jumped at the opportunity. The good ones without FU money reluctantly signed and have been complaining since. The good ones with FU money asked, "You know my current package. If you were me, would you sign this?" HR had no good response to this, stopped responding to our emails and basically left us alone keeping the terms of the old contract.

APowers

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1720 on: June 03, 2017, 08:07:57 AM »
Not epic, but still a little bit exciting.

A couple months ago, I asked my boss at Domino's to take me off the schedule, as I have a house to remodel, and over full-time projects at my day job. I told him that I'd be available to come in if they had someone call in sick and they couldn't find anyone else.

They called me a couple days ago to come in; it didn't conflict with what I had going on, so I agreed. About an hour into the shift, the shift manager asked which of us closers (me and the other scheduled closing driver) was going to drive the company car....

The company car. This franchise has a company car, which the owner requires to be driven daily. It's terrible. Relatively uncomfortable, no cupholder large enough for my drink, no flashlight/spotlight for finding house numbers in the dark, TINTED WINDOWS (seriously, who puts tinted windows in a late-night pizza delivery vehicle?), and no mileage reimbursement (important, since I drive a Civic and actually make money on this). AND, the last time I drove it, I had two separate orders of pizza slip off the seat onto the floor (no, I wasn't braking hard); I already hated driving it, but after that incident, I decided I was not driving it again.

I calmly told her that I was not going to drive it (citing the most relevant-to-the-business reason of "I'm not driving a car that throws pizzas off the seat; that's bad customer service"). I thought about it as I was refusing-- what's the worst that can happen? They cut my hours...to what, zero? I'm already there. They fire me....and then the whole closing shift is screwed over by being shorthanded? I don't have to be there, but they need me.

It's not because I have enough money in the bank to not need a job, but being in a position where my other job is already giving me over full-time hours, meant I had power to make this job not suck. Seriously, though-- delivering pizzas is fun. Driving the company car is...not fun.

Epilogue...they also called me the next day, and the shift manager, in trying to convince me to come in, specifically said "I promise I won't ask you to drive the company car."

Great story. Did you go back? Would you go back in the future?
I did. The money's not bad (ends up netting about $15/hr), and it's fun... at least when I'm not being made to do stupid stuff. I'm still on call for them, and they *love* me-- seriously, they act like I'm some kind of returning messiah when I come in.

FIREby35

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1721 on: June 04, 2017, 08:01:27 AM »
Not epic, but still a little bit exciting.

A couple months ago, I asked my boss at Domino's to take me off the schedule, as I have a house to remodel, and over full-time projects at my day job. I told him that I'd be available to come in if they had someone call in sick and they couldn't find anyone else.

They called me a couple days ago to come in; it didn't conflict with what I had going on, so I agreed. About an hour into the shift, the shift manager asked which of us closers (me and the other scheduled closing driver) was going to drive the company car....

The company car. This franchise has a company car, which the owner requires to be driven daily. It's terrible. Relatively uncomfortable, no cupholder large enough for my drink, no flashlight/spotlight for finding house numbers in the dark, TINTED WINDOWS (seriously, who puts tinted windows in a late-night pizza delivery vehicle?), and no mileage reimbursement (important, since I drive a Civic and actually make money on this). AND, the last time I drove it, I had two separate orders of pizza slip off the seat onto the floor (no, I wasn't braking hard); I already hated driving it, but after that incident, I decided I was not driving it again.

I calmly told her that I was not going to drive it (citing the most relevant-to-the-business reason of "I'm not driving a car that throws pizzas off the seat; that's bad customer service"). I thought about it as I was refusing-- what's the worst that can happen? They cut my hours...to what, zero? I'm already there. They fire me....and then the whole closing shift is screwed over by being shorthanded? I don't have to be there, but they need me.

It's not because I have enough money in the bank to not need a job, but being in a position where my other job is already giving me over full-time hours, meant I had power to make this job not suck. Seriously, though-- delivering pizzas is fun. Driving the company car is...not fun.

Epilogue...they also called me the next day, and the shift manager, in trying to convince me to come in, specifically said "I promise I won't ask you to drive the company car."

Great story. Did you go back? Would you go back in the future?
I did. The money's not bad (ends up netting about $15/hr), and it's fun... at least when I'm not being made to do stupid stuff. I'm still on call for them, and they *love* me-- seriously, they act like I'm some kind of returning messiah when I come in.

I delivered pizza for five years to pay for community college and university. The last job I had before making it "big time" into the biggest corporate law firm in my region was delivering for Pizza Hut. That was a big jump! Now you are making me wax nostalgic about my pizza delivery days :)

Zamboni

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1722 on: June 05, 2017, 06:05:58 AM »
Pizza delivery drivers represent! One of the more fun jobs in my life . . . and it made me appreciate the value of tipping the delivery driver. The irony is that I only get pizza delivered about once or twice a year now . . .

Maenad

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1723 on: June 06, 2017, 09:57:29 AM »
I finally have an FU money story, not sure how epic it is...

I work in a regulated industry, we have numerous countries that send auditors to our site, as well as companies that audit to various ISO standards for use elsewhere in the world.

Last week, one of the auditing companies sent in an auditor that we've had visit us before, but this time was... different. First, he started talking politics. Like, obvious-what-his-views-were politics. And much like the complaints about professors pushing their political views on their students, we weren't really able to complain, since if you make an auditor cranky, you get lots of findings/observations/non-conformities.

Then it got worse. He threw out a couple of racist/xenophobic shots over the bow. Again, we can't say anything due to the power imbalance.

The FU money comes in today. I set up a meeting with my boss, and said that I think we should "fire" this auditor for his obvious misalignment with our company's values (the racism part, not the politics part), and regardless of what they do, I will not work another audit where he's the auditor. I knew there was a risk of being punished professionally for my refusal to work audits, since it's part of my core job function, but my FU money put me in the position to take a stand here.

My boss made the right noises, at least, about addressing this. What's important to me is that I can still look myself in the mirror tomorrow, and the FU money really helped with that.

jfolsen

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1724 on: June 06, 2017, 10:46:20 AM »
I finally have an FU money story, not sure how epic it is...

I work in a regulated industry, we have numerous countries that send auditors to our site, as well as companies that audit to various ISO standards for use elsewhere in the world.

Last week, one of the auditing companies sent in an auditor that we've had visit us before, but this time was... different. First, he started talking politics. Like, obvious-what-his-views-were politics. And much like the complaints about professors pushing their political views on their students, we weren't really able to complain, since if you make an auditor cranky, you get lots of findings/observations/non-conformities.

Then it got worse. He threw out a couple of racist/xenophobic shots over the bow. Again, we can't say anything due to the power imbalance.

The FU money comes in today. I set up a meeting with my boss, and said that I think we should "fire" this auditor for his obvious misalignment with our company's values (the racism part, not the politics part), and regardless of what they do, I will not work another audit where he's the auditor. I knew there was a risk of being punished professionally for my refusal to work audits, since it's part of my core job function, but my FU money put me in the position to take a stand here.

My boss made the right noises, at least, about addressing this. What's important to me is that I can still look myself in the mirror tomorrow, and the FU money really helped with that.

You did the right thing! I am not sure of your specific situation, but usually the ISO audits are handled through a registrar, who sends out the external auditors. Your company is free to pick another registrar, so while an auditor has a lot of "tactical" power, and it's good to not piss them off during the audit, the company has the "strategic" power to dump that registrar, or at least complain and make sure that person is never sent to you again.

Liberty Stache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1725 on: June 06, 2017, 02:29:38 PM »
I finally have an FU money story, not sure how epic it is...

I work in a regulated industry, we have numerous countries that send auditors to our site, as well as companies that audit to various ISO standards for use elsewhere in the world.

Last week, one of the auditing companies sent in an auditor that we've had visit us before, but this time was... different. First, he started talking politics. Like, obvious-what-his-views-were politics. And much like the complaints about professors pushing their political views on their students, we weren't really able to complain, since if you make an auditor cranky, you get lots of findings/observations/non-conformities.

Then it got worse. He threw out a couple of racist/xenophobic shots over the bow. Again, we can't say anything due to the power imbalance.

The FU money comes in today. I set up a meeting with my boss, and said that I think we should "fire" this auditor for his obvious misalignment with our company's values (the racism part, not the politics part), and regardless of what they do, I will not work another audit where he's the auditor. I knew there was a risk of being punished professionally for my refusal to work audits, since it's part of my core job function, but my FU money put me in the position to take a stand here.

My boss made the right noises, at least, about addressing this. What's important to me is that I can still look myself in the mirror tomorrow, and the FU money really helped with that.

Well done!
"Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright" ~Benjamin Franklin, The Way to Wealth

Nangirl17

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1726 on: June 07, 2017, 12:10:06 PM »
....but my FU money put me in the position to take a stand here.


This is epic.

nara

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1727 on: June 08, 2017, 09:59:56 PM »
I'm not FI, but I do have an FU money type story!

I was working a job that was really burning me out...waking up at 4:00 every morning for a 3+ hour round trip commute to NYC and working 8-10 hours a day with special needs children. My boyfriend and I (now my husband) decided to quit our jobs and go teach English in Korea for a year. We signed our one year contracts for Korea, worked our last few weeks, and then went to Florida mid-winter to WWOOF (live and volunteer at) on an organic farm. What a change it was to go from a stressful city job in bleak winter to picking flowers all day and sleeping under an avocado tree! We lived virtually for free for that month prior to leaving for Korea. While in Korea, we went on trips every weekend and traveled to Thailand and Japan during our school breaks. We had free housing and managed to save enough money to spend 3 months traveling to India, Nepal, China, Tibet, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Malaysia after our contract ended. It was the best time of our lives!!! We even brought a dog home with us from Korea that we rescued from the meat trade (she's now 7!)

When we returned to the US, we were able to pay for our wedding and had enough money leftover still to sit around for 2 months while looking for jobs. We didn't make any money that year---but we didn't spend any of our savings either and had experiences that we wouldn't trade for anything!!!! I accepted a job offer across the country (the year off made no real dent in my ability to find a new job..) and we moved to our new home in Colorado without ever looking back! The decision to abandon our lives in NY for a little adventure was the best thing we've EVER done!!!

felixbf

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1728 on: June 08, 2017, 11:53:53 PM »
I'm not FI, but I do have an FU money type story!

I was working a job that was really burning me out...waking up at 4:00 every morning for a 3+ hour round trip commute to NYC and working 8-10 hours a day with special needs children. My boyfriend and I (now my husband) decided to quit our jobs and go teach English in Korea for a year. We signed our one year contracts for Korea, worked our last few weeks, and then went to Florida mid-winter to WWOOF (live and volunteer at) on an organic farm. What a change it was to go from a stressful city job in bleak winter to picking flowers all day and sleeping under an avocado tree! We lived virtually for free for that month prior to leaving for Korea. While in Korea, we went on trips every weekend and traveled to Thailand and Japan during our school breaks. We had free housing and managed to save enough money to spend 3 months traveling to India, Nepal, China, Tibet, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Malaysia after our contract ended. It was the best time of our lives!!! We even brought a dog home with us from Korea that we rescued from the meat trade (she's now 7!)

When we returned to the US, we were able to pay for our wedding and had enough money leftover still to sit around for 2 months while looking for jobs. We didn't make any money that year---but we didn't spend any of our savings either and had experiences that we wouldn't trade for anything!!!! I accepted a job offer across the country (the year off made no real dent in my ability to find a new job..) and we moved to our new home in Colorado without ever looking back! The decision to abandon our lives in NY for a little adventure was the best thing we've EVER done!!!

That's awesome :)

Livingthedream55

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1729 on: June 09, 2017, 07:03:24 AM »
I'm not FI, but I do have an FU money type story!

I was working a job that was really burning me out...waking up at 4:00 every morning for a 3+ hour round trip commute to NYC and working 8-10 hours a day with special needs children. My boyfriend and I (now my husband) decided to quit our jobs and go teach English in Korea for a year. We signed our one year contracts for Korea, worked our last few weeks, and then went to Florida mid-winter to WWOOF (live and volunteer at) on an organic farm. What a change it was to go from a stressful city job in bleak winter to picking flowers all day and sleeping under an avocado tree! We lived virtually for free for that month prior to leaving for Korea. While in Korea, we went on trips every weekend and traveled to Thailand and Japan during our school breaks. We had free housing and managed to save enough money to spend 3 months traveling to India, Nepal, China, Tibet, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Malaysia after our contract ended. It was the best time of our lives!!! We even brought a dog home with us from Korea that we rescued from the meat trade (she's now 7!)

When we returned to the US, we were able to pay for our wedding and had enough money leftover still to sit around for 2 months while looking for jobs. We didn't make any money that year---but we didn't spend any of our savings either and had experiences that we wouldn't trade for anything!!!! I accepted a job offer across the country (the year off made no real dent in my ability to find a new job..) and we moved to our new home in Colorado without ever looking back! The decision to abandon our lives in NY for a little adventure was the best thing we've EVER done!!!

Awesome and epic!!!



arebelspy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1730 on: June 18, 2017, 09:42:20 AM »
Woo, so many good stories in the last few pages!  I love this thread.  :D
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, and now travel the world full time with a kid.
If you want to know more about me, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (occasionally) blog at AdventuringAlong.com.
You can also read my forum "Journal."

Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1731 on: June 18, 2017, 06:02:10 PM »
Cross posting from the 2017 FIRE thread.

Well I am a month away from my stated FIRE date. I am not sure if I will hit it, but I am definitely trying to chart my escape path.

I am currently tapping into my FU reservoirs to try and right some recent wrongs at work. Will it turn into an epic FU money story? Only time will tell. This may slightly delay my FIRE date but will be well worth it life-satisfaction-wise.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1732 on: June 19, 2017, 12:35:54 PM »
Cross posting from the 2017 FIRE thread.

Well I am a month away from my stated FIRE date. I am not sure if I will hit it, but I am definitely trying to chart my escape path.

I am currently tapping into my FU reservoirs to try and right some recent wrongs at work. Will it turn into an epic FU money story? Only time will tell. This may slightly delay my FIRE date but will be well worth it life-satisfaction-wise.
Please share if/when you can! :)

Flyingkea

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1733 on: June 25, 2017, 06:51:58 PM »
Posting to follow and with a minor story of my own.

I work in aviation, and it is really common for employers to take advantage of low hour pilots - getting them to do unpaid labor, not always in exchange for flying hours, and certainly less than the legally mandated minimums.

I had 3 years off from aviation, being a SAHP, and I recently went back to work as a casual employee for a small flight school. This school is better than most wrt pay, but recently they sent out an email asking us to be rostered on for a day in the office, unpaid.
Because I didn't need this job, I was able to query this email (it was illegal, but the other guys there are pretty junior and didn't realise how bad it was and needed the experience more than I did) and shortly after sending my query, had some back tracking from the boss in terms of what he was wanting - which was now legal.
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firelight

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1734 on: June 25, 2017, 10:31:45 PM »
Posting to follow and with a minor story of my own.

I work in aviation, and it is really common for employers to take advantage of low hour pilots - getting them to do unpaid labor, not always in exchange for flying hours, and certainly less than the legally mandated minimums.

I had 3 years off from aviation, being a SAHP, and I recently went back to work as a casual employee for a small flight school. This school is better than most wrt pay, but recently they sent out an email asking us to be rostered on for a day in the office, unpaid.
Because I didn't need this job, I was able to query this email (it was illegal, but the other guys there are pretty junior and didn't realise how bad it was and needed the experience more than I did) and shortly after sending my query, had some back tracking from the boss in terms of what he was wanting - which was now legal.
Great job! I don't think it's minor - I'm sure your colleagues would've appreciated it too.

Daisy

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1735 on: June 30, 2017, 05:17:58 PM »
Cross posting from the 2017 FIRE thread again as it is FU money related.

Sooooo...here is the story.

I thought I might FIRE in 2016 (but probably would have OMY’d anyways), but ended up having a medical emergency that ended up with a brain injury. I have recovered remarkably well, but still have some lingering issues with my cognitive skills not 100% for my high-skilled job. I was out of work for 6 months in 2016. So the time off, although for medical reasons, gave me some breathing room. Also, I returned to a friendly work environment, so I wanted to give them 100% (or rather 80% since I am part time) of my effort in gratitude.

Well, as 2016 was ending and a couple of months after returning to work and now into 2017, the shine of optimism and positivity I was feeling started to fade as two d**k managers started to critique my performance, seemingly to me accusing me of not performing to my previous standards on purpose. They gave me a terrible rating which resulted in no annual pay increase, and doubtfully future bonuses. They threatened to demote me two levels (not just one, talk about sticking a knife in the wound).

But I do have a medical disability due to the brain injury. Although not as bad as it could have been, I still think a little slower and have some trouble with memory and multi-tasking. Now, at first I thought “great, this will probably lead to a layoff and a severance package later in the year as I have been yearning for as I am about to launch into FIRE”. But, I just felt this wasn’t right. Although I can take the financial hit of a layoff, I thought about others with disabilities that in this same situation would be in dire straits if d**k managers that didn’t understand disabilities treated them this way.

I knew my mega-corp’s HR department would be appalled at how my d**k managers were treating someone with a cognitive disability and that this problem was localized to my department. All mention of the brain injury fell onto deaf ears with my d**k mangers. So, I decided to take the risk and go talk to HR and tell them what was happening. The HR person was appalled that my d**k managers had told me upon my return that I should avoid taking PTO to “show my dedication”. And that they totally downplayed my lead role on the project I was on right before the injury (even after having a great performance review on it). I was also threatened with a 2-level demotion (just to stick the knife in the wound). I also decided to throw in some other unsavory things going on in my department where people aren’t treated as professionals (grading people from A to F based on how many tests they write).

So HR person ended up talking to my direct manager and I was prepared for the fallout at this week’s “sync up” with the manager. I thought the manager would be upset. Then I thought it would be the perfect fodder to go the HR in a couple of weeks and say “just give me a buyout package because I can’t deal with these managers”. Rather, my manager’s attitude seems to have done a 180 after their “talk” with HR, who probably set them straight on the law. My manager was totally understanding and very nice this time around.

So now I am in a pickle. I decided to stand up for the disabled rights. I could have just taken the punishment, not gone to HR, and ended up getting laid off, but now it seems I have turned things around with my d**k managers (after HR probably scared them) and now I may not have grounds to go to HR and ask for a buyout package. And after managers are now being nice to me, I may feel obligated to continue on for a while.

But I really want to FIRE...and do it with a package. Sigh...the saga continues…

I guess the FU money came in handy and I hope there is more awareness of all types of disabilities throughout my company now. Or at least they are just scared of lawyers getting involved.

scottish

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1736 on: June 30, 2017, 05:23:10 PM »
But you did the right thing.   That's important.

Also, this story may not be over yet.   In my experience, d**ks don't stop being d**ks just because HR talks to them.

tyort1

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1737 on: June 30, 2017, 05:33:24 PM »
But you did the right thing.   That's important.

Also, this story may not be over yet.   In my experience, d**ks don't stop being d**ks just because HR talks to them.

Agreed.  On both counts.
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G-dog

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1738 on: June 30, 2017, 06:01:48 PM »
But you did the right thing.   That's important.

Also, this story may not be over yet.   In my experience, d**ks don't stop being d**ks just because HR talks to them.

Exactly. It is their core behavior. This will get interesting....

rpr

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1739 on: June 30, 2017, 06:21:32 PM »
Posting to follow. I love the stories. Maybe I'll have one someday.

Bicycle_B

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1740 on: June 30, 2017, 06:26:40 PM »
Cross posting from the 2017 FIRE thread again as it is FU money related.

I knew my mega-corp’s HR department would be appalled at how my d**k managers were treating someone with a cognitive disability and that this problem was localized to my department. All mention of the brain injury fell onto deaf ears with my d**k mangers. So, I decided to take the risk and go talk to HR and tell them what was happening. The HR person was appalled that my d**k managers had told me upon my return that I should avoid taking PTO to “show my dedication”. And that they totally downplayed my lead role on the project I was on right before the injury (even after having a great performance review on it). I was also threatened with a 2-level demotion (just to stick the knife in the wound). I also decided to throw in some other unsavory things going on in my department where people aren’t treated as professionals (grading people from A to F based on how many tests they write).

So HR person ended up talking to my direct manager and I was prepared for the fallout at this week’s “sync up” with the manager. I thought the manager would be upset. Then I thought it would be the perfect fodder to go the HR in a couple of weeks and say “just give me a buyout package because I can’t deal with these managers”. Rather, my manager’s attitude seems to have done a 180 after their “talk” with HR, who probably set them straight on the law. My manager was totally understanding and very nice this time around.


Way to go Daisy!


So now I am in a pickle. I decided to stand up for the disabled rights. I could have just taken the punishment, not gone to HR, and ended up getting laid off, but now it seems I have turned things around with my d**k managers (after HR probably scared them) and now I may not have grounds to go to HR and ask for a buyout package. And after managers are now being nice to me, I may feel obligated to continue on for a while.

But I really want to FIRE...and do it with a package.

...Or at least they are just scared of lawyers getting involved.

Maybe they're still scared, and they'd be willing to arrange a package if asked?  After all, the managers got better, but they should have been properly trained in the first place, the company is still at fault. If HR has any wiggle room to arrange a package, whether due to these incidents or other grounds, perhaps they would still do it.  Especially if you're up front that the managers improved, and you appreciate that HR did a good job fixing it, you're "asking only for whatever is actually within their professional discretion to arrange" or some such?

Good luck pulling the ripcord in any case. 

FIREby35

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1741 on: June 30, 2017, 06:57:17 PM »
Good story. Good job.

As for those guys being straightened up, don't count on it. Keep your wits about you. I agree, they will try and set you up for something.

If they do try more stuff it will just get you a bigger severance package. So, don't let it stress you out, one way or the other :)

firelight

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1742 on: June 30, 2017, 07:08:59 PM »
Awesome story Daisy!

You can still go to HR and say you don't feel comfortable with the d**k managers after what happened and that you fear retribution and that you want the package if possible. The worst they can say is no but it'll also put them on alert to anything that the managers set you up for and make sure someone else is aware of this possibility

paddedhat

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1743 on: June 30, 2017, 07:12:54 PM »
But you did the right thing.   That's important.

Also, this story may not be over yet.   In my experience, d**ks don't stop being d**ks just because HR talks to them.

Yep, my dear wife successfully tackled the last 2/3rds of her thirty year teaching career with a traumatic brain injury. Sadly, when you are disabled, there is a small subset of subhumans that WILL kick you when you are down. Some of these bastards even get great joy in doing so.
The very real threat of damage to their career, or creating a legal shit-storm, is often your only protection. Believing that they have "seen the light" is only a delusion on your part. I would strongly suggest that you document to the point of being obsessive. My wife's last principal was one sick individual, who found a lot of satisfaction in making my wife's work life absolutely horrible. The big mistake the principal made was documenting some of her totally illegal abusive behavior and stupidly leaving a significant email trail. The wife had enough and scheduled a meeting with the district's HR director. We gave the HR guy an overview of what was going on, and decided to keep the evidence out of the discussion, just reviewing some key points.  He clearly understood that an ADA lawyer would of thought they died and went to litigation heaven if they ever got their hands of that documentation. After he picked himself off the floor, he offered the wife a chance to leave a year early, with half pay, full benefits and a full year's pension credit. Since we had a nice stash, the money was no issue. Shortly after, the principal was demoted from a showplace, new eighty million dollar middle school to the smallest building in the district, in a remote location. A few years later, still delusional about her status with the district, she applied for, and fully expected to be chosen to replace the retiring assistant superintendent. Ouch, sorry but no love from management. The insider's bet is that the district will be closing her building, and showing her the door, as enrollment continue to drop. I'm quite sure that the DW played a significant part in torpedoing that bitch's career.  Karma, can be a bitch......................

Oh, one more thing daisy, It's DICK. You're here, where the fucks fly, as required. Loosen up :)


« Last Edit: June 30, 2017, 07:16:57 PM by paddedhat »

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1744 on: June 30, 2017, 07:27:45 PM »
But you did the right thing.   That's important.

Also, this story may not be over yet.   In my experience, d**ks don't stop being d**ks just because HR talks to them.

Yep, my dear wife successfully tackled the last 2/3rds of her thirty year teaching career with a traumatic brain injury. Sadly, when you are disabled, there is a small subset of subhumans that WILL kick you when you are down. Some of these bastards even get great joy in doing so.
The very real threat of damage to their career, or creating a legal shit-storm, is often your only protection. Believing that they have "seen the light" is only a delusion on your part. I would strongly suggest that you document to the point of being obsessive. My wife's last principal was one sick individual, who found a lot of satisfaction in making my wife's work life absolutely horrible. The big mistake the principal made was documenting some of her totally illegal abusive behavior and stupidly leaving a significant email trail. The wife had enough and scheduled a meeting with the district's HR director. We gave the HR guy an overview of what was going on, and decided to keep the evidence out of the discussion, just reviewing some key points.  He clearly understood that an ADA lawyer would of thought they died and went to litigation heaven if they ever got their hands of that documentation. After he picked himself off the floor, he offered the wife a chance to leave a year early, with half pay, full benefits and a full year's pension credit. Since we had a nice stash, the money was no issue. Shortly after, the principal was demoted from a showplace, new eighty million dollar middle school to the smallest building in the district, in a remote location. A few years later, still delusional about her status with the district, she applied for, and fully expected to be chosen to replace the retiring assistant superintendent. Ouch, sorry but no love from management. The insider's bet is that the district will be closing her building, and showing her the door, as enrollment continue to drop. I'm quite sure that the DW played a significant part in torpedoing that bitch's career.  Karma, can be a bitch......................

Oh, one more thing daisy, It's DICK. You're here, where the fucks fly, as required. Loosen up :)

I'm sorry this happened to your wife. It must have been very stressful for her. I have a brain injured colleague and I know it's been a struggle for her. Unfortunately, although no fault of the brain injured colleague's, it's also been a struggle for me. Management have changed her role to allow for her abilities by increasing mine, with no increase in pay or recognition or anything else that might make this situation easier to swallow. That could be why some of your wife's colleagues were dicks. I hope I'm only a dick to management, and not to my colleague!

paddedhat

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1745 on: June 30, 2017, 09:31:10 PM »
But you did the right thing.   That's important.

Also, this story may not be over yet.   In my experience, d**ks don't stop being d**ks just because HR talks to them.

Yep, my dear wife successfully tackled the last 2/3rds of her thirty year teaching career with a traumatic brain injury. Sadly, when you are disabled, there is a small subset of subhumans that WILL kick you when you are down. Some of these bastards even get great joy in doing so.
The very real threat of damage to their career, or creating a legal shit-storm, is often your only protection. Believing that they have "seen the light" is only a delusion on your part. I would strongly suggest that you document to the point of being obsessive. My wife's last principal was one sick individual, who found a lot of satisfaction in making my wife's work life absolutely horrible. The big mistake the principal made was documenting some of her totally illegal abusive behavior and stupidly leaving a significant email trail. The wife had enough and scheduled a meeting with the district's HR director. We gave the HR guy an overview of what was going on, and decided to keep the evidence out of the discussion, just reviewing some key points.  He clearly understood that an ADA lawyer would of thought they died and went to litigation heaven if they ever got their hands of that documentation. After he picked himself off the floor, he offered the wife a chance to leave a year early, with half pay, full benefits and a full year's pension credit. Since we had a nice stash, the money was no issue. Shortly after, the principal was demoted from a showplace, new eighty million dollar middle school to the smallest building in the district, in a remote location. A few years later, still delusional about her status with the district, she applied for, and fully expected to be chosen to replace the retiring assistant superintendent. Ouch, sorry but no love from management. The insider's bet is that the district will be closing her building, and showing her the door, as enrollment continue to drop. I'm quite sure that the DW played a significant part in torpedoing that bitch's career.  Karma, can be a bitch......................

Oh, one more thing daisy, It's DICK. You're here, where the fucks fly, as required. Loosen up :)

I'm sorry this happened to your wife. It must have been very stressful for her. I have a brain injured colleague and I know it's been a struggle for her. Unfortunately, although no fault of the brain injured colleague's, it's also been a struggle for me. Management have changed her role to allow for her abilities by increasing mine, with no increase in pay or recognition or anything else that might make this situation easier to swallow. That could be why some of your wife's colleagues were dicks. I hope I'm only a dick to management, and not to my colleague!

No, fortunately, it nothing to do with others sharing any slack that she couldn't handle. In fact there really was no mental deficit, just lots of physical ones. The issue was that the principal was a recent hire who only comfortable if she had a cult of personality surrounding her. She really needed a small group of ass kissers that worshiped her, and the DW was not willing to partake. It got to the point that some of her minions figured out that they no longer had to actually perform, but could kick back, and do little, then scapegoat whoever was a weak target, outside of the principal's little posse. Eventually the wife was being punished for not picking up the slack for a posse member who was a doe eyed young school counselor, who could bawl on cue, and did little during the day but spend time on a cell phone with her boyfriend, while falling further behind on state mandated evaluations. Since little miss doe eyes was part of the posse, somebody had to pay, and my wife was the chosen one, since in the principal's  sick mind, a severely disabled person was an easy target.  Where she fucked up was that, in her failed attempt to intimidate the DW, she created a totally unbelievable e-mail chain, claiming that she was under severe pressure to address the wife's poor performance, that the district superintendent was on her about the DW's failings, and that it was becoming an issue that was being investigated by the state department of Ed. Problem was, my DW was so far down the chain that the superintendent would know her if he tripped over her. He never had a single conversation with anyone about the DW's performance, and all of it was a bunch of fabrications that her superiors readily confirmed. it was all a sick and well documented game. In the ended it ended the wife's career and essentially destroyed the principal's also.

I'm sorry to hear that you are in a totally different situation and shouldering an unfair burden. It isn't right. Toward the end of my DW's career, she finally relented and allowed her employer to provide an assistant. This was a low cost teacher's aide who did a lot of the physical stuff that she struggled with. It worked out really well. To be in a situation where somebody just can't perform their job, and expect others to take up the slack, essentially doing their work, is a whole other problem. I hope it works out for you.

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1746 on: July 01, 2017, 12:08:59 AM »

I'm sorry to hear that you are in a totally different situation and shouldering an unfair burden. It isn't right. Toward the end of my DW's career, she finally relented and allowed her employer to provide an assistant. This was a low cost teacher's aide who did a lot of the physical stuff that she struggled with. It worked out really well. To be in a situation where somebody just can't perform their job, and expect others to take up the slack, essentially doing their work, is a whole other problem. I hope it works out for you.

My colleague has lost all ability to pay attention to detail. She's aware of this and struggling with tasks. I think we need to have a coffee and divide up the jobs between us, so neither of us are struggling, but I'm just a bit concerned that she may interpret this as a criticism or me trying to palm off the slightly more tedious jobs. We work as a unit, so either the unit gets things done or it doesn't - if one fails we sort of both fail so hopefully we can divvy things up in a more intelligent way than we are currently.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1747 on: July 01, 2017, 12:49:58 AM »

I'm sorry to hear that you are in a totally different situation and shouldering an unfair burden. It isn't right. Toward the end of my DW's career, she finally relented and allowed her employer to provide an assistant. This was a low cost teacher's aide who did a lot of the physical stuff that she struggled with. It worked out really well. To be in a situation where somebody just can't perform their job, and expect others to take up the slack, essentially doing their work, is a whole other problem. I hope it works out for you.

My colleague has lost all ability to pay attention to detail. She's aware of this and struggling with tasks. I think we need to have a coffee and divide up the jobs between us, so neither of us are struggling, but I'm just a bit concerned that she may interpret this as a criticism or me trying to palm off the slightly more tedious jobs. We work as a unit, so either the unit gets things done or it doesn't - if one fails we sort of both fail so hopefully we can divvy things up in a more intelligent way than we are currently.

She probably knows, and might well be desperate for a chat but embarrassed. I'd really encourage you to talk to her, but to think carefully about how you put it first. Maybe don't even mention her problems if you think it might upset her - just say that now you've had a bit of a re-org of responsibilities maybe you can have a chat about how it's working and see if there's anything either of you would like to swap. Then it's up to her to mention her disability if she wants to.

Playing with Fire UK

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1748 on: July 01, 2017, 02:29:27 AM »

I'm sorry to hear that you are in a totally different situation and shouldering an unfair burden. It isn't right. Toward the end of my DW's career, she finally relented and allowed her employer to provide an assistant. This was a low cost teacher's aide who did a lot of the physical stuff that she struggled with. It worked out really well. To be in a situation where somebody just can't perform their job, and expect others to take up the slack, essentially doing their work, is a whole other problem. I hope it works out for you.

My colleague has lost all ability to pay attention to detail. She's aware of this and struggling with tasks. I think we need to have a coffee and divide up the jobs between us, so neither of us are struggling, but I'm just a bit concerned that she may interpret this as a criticism or me trying to palm off the slightly more tedious jobs. We work as a unit, so either the unit gets things done or it doesn't - if one fails we sort of both fail so hopefully we can divvy things up in a more intelligent way than we are currently.

She probably knows, and might well be desperate for a chat but embarrassed. I'd really encourage you to talk to her, but to think carefully about how you put it first. Maybe don't even mention her problems if you think it might upset her - just say that now you've had a bit of a re-org of responsibilities maybe you can have a chat about how it's working and see if there's anything either of you would like to swap. Then it's up to her to mention her disability if she wants to.

+1 to this.

I had an amazingly productive chat with my supervisor and mentee where we were all honest about what work needed to be done and what work we actually LIKED doing and what tasks we thought we were good at. Prior to this there were a couple of concerns about standards and abilities (more a difference in opinion about what the design standards were and how much we focused on content and how much on presentation), and after the talk it was a whole lot better. This is totally the opposite of our management's "address your weaknesses" chat that we had been following. It turned out that my supervisor was taking the bullet of doing the training presentations that he hates and assumed everyone hated. I sodding love giving those presentations. Swap completed.

I'd phrase it as "I've noticed that you are really good at ..... and .....; I enjoy ..... work more; what do you think about trading?" Ask questions about timing and work load and make it clear that you are only looking for win/wins (urgh, I normally hate that phrase), where you switch two tasks, you both enjoy your new task more and both tasks get done better or quicker. IMO we should all be having these conversations with our colleagues more often.

I'm crap at attention to detail after about ten minutes for stuff that doesn't interest me, and if someone offered to switch these tasks with me I'd be delighted. Granted, if someone started with "I've noticed that you are mentally deficient..." then I'd be pissed. So, as SLTD says, you are right to be thoughtful about having the conversation but you should absolutely have it.

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Epic FU money stories
« Reply #1749 on: July 01, 2017, 03:38:08 PM »

I'm sorry to hear that you are in a totally different situation and shouldering an unfair burden. It isn't right. Toward the end of my DW's career, she finally relented and allowed her employer to provide an assistant. This was a low cost teacher's aide who did a lot of the physical stuff that she struggled with. It worked out really well. To be in a situation where somebody just can't perform their job, and expect others to take up the slack, essentially doing their work, is a whole other problem. I hope it works out for you.

My colleague has lost all ability to pay attention to detail. She's aware of this and struggling with tasks. I think we need to have a coffee and divide up the jobs between us, so neither of us are struggling, but I'm just a bit concerned that she may interpret this as a criticism or me trying to palm off the slightly more tedious jobs. We work as a unit, so either the unit gets things done or it doesn't - if one fails we sort of both fail so hopefully we can divvy things up in a more intelligent way than we are currently.

She probably knows, and might well be desperate for a chat but embarrassed. I'd really encourage you to talk to her, but to think carefully about how you put it first. Maybe don't even mention her problems if you think it might upset her - just say that now you've had a bit of a re-org of responsibilities maybe you can have a chat about how it's working and see if there's anything either of you would like to swap. Then it's up to her to mention her disability if she wants to.

+1 to this.

I had an amazingly productive chat with my supervisor and mentee where we were all honest about what work needed to be done and what work we actually LIKED doing and what tasks we thought we were good at. Prior to this there were a couple of concerns about standards and abilities (more a difference in opinion about what the design standards were and how much we focused on content and how much on presentation), and after the talk it was a whole lot better. This is totally the opposite of our management's "address your weaknesses" chat that we had been following. It turned out that my supervisor was taking the bullet of doing the training presentations that he hates and assumed everyone hated. I sodding love giving those presentations. Swap completed.

I'd phrase it as "I've noticed that you are really good at ..... and .....; I enjoy ..... work more; what do you think about trading?" Ask questions about timing and work load and make it clear that you are only looking for win/wins (urgh, I normally hate that phrase), where you switch two tasks, you both enjoy your new task more and both tasks get done better or quicker. IMO we should all be having these conversations with our colleagues more often.

I'm crap at attention to detail after about ten minutes for stuff that doesn't interest me, and if someone offered to switch these tasks with me I'd be delighted. Granted, if someone started with "I've noticed that you are mentally deficient..." then I'd be pissed. So, as SLTD says, you are right to be thoughtful about having the conversation but you should absolutely have it.

LOL@ "I've noticed that you are mentally deficient..."

I think I'm going to just remind her of a few years ago when we both came into the roles and deliberately divided things up. There's been a bit of a change in tasks since then, so we probably would have needed that kind of chat regardless of the situation. And I think asking if there's anything she would like to swap is a great idea. Put the ball in her court.