Author Topic: Cost of different coffee brewing methods  (Read 16895 times)

Scandium

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Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« on: April 28, 2017, 08:54:44 AM »
Coffee at my new work is undrinkable garbage so I have to make my own now so this has become an expense. Tried to do some calcs for cost of making coffee with different methods for my own benefit, but figured some might be interested, and have input/corrections. It's not exact as I took input from different sources. I did not weigh it myself. I especially need to double-check how much goes into my coffee maker (I use 1 scoop per cup of water. Five scoops yields ~two mugs). I'm surprised there are such large differences, almost 3x as much.

I buy fancy coffee (on sale), so $6 per 12 oz bag. A mug is 1.5 cups/354 ml.

BeansBrewed$/mug
Aeropress   28 g354 ml$0.51*
French press20 g355 ml$0.35
Cold brew290 g2100 ml$0.86
Coffee maker17.5 g354 ml$0.31
Nescafe Instant2.3 g (1 tsp)354 ml$0.06
Percolator14 g (~2 tbsp)354 ml$0.25
Pour-over30354 ml$0.58*

*include filters
Notes:
Oxo cold brew device. Letting the cold brew sit longer will increase strength, yielding more finished coffee. This is using a 2:1 ratio.
Nescafe instant is $0.76/oz on amazon
Percolator amount is just rough estimate from online instructions. Need to measure.
Pour-over recipe just from 1st google hit, "blue bottle coffee". No experience with this method. $11 for 200 filters

edit: found aeropres recipes calling for less coffee, between 1 "scoop" and 18 grams. That would bring it about even with drip coffee maker.
edit: looked up/recalculated french press recipe
« Last Edit: May 01, 2017, 09:54:03 AM by Scandium »

Davnasty

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2017, 09:28:46 AM »
How did you decide how much bean to use for each method?

For example coffee press uses more than aeropress... because aeropress uses a finer grind, extracts more with pressure or other reasons?

I mean after all this is the only variable so I think we need a concrete way to determine how much bean each method requires to make a coffee of comparable strength.

Wise Virgin

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2017, 09:40:40 AM »
Your cheapest option is to lobby for better-quality work coffee so you can get it for free.

Who makes the decision about which coffee to buy?

Davnasty

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2017, 09:51:50 AM »
I drink my free work coffee despite its terribleness. I adjusted to it and kinda like it now plus when I make my fresh ground, coffee press Peruvian coffee on the weekends I can really enjoy it. Avoiding hedonic adaptation.




Scortius

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2017, 09:53:28 AM »
Agree, my office area didn't have a coffee machine... so I bought a fairly large but simple drip system for $30 and just brought it in.  The coworkers all appreciated it and we take turns buying beans (work doesn't provide anything).  The problem is that some coworkers bring in nice beans, and others bring in cheap bulk tins.  Still, it gets the caffeine into my system!

Before you go too overboard, I would just ask around about getting better beans at work.  You could even offer to start a coffee bean donation pot, which would still be a lot cheaper than doing anything yourself.  Otherwise, just look at getting yourself a cheap drip system and using your own beans if you care about cost.

CptCool

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2017, 09:57:29 AM »
I drink my free work coffee despite its terribleness. I adjusted to it and kinda like it now plus when I make my fresh ground, coffee press Peruvian coffee on the weekends I can really enjoy it. Avoiding hedonic adaptation.

Same. I somehow came to enjoy the crappy coffee at my work. The weekend benefit is a huge plus because my coffee made at home tastes incredible now and is a true treat each weekend

dcheesi

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2017, 09:58:42 AM »
How did you decide how much bean to use for each method?

For example coffee press uses more than aeropress... because aeropress uses a finer grind, extracts more with pressure or other reasons?

I mean after all this is the only variable so I think we need a concrete way to determine how much bean each method requires to make a coffee of comparable strength.
My guess is they're doing it to "taste", which is how I did it when I was comparing methods back in the day. It doesn't take long to 'dial in' the amount of coffee needed to produce a satisfactory cup using a given method and a consistent blend. Of course the downside is that YMMV based on personal tastes, but that's going to be true overall in any case, since some people prefer it much stronger than others.

neo von retorch

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2017, 10:00:27 AM »
I drink my free work coffee despite its terribleness. I adjusted to it and kinda like it now plus when I make my fresh ground, coffee press Peruvian coffee on the weekends I can really enjoy it. Avoiding hedonic adaptation.

This is where I am, but I hate the k-cup garbage I'm contributing. So when I'm not too lazy, I do make coffee at home and use a thermos.

When I ran my own experiment, due to using 2 scoops of fresh ground coffee in my Aeropress, I estimated ~$0.28 or so per 8 oz serving.

Scandium

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2017, 10:23:28 AM »
How did you decide how much bean to use for each method?

For example coffee press uses more than aeropress... because aeropress uses a finer grind, extracts more with pressure or other reasons?

I mean after all this is the only variable so I think we need a concrete way to determine how much bean each method requires to make a coffee of comparable strength.

It's what the instructions for each method recommends. Aeropress comes with a scoop and says to use two. So yes you could of course use one and get 1/2 the cost. I don't have a french press at the moment so looked up what the manufacturer recommends. My coffee maker quantities is based on trial and error for what I like.

LostGirl

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2017, 10:34:14 AM »
Interesting assessment.  I usually do a pour over cup at home or my husband will make one with the Aeropress.  At work we have K-cups which I don't love and a nespresso machine. I make the coffee buying decisions but usually just bring one cup from home.  I don't think any of the pre-ground options are great but we do get high quality K-cups and nespresso pods. 

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2017, 10:35:04 AM »
I think the coffee maker is the worst idea (Mr. Coffee, etc.)   I used to make coffee at home that way and always ended up making too much coffee and throwing the leftover out.  Also, since I made a small potful, I found myself drinking more coffee in the morning. 
I switched to a single-cup drip system using a stainless fine-mesh basket.  This way I have to make each cup individually.

This is more efficient plus ... I find I tend to drink less coffee if I have to make it one cup at a time.


Davnasty

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2017, 10:39:36 AM »
I would think that the Aeropress should be the most efficient based on the mechanics. Correct me if I'm wrong but it looks like a coffee press that you can apply pressure to which would extract a little more from the grounds. Drip has less time contacting the grounds. Cold brew has the most time contacting grounds but dissolves fewer compounds.

And it sounds like you already have an Aeropress? If so, that's the way to go.

But if you wanted to get really detailed you'd need to determine how to make the same cup of coffee with each method. And determine if 'same' means same caffeine level or same flavor. Same flavor may not even be possible for all methods.

Scandium

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2017, 10:41:42 AM »
Agree, my office area didn't have a coffee machine... so I bought a fairly large but simple drip system for $30 and just brought it in.  The coworkers all appreciated it and we take turns buying beans (work doesn't provide anything).  The problem is that some coworkers bring in nice beans, and others bring in cheap bulk tins.  Still, it gets the caffeine into my system!

Before you go too overboard, I would just ask around about getting better beans at work.  You could even offer to start a coffee bean donation pot, which would still be a lot cheaper than doing anything yourself.  Otherwise, just look at getting yourself a cheap drip system and using your own beans if you care about cost.

I have pretty high tolerance for bad coffee. I drink it black and strong. My previous work was not good but I drank 2+ cups/day for 7 years no problem. But here it's horrifically bad; burnt, bitter, sour and nasty beyond anything I've had before. Often I can't physically get down a whole cup.

There's some cheapskate guy here (fellow MMM..), who hardly drink coffee, in charge of buying in bulk from costco. Some old 4 lb bag of "starbucks roasted" stuff. Since starbucks it's no surprise it's gross.. The drip coffee maker seesm ok. I don't really want to pay into it since nobody else seems to care. I'd rather save it and complain about our terrible 401k first

Yes this is defensive, but I buy lunch out 4 times per year and never coffee so i'm willing to spend to make good coffee. Have an aeropress in my office and it costs maybe $5/week. Most people spend 2x that on lunch every day..

Scandium

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2017, 10:48:12 AM »
I think the coffee maker is the worst idea (Mr. Coffee, etc.)   I used to make coffee at home that way and always ended up making too much coffee and throwing the leftover out.  Also, since I made a small potful, I found myself drinking more coffee in the morning. 
I switched to a single-cup drip system using a stainless fine-mesh basket.  This way I have to make each cup individually.

This is more efficient plus ... I find I tend to drink less coffee if I have to make it one cup at a time.

I have a good system with the drip maker at home on the weekend. Make 5 "cups" which gives me one mug, then put the rest in a jar in the fridge for another mug in the afternoon. Reheat in microwave.

Unlike everyone else in the world I dislike all the single cup systems (yes I'm a snob). At least black the coffee tastes bad. But most people dump sugar and milk in so..

Realized I should add percolator and pour-over coffee to the list. I own the former but not the latter though. It's just feeding my love of data at this point:)

Tyson

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2017, 10:55:17 AM »
I like the aeropress - it makes a single cup of coffee at a time, and the grounds are actually re-usable if you want a 2nd cup.  Won't be as strong as the first cup, but still tasty and cuts the cost in half.

neo von retorch

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #15 on: April 28, 2017, 11:02:26 AM »
I switched to a single-cup drip system using a stainless fine-mesh basket.
Unlike everyone else in the world I dislike all the single cup systems (yes I'm a snob).

My dad has a single-cup drip maker though I hesitate to call it a system, since it's just a straight simple coffee brewer. It's just fine. A slow alternative to an Aeropress. But I also hate all the single-cup pod systems - I can find some "tolerable" coffee, but it's still straight up awful in comparison to the fresh ground pressed coffee I make at home. (And yes, I drink it all straight black, except at diners where I sometimes put a little sugar in....) :)

Tyson

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #16 on: April 28, 2017, 11:06:26 AM »
The biggest expense with good coffee is not the brewing method, but the grinder.  You really do need a good burr grinder and not a blade grinder to get the best out of the beans you buy (you do buy beans, right?).  Burr grinders are expensive.  Lucky for me, I bought mine before my preMMM days, so it's a sunk cost and I enjoy the benefits of my previous spendy ways every single day.

Wish I could say that for some of the other crap I bought, pre MMM!!

nereo

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #17 on: April 28, 2017, 11:11:40 AM »

I buy fancy coffee (on sale), so $6 per 12 oz bag. A mug is 4 cups/354 ml. ...

Just to be clear... 1 cup = 8oz = 236ml. 
Coffee mugs vary wildly in size, but a 'typical' mug is ~12 oz = 1.5cups = 354ml (which is what I think you meant).
Diner coffee mugs tend to be between 6-8oz.
Just to use Starbucks as a reference:

short = 1 cup = 236ml
tall = 1.5 cup/1 'mug' = 354
Grande = 2 cups = 472ml
Venti = 3 cups = 709mL
Trenta = way too much coffee for one person

Scandium

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2017, 11:13:21 AM »
The biggest expense with good coffee is not the brewing method, but the grinder.  You really do need a good burr grinder and not a blade grinder to get the best out of the beans you buy (you do buy beans, right?).  Burr grinders are expensive.  Lucky for me, I bought mine before my preMMM days, so it's a sunk cost and I enjoy the benefits of my previous spendy ways every single day.

Wish I could say that for some of the other crap I bought, pre MMM!!

I buy whole beans at home, but pre-ground for work. I don't have the time to grind beans twice a day. Only have a blade grinder though. I knew burr grinders were better, but didn't want to spend the money, plus they're often huge and our kitchen space limited. Meh, i think blade ground is fine, and quality pre-ground coffee is also perfectly drinkable if made correctly. I mean, I don't need my coffee to be amazing or anything, it's just the swill at work that literally makes me gag.

neo von retorch

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #19 on: April 28, 2017, 11:14:58 AM »
Manual burr grinders, like a Hario, are about $25. I bought a Cuisinart for $50. It's super loud and imperfect, but a good 80/20 improvement over blade grinders. I've owned it for about 8 years now, and probably made at the very least 1000 cups of coffee (~8 years, 2+ cups per week bare, bare minimim), so the grinder has contributed at most, $0.05 / cup in cost.

Scandium

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #20 on: April 28, 2017, 11:17:18 AM »

I buy fancy coffee (on sale), so $6 per 12 oz bag. A mug is 4 cups/354 ml. ...

Just to be clear... 1 cup = 8oz = 236ml. 
Coffee mugs vary wildly in size, but a 'typical' mug is ~12 oz = 1.5cups = 354ml (which is what I think you meant).
Diner coffee mugs tend to be between 6-8oz.
Just to use Starbucks as a reference:

short = 1 cup = 236ml
tall = 1.5 cup/1 'mug' = 354
Grande = 2 cups = 472ml
Venti = 3 cups = 709mL
Trenta = way too much coffee for one person

thanks, corrected. I try to avoid the silly "cup/spoon" measuring system anyway. So antiquated and imprecise. Or worse; measuring solids by volume! *shudder

Tyson

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #21 on: April 28, 2017, 11:17:38 AM »
Yeah, blade grinders suck.  Bad.  But I never knew that till I used a burr grinder for a while (at my mother-in-laws) and things were so much tastier, even with the same beans. 

Re: brewing method - I'd also factor in ease of cleanup.  A pour-over is by far the easiest to clean method and least fiddly of anything outside just buying a better coffee maker for the work place. 

CptCool

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #22 on: April 28, 2017, 11:22:08 AM »
Manual burr grinders, like a Hario, are about $25. I bought a Cuisinart for $50. It's super loud and imperfect, but a good 80/20 improvement over blade grinders. I've owned it for about 8 years now, and probably made at the very least 1000 cups of coffee (~8 years, 2+ cups per week bare, bare minimim), so the grinder has contributed at most, $0.05 / cup in cost.

For an aeropress or french press does it even matter what type of grinder you use? You want it at least semi-coarse right? I don't think consistency is super important unless you're doing pour over or drip since you choose how long the coffee is in contact with the water in a press

Scandium

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #23 on: April 28, 2017, 11:22:24 AM »
Yeah, blade grinders suck.  Bad.  But I never knew that till I used a burr grinder for a while (at my mother-in-laws) and things were so much tastier, even with the same beans. 

Re: brewing method - I'd also factor in ease of cleanup.  A pour-over is by far the easiest to clean method and least fiddly of anything outside just buying a better coffee maker for the work place.

Are you trying to talk me into spending $150 to grind coffee beans...? :D
(nono, I'd never)

With the Aeropress i just toss the "puck", and clean it out once a week or so. Not too bad. All the parts is a bit annoying though, it's a fiddly method. BTW thanks for the tip on reusing grounds! I'll have to try that. Good for when I need a 2nd cup at 10 am;)

I don't know why the coffee here is so bad. The machine seems ok. Could be the bulk costco beans, the brewing method (though I've done it myself too) or the water. The beans smell pretty bad though.

Tyson

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #24 on: April 28, 2017, 11:29:31 AM »
Cheapest option would be to just try different beans with the office coffee maker.  Try your home beans in it for a few days just as an experiment.

Scandium

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #25 on: April 28, 2017, 11:35:41 AM »
Cheapest option would be to just try different beans with the office coffee maker.  Try your home beans in it for a few days just as an experiment.

Yeah I've considered that. But then I'd have to make enough for everyone, or be a jerk. And suddenly it get expensive again.. :)

Also looks like I use too much coffee in the aeropress. Their instructions now say ~18 grams. I swear I saw two scoops somewhere when I got it.

neo von retorch

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #26 on: April 28, 2017, 11:40:09 AM »
"Too much" is a matter of opinion!! I have experimented with 1, 1.5 and 2 scoops. Absolutely only drink it with 2 scoops now. (Also experimented with reusing grounds. Nope, nuh-uh! I do reuse the filters about 4 or 5 times though...)

NESailor

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #27 on: April 28, 2017, 12:37:10 PM »
Manual burr grinders, like a Hario, are about $25. I bought a Cuisinart for $50. It's super loud and imperfect, but a good 80/20 improvement over blade grinders. I've owned it for about 8 years now, and probably made at the very least 1000 cups of coffee (~8 years, 2+ cups per week bare, bare minimim), so the grinder has contributed at most, $0.05 / cup in cost.

For an aeropress or french press does it even matter what type of grinder you use? You want it at least semi-coarse right? I don't think consistency is super important unless you're doing pour over or drip since you choose how long the coffee is in contact with the water in a press

In order:  Absolutely yes and maybe not.   Aeropress needs espresso grind to be done right.  French press is rather forgiving.

I second whoever said Hario manual up above.   I've had one for maybe 2 years and that's all I use.  I grind once a day on weekdays and maybe twice on weekends depending.  Not sick of it yet.  Not $300-go-buy-a-real-electric-burr-grinder sick anyway.

As far as method - I use mostly my Gaggia Classic and pull shots of espresso.

nereo

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #28 on: April 28, 2017, 12:43:05 PM »
In order:  Absolutely yes and maybe not.   Aeropress needs espresso grind to be done right.  French press is rather forgiving.

I second whoever said Hario manual up above.   I've had one for maybe 2 years and that's all I use.  I grind once a day on weekdays and maybe twice on weekends depending.  Not sick of it yet.  Not $300-go-buy-a-real-electric-burr-grinder sick anyway.

Ok - now I'm curious... besides the Hario manual grinders, what is a "good" electric burr grinder vs a crap burr grinder?

I ask because I quickyl glanced on Amazon and saw everything from $25 models to $250 models - all burr, all electric.

Turkey Leg

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #29 on: April 28, 2017, 12:48:12 PM »
Had the Hario manual grinder for years. It's now sitting on a shelf, waiting for a power outage.

We bought one of these from Amazon for about $100: Capresso Jura Infinity 560 Conical Burr Coffee Grinder

It does a very nice job.

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #30 on: April 28, 2017, 12:50:35 PM »
Another plus to the hario manual grinder. I had the $50 cuisinart electric  burr for a few years, but it got so loud and we wake up so early that we couldn't in good conscious use it in our apartment building, lol. We've had the manual guy a couple years now. The grind is much more consistent compared to the cuisinart electric one.

ETA: mesh pour over cone. Upfront cost ~$18, no ongoing cost except the coffee itself.

neo von retorch

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #31 on: April 28, 2017, 01:06:13 PM »
Another plus to the hario manual grinder. I had the $50 cuisinart electric  burr for a few years, but it got so loud and we wake up so early that we couldn't in good conscious use it in our apartment building, lol. We've had the manual guy a couple years now. The grind is much more consistent compared to the cuisinart electric one.

ETA: mesh pour over cone. Upfront cost ~$18, no ongoing cost except the coffee itself.

At a previous job, a friend/colleague was a fellow coffee connoisseur, but he didn't have a good grinder, so I brought mine in. We'd find an empty meeting room to run it... he called it the "Retorch Blaster 2000." I have a Hario, but I only tend to use manual grinders on camping trips. Don't seem to have the dexterity or patience required in the mornings before work... it does make nice grounds though.

rantk81

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #32 on: April 28, 2017, 01:39:06 PM »
The coffee at my office isn't great, but not terrible either. I think it is that "Aramark" branded stuff.

However, I do bring in my own heavy whipping cream to put in my coffee, and that makes it delicious.

Scandium

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #33 on: April 28, 2017, 01:49:42 PM »
"Too much" is a matter of opinion!! I have experimented with 1, 1.5 and 2 scoops. Absolutely only drink it with 2 scoops now. (Also experimented with reusing grounds. Nope, nuh-uh! I do reuse the filters about 4 or 5 times though...)
breaking news! Just tried reusing grounds in aeropress; agree, heck no! Tastes like brown piss water

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #34 on: April 28, 2017, 02:03:21 PM »
"Too much" is a matter of opinion!! I have experimented with 1, 1.5 and 2 scoops. Absolutely only drink it with 2 scoops now. (Also experimented with reusing grounds. Nope, nuh-uh! I do reuse the filters about 4 or 5 times though...)
breaking news! Just tried reusing grounds in aeropress; agree, heck no! Tastes like brown piss water

I don't have an aeropress, but my 'reuse' compromise with a pour over cone is to add *some* fresh still. Like 1/3-1/2 the amount of a fresh run.

NESailor

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #35 on: April 28, 2017, 02:45:32 PM »
In order:  Absolutely yes and maybe not.   Aeropress needs espresso grind to be done right.  French press is rather forgiving.

I second whoever said Hario manual up above.   I've had one for maybe 2 years and that's all I use.  I grind once a day on weekdays and maybe twice on weekends depending.  Not sick of it yet.  Not $300-go-buy-a-real-electric-burr-grinder sick anyway.

Ok - now I'm curious... besides the Hario manual grinders, what is a "good" electric burr grinder vs a crap burr grinder?

I ask because I quickyl glanced on Amazon and saw everything from $25 models to $250 models - all burr, all electric.

Good question indeed!  Once I realized how much better freshly ground coffee was in my decent yet economical Italian espresso machine I had to go freshly ground.  So I set out to do the research and 10 minutes later realized I can't afford what the snobs were recommending.  It was pretty much $300 (and up) or the Hario.   So I went with the Hario :D.  I have heard a few people recommend cheaper ones (perhaps the Capresso) but since I already settled on the $25 hand grinder I'm all done researching for now.

Most of the issues with the cheaper ones were consistency of the grind and durability of the machine.  Neither is an issue with the hand grinder.

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #36 on: April 28, 2017, 02:54:28 PM »
I used to have a Cuisinart burr grinder -- it eventually died, after several years of use.

I replaced it with a Capresso, which had pretty good reviews for the "cheaper" burr grinders -- this one:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0000AR7SY/ref=asc_df_B0000AR7SY4960107/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=394997&creativeASIN=B0000AR7SY&linkCode=df0&hvadid=167144008776&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=17527616923827300935&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9030890&hvtargid=pla-465686412632

About 3 years of use on it, and it's working great.  Gets used about 5 mornings a week.  I like the infinitely-adjustable fine/coarse setting, for use in a drip coffeemaker or for in an espresso machine.

nereo

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #37 on: April 28, 2017, 03:53:43 PM »

Most of the issues with the cheaper ones were consistency of the grind and durability of the machine.  Neither is an issue with the hand grinder.
Wouldn't that depend on the user? :-P

@Clean Shaven & NESailor - thanks for the synopses.  One of our (gasp! horror!) blade grinders had its lid break so we're considering stepping up to a burr grinder.  I'd probably do fine with the manual Hario but not sure my SO would first thing in the morning.  Maybe I"ll just ask for the Capresso for my b-day since my parents always seem to struggle with what to get me.
First world problems...

Spork

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #38 on: April 28, 2017, 04:00:59 PM »
You might try using the awful work coffee, but brewing it at double strength.   I can adapt to pretty much any coffee as long as it is strong enough.  I've found that typical American pre-packaged brew packs are about 1/2 (or even 1/3) of the amount of coffee I'd use. 

albireo13

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #39 on: April 28, 2017, 05:17:41 PM »
Life is too short to deal with bad coffee .... even if it is free.
I really don't see any enjoyment in drinking bad coffee so, I'd rather drink water.
It's free, btw.

Gumption

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #40 on: April 28, 2017, 05:52:17 PM »
aeropress makes a great cup with little grounds, but its gimmicky.
I would go with stovetop espresso percolator.

neo von retorch

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #41 on: April 28, 2017, 07:43:59 PM »
aeropress makes a great cup with little grounds, but its gimmicky.
I would go with stovetop espresso percolator.

What do you mean by "gimmicky"? I don't think I could live without my weekend Aeropress routine. It really is delicious coffee.

kimmarg

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #42 on: April 28, 2017, 08:06:38 PM »
 I got converted to a Burr grinder and it really does make a difference. after readng a bunch of reviews I picked this one which seems to hit the sweet spot as not too expensive ($50) but good quality.  Been using it 6 months now.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0001I9R8W/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

alsoknownasDean

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #43 on: April 28, 2017, 08:15:28 PM »
I used to take a big thermos of plunger coffee (French press) on the train to my previous workplace.

The current workplace has one of those automatic espresso machines. It's alright. I'd get better coffee if I went to one of the many nearby cafes and spent $4-4.50, but whatever.

Here drip coffee isn't all that common. Aside from a few people drinking french press or some of the hipster methods, those who don't drink espresso-based coffee, just drink instant.

Even good instant might be an option. Assuming it exists :)

Gumption

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #44 on: April 29, 2017, 09:22:44 AM »
aeropress makes a great cup with little grounds, but its gimmicky.
I would go with stovetop espresso percolator.

What do you mean by "gimmicky"? I don't think I could live without my weekend Aeropress routine. It really is delicious coffee.

just that its made of plastic and you have to buy specific filters for it. ideally i think its good to have something that operates without additional investments. but, yes it makes a good cup!

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #45 on: April 29, 2017, 09:29:21 AM »
aeropress makes a great cup with little grounds, but its gimmicky.
I would go with stovetop espresso percolator.

What do you mean by "gimmicky"? I don't think I could live without my weekend Aeropress routine. It really is delicious coffee.

just that its made of plastic and you have to buy specific filters for it. ideally i think its good to have something that operates without additional investments. but, yes it makes a good cup!

I would probably call it 'gadgety' rather than 'gimmicky', but yeah- the plastic is an aspect that's kept me from getting one. I like to avoid plastics, especially with hot liquids involved. Part of why we moved away from our drip maker as well. (That, and the 'hidden mold' issue with them. Oregon is quite wet. Stuff never really dries out. I ran vinegar pretty often, but still never felt great about the whole thing).

gmp029

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #46 on: April 29, 2017, 10:43:20 AM »
Here is my setup:
Conical burr grinder:
https://www.amazon.com/Secura-Automatic-Conical-Grinder-CGB-018/dp/B01HHDFHUU/ref=sr_1_10

My understanding is that conical burr grinders (like above) are better than flat burr, which are better than blade grinders. I use a fine grind (slightly more coarse than espresso grind) to maximize extraction from the limited contact time in the k cup basket.

I use a Keurig 1.0 single cup Brewer,  the Keurig brand reusable k cup, and these filters to catch fines:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B06XDR1DCY/

All this with awesome fresh coffee which is roasted one mile from my house!

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #47 on: April 29, 2017, 03:25:04 PM »
Best work coffee I've ever had was.....Maxwell House.  There was someone that would portion out several filters at once so if you finished the carafe all you needed to do was dump the old filter, put the new one in, and push brew. Whoever did the portioning probably did double what the instructions would say. That stuff was rocket fuel.

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #48 on: April 29, 2017, 04:54:39 PM »
You might try using the awful work coffee, but brewing it at double strength.   I can adapt to pretty much any coffee as long as it is strong enough.  I've found that typical American pre-packaged brew packs are about 1/2 (or even 1/3) of the amount of coffee I'd use.

Best work coffee I've ever had was.....Maxwell House.  There was someone that would portion out several filters at once so if you finished the carafe all you needed to do was dump the old filter, put the new one in, and push brew. Whoever did the portioning probably did double what the instructions would say. That stuff was rocket fuel.

Jet, I think I found who portioned out your work coffee!

Rimu05

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Re: Cost of different coffee brewing methods
« Reply #49 on: April 29, 2017, 05:08:17 PM »
I drink my free work coffee despite its terribleness. I adjusted to it and kinda like it now plus when I make my fresh ground, coffee press Peruvian coffee on the weekends I can really enjoy it. Avoiding hedonic adaptation.

I don't think it can be adjusted to. I tried with the work coffee despite how garbage it was until I moved my stuff out of storage and my French press was revisited. I tried the work coffee and it made me gag. It is also completely undrinkable with cake, biscuits, or the once in a blue moon donut.

I buy the Kenyan at starbucks because despite the expense $13 (They do sometimes have sales on this, so at around $7, I might go for two bags and they also as a bonus grind it for you with their fancy grinders.). It lasts me and is so good. I am looking for cheaper Kenyan options on amazon though.

Honestly, coffee is something I am severely not mustachian about. Prior to getting my French press again, I bought a cup damn near everyday.
« Last Edit: April 29, 2017, 05:14:23 PM by Rimu05 »

 

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