Author Topic: The Internet Sewing Circle  (Read 37978 times)

be

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 59
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #100 on: February 09, 2015, 10:12:04 AM »
HomeHandyMum,

Thanks so much for your sheet mending advice.  And may I say I LOVE how you would wear pjs that have hole in the under arm.  You make me feel so much better.  I really do appreciate it.  Thanks.

Spruit

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1203
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #101 on: February 10, 2015, 04:13:25 PM »
I skipped a few steps of the practice plan and went right ahead with the lounge chair cover. Pretty ambitious, I know. Flat seams and all, it was going really well although a bit of a pain to work with all the excess fabric that was constantly getting in the way. It was looking sharp and pretty professional when...I discovered I 'd forgotten to make the zippers on the back first. Whoops!
 So I had to undo part of the fancy seams to tackle the recessed zipper. Luckily I had plenty of fabric left to make up for the extra lenght needed for fitting in the zipper properly. Zipper number two is on my list for tomorrow and than the seams need to be redone in some areas. But if that's finished it is really ready. Than just stuffing the cover with new foam and dacron, and it's ready for use. Woot!

Anatidae V

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7613
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Fourecks
  • Nullus Anxietas
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #102 on: February 15, 2015, 05:12:34 PM »
I finally fixed my courderouy (sp?) Beanbag cover. It is a mushroom with white spots, and some of the white circles had frayed and come undone. I put iron-on interfacing behind them to hold the fabric a bit better and sewed lines across them so there's less pull on the fabric. Now just have to tidy the seams!

I also tacked my quilt by hand last week. Now it's an easy mobile project! It feels AMAZING to get this stuff done, and all I needed was to slow down the social events :)

dorothyc

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 249
  • Age: 60
  • Location: Los Angeles
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #103 on: February 16, 2015, 01:01:14 PM »
I fixed my duvet cover that I had made a while back to put buttons and buttonholes on the end to keep the cover closed, and I also put ribbons on the inside corners of the duvet cover, and diagonal twill tapes on the corners of the duvet itself, about two inches in from each corner, so I can fasten the corners to the cover, and it stays neat and in place when I make the bed.

I found two flat sheets that we never use, so I made my son a duvet/comforter cover also, and put the same kinds of tapes on the corners of his comforter to keep it in place also, and I had more of the same buttons I had used on my cover, so I put the buttons and buttonholes on the end of his cover. His bed looks so much nicer now. He had a cheap polyester cotton covered comforter that looks a lot better in the Costco Egyptian cotton 400 thread count sheets I used.

AllieVaulter

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 304
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Portland, OR
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #104 on: February 16, 2015, 03:37:52 PM »
I had a (very small) victory yesterday.  I managed to repair a dog toy.  It was made of some sort of loosely woven nylon.  The fabric itself is pretty strong, but of course my dog attacked the seems and started ripping the stuffing brains out of the toy.  I had to carefully melt the edges of the fabric to make it stop fraying (while avoiding melting the stuffing) and THEN sew it back up.  It worked great.  There are some scorch marks, but the dog loves it, so I'll take the victory!

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #105 on: February 16, 2015, 04:50:43 PM »
Nice Allie!  I've had to use heat to get nylon weave to sew together before, it's tricky but very helpful!

Today I sewed the seams together of the armpits of my husband's t-shirt, there was a tiny hole in each armpit.  Easy to fix now while the holes were small.

Also, last week I made a pair of harem pants that I'm selling to a friend.  Now I have the pieces for the top, and will be making that in the next few days.

Spruit

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1203
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #106 on: March 03, 2015, 04:20:31 AM »
Seems like my new mending "system" is working. Whenever I find an item that needs mending, I throw it inside a designated basket under the couch. The basket also contains a few standard yarn colors, needles and scissors. This way, whenever the mood to mend strikes me, I don't have to pain my memory trying to remember which items had some wholes and where. If I want to use an item that's still in the basket I "have" to mend it right away. No more piling up of punctured clothing :P

My lounge chair pillow case turned out just a bit to narrow (arghhhh), so I have to make a new one. It's coming along a lot quicker this time, now that I know where the tough bits are and what to do about them.

deborah

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 10266
  • Location: Australia or another awesome area
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #107 on: March 03, 2015, 04:28:46 AM »
I was going to sew new covers for the couch, but when I looked at it, the brocade is two layers, and the warp of one layer was worn in a ot of places, so I found a thread that matched and darned it on my sewing machine. Took a while, but it looks a lot better!

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #108 on: March 03, 2015, 05:51:55 AM »
I finished up a Princess Jasmine costume for a friend.  She does birthday parties.  I covered up her face in the pic, but it's about the outfit!

There is also a knee length cape out of the same fabric, so she doesn't turn up at a birthday party wearing a modern coat.

AllieVaulter

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 304
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Portland, OR
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #109 on: March 27, 2015, 10:47:17 AM »
OK, I finally just tried sewing something with my abundant silk fabric.  The dress cut isn't particularly flattering for my body type, which I knew going in.  But I chose that pattern because it seemed like it would be the easiest to make (not particularly fitted).  I also learned a lot.  This was my first time sewing a lining.  I also learned about the fabric.  It's pretty stringy.  I think if I want to make a really nice dress I'll need to do French seams. 

On a completely un-related note - I have a zipper that lost the little metal band at the bottom that stops the zipper.  I can buy a kit for $10 to fix it, but does anyone know a cheaper fix?  It's a pretty heavy zipper, it's essentially for a sleeping bag.

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #110 on: March 27, 2015, 10:49:59 AM »
For a broken zipper I usually just replace the entire zipper.  Of course, I have a pretty good selection of zippers that I got really cheap from an estate sale, so that is the frugal choice for me.

deborah

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 10266
  • Location: Australia or another awesome area
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #111 on: March 27, 2015, 07:09:44 PM »
As I read it, you have a zipper which when closed has no metal stopper at the bottom. It is not actually broken.

I usually get rid of the stopper. When I buy a zip, I usually buy one that is a bit longer than I need. This makes it so much easier to insert because you can put the actual up-and-down thing out of the way(in the extra length), and just sew without having to go around that bit. Once you have inserted the zip, just zigzag over the place where you want the stopper to be (the zig and zag are on either side of the zip) a few times.

Megma

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 722
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #112 on: March 27, 2015, 08:36:49 PM »
I'm an avid sewer and just found this!

Current projects are:
- quilt as a wedding gift for a friend, need to get moving here, the wedding is in two months!
- chanel style French jacket, most challenging project of mine yet
- shirt dress, also turned out to be complicate! Fitted blouse/shirt techniques are complicated.


I was going to say the same! You can make a new stopper by sewing many times over the end. If it's too wide to zig zag on your machine, you can do it by hand. If you do it on machine, you want to set the length to 0 so your not moving down just going back and forth.

As I read it, you have a zipper which when closed has no metal stopper at the bottom. It is not actually broken.

I usually get rid of the stopper. When I buy a zip, I usually buy one that is a bit longer than I need. This makes it so much easier to insert because you can put the actual up-and-down thing out of the way(in the extra length), and just sew without having to go around that bit. Once you have inserted the zip, just zigzag over the place where you want the stopper to be (the zig and zag are on either side of the zip) a few times.

AllieVaulter

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 304
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Portland, OR
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #113 on: March 28, 2015, 11:42:38 AM »
I was going to say the same! You can make a new stopper by sewing many times over the end. If it's too wide to zig zag on your machine, you can do it by hand. If you do it on machine, you want to set the length to 0 so your not moving down just going back and forth.

As I read it, you have a zipper which when closed has no metal stopper at the bottom. It is not actually broken.

I usually get rid of the stopper. When I buy a zip, I usually buy one that is a bit longer than I need. This makes it so much easier to insert because you can put the actual up-and-down thing out of the way(in the extra length), and just sew without having to go around that bit. Once you have inserted the zip, just zigzag over the place where you want the stopper to be (the zig and zag are on either side of the zip) a few times.

Exactly what I needed!  Thanks!  I was so focused on finding a small metal band to clamp on there, I didn't even think of sewing it!  Even as I posted to the sewing circle.  :D  It worked like a charm!

tmac

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 472
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #114 on: March 28, 2015, 04:35:42 PM »
This thread is very motivating. I went to my mother's yesterday with my bag of mending, and we sewed together while chatting. So nice, and now I get to put three shirts back into circulation. I was able to finish most of a little pillow case skirt for my daughter, which I'll finish up once I get the length and waist measured.

Megma

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 722
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #115 on: March 28, 2015, 06:28:42 PM »
Glad it worked!

I was going to say the same! You can make a new stopper by sewing many times over the end. If it's too wide to zig zag on your machine, you can do it by hand. If you do it on machine, you want to set the length to 0 so your not moving down just going back and forth.

As I read it, you have a zipper which when closed has no metal stopper at the bottom. It is not actually broken.

I usually get rid of the stopper. When I buy a zip, I usually buy one that is a bit longer than I need. This makes it so much easier to insert because you can put the actual up-and-down thing out of the way(in the extra length), and just sew without having to go around that bit. Once you have inserted the zip, just zigzag over the place where you want the stopper to be (the zig and zag are on either side of the zip) a few times.

Exactly what I needed!  Thanks!  I was so focused on finding a small metal band to clamp on there, I didn't even think of sewing it!  Even as I posted to the sewing circle.  :D  It worked like a charm!

happypup

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 111
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #116 on: March 30, 2015, 06:41:31 AM »
I've done zero of the sewing projects I said I'd do, but instead I made a pillow this weekend :) Got a chair for free for the living room and wanted to spiff it up a little bit. I'm pleased that I finally have a good enough handle on how to use the sewing machine that I can bang out quick projects like this!

bomburdoo

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 11
  • Location: Portland, OR
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #117 on: April 03, 2015, 12:23:02 PM »
Late to the game, but loving the inspiration in this thread.  I've been an obsessed knitter for five years now, and have dabbled in sewing.  I made some blackout curtains for the bedroom, a floor cushion and some other odds and ends, but I want to start making clothes for myself.  I have learned with knitting that making your own clothes is not always the cheapest option, but I think there is a lot of value in having something custom fitted and something of quality that will last.  I am wearing an alpaca knitted sweater I made for the first time today and it's fantastic!  I feel even better about it because I bought the yarn with a Christmas gift card, so it only cost me about $10 out of pocket. 

I finally bought myself a proper sewing pattern and some fabric to make a dress.  Weather report calls for rain on Sunday, so I'm hoping to spend the morning tackling it.  Any advice for a newbie sewist starting her first big project?  It's a basic two piece dress (front and back), but it is cut on the bias.  eep!

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #118 on: April 03, 2015, 02:38:43 PM »
Biggest advice for a dress (or anything that is long and the fabric will hang on you) is to hang the fabric overnight before you cut and sew it.  Then once it is all made, hang it on a hanger another night before you do the hem up.

Oh, and wash and dry the fabric, if it's washable, before any of the above!

Megma

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 722
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #119 on: April 08, 2015, 08:46:19 AM »
Late to the game, but loving the inspiration in this thread.  I've been an obsessed knitter for five years now, and have dabbled in sewing.  I made some blackout curtains for the bedroom, a floor cushion and some other odds and ends, but I want to start making clothes for myself.  I have learned with knitting that making your own clothes is not always the cheapest option, but I think there is a lot of value in having something custom fitted and something of quality that will last.  I am wearing an alpaca knitted sweater I made for the first time today and it's fantastic!  I feel even better about it because I bought the yarn with a Christmas gift card, so it only cost me about $10 out of pocket. 

I finally bought myself a proper sewing pattern and some fabric to make a dress.  Weather report calls for rain on Sunday, so I'm hoping to spend the morning tackling it.  Any advice for a newbie sewist starting her first big project?  It's a basic two piece dress (front and back), but it is cut on the bias.  eep!

In addition to pre-washing/hanging as suggested by Zaga, make sure you proof your pattern. Do not trust that it will fit you because the envelope measurements say it will. Measure the paper pattern (deducting the seam allowance, usually 5/8") against what your body measures. Also, measure the vertical distance, ie is the bust line the same distance from the should as your bust line is from your shoulder? If not you will need to use the lengthen/shorten line on the pattern to adjust. Same goes for the waist line. I for example, though being above average height for a woman, always have to shorten the torso of the pattern (apparently all my height is in my legs!).

This is a little complicated to explain, so you might want research how to do this online before you choose a size/cut it out, or you can end up with ill-fitting garmets, much easier to alter before you cut! Let us know how it goes :-)

As you said, while making clothes yourself isn't cheaper it will fit you better and you can have whatever you want, it's amazing :-)

dorothyc

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 249
  • Age: 60
  • Location: Los Angeles
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #120 on: April 08, 2015, 01:03:44 PM »
As you said, while making clothes yourself isn't cheaper it will fit you better and you can have whatever you want, it's amazing :-)

And less clothing is shipped here from India/China/The Phillipines/Bangladesh etc. , which is a big hidden cost environmentally.

Megma

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 722
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #121 on: April 08, 2015, 01:41:22 PM »
As you said, while making clothes yourself isn't cheaper it will fit you better and you can have whatever you want, it's amazing :-)

And less clothing is shipped here from India/China/The Phillipines/Bangladesh etc. , which is a big hidden cost environmentally.

Also a good point! There is a huge environmental and social cost to cheap clothing imports, in addition to it also being of poor quality/fit (usually). There's a really good book about it called "Overdressed: the shockingly high cost of cheap fashion."

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #122 on: April 08, 2015, 03:20:21 PM »
I got a wrap skirt cheap from a consignment shop, it's a simple black and white plaid and the outer shell is about 1/3 wool and 2/3 man made.  Since it was almost completely flat I was able to remove the waist, cut that in half, and reattach it with gathering.  Then I added a simple clasp and now have a knee length plaid wool cape.

No need to change up any of the lining either, so it looks quite fancy and finished on the inside without any work on my part.  I even saved the relevant part of the tag, the material and the washing instructions.  I figured the size was no longer relevant.

handsnhearts

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 273
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #123 on: April 08, 2015, 05:37:46 PM »
Ok, I'm late but I'm in!  I have several projects hanging around that I'd like to finish before they get packed for the move.

1.  Sew button on DD pant leg before putting them in the donate bin.  I have the button still and hate to wast things...)
2.  Finish the matching PJs from Xmas for DD and her cousin.  Only need to hem the sleeves and the pants.  Rest is done.
3.  tackle mending pile.  donate or fix!

I also have a quilt all cut out ( I just found it after 5+ years of it being packed away.  Good thing I still like it).  But that will have to wait until after the move.

irishbear99

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 295
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #124 on: April 09, 2015, 03:20:38 PM »
Again, this isn't a traditional sewing project, but since it involves a needle and thread (well, embroidery floss), I'm going to count it! I decided last Christmas that I wanted a Christmas village for decoration; however, I didn't want to spend the $$$ on those ceramic villiages, and all of my decorations are handmade anyway so a ceramic one probably wouldn't "fit" the decor. So, I decided to design and make my own using 10 ct plastic canvas and embroidery floss. I just started the first house and have the front half done. I've cut and begun stitching on the sides of the house. I think it should only take another couple of weekends to finish it. I'll post progress photos soon.

TrMama

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3387
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #125 on: April 14, 2015, 10:34:43 AM »
I've still not finished up the welt pockets on the pants I'm sewing, however I have rediscovered my sewing mojo. Since I last posted I've made a t-shirt for myself, a quilt that's been cut out for ages, 2 summer tops, a t-shirt and a pair of shorts for my oldest plus I've cut out a couple more tops and a pair of shorts for my youngest. I also ruthlessly went through my fabric collection and either used up what I had to make the above items or tossed bits I'll never use.
 
Over the next few weeks I'd like to finally finish up those pants, sew up two more summer tops I've cut out, make some leggings for my youngest since she's just had a growth spurt and sew up some swim bottoms for myself.


Carrie

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 603
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #126 on: April 15, 2015, 09:31:40 AM »
I've lost my quilting mojo, but I've been sewing clothes like mad.  In the past month I've made six dresses and a top for the baby,  and two simple skirts and a tank top for myself.  I've got a tunic top on  my cutting board, which  I  plan to make today.

I have used exclusively from my stash.  Fabrics that I wasn't crazy about (any more) for quilts make charming baby dresses.

Best part, baby is completely outfitted for summer.  My goal is to make myself enough tops for summer as well.  My other two kids are set just from hand me downs.   

After I get myself 3-4 more shirts made, maybe I will be ready to get back to the unfinished quilts.  I also want to make a wrap dress, but I'd have to buy fabric for that.

misschedda

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 122
  • Location: DC
    • The Chedda
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #127 on: April 16, 2015, 07:58:44 AM »
I'm late to the party but I've been lurking a while. This past weekend my fiance and I replaced the fraying barrel cuffs on a few of his dress shirt with notched french cuffs. Cuffs look neat and non-fraying AND now they're the fancy type he likes to wear to work! In the process I learned how to sew a button hole, which was shockingly easy.

Megma

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 722
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #128 on: April 16, 2015, 08:48:06 AM »
Everyone is doing so much, more pictures please!

I will start! I have sewn my first collar ever! It took around 8 hours (with professional instruction). Please ignore the non-straight stitches on the back of the collar band, those are basting stitches I still need to remove.

The dress is a shirt dress I started in December, thinking it would be an easy over Christmas project. I heard shirt dress and thought "dress - easy peasy" - wrong! I should have thought "dress shirt - hours of tailoring, plackets and collars." Oh well it's looking super cute, almost done and now the season to wear it is here! And so much nicer than anything I could buy in a store.

TrMama

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3387
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #129 on: April 16, 2015, 10:22:24 AM »
Everyone is doing so much, more pictures please!

I will start! I have sewn my first collar ever! It took around 8 hours (with professional instruction). Please ignore the non-straight stitches on the back of the collar band, those are basting stitches I still need to remove.

Nice shirt!

Here are the tops and a pair of shorts I've made for my kids to wear this summer. All were sewn from scraps leftover from clothes I'd made for myself.

handsnhearts

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 273
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #130 on: April 16, 2015, 07:20:40 PM »
Everyone is doing so much, more pictures please!

I will start! I have sewn my first collar ever! It took around 8 hours (with professional instruction). Please ignore the non-straight stitches on the back of the collar band, those are basting stitches I still need to remove.

The dress is a shirt dress I started in December, thinking it would be an easy over Christmas project. I heard shirt dress and thought "dress - easy peasy" - wrong! I should have thought "dress shirt - hours of tailoring, plackets and collars." Oh well it's looking super cute, almost done and now the season to wear it is here! And so much nicer than anything I could buy in a store.

Beautiful shirt dress, and so well made.  A very fussy type of sewing, but its coming together so nicely. 

And those cute little fast dresses and those nice pants!  Love it.  fabric choice is nice!

I haven't sewn anything yet...
My housecleaner must have thrown away the button I was saving to sew back on.  But maybe this is a blessing as those pants are too small for DD now anyway, and I was putting them up.  I just wanted to put them up mended...

Maybe this weekend?

tofuchampion

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 372
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Wilmington, NC
    • MadeByMarilynM
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #131 on: April 17, 2015, 08:19:15 PM »
I need to sew things! I need to do coffee sleeves for a few friends, and the pic TrMama posted made me want to sew some summer tops & dresses for my almost-5-month-old daughter. The hard part is finding time to sew with the baby wanting to be held all the time. She's gotten better at letting me put her down, but that's when I try to do housework...

Megma

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 722
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #132 on: April 18, 2015, 09:01:29 PM »
Everyone is doing so much, more pictures please!

I will start! I have sewn my first collar ever! It took around 8 hours (with professional instruction). Please ignore the non-straight stitches on the back of the collar band, those are basting stitches I still need to remove.

Nice shirt!

Here are the tops and a pair of shorts I've made for my kids to wear this summer. All were sewn from scraps leftover from clothes I'd made for myself.

Such cute little tops! And very impressed you made them with scraps! I'm a horrible scrap hoarder 😄

Thanks for the nice words about my dress...I just need sleeves, hemming and some finishing/cleaning up here And there and I can wear it! Super excited!

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #133 on: April 19, 2015, 02:20:34 PM »
I have 2 prom dresses in my house now for alteration.  This is just getting my little sewing business going, and if these 2 girls are happy hopefully my reputation will spread in a positive way!

Megma

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 722
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #134 on: April 21, 2015, 10:22:33 AM »
Zaga, you must be a saint! You could not pay me enough to alterations for other people! I hope you are charging enough for your time :-)


Meanwhile, big sewing week for me continues (bf was out of town all weekend=productivity). I finished the quilt top I am making for a wedding gift in May - less than a month left! Just the backing, quilting and binding to go.


Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #135 on: April 21, 2015, 06:33:10 PM »
I love altering clothes!  And I also hope I am charging enough, it's a learning curve.  Right now I've got a sort of formula based on the number of layers and what needs to be done to them.  The first dress just went home, it started out with 9 layers, I removed 1, trimmed 6, trimmed and hemmed 2, then did about 5 minutes of needle work adding a hook and reinforcing a few beads.  Took about an hour and a half, charged $50. 

Remember, this is a very small town, average income around here is $30K a year for an entire household.  So I really don't want to overcharge either!

The next dress I'll do tomorrow.  It's much simpler, taking in at the sides and hemming 3 non-poofy layers.  Charging $30. 

I hope they tell all their friends!

MicroRN

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1033
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #136 on: April 21, 2015, 06:45:44 PM »
Oh yes, I have so much to do!

Megma

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 722
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #137 on: April 21, 2015, 06:57:29 PM »
I love altering clothes!  And I also hope I am charging enough, it's a learning curve.  Right now I've got a sort of formula based on the number of layers and what needs to be done to them.  The first dress just went home, it started out with 9 layers, I removed 1, trimmed 6, trimmed and hemmed 2, then did about 5 minutes of needle work adding a hook and reinforcing a few beads.  Took about an hour and a half, charged $50. 

Remember, this is a very small town, average income around here is $30K a year for an entire household.  So I really don't want to overcharge either!

The next dress I'll do tomorrow.  It's much simpler, taking in at the sides and hemming 3 non-poofy layers.  Charging $30. 

I hope they tell all their friends!

I'm impressed! I'd rather construct something from scratch any day, let alone for someone else who has no idea the work involved. Kudos to you!

meg_shannon

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 168
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #138 on: April 23, 2015, 12:56:40 AM »
I've been sewing for about two years and have made quite a few items. My goals are to currently use up most of my fabric stash, which was bought before I cut back on spending. I probably have enough supplies to sew for a year, including a lap quilt, skirts, shirts, and a couple of dresses for my daughter.

We just moved so I have been able to sew much recently, but I'll have more time as we settle in.

AllieVaulter

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 304
  • Age: 36
  • Location: Portland, OR
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #139 on: May 02, 2015, 08:13:18 PM »
I'm going on a trip to South America soon and I was considering how to stash some cash under my clothes.  I could buy something for $15, but I didn't really want to.  I had some clothes I was going to get rid of, so I just used that to make some.  I made a passport holder that will snap on to my underwear and sit on my hip and a credit card holder that I can snap around a bra strap and it will sit under my arm. 

I had a bit of trouble with the stretchiness of the fabric, so they're not super square, but they should work for me.  And they were free.  Once I decided to just make them, it took me less than an hour to set up my sewing machine and make both of them. 

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #140 on: May 03, 2015, 08:34:43 AM »
DH is a fidgeter.  He can't go to sleep without fidgeting with his feet.  The end result of this is holes in the bedsheets far more often than I'd like, sigh.

So this week when we got a hole in the sheet I took all the good fabric and made myself an underdress for my medieval costumes and my best friend a gypsy shirt with the scraps.  I think the smaller scraps will make several nice soft handkerchiefs as well.

This was a nice tight woven 100% cotton black sheet, it would have been such a pity to throw away so much nice fabric!

geekette

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2000
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #141 on: May 03, 2015, 03:30:37 PM »
If it's restless legs, especially if he ever gets leg cramps, try a bar of Ivory soap under the bottom sheet near his feet.  Sounds crazy, but it helps some people (including me).  I eventually resorted to taking meds because I could no get to sleep, my legs were jumping and keeping me awake.

I went through a lot of bottom sheets...

handsnhearts

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 273
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #142 on: May 03, 2015, 03:35:02 PM »
DH is a fidgeter.  He can't go to sleep without fidgeting with his feet.  The end result of this is holes in the bedsheets far more often than I'd like, sigh.

So this week when we got a hole in the sheet I took all the good fabric and made myself an underdress for my medieval costumes and my best friend a gypsy shirt with the scraps.  I think the smaller scraps will make several nice soft handkerchiefs as well.

This was a nice tight woven 100% cotton black sheet, it would have been such a pity to throw away so much nice fabric!

 Has he tried magnesium supplements? 

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #143 on: May 03, 2015, 05:01:47 PM »
It's not a symptom, he's just a fidgeter.  He doesn't have muscle cramps or anything like that, it's a habit from childhood.  Some people bite their nails, he shakes his feet back and forth.

It doesn't bother me any to be honest.  He used to apologize all the time for "keeping me awake", but I sleep right through it. 

I just was making the best of having perfectly good fabric that was no longer useful for it's previous purpose.  And I pulled our old sheet out of the closet, problem solved.

MicroRN

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1033
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #144 on: May 05, 2015, 04:41:14 PM »
So this week when we got a hole in the sheet I took all the good fabric and made myself an underdress for my medieval costumes and my best friend a gypsy shirt with the scraps.  I think the smaller scraps will make several nice soft handkerchiefs as well.

SCAdian, Rennie, or other?  I used to play in the SCA, so I have about a million pounds of fabric and half-finished costumes floating around.

tofuchampion

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 372
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Wilmington, NC
    • MadeByMarilynM
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #145 on: May 05, 2015, 07:04:18 PM »
I saw this on Facebook the other day and thought of this thread. :)

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #146 on: May 05, 2015, 07:35:57 PM »
So this week when we got a hole in the sheet I took all the good fabric and made myself an underdress for my medieval costumes and my best friend a gypsy shirt with the scraps.  I think the smaller scraps will make several nice soft handkerchiefs as well.

SCAdian, Rennie, or other?  I used to play in the SCA, so I have about a million pounds of fabric and half-finished costumes floating around.
Mostly SCAdian, sometimes rennie.  I live 20 minutes from Pennsic, super convenient!

MicroRN

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1033
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #147 on: May 05, 2015, 07:53:15 PM »
So this week when we got a hole in the sheet I took all the good fabric and made myself an underdress for my medieval costumes and my best friend a gypsy shirt with the scraps.  I think the smaller scraps will make several nice soft handkerchiefs as well.

SCAdian, Rennie, or other?  I used to play in the SCA, so I have about a million pounds of fabric and half-finished costumes floating around.
Mostly SCAdian, sometimes rennie.  I live 20 minutes from Pennsic, super convenient!

Sweet!  I haven't made it to Pennsic since my kiddos were born, and being on the opposite coast I'm unlikely to soon.  However, one of the reasons I jumped into this thread is because we're planning on our first event in a long time in June, and I have some clothes that need to be reworked, plus need to make garb for the tinies. 

Zaga

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2472
  • Age: 40
  • Location: North of Pittsburgh, PA
    • A Wall of Hats
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #148 on: May 06, 2015, 09:34:39 AM »
So this week when we got a hole in the sheet I took all the good fabric and made myself an underdress for my medieval costumes and my best friend a gypsy shirt with the scraps.  I think the smaller scraps will make several nice soft handkerchiefs as well.

SCAdian, Rennie, or other?  I used to play in the SCA, so I have about a million pounds of fabric and half-finished costumes floating around.
Mostly SCAdian, sometimes rennie.  I live 20 minutes from Pennsic, super convenient!

Sweet!  I haven't made it to Pennsic since my kiddos were born, and being on the opposite coast I'm unlikely to soon.  However, one of the reasons I jumped into this thread is because we're planning on our first event in a long time in June, and I have some clothes that need to be reworked, plus need to make garb for the tinies.
Aww, I love the tiny garb!  You should ask around though, I bet a lot of people have leftover tiny garb that they can't use any longer cause kids grow so fast!

Anatidae V

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7613
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Fourecks
  • Nullus Anxietas
Re: The Internet Sewing Circle
« Reply #149 on: May 07, 2015, 05:02:14 PM »
Making costumes sounds like fun!

I opted not to drive 40 minutes each way to my sewing group last night and used the extra time to get through:
4 pairs of boxers that had holes, all fixed
A dress where the plastic strap adjuster had snapped. It was so slippery anyway, and now I've just sewed the straps down so I don't have to check them every 10 second while wearing them!
A button up work shirt with ultra- long sleeves is now short sleeved and extremely comfortable!

They've been sitting in my craft room for over a month.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2015, 05:23:32 PM by anatidaev »