Author Topic: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat  (Read 107482 times)

robartsd

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #500 on: January 11, 2019, 12:45:54 PM »
On that note, has anyone put their teen on an ebike? Any problems with them riding dangerously?
Some teens are much more likely to do dangerous things than others. Does your daughter ride a regular bike responsibly? Has she learned to anticipate and mitigate potential hazards as she rides (becomes more important at higher speeds)? If you're satisfied that she knows how to handle herself on an ordinary bicycle, there is little chance that adding a moderate electric assist will change her basic skills and approach to riding. For a child, I'd favor pedal assist with moderate limits to power and speed.

katscratch

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #501 on: January 11, 2019, 01:45:23 PM »
A bike with a middrive motor is really hard to ride recklessly, more than usual at least. They ride just like a regular bike, it just feels like you have easier gears.

The assist doesn't necessarily change good or poor cycling habits.

--somehow I missed robartsd's post, but that, exactly. If anything when I've talked with my son and in my own riding, my e-bike makes us each a more conservative and safer rider, because it's dead easy to fully stop at lights when I can give myself a little boost off the stop, compared to riding my other bike where I am trying to conserve as much energy as possible.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2019, 01:48:27 PM by katscratch »

LittleWanderer

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #502 on: January 11, 2019, 03:07:00 PM »
It might be worth it for stickman to check into an e-bike, but I already have two very nice road bikes and I like the exercise, so I'm sticking with my long commute on a regular bike.  I actually enjoy myself most of the time!  :)

FunkyStickman

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #503 on: January 11, 2019, 09:09:30 PM »
It might be worth it for stickman to check into an e-bike, but I already have two very nice road bikes and I like the exercise, so I'm sticking with my long commute on a regular bike.  I actually enjoy myself most of the time!  :)

I'm still thinking about it. Probably will hold off for now, due to time constraints... but I may give it a run on a weekend just to see how it goes.

ysette9

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #504 on: January 14, 2019, 12:55:48 PM »
I adore the ebike i am on. The program my work has lets me borrow it for six moths, the first three with a 19mi/hr limiter in place. Now I can go 28mi/hr, though in practice I rarely get up to 25 mi/hr.

That said, for a teen I would look I to a limited. 19mi/hr is still a ton of fun and makes for a very decent transportation method while being a little safer. I feel safer than on a regular bike mostly because I can accelerate with the normal flow of traffic, so I feel I can fit in to the flow if I need to use a real lane if a bike lane isn’t available.

FunkyStickman

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #505 on: January 21, 2019, 03:02:18 PM »
Quick update: mapped out my route, and it's actually only 21.5 miles. Seriously thinking about diving back in...

ysette9

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #506 on: January 21, 2019, 03:27:07 PM »
I’m on business travel this week and can’t bike. It sucks! The commute from the hotel to the factory is 1.5 hours each way on the bus. I am going crazy and it is only day #2. Those of us who can bike are so privileged.

TrMama

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #507 on: January 21, 2019, 04:10:09 PM »
Pro Tip: When it's time to rebuild the drive train on your winter bike and you want to DIY for the first time, wait for the weather to be nice enough to use your summer bike.

I started taking my winter bike apart last week and quickly realized I was in just a bit over my head. Took me until Sunday evening to get it all back together again. Plus, I had to drive to work twice last week. Horrors! And there were 3 trips to 2 different bike shops to get parts, tools and advice.

On the bright side, it runs so much better! Now I just need to clean my "summer" bike. It's caked in sand and road grit from the 3 days I used it to commute.

ysette9

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #508 on: January 21, 2019, 05:57:56 PM »
What is different about a winter bike versus a summer bike?

FunkyStickman

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #509 on: January 21, 2019, 07:20:38 PM »
What is different about a winter bike versus a summer bike?

"Winter" bikes are usually built to ride in nasty weather. Fenders, wider tires, sometimes internal gear hubs. Can also be used to describe your "beater" bike you don't mind getting nasty.

katscratch

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #510 on: January 21, 2019, 07:23:03 PM »
My winter bike and summer bike are one and the same. For me it just means different cleaning requirements - snow and salt and slush wiped off the half frozen chain in winter; sand and mud wiped off the chain in summer :)  I keep my bike inside, though, which does make a difference in harsh winter weather especially.

ysette9

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #511 on: January 21, 2019, 07:37:15 PM »
That was probably a naive Californian-type question. ;)

FunkyStickman

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #512 on: January 21, 2019, 08:48:14 PM »
That was probably a naive Californian-type question. ;)

I'm in southern Louisiana... it's only winter here for about 4 weeks. Only snows every 10 years or so.

ysette9

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #513 on: January 21, 2019, 09:41:38 PM »
It has snowed exactly once in my lifetime. My mother woke us all up early to see it and it melted as soon as the sun rose.

Arbitrage

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #514 on: January 22, 2019, 09:37:09 AM »
I'm in the midst of being taught a valuable biking lesson - my skin is not invincible. 

Months of riding with a balaclava, tossing it down after the ride, never washing it...then a week of very rainy weather, soaking the balaclava, wearing a soaked balaclava while biking and still never washing it...

So, now I have a fungal skin infection.  Initially, I thought that it was contact dermatitis, but after seeing it spread a bit from the back of my neck despite no further stimuli, it definitely seems to be fungal.  I do not recommend this approach. 

GuitarStv

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #515 on: January 22, 2019, 10:17:06 AM »
What is different about a winter bike versus a summer bike?

For me personally?

- Cheaper components that can be replaced as the salt eats them
- Heavy flat proof tires with a little tread
- Full fenders
- Bar end shifters (they can be operated with heavy gloves/mitts . . . regular STI type shifters can't).
- Waterproof grease used on everything (headset, wheel bearings, bottom bracket, bottle holder screws, etc)
- Reflective tape everywhere

:P

TrMama

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #516 on: January 22, 2019, 10:18:13 AM »
That was probably a naive Californian-type question. ;)

LOL. Sorry for the confusion. It rarely snows here either, but it does rain quite a bit and there's lots of sand and grit on the roads. Riding on wet roads transfers all that grit onto your drivetrain and brake pads (if you have rim brakes). So all those parts wear out much more quickly in the winter.

My summer bike is a carbon road bike that's more expensive to maintain in winter conditions. The winter bike is built with much cheaper parts so replacing them isn't so painful.

ysette9

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #517 on: January 22, 2019, 05:47:16 PM »
Why would you want little tread on the tires of a winter bike?

GuitarStv

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #518 on: January 23, 2019, 09:20:46 AM »
Quote from: ysette9 link=topic=81280.m
sg2269500#msg2269500 date=1548204436
Why would you want little tread on the tires of a winter bike?

Smooth tires are perfect for tarmac when it's dry or wet.  Bikes don't hydroplane, and there's less rolling resistance with less tread pattern usually.  When there's snow and slush down on top though (or wet mud and sometimes sand can also have this issue), it doesn't grip at all.  You'll just end up spinning your rear tire as you try to take off from lights at intersections, and will have more difficulty turning without losing the front wheel.  On the other side though, there's rarely enough snow on our roads to merit big knobby mountain bike tires . . . and using them when there isn't enough snow down they feel very squirmy (as well as rolling very poorly, requiring you to do way too much work to maintain speed).  That squirmy feeling happens because the treads are making minimal contact with the road as you cycle along . . . they are a lot less stable when taking a corner fast.

A little bit of tread pattern gives you just enough traction to deal with some snow between your tires and the road if you get caught in a storm, but doesn't have the grip problem when cornering on dry road.  Also, it's miserable enough cycling in the winter, no way to I want to voluntarily add rolling resistance to a 14 mile commute each way.  :P

katscratch

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #519 on: January 23, 2019, 09:44:27 AM »
Oh - I guess I do make changes to my bike for the winter. I have full fenders year-round. For winter I switch to studded tires and use a dry chain lube. We also have a number of shops that do winter maintenance plans - a subscription service where they'll maintain your drivetrain and check shifting, brakes etc as often as you want, which I did my first year biking to work (two years ago). 

robartsd

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #520 on: January 24, 2019, 08:45:56 AM »
We also have a number of shops that do winter maintenance plans - a subscription service where they'll maintain your drivetrain and check shifting, brakes etc as often as you want, which I did my first year biking to work (two years ago).
Sounds like a way for shops to keep busy during the off (for many) season.

Boofinator

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #521 on: January 24, 2019, 09:16:13 AM »
The train I take to work just added a station 4 miles from my house, so I can start biking. I am going to an ebike shop next weekend to test one out.

My main concern is the bike being stolen from out front of my downtown office building. People have cut my chains and stolen nice bikes twice in my life (I've also had two vehicles broken into, so I may just have bad luck), so I'm nervous about having nice things.

Four miles is (in my opinion) about an ideal distance for pedaling. On a decent road bike, and assuming minimum hills, you can probably cover this distance in about 15-20 minutes. This will be enough to get a decent workout in without being a sweaty mess (at least in the morning).

Boofinator

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #522 on: January 24, 2019, 09:53:19 AM »
I live in a very hilly area, and my bike is a single speed. I don't mind the workout, but I sweat very easily, which won't work in an office environment. However, since I don't want to blow $1k on an ebike without even checking to see if my current road bike will work, I will try it a couple times first. Google Maps does put it at a 20 minute ride, which is only a couple minutes more than what my previous driving time was at the old station.

Single speed in a hilly area? Definitely due for an upgrade. In all Mustachian seriousness. I bought my road bike from Nashbar for about $200 several years ago, and it has served me very well. It doesn't look like Nashbar still sells Nashbar branded road bikes, and the ones they have (Fuji) are more expensive these days ($350 for what looks like the exact bike I bought five years ago). Of course, you could always go Craigslist but that can be a crapshoot if you don't know bikes too well.

Given the hilliness in your area, four miles might make sense for an electric. Don't want to get too sweaty before work.

GuitarStv

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #523 on: January 24, 2019, 09:53:46 AM »
The train I take to work just added a station 4 miles from my house, so I can start biking. I am going to an ebike shop next weekend to test one out.

My main concern is the bike being stolen from out front of my downtown office building. People have cut my chains and stolen nice bikes twice in my life (I've also had two vehicles broken into, so I may just have bad luck), so I'm nervous about having nice things.

Making your bike harder to steal than average is your best protection.  Invest in a heavy U-lock and cable at minimum.  Leave the lock/cable attached to the stand at work so you're not hefting it around all the time because if it's heavy enough to be .  Ensure that the front wheel, rear wheel, and frame are all secured soundly.


Tass

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #524 on: January 24, 2019, 09:58:41 AM »
The train I take to work just added a station 4 miles from my house, so I can start biking. I am going to an ebike shop next weekend to test one out.

My main concern is the bike being stolen from out front of my downtown office building. People have cut my chains and stolen nice bikes twice in my life (I've also had two vehicles broken into, so I may just have bad luck), so I'm nervous about having nice things.

Making your bike harder to steal than average is your best protection.  Invest in a heavy U-lock and cable at minimum.  Leave the lock/cable attached to the stand at work so you're not hefting it around all the time because if it's heavy enough to be .  Ensure that the front wheel, rear wheel, and frame are all secured soundly.

I've got #1 down and I will invest in a cable lock to achieve #2 as well. I have to lock my bike at home as well as at work, though, so I do tote it around everywhere.

So far I've lost small accessories (lights I forgot to remove) to thieves, but nothing over $20 in value.

GuitarStv

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #525 on: January 24, 2019, 10:33:36 AM »
The train I take to work just added a station 4 miles from my house, so I can start biking. I am going to an ebike shop next weekend to test one out.

My main concern is the bike being stolen from out front of my downtown office building. People have cut my chains and stolen nice bikes twice in my life (I've also had two vehicles broken into, so I may just have bad luck), so I'm nervous about having nice things.

Making your bike harder to steal than average is your best protection.  Invest in a heavy U-lock and cable at minimum.  Leave the lock/cable attached to the stand at work so you're not hefting it around all the time because if it's heavy enough to be .  Ensure that the front wheel, rear wheel, and frame are all secured soundly.

I've got #1 down and I will invest in a cable lock to achieve #2 as well. I have to lock my bike at home as well as at work, though, so I do tote it around everywhere.

So far I've lost small accessories (lights I forgot to remove) to thieves, but nothing over $20 in value.

If you're regularly using your bike, it's probably worth buying a second lock for home.

TrMama

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #526 on: January 24, 2019, 10:35:01 AM »
The train I take to work just added a station 4 miles from my house, so I can start biking. I am going to an ebike shop next weekend to test one out.

My main concern is the bike being stolen from out front of my downtown office building. People have cut my chains and stolen nice bikes twice in my life (I've also had two vehicles broken into, so I may just have bad luck), so I'm nervous about having nice things.

Making your bike harder to steal than average is your best protection.  Invest in a heavy U-lock and cable at minimum.  Leave the lock/cable attached to the stand at work so you're not hefting it around all the time because if it's heavy enough to be .  Ensure that the front wheel, rear wheel, and frame are all secured soundly.

I've got #1 down and I will invest in a cable lock to achieve #2 as well. I have to lock my bike at home as well as at work, though, so I do tote it around everywhere.

So far I've lost small accessories (lights I forgot to remove) to thieves, but nothing over $20 in value.

For only 4mi, have you considered just getting a well used hybrid? This is the route I went. My hope is that an older bike with a scratched up frame will be less attractive to thieves. I then replaced the drive train, so it rides like a new bike, even though it looks like an old piece of crap. It's got lots of granny gears, including an old fashioned triple crank. I'm won't be passing the roadies going downhill, but that's ok. I can just coast downhill so I don't get too sweaty and then I've got lots of low gears to choose from for the uphill stretches.

Boofinator

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #527 on: January 24, 2019, 11:25:35 AM »
My current bike does look a little older, and Nashville seems to have a lot less stealing than west Texas had. Btw, here is the bike

https://imgur.com/6ODriwy

I can't view the image at work but.... Seriously, if you live in a hilly area and want to enjoy biking, get a bike with gears.* At least a rear cassette, but you can't go wrong with the front crankset as well.

*There are some masochistic fools who enjoy riding without gears. If this is you, ignore my comment and enjoy the pain.

hadabeardonce

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #528 on: January 24, 2019, 11:43:45 AM »
My current bike does look a little older, and Nashville seems to have a lot less stealing than west Texas had. Btw, here is the bike

https://imgur.com/6ODriwy
Looks like you customized it nicely for yourself though. I was looking at the bars and downtube wondering how you shift, then I saw the rear wheel. Nifty fixie.

Back to Winterizing... I picked up an Ass Saver to put on the end of my saddle and it works really well compared to fenders. Cheap easy solution if you're dealing with occasional rain. Road grit is no joke though. I've been washing my bike once a week to prevent premature wear. Degreasing and re-lubricating the chain is important too. Re-greasing the bottom bracket and headset is also on my to-do list. I want to ride all year, but I don't want to be forced to buy a new bike or pay for new components anytime soon.

For any newbies on indoor trainers, cycling shorts make a difference if riding for 30min+ and feeling uncomfortable. Pedaling out of the saddle every 5 or 10min for 5 or 10sec is also a good trick for staying comfortable.

GuitarStv

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #529 on: January 24, 2019, 12:00:36 PM »
Indoor trainers are also inherently less comfortable than cycling outdoors.  :P

I'm happy for 4-5 hours riding outside, but much over an hour on an indoor trainer is quite literally a pain in the ass.  I think that the leaning and changes in elevation of the front end from riding outside spreads around the pressure much better.

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #530 on: January 24, 2019, 12:44:07 PM »
Indoor trainers are also inherently less comfortable than cycling outdoors.  :P

I'm happy for 4-5 hours riding outside, but much over an hour on an indoor trainer is quite literally a pain in the ass.  I think that the leaning and changes in elevation of the front end from riding outside spreads around the pressure much better.

This has been my experience as well. My wife is always saying "You have a trainer, just ride inside!" But it's not the same... not at all.

Boofinator

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #531 on: January 24, 2019, 12:51:38 PM »
Indoor trainers are also inherently less comfortable than cycling outdoors.  :P

I'm happy for 4-5 hours riding outside, but much over an hour on an indoor trainer is quite literally a pain in the ass.  I think that the leaning and changes in elevation of the front end from riding outside spreads around the pressure much better.

This has been my experience as well. My wife is always saying "You have a trainer, just ride inside!" But it's not the same... not at all.

I'll third. I'll take shitty weather over the dullness that is a trainer any day. Much of the joy of biking is in the actual movement and traveling, neither of which you can get inside.

Boofinator

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #532 on: January 24, 2019, 02:49:49 PM »
Am I the only person here who has never worn a helmet on a bicycle? I've been hit by a car twice and wrecked countless times, and I can't think of a time when a helmet would have made any difference.

I don't wear a helmet except for mountain biking.

katscratch

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #533 on: January 24, 2019, 04:00:59 PM »
My helmet is rain snow and windproof and I find myself wishing I had it on during days I wait for the train :)

TrMama

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #534 on: January 24, 2019, 04:09:41 PM »
Indoor trainers are also inherently less comfortable than cycling outdoors.  :P

I'm happy for 4-5 hours riding outside, but much over an hour on an indoor trainer is quite literally a pain in the ass.  I think that the leaning and changes in elevation of the front end from riding outside spreads around the pressure much better.

This has been my experience as well. My wife is always saying "You have a trainer, just ride inside!" But it's not the same... not at all.

I'll third. I'll take shitty weather over the dullness that is a trainer any day. Much of the joy of biking is in the actual movement and traveling, neither of which you can get inside.

This. I could only stand to ride the trainer when I could also watch a very specific type of video (pro road bike racing, shot from behind so it felt like I was also in the Tour de Wherever). Otherwise, I'd rather gouge my eyes out with a spoon that ride the stupid thing. I was so happy the day I sold it.

Am I the only person here who has never worn a helmet on a bicycle? I've been hit by a car twice and wrecked countless times, and I can't think of a time when a helmet would have made any difference.

I reached my personal lifetime quota of concussions by age 19. I'd happily wear a helmet for just about anything. I never again want to be stumped by the task of how to tie my shoes.

My bike helmet is doubly handy because it has a built in rear blinky light. If drivers don't see the other 2 red blinkies, 2 white front lights or my dorky, reflective yellow jacket then maybe that helmet light will tip them off to please not run me over.

runbikerun

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #535 on: January 25, 2019, 01:00:56 AM »
I know I'm in a minority on this, but I quite like the turbo trainer. It's not as pleasant as an outdoor ride, but an hour on the turbo is worth ninety minutes at least on the road. No freewheeling, no stopping at lights and junctions, and I can go absolutely flat out without worrying about my surroundings.

GuitarStv

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #536 on: January 25, 2019, 08:13:45 AM »
I know I'm in a minority on this, but I quite like the turbo trainer. It's not as pleasant as an outdoor ride, but an hour on the turbo is worth ninety minutes at least on the road. No freewheeling, no stopping at lights and junctions, and I can go absolutely flat out without worrying about my surroundings.

It's very good for sustained threshold interval type efforts.  I do believe that it's more time efficient (although much less fun) than riding on the road too.  It's awful for standing and sprinting efforts though, because you can't throw your bike from side to side.  Trying to do standing at all kinda feels weird on a trainer.

FunkyStickman

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #537 on: January 25, 2019, 08:18:00 AM »
It's very good for sustained threshold interval type efforts.  I do believe that it's more time efficient (although much less fun) than riding on the road too.  It's awful for standing and sprinting efforts though, because you can't throw your bike from side to side.  Trying to do standing at all kinda feels weird on a trainer.

Well, there's always rollers... or a Kinetic Rock-n-Roll that sways side-to-side.

LittleWanderer

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #538 on: January 25, 2019, 08:53:55 AM »
I got a fancy new smart trainer this winter (facepunch for myself) and am using Zwift and my trainer rides STILL suck.  God, it's so mind numbingly boring!  I can't wait for spring.

GuitarStv

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #539 on: January 25, 2019, 08:59:24 AM »
I'm a fan of sufferfest.

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #540 on: January 25, 2019, 09:07:51 AM »
I'm a fan of sufferfest.

I have one of their videos. Never did spring for the subscription when they went to those.

hadabeardonce

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #541 on: January 25, 2019, 10:20:19 AM »
Zwift encourages me to ride a little more than I would normally and it's a nice alternative hitting the road(or a car) at night. Right now I'm doing 30min sessions on a dumb trainer(Minoura RDA80) with a speed sensor. Pain in the ass at first, but now it's tolerable. I can see the trainer setup from my couch, so it lures me up off of that.

I'd consider adding more miles to my commute home, but going past driveways and cars turning right in front me gets more tiresome and painful than the time on the trainer. Whatever floats boats and puts asses on saddles is fine though.

Tass

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #542 on: January 25, 2019, 12:40:55 PM »
Fourth day of biking this week, bringing me up to 6/14 days overall for 2019. The rain last week had me starting out behind, but it's also giving me good motivation to catch up to my goal of 75% bike commutes.

Money Badger

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #543 on: January 27, 2019, 05:17:47 AM »
New bike trailer and Kool Stop pads arrived...   Planning the first ride today with the trailer to Trader Joe's that's now less than a mile from our new house with the "almost" completed wide bike/walking trail our city invested in...   The plot thickens!

GuitarStv

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #544 on: January 27, 2019, 12:22:57 PM »
I live in a very hilly area, and my bike is a single speed. I don't mind the workout, but I sweat very easily, which won't work in an office environment. However, since I don't want to blow $1k on an ebike without even checking to see if my current road bike will work, I will try it a couple times first. Google Maps does put it at a 20 minute ride, which is only a couple minutes more than what my previous driving time was at the old station.

Single speed in a hilly area? Definitely due for an upgrade. In all Mustachian seriousness. I bought my road bike from Nashbar for about $200 several years ago, and it has served me very well. It doesn't look like Nashbar still sells Nashbar branded road bikes, and the ones they have (Fuji) are more expensive these days ($350 for what looks like the exact bike I bought five years ago). Of course, you could always go Craigslist but that can be a crapshoot if you don't know bikes too well.

Given the hilliness in your area, four miles might make sense for an electric. Don't want to get too sweaty before work.

I gave it a dry run today, and I donít think Iíll be able to use this bike to get to work, at least not until I am in much better shape. Total elevation for the ride was only 138 feet, but the two hills I faced on the ride completely destroyed me.

Also, I was freezing cold (temp is right at freezing) but still sweating through my clothes. Iím just going to have to do it on weekends until I am in better shape and can get a better bike for the ride.

Single speed bikes are great if you live in a very flat area, but are kinda rough if you're going up and down big hills.  It's tremendously easier (and faster) to have a geared bike.

Cold weather cycling is a constant battle between overheating/sweating and freezing.  Make sure you don't wear anything made of cotton (cotton pulls heat away from your body faster than being naked when it's soaking wet).  Wool and synthetic wicking type materials tend to work reasonably well for riding a bike.  You'll figure out a layering strategy eventually . . . but as a place to start:
- have something next to your skin that will pull sweat away
- have something over that that is thick enough to trap some heat
- have something over that to act as a windproof shell

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #545 on: January 29, 2019, 09:54:35 AM »
Question about headlights...

My Cygolite Metro 400 seems to have crapped out after just 14 months of use. It says it's charged but then dies within 3 minutes of use.

Are these only supposed to last a certain number of charges? It's difficult to find this information, but I've heard 30 charges thrown around on another forum.

I guess my question is... Are they all going to die after 1-2 years of use? And should I purchase a light from a LBS instead of Amazon? I need one to safely ride into work tomorrow morning.

GuitarStv

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #546 on: January 29, 2019, 11:08:59 AM »
Question about headlights...

My Cygolite Metro 400 seems to have crapped out after just 14 months of use. It says it's charged but then dies within 3 minutes of use.

Are these only supposed to last a certain number of charges? It's difficult to find this information, but I've heard 30 charges thrown around on another forum.

I guess my question is... Are they all going to die after 1-2 years of use? And should I purchase a light from a LBS instead of Amazon? I need one to safely ride into work tomorrow morning.

It's always a good idea to support your LBS, but the one near me doesn't carry the lights I want for riding in to work.

For longevity I kinda feel like lights that use regular batteries are going to be best.  I've got a couple Planet Bike Superflash Turbo taillights that take regular AAA batteries and have been in regular usage for about five years now with no issue.  My old  Planet Bike Blaze that takes AA batteries has been around for about the same time and still works well.   I've been less successful with USB charging stuff . . . it seems like these special lithium batteries do have a limited shelf life and it's often hard to find replacements for them if they're replaceable at all.  This is a shame as it's getting a bit harder to find good bike lights that use regular batteries.

35andFI

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #547 on: January 29, 2019, 11:18:24 AM »
Moving from 44 miles away to 2.5 miles away this Friday. Will be biking to work on Monday!

At least that's the plan... Looks like it's supposed to be raining pretty good...

Headlight: NiteRider Lumina 1200 Boost (Ordered the cheaper 750 and was given this!)

Taillight: NiteRider Solas 100

I have been using the headlight for a few months now and love the thing. I have been told that I look like a car with a headlight out.

I just got the taillight a few days ago and am very happy with that as well. I can't believe how bright it is though.
I made the mistake of looking directly into it and blinded myself for a minute. Shocked that its < $25.

Also, get this: I was talking to a coworker about starting to bike to work and she suggested getting a bike rack under the covered area outside to our building manager.
That is now in the works!

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #548 on: January 29, 2019, 12:21:49 PM »
Question about headlights...

My Cygolite Metro 400 seems to have crapped out after just 14 months of use. It says it's charged but then dies within 3 minutes of use.

Are these only supposed to last a certain number of charges? It's difficult to find this information, but I've heard 30 charges thrown around on another forum.

I guess my question is... Are they all going to die after 1-2 years of use? And should I purchase a light from a LBS instead of Amazon? I need one to safely ride into work tomorrow morning.

It's always a good idea to support your LBS, but the one near me doesn't carry the lights I want for riding in to work.

For longevity I kinda feel like lights that use regular batteries are going to be best.  I've got a couple Planet Bike Superflash Turbo taillights that take regular AAA batteries and have been in regular usage for about five years now with no issue.  My old  Planet Bike Blaze that takes AA batteries has been around for about the same time and still works well.   I've been less successful with USB charging stuff . . . it seems like these special lithium batteries do have a limited shelf life and it's often hard to find replacements for them if they're replaceable at all.  This is a shame as it's getting a bit harder to find good bike lights that use regular batteries.

That's very interesting. Thanks for that.

I ended up biking over to the LBS and bought a Blackburn Dayblazer 400 front and Dayblazer 65 rear (as a backup). Total was like $64 after tax (same price as amazon it seems). Best part was how friendly the interaction was!  :)

robartsd

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Re: Start Biking To Work - cycling newbies chat
« Reply #549 on: January 30, 2019, 11:44:01 AM »
It's always a good idea to support your LBS, but the one near me doesn't carry the lights I want for riding in to work.

For longevity I kinda feel like lights that use regular batteries are going to be best.  I've got a couple Planet Bike Superflash Turbo taillights that take regular AAA batteries and have been in regular usage for about five years now with no issue.  My old  Planet Bike Blaze that takes AA batteries has been around for about the same time and still works well.   I've been less successful with USB charging stuff . . . it seems like these special lithium batteries do have a limited shelf life and it's often hard to find replacements for them if they're replaceable at all.  This is a shame as it's getting a bit harder to find good bike lights that use regular batteries.
I like regular AA (or AAA) battery lights too. I run them on NiMH rechargeable cells. I bought a NiteRider MAKO mini and a larger MAKO (don't remember which one) at a LBS a few years back (only AA lights they had available). Currently using the mini because the larger one crapped out on me. I'm considering getting a MAKO 250 or a Planet Bike Blaze 140 SL. I'm also considering a AA (prefer AA because I have many AA NiMH cells on hand but have few spare AAA cells) rear light to mount on my rack - Planet Bike Grateful Red or Serfas Red Stop Sign Light.