Author Topic: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020  (Read 29415 times)

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #550 on: June 25, 2020, 06:35:23 AM »
Beautiful plants.

Roots&Wings

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #551 on: June 25, 2020, 10:15:55 AM »
I grow turmeric in pots, and we planted ginger this year (pots and in the ground near the downspout)
From what I've read, you can start harvesting in year 2, will see how it goes! There's a large patch of some type of ginger here that gets a small pink flower (below), the roots are quite fragrant. If anyone recognizes the variety, would love to know (plant ID apps are coming up short).


Punk pups have been eating all my ground cherries.

I did a double take on this, hope you're able to get some before the next raid!
« Last Edit: June 25, 2020, 10:44:54 AM by Roots&Wings »

MudPuppy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #552 on: June 25, 2020, 10:32:23 AM »
I moved the pots to the patio table so they couldnít reach them, much to their dismay.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #553 on: June 26, 2020, 10:05:51 AM »
Last night we had some steamed green orca beans for supper.  I have never ever harvested beans this early.  There weren't a lot ready yet and usually peas are first.  I pre-germinated them in a plug tray because we had a super cold week in May - with snow and everything.  It worked out really well - mostly by luck.  But am I ever feeling like a gardening master.

We have been having super salads about as much as we want.  I am continuing to give away a lot of the harvest - first to the homeowners where the garden is located.  Since they are not gardeners, I pick stuff and drop it at their front door (or else it gets overripe).  And to other neighbours who live alone, and might not want to buy a whole container of arugula or spinach, but are delighted with a handful of freshly picked greens.

Now hive:  what do you do with garlic scapes?  I probably let them get too far along.  I have been using one or three in my cooking as I have no garlic cloves at the moment.  I have a lot.

MudPuppy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #554 on: June 26, 2020, 01:13:06 PM »
I sautee them in my asparagus or green beans for extra flavor

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #555 on: June 26, 2020, 01:59:52 PM »
Now hive:  what do you do with garlic scapes? 

I have pickled them.  Tasty. 

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #556 on: June 26, 2020, 03:18:44 PM »
Now hive:  what do you do with garlic scapes? 

I have pickled them.  Tasty.

Very timely topic as I just cut off a few dozen of these literally an hour ago. But as someone who has never pickled - and Iím really not set up for it where I am - any other slam dunk ways to use it up? Worth freezing?

In other news...the produce avalanche has truly begun over here on the left coast. Wouldnít know where to properly begin to illustrate this fact...but my sugar snap peas, which were once 9 feet tall are now 6ft as they collapsed on themselves from the weight of the pea mass - a bit of rain didnít help nor my cutting of a few corners when I built their support structure. I worry that the remaking peas wonít get the proper nourishment now that the stalks/vines are so creased.

😐



Yet another learning moment for me in what seems to be a never ending series of learning moments.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2020, 03:29:25 PM by Jon_Snow »

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #557 on: June 27, 2020, 05:49:49 AM »
What happened @Jon_Snow?   

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #558 on: June 27, 2020, 12:12:12 PM »
What happened @Jon_Snow?

Oh, I guess I didnít whine in as coherent a manner as possible a few posts up. 😉

The top third of my peas decided to detach from the trellis sturcture and are now flopped forward on themselves....pinching their vines (as pictured a few posts back). A 1st-world gardening problem to be sure....and most everything is doing wonderfully, even my hot peppers are coming along despite a cooler start to Summer than we have been used to in recent years. Iím thinking of putting my tomatoes under plastic  to help speed the ripening process. I guess I could just got with the tried and true green fried tomatoes for now. 🙂

Zucchini is now reaching the stage where I will have to step up efforts to either use it in a lot of meals, shred it up and freeze it for future use, or give it away. Actually, in regards to the latter, Iíve got four households who have been taking my excess produce. I sensed some relief when I told the various parties that the spinach pipeline has now ended, lol. Because my garden has never been bigger than this year - thanks pandemic - I need to top up my 3000 gallon water tank today. Even though it hasnít been hot enough to require a ton of watering Iím already down approximately 25% in the tank. So Iíll set up my Honda gas-pump and siphon water from our underground wells and into the tank, which is about 12 feet above the garden grade - to allow for gravity water flow...as my garden is off-grid and literally in the middle of a forest clearing.

Probably time for some updated pics.....

MudPuppy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #559 on: June 27, 2020, 12:29:22 PM »
here are two of my favorite use-up-zucchini recipes

Zucchini Gyros (we don't typically add the mushrooms, since my spouse is not a fan)

Cream of zucchini soup

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #560 on: June 27, 2020, 01:44:31 PM »
Now hive:  what do you do with garlic scapes? 

I have pickled them.  Tasty.

Very timely topic as I just cut off a few dozen of these literally an hour ago. But as someone who has never pickled - and Iím really not set up for it where I am - any other slam dunk ways to use it up? Worth freezing?

In other news...the produce avalanche has truly begun over here on the left coast. Wouldnít know where to properly begin to illustrate this fact...but my sugar snap peas, which were once 9 feet tall are now 6ft as they collapsed on themselves from the weight of the pea mass - a bit of rain didnít help nor my cutting of a few corners when I built their support structure. I worry that the remaking peas wonít get the proper nourishment now that the stalks/vines are so creased.

😐



Yet another learning moment for me in what seems to be a never ending series of learning moments.

I always bind sugar pees to sticks for support. That works well.

Indio

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #561 on: June 27, 2020, 07:52:45 PM »
@MudPuppy  That zucchini gyro recipe and sun dried tomato tatziki looks delectable. I'm overloaded, I mean blessed, with a lot of oregano so I'm definitely going to try that if and when the zucchini starts producing. My favorite way to preserve zucchini is to make it into relish. Fabulous way to add a little zip to winter salads.

I'd like the zucchini plants to be as prolific too. Tp prevent the usual attacks from vine borers, I've put the plants in different spots in the veg garden and seeded them at different times to sort of have a succession of zucchini. With 8 winter/summer squash plants, I'm going to try wrapping the base stems with recycled aluminum foil this year to see if that reduces the attack vector. I've also planted varieties that are disease and powdery mildew resistant.

My broccoli plants have already been attacked by cabbage moth and I didn't notice it in time. The plants are in pots which made it easy to move them next to the blueberry bushes under the mosquito netting for extra protection. Hopefully, that will work. The neem oil treatment for flea beetle stopped the pinprick holes they made in the tomato leaves but wasn't effective for the cabbage moth.

On a different but related topic, read a fascinating article about a Moroccan food forest that fed villagers for generations. I thought permaculture enthusiasts might be interested in it.
https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/what-is-permaculture-food-forests



horsepoor

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #562 on: June 28, 2020, 09:43:14 AM »
Thanks @Indio I'll definitely give that a read!

We are also on the cusp of produce overload here.  Tons of collards and lettuce, snap peas, bulb fennel, carrots big enough to harvest, and zucchini starting to produce at a ridiculous rate.  I harvested some garlic and a few new red potatoes from a volunteer potato plant last night, and ate a handful of raspberries straight from the plants.

Peppers are kind of uneven - the green chiles are getting some good size to them.  My dog has been favoring laying right on top of some of the other pepper varieties, so they've been kind of stunted, but seem to be picking up a bit now.

The horseradish has gone nuts.  I'll be supplying everyone I know with horseradish this fall, then I'll need to figure out some way to contain it to a smaller section of the bed.

Tomatoes seem to be getting a late start.  Only a few varieties have fruit set, even though all the plants are really vigorous and bushy.  Hopefully in a few weeks we'll at least have salad tomatoes.

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #563 on: June 28, 2020, 12:45:27 PM »
Great article @Indio!  Thanks

Raenia

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #564 on: June 28, 2020, 01:37:42 PM »
My tomato and bean plants are flowering like crazy, but not setting fruit - the flowers just dry up and fall off.  Really hoping it was just because of a dry week and I didn't water enough, and not a pollination issue, since it's a bit late to plant more flowers to bring in the pollinators :(  Hopefully I get at least a little produce from them.

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #565 on: June 28, 2020, 02:14:10 PM »
I saw a new (to me) wasp yesterday and identified it as a Great Golden Digger Wasp.  They are big (the one I saw was more than 1.5 inches), solitary, mild mannered, and considered beneficial to the garden because they prey on pests and also pollinate.  What a beauty.  I watched her for a long time excavating a tunnel in the ground.   I read that they then drag their paralyzed prey in there (grasshoppers, crickets, etc) in there and lay an egg on it.  The young then hatch out and dine on the insect meal. 




RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #566 on: June 28, 2020, 04:39:08 PM »
I saw a new (to me) wasp yesterday and identified it as a Great Golden Digger Wasp.  They are big (the one I saw was more than 1.5 inches), solitary, mild mannered, and considered beneficial to the garden because they prey on pests and also pollinate.  What a beauty.  I watched her for a long time excavating a tunnel in the ground.   I read that they then drag their paralyzed prey in there (grasshoppers, crickets, etc) in there and lay an egg on it.  The young then hatch out and dine on the insect meal.

Oooh she is as pretty as a bronze birch borer and a lot less destructive.

Indio

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #567 on: June 28, 2020, 07:10:06 PM »
@Trifele
Haven't seen that pollinator before. How did you identify it? Is there a photo app that can detect it?
I come across so many insects that I'd like to identify.

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #568 on: June 29, 2020, 04:19:49 AM »
@Indio -- plain Google got me there with this wasp, because she's unusually big and has distinctive orange legs and golden areas.  There are other insects and plants I haven't yet identified because they're more nondescript.   

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #569 on: June 29, 2020, 05:25:33 AM »
My favourite garden produce has to be shelling peas.  And I got picking last night.   Almost a 3L basket.  The best.

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #570 on: June 29, 2020, 11:30:59 AM »
This is my first year gardening, so I'm doing a lot of experimenting to see what grows well here (tomatoes), what is a good ROI (peas), what gets destroyed by bugs (broccoli), and what is not worth the hours of shoveling endless dirt onto giant vines (potatoes).

Successes

* Tomatoes - We have 20-something plants, and even the ones in mostly shade are doing better than expected. Look at these beasts, two months apart:





* Peas and pole beans - Fresh snap peas are the best, and the pole beans are 8 or 9 feet tall. We had to extend our trellises to the roof.
* Potatoes - They have grown crazy high despite my active neglect and rough transplantation into shade. Hilling is a pain in the ass, especially when they're planted on a slope.




* Corn - at least so far, they're growing despite shady spots. (Shade is a common theme in this garden.)
* Kale - again, so far. Some plants are looking strong and avoided total destruction.
* Lettuce - I've been able to harvest enough for a few side salads. This is success relative to the rest of the greens.
* Our gardening group - Their generosity has made up for quite a few failed plants.
* Oregano - Oregano eeeeverywhere.
* Scallions - We've been able to harvest for a few meals, including chilaquiles yesterday:



Fails Learning Experiences

* Cabbage and broccoli: aphid central, I had to pull our biggest plant today. I've been meaning to spray neem for weeks, but I've either been too lazy or used the chance of rain to justify my laziness. This is Portland, there's always a chance of rain.
* Bush beans - none have sprouted. I was so excited about the orca beans, too... The bush beans that did sprout turned out to be a pole version, necessitating an emergency trellis operation.
* Peppers - Oh god. This overcast, rainy weather made them moldy and stunted. Out of maybe a dozen attempted plants, we currently have two baby peppers on one plant.
* Spinach - growing super slowly, one bolted, and another is brown and shriveled.
* Beet tops - I should've kept them in water, they died in the soil.
* Catgrass - The cats could care less.
* Oregano -  I didn't plant any oregano. Please someone come take our oregano.

?????

* Onions- we "harvested" three baby onions with gigantic tops that grew out of one grocery store onion bottom. It is... an underwhelming amount of onion considering how tall they got. 'm holding out hope for the Walla Wallas grown from sets.



* Garlic - planted these at the wrong time and didn't let them grow before a test harvest over the weekend.
* Celery - the stalks are thin, but they grew taller than I hoped for.
* Bok choy - produced slowly but reliably, and didn't get munched or infested. A few dry, hot days killed if off. The baby bok choy regrowing from a grocery store base got moldy.
* Squash/cucumber - some plants got munched to death, but some are starting to flower.

@Jon_Snow - same thing happened to our snap peas. We took too long to secure them to the trellis when they were tilting



and they fell over.



They're still alive, at least, and seem to be growing.

Raenia

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #571 on: June 29, 2020, 05:12:24 PM »
My coworker offered me two plants from her garden that she had too much of, and I gladly accepted!  Now I just have to figure out what to do with celery leaf and garlic chives...  Has anyone grown those before?

TomTX

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #572 on: June 29, 2020, 05:45:38 PM »
My coworker offered me two plants from her garden that she had too much of, and I gladly accepted!  Now I just have to figure out what to do with celery leaf and garlic chives...  Has anyone grown those before?

Garlic chives (presuming it's the same "garlic chives" is a bunchy perennial which acts as a groundcover here in Central Texas. I use scissors to harvest leaves whenever we want some.

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #573 on: June 30, 2020, 03:46:24 AM »
Great post @MonkeyJenga!  That is an impressive first year garden.  One thing I've learned is that sometimes successes and fails can change year to year.  Last year I had aphids and cabbage worms out the yingyang, but this year not many.  (I'm attributing it to the insect balance between pest/predator getting better.)  So you never know -- broccoli may work for you if you plant it this fall, or next spring.  As for the potatoes, if you don't like hilling with dirt you could use straw or leaves.   

Raenia

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #574 on: June 30, 2020, 03:16:26 PM »
My coworker offered me two plants from her garden that she had too much of, and I gladly accepted!  Now I just have to figure out what to do with celery leaf and garlic chives...  Has anyone grown those before?

Garlic chives (presuming it's the same "garlic chives" is a bunchy perennial which acts as a groundcover here in Central Texas. I use scissors to harvest leaves whenever we want some.

How do you cook with them?  Any particular uses, or just substitute for regular chives?

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #575 on: June 30, 2020, 10:11:54 PM »
Thanks @Trifele ! Thankfully there was a good setup already, since I moved in with my bf and inherited his yard. He hadn't done this much before, though, just tomatoes and corn and some failed broccoli. We're considering a hoop house so we can do greens over the winter and keep bugs out.

I wanted to hill the potatoes with dirt so more tubers would grow along the stems. We're probably at the point of having more potatoes than we can eat if everything produces, so I'll put less effort in if we try again next year.

horsepoor

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #576 on: June 30, 2020, 11:08:49 PM »
I quit hilling potatoes and still get a pretty good yield.  If I have extra straw, I might pile some around, but I'm pretty lazy about it. 

I've also discovered that leeks grow just fine without being planted into a trench that is slowly filled in, which is how I initially learned to grow them.

Lazy gardening FTW!

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #577 on: June 30, 2020, 11:40:58 PM »
That's good to know about leeks! I got a bunch of free starts, and I was not thrilled about the maintenance.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #578 on: July 02, 2020, 01:01:49 PM »
I picked the greens hard this morning as it is so hot and things were getting very mature.  I then donated the excess to our local food pantry.  0.55kg of delicious greens.

We have been eating beans, peas, basil, onions, garlic scapes and rhubarb in addition to the greens and radish.  Peas are like candy in my opinion.

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #579 on: July 03, 2020, 11:47:11 AM »
We have been eating beans, peas, basil, onions, garlic scapes and rhubarb in addition to the greens and radish.

Nice haul FL!

Peas are like candy in my opinion.

If peas are indeed garden candy then I am a veritable Willy Wonka these days.



The Great Pea Collapse of 2020 didnít do much to stop this train after all.


TomTX

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #580 on: July 04, 2020, 05:47:29 AM »
My coworker offered me two plants from her garden that she had too much of, and I gladly accepted!  Now I just have to figure out what to do with celery leaf and garlic chives...  Has anyone grown those before?

Garlic chives (presuming it's the same "garlic chives" is a bunchy perennial which acts as a groundcover here in Central Texas. I use scissors to harvest leaves whenever we want some.

How do you cook with them?  Any particular uses, or just substitute for regular chives?

Usually just chopped and sprinkled on something like potatoes, sometimes added to soup/stew. The kid will just eat it straight out of the garden.

MudPuppy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #581 on: July 04, 2020, 06:32:06 AM »
We have been eating beans, peas, basil, onions, garlic scapes and rhubarb in addition to the greens and radish.

Nice haul FL!

Peas are like candy in my opinion.

If peas are indeed garden candy then I am a veritable Willy Wonka these days.



The Great Pea Collapse of 2020 didnít do much to stop this train after all.

Hail Wonka!

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #582 on: July 04, 2020, 09:25:55 AM »
@Jon_Snow  Jealous of that pea crop - do you recall what variety this is?

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #583 on: July 04, 2020, 12:16:57 PM »
@Jon_Snow  Jealous of that pea crop - do you recall what variety this is?

Good question @Frugal Lizard. Iíll have a look at my little garden I.D. markers to be sure, but itís either Sugar Lace II or Super Sugar Snap or some such thing. Iíll re-edit this post once I know for sure. Super Sugar Snap. 😊

Iíve been posting the vast majority of my garden stuff in my journal, but since Iím often here to read about others garden adventures and hopefully see some pictures.....and since Iím here now....

....hereís a tater harvest from yesterday...should have many dozens of such bounties right on into the fall.


Cooked up some of these last night and...oh my...just like pretty much everything else in oneís own garden, kicks the living crud out of store bought.
« Last Edit: July 04, 2020, 06:26:55 PM by Jon_Snow »

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #584 on: July 04, 2020, 03:25:02 PM »
Love the pix @Jon_Snow !  Gorgeous peas and potatoes.  Totally agree that homegrown potatoes are super delicious -- so much better than store bought. 

horsepoor

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #585 on: July 04, 2020, 06:31:04 PM »
I harvested about half of my garlic today.  It's interesting - all the garlic in one bed has been about a week ahead of the garlic in another bed about 4' away.  So I'll let this dry and then get the rest from the other bed next week.  Also picked almost a quart of beautiful raspberries, lots of sugar snap peas, a nice cabbage, and easily the biggest broccoli I've ever grown.  I have another one just like it still out there in the garden.  I'm curious to see how bit it will get, since they don't seem quite near flowering yet.  I'm also super excited that the hollyhocks I started from seed are finally blooming.  I think they've been in the ground for 3-4 years, but largely neglected, so it probably took them longer to get to this stage.  AND, I spotted a few black cherry tomatoes that look like they'll be ripe in a few days. 

On the other hand, my Thai basil is just not growing.  I have purple and Genovese basil right near it that is growing really well, but the Thai is just tiny and sad looking.  I might need to try starting some more plants because Thai basil pesto is to die for and I really need to stock the freezer with a bunch of that stuff.










Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #586 on: July 05, 2020, 05:22:36 PM »
Beautiful pics @horsepoor. And your garlic talk reminded me to go pull mine up.

And Iím a bit late in complimenting you on the garden pic you posted a while back. That kind of garden order appeals to me and one day it will be my horticultural reality. Currently, Nature is getting the upper hand on the degree of order I prefer. 🤷🏻‍♂️

horsepoor

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #587 on: July 05, 2020, 06:12:03 PM »
Thanks Jon, but I think it might be a function of environment.  We don't have enough moisture here to have much takeover, aside from the really weedy things.  And I do the raised beds with soaker hoses because of the need to get as much water to its target as possible.  Sunken beds would probably be even better, but I'm not a fan of stooping down that much.


Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #588 on: July 06, 2020, 10:18:21 AM »
Wow - lovely pictures. I will be ordering some of those super sugar snap peas next year.  They look so lovely.

I spent a good portion of the weekend in my gardens.  It is so stinking hot here.  We need rain so a lot of time is spent moving sprinklers around.

Out at my weedy field at the farm, everything that is close to the hose/sprinkler is doing well.  I am still on top of the weeds.
The black bean seeds I planted 11 days ago are up.  I planted them very close together as I was tired and hot and have been having really poor germination rates.  They all came up.  They are short rows but there are six of them.  Hopefully they are in soon enough to get a great crop.

Tomatoes are setting fruit, as are the squash and cukes.  Potatoes are up and so far - no potato bugs.  I had heard that planting them late reduced the insect pressure.  Perhaps the potato beetles need potato when they are out and about in the late spring - and because I was so late planting the potatoes, there were no potato leaves around?  If we get through another two weeks with no bugs - I am going to be thrilled.  Mind you I have no delicious potatoes as @Jon_Snow does. 
If all this grows - I am going to have way too much food.  WAY TOO MUCH.

Three tomato plants wilted in my city garden.  I cut back some of the growth around the base to get some air between them and the ground and got everything staked up and pruned.  Hopefully it was a watering issue not a soil fungal thing.  Tomatillos are setting fruit. 

Harvested a huge handful of beans and my next crop of peas - Grundy are ready.  I picked a number of the flowers on the older onions for a weird type of bouquet - and a variety of greens for a salad tonight.

The bok choi, kale, spinach, arugula and radish went from tiny to bolted before I really got much of any harvest, while the bok choi in the green house was fine.  The second planting of arugula in the shade of the orca bush beans is not bolting.  I planted some beet seeds in the shade of onions ie not much shade.  They are up and pretty good germination.  Very spotty germination of the carrots.  I am probably going to have to purchase beets for pickling and carrots for storage.  I just don't have enough space.

My neighbour who so graciously lets me garden at her house is agreeable to planting along row of strawberry plants along the edge of the garden.  We will have to protect them from the chickens, but I think it will be enough plants to produce a good crop.  I would be interested in what varieties are the best for the home gardener - taste is the most important consideration followed by yield.  I like to make a couple of batches of jam, so would prefer a traditional plant over everbearing , I think.

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #589 on: July 06, 2020, 10:59:48 AM »
My coworker offered me two plants from her garden that she had too much of, and I gladly accepted!  Now I just have to figure out what to do with celery leaf and garlic chives...  Has anyone grown those before?

Garlic chives (presuming it's the same "garlic chives" is a bunchy perennial which acts as a groundcover here in Central Texas. I use scissors to harvest leaves whenever we want some.

How do you cook with them?  Any particular uses, or just substitute for regular chives?

Usually just chopped and sprinkled on something like potatoes, sometimes added to soup/stew. The kid will just eat it straight out of the garden.

The garlic chives are awesome in omelets and salads or sprinkled on top of chili and soups and tacos, fajitas or anything you would use regular chives for but would appreciate the extra potent garlic flavor.
Great in soups and stews of course, with pot roasts and of course in any salad.
If you have no basil to eat with your tomato/salad - celery leaves are a great substitute.

@Indio thanks for that awesome article link about the Moroccan Food Forest.

For me in Florida, gardening seasoning is over. Just harvesting herbs and peppers.
My basil had the most interesting visitors - a whole squadron flying in formation, metallic green bee looking insects, same size as a bee.
They came for two weeks or so and only visited this one particular basil plant. They could stand still in midair.
While they visited no bees came around.
As of yesterday, they are gone and my regular bees are back - odd.

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #590 on: July 06, 2020, 11:09:11 AM »
Stunning @horsepoor! Love seeing the pictures. Those tomatoes look delicious.

Here's more subtropical zone 9B, should have fresh pineapple and starfruit soon. Banana is putting out the "flag leaf" signaling a new rack of fruit will soon form.



Oh,  that pineapple looks awesome.
I didn't know about the flag leaf for bananas - now I know what to look for. Mine still have some growing to do although I can't get over how thick they are becoming at the bottom.

My guava suddenly got all yellow leaves only a bit of green remaining, not sure what happened.

gaja

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #591 on: July 06, 2020, 11:28:29 AM »
Fun to see pictures from other gardens around the world!

We need some sort of weed trimmer, but the string trimmers never last. This weekend I tried a small handheld electric trimmer, but it was better at combing the weeds than cutting them. So today I went off and bought a small scythe instead.  I was wondering if it would be better to get a sickle, but the short scythe covers both needs.

Scything is just as much fun as I remember from my youth! If it wasn't for my hayfever, I would buy a full size scythe and convert the lawn into flowering grassland.

On the negative side, there was a bit of wind yesterday, and the sofa swing fell over my jostaberries. Luckily, it missed the newly planted fruit trees. And one of the glass panes on the green house broke.

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #592 on: July 06, 2020, 12:11:43 PM »
For me in Florida, gardening seasoning is over. Just harvesting herbs and peppers.
My basil had the most interesting visitors - a whole squadron flying in formation, metallic green bee looking insects, same size as a bee.
They came for two weeks or so and only visited this one particular basil plant. They could stand still in midair.
While they visited no bees came around.
As of yesterday, they are gone and my regular bees are back - odd.

@Rosy -- was this your visitor?  If so, they are bees -- Agapostemon, a/k/a sweat bees.  I see them too sometimes.  They are so shockingly green, they don't look real:


Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #593 on: July 06, 2020, 03:19:06 PM »
I don't think so, they were entirely green. No striped bee body at all. It had two body parts both were metallic green, there was a very little bit of black near the eyes I think.
I only managed one rather poor shot. I'll see if I can upload it later.