Author Topic: November Cycling Challenge 2014  (Read 21324 times)

Thegoblinchief

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #50 on: November 13, 2014, 10:34:52 AM »
There's two parts:

1. Mental - I'll be honest, I bribe them at first. Whenever we hit new milestones or have to bike in crappy conditions for the first time, they get "stars" for doing it without fussing (too much). Stars are our reward currency. Each star is $1. They can spend half. The other half goes into their Vanguard account.

2. Gear - this can be challenging with kids, but between REI Outlet and Sierra Trading Post, I've been able to get stuff pretty reasonably over the year. For winter:

Head: I just taped our helmets with packing tape. All of us have balaclavas. All of my kids have giant heads, so they all wear adult headgear. I think I'm going to get ski goggles for them as well but haven't yet.

Torso: Layers! Eventually I want to get the Marmot outer shell that I have in smaller adult sizes, but for now we are using conventional kids jackets.

Hands: not terribly happy with our gloves, but it's hard to find good ski gloves for kids this small.

Legs/feet: at these temps, either snow pants or double layers of sweatpants. Wool socks in snow boots.

johnny847

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #51 on: November 13, 2014, 10:40:23 AM »
I'll be honest, I bribe them at first.  ... Stars are our reward currency. Each star is $1. They can spend half. The other half goes into their Vanguard account.
Hahaha nice.
And damn, starting their investment portfolio early! Is it actually in their name? Or do you just keep track of what portion of the funds in your account are theirs?

Yea I can see the clothes get tricky. And they'll grow out of it too, so it's more challenging to keep the costs down (although I'm guessing you're planning on handing down clothes amongst your kids?)

Thegoblinchief

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #52 on: November 13, 2014, 11:11:56 AM »
@johnny- yeah, we hand down as much as possible. Anything I buy for my older two girls has to be neutral so the boy can wear it too.

@jordanread- I wish you the best of luck deciding which is most important, the spending freeze, or maintaining your commuting through the winter. I'd offer my own gear recommendations but don't want to increase the noise level in your decision process :)

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #53 on: November 13, 2014, 12:56:24 PM »
@johnny- yeah, we hand down as much as possible. Anything I buy for my older two girls has to be neutral so the boy can wear it too.

@jordanread- I wish you the best of luck deciding which is most important, the spending freeze, or maintaining your commuting through the winter. I'd offer my own gear recommendations but don't want to increase the noise level in your decision process :)

By all means, recommend away. Noise doesn't bother me. I'm not a big impulse buyer, so the more knowledge I have, the better.

Thegoblinchief

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #54 on: November 13, 2014, 01:20:46 PM »
By all means, recommend away. Noise doesn't bother me. I'm not a big impulse buyer, so the more knowledge I have, the better.

For Canadians, MEC seems to be a favorite source, but for us in the States, I really like Sierra Trading Post's e-mail sales but will occasionally buy stuff from REI.

Head: cheap neoprene balaclava + taping over the vent holes of your helmet with packing tape

Torso: base layer is a thin synthetic long-sleeve shirt. Most of mine are Kenyon Polarskins because they were dirt cheap on STP. Mid layer is my spring pullover fleece jacket, which works for most winter temps below freezing but not super cold. Outer layer is a Marmot PreCip (GoreTex-like material) jacket.

Hands: I have some Dakine ski/snowboard gloves. They're pretty warm but I might need to add a thin liner layer for the really cold days, or days when I'm out for long periods.

Legs: synthetic base layer - same brands as above. Outer layer is usually cotton sweats unless it's either very cold or wet, in which case I have Marmot PreCip pants.

Feet: I know you like your powered upstroke, but I like the grip of traction-pin pedals combined with NOT having my feet hooked in when conditions are shit. Above freezing I wear my standard sneakers with wool socks, but below freezing I have ridiculously warm hunting boots, which also work great as winter hiking footwear. I could do without the camo aesthetic, but they're well built (Red Wings) and have 1000g Thinsulate insulation, which is rated to -40F. If you're taking really long rides in the winter, no matter what the boot, you might need to dismount occasionally to walk. (I definitely needed to do this last winter.) The motion helps stimulate blood flow in your toes. I also curl my toes every couple minutes when actively pedaling to do the same thing.

Keeping your LEGS warm does help keep your FEET warmer, so consider adding leg layers unless you're getting sweaty legs.

Avoid cotton like the plague, even for mid and outer layers.

PindyStache

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #55 on: November 13, 2014, 07:42:31 PM »
However, from experience I can attest that falling on ice hurts less than falling on dry pavement. You just slide to a stop with much less bruising and don't get any of that nasty road rash. Go slow though.

Heh would not have expected that. Makes sense though.

+1 to this TrMama! Had my first spill of the season today. Going about 2mph coming up to a stop sign, but thanks to the cars spinning wheels to get going 'quickly' it was icy and bumpy. Not bad at all though. Lady in a car behind me "hey are you OK?" ... "wounded in dignity only"

rocketpj

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #56 on: November 15, 2014, 02:52:10 PM »
First time I noticed this particular thread.  I know the month is half over, but all of my riding has been commuting, so it was fairly easy for me to backtrack a bit.  My bike was getting to be in desperate need of repair/tuneup (7 year old bike with heavy use, some stuff was wearing out completely), so I wasn't riding it when I didn't have to.  Now that it's back in top shape I will be doing a lot more car replacement cycling outside of my commute.

Of course I notice the thread the day after I spend the year's bike maintenance budget (new cassette, new shifter cable, new chain, new front derailleur, some other bits & bobs).

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #57 on: November 15, 2014, 08:31:59 PM »
First time I noticed this particular thread.  I know the month is half over, but all of my riding has been commuting, so it was fairly easy for me to backtrack a bit.  My bike was getting to be in desperate need of repair/tuneup (7 year old bike with heavy use, some stuff was wearing out completely), so I wasn't riding it when I didn't have to.  Now that it's back in top shape I will be doing a lot more car replacement cycling outside of my commute.

Of course I notice the thread the day after I spend the year's bike maintenance budget (new cassette, new shifter cable, new chain, new front derailleur, some other bits & bobs).
Always good to have new riders. Welcome!

rocketpj

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #58 on: November 17, 2014, 03:12:51 PM »
I had an unexpected bonus riding up to the gym this morning after getting home from work.  Someone had a used table saw at the front of his yard (he got a new one) and he was giving it away for free.  As it happens, there are times when I can use a table saw, but not often enough to buy one at this time.

So free is the right price.  I knocked on his door and he offered to drive it over to my house, if I helped him lift it into his truck (it is an old, very heavy saw).  I did so, and not only did I get a great ride today but there is also a tool in the 'table saw' spot in my shop.  The inadvertent benefits of cycling.

usmarine1975

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #59 on: November 18, 2014, 08:23:28 AM »
Miles are not racking up the past two weeks.  This month will be a bad month.  Hunting and a flat tire are the cause.  I need to find time to change my tire and get the spare bike done.

Mrs. PoP

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #60 on: November 19, 2014, 05:29:03 PM »
This morning it was COLD... Wunderground said it was 49 as I rode to work, which is pretty freakin' rare down here (FL).  Plus it was overcast and windy, also pretty freakin' rare to happen during the winter as that's more typically summer weather.  But I wanted to be tough and bike to work, so I did... and even got rained on a bit on the way.  Cold rain is way less fun than summer rain.  So yeah, this was probably one of my toughest bike commutes yet, especially to work.  =( 

Yet as I warmed up in the office after my ride, I thought how amazing it is that most of you guys do that and way worse day after day for months on end.  Mad props to you!

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #61 on: November 20, 2014, 07:23:41 AM »
So my cycling has suffered a bit while I waited for it to get into the double digits when I left. Looks to be a cold winter. I decided to go ahead and get a better base layer, and the booties I posted about earlier. Straight numbers showing that I"ll have to bike for about 4 months for it to pay for itself. However, I seem to drink a lot less when I bike, and once I've ridden at some point during the day, I hate the idea of getting into my car. So with miscellaneous and secondary savings, I decided to pull the trigger, and forego the spending freeze. However, I've done so well on the freeze, that my credit card was supposed to have been replaced, and it didn't work. Which means another 6 days to get a new card and activate it. The fact that the only card I use for purchases (due to the rewards) was disabled for almost a month, and I didn't notice, really made me feel good about sticking to it. More cycling soon!!

johnny847

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #62 on: November 20, 2014, 07:25:21 AM »
So my cycling has suffered a bit while I waited for it to get into the double digits when I left. Looks to be a cold winter. I decided to go ahead and get a better base layer, and the booties I posted about earlier. Straight numbers showing that I"ll have to bike for about 4 months for it to pay for itself. However, I seem to drink a lot less when I bike, and once I've ridden at some point during the day, I hate the idea of getting into my car. So with miscellaneous and secondary savings, I decided to pull the trigger, and forego the spending freeze. However, I've done so well on the freeze, that my credit card was supposed to have been replaced, and it didn't work. Which means another 6 days to get a new card and activate it. The fact that the only card I use for purchases (due to the rewards) was disabled for almost a month, and I didn't notice, really made me feel good about sticking to it. More cycling soon!!
Hahaha Mustachian people problems!

Kmp2

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #63 on: November 20, 2014, 10:10:53 AM »
My cycling has been derailed this week - although the weather was much more conducive to last weeks 0F's..
New downtown location, new project role, and a cold that's wearing me down - standing on the train was enough to make me light headed so hopefully next week I can start trying out some new routes, and incorporating cycling more than transit.

Kudos Mrs. Pop - and for the record really cold dry temps are sooo much nicer than cold rain.


jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #64 on: November 20, 2014, 10:34:00 AM »
So my cycling has suffered a bit while I waited for it to get into the double digits when I left. Looks to be a cold winter. I decided to go ahead and get a better base layer, and the booties I posted about earlier. Straight numbers showing that I"ll have to bike for about 4 months for it to pay for itself. However, I seem to drink a lot less when I bike, and once I've ridden at some point during the day, I hate the idea of getting into my car. So with miscellaneous and secondary savings, I decided to pull the trigger, and forego the spending freeze. However, I've done so well on the freeze, that my credit card was supposed to have been replaced, and it didn't work. Which means another 6 days to get a new card and activate it. The fact that the only card I use for purchases (due to the rewards) was disabled for almost a month, and I didn't notice, really made me feel good about sticking to it. More cycling soon!!
Hahaha Mustachian people problems!

I wish it was the first time (from an earlier post in Mustachian People Problems):

I just got the most perfect Mustachian problem...



Online bill-pay for the win!!

Edited to add: I'm pretty sure that's my savings account card.

johnny847

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #65 on: November 20, 2014, 10:44:07 AM »
I wish it was the first time (from an earlier post in Mustachian People Problems):
This is kind of a silly suggestion, but you could set up a recurring $1 monthly transaction of loading an Amex Serve with a debit card (free to do). Then, either withdraw it back to a bank account or pay a credit card with it. Of course, this is nowhere near worth the hassle if you don't already have a Serve.

Incidentally, this is my plan to meet the 10-12 debit transactions a month for a rewards checking account when i finally get off my butt and open one (you can make daily recurring transactions also).

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #66 on: November 20, 2014, 11:20:39 AM »
I wish it was the first time (from an earlier post in Mustachian People Problems):
This is kind of a silly suggestion, but you could set up a recurring $1 monthly transaction of loading an Amex Serve with a debit card (free to do). Then, either withdraw it back to a bank account or pay a credit card with it. Of course, this is nowhere near worth the hassle if you don't already have a Serve.

Incidentally, this is my plan to meet the 10-12 debit transactions a month for a rewards checking account when i finally get off my butt and open one (you can make daily recurring transactions also).

Yeah, I'm familiar with that. I don't normally do full on spending freezes for multiple months, so it was a one off with the latest card. The 1st one was for a secondary account. I haven't even bothered renewing it. I just do online transfers if I need money out of there, but I still haven't (since savings is for the future!!). I don't have rewards checking, but my CC is a rewards one. I don't have an amex serve, but I plan to use something like that once my credit card hacking gets into full swing next year.

usmarine1975

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #67 on: November 21, 2014, 05:32:40 AM »
So I replaced my tires. While inflating the front tire the tube popped. I figured user error and replaced it with a used tube. Went down this morning to get ready for my ride only to find the back tube had also popped. Ugh no riding this week don't have time to change it.  I bought Duro brand tires that came with duro tubes.  50 psi in each tire.

Did I do something wrong? The used tube is still fine.

Will fix it this weekend and hopefully catch up on some miles.

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #68 on: November 21, 2014, 05:38:03 AM »


So I replaced my tires. While inflating the front tire the tube popped. I figured user error and replaced it with a used tube. Went down this morning to get ready for my ride only to find the back tube had also popped. Ugh no riding this week don't have time to change it.  I bought Duro brand tires that came with duro tubes.  50 psi in each tire.

Did I do something wrong? The used tube is still fine.

Will fix it this weekend and hopefully catch up on some miles.

By popped, do you mean like an actual "pop"? That's usually due to over inflation or a twisted tube. I went through a fair amount of tubes before realizing there was something inside the tire putting a hole in the tube every time. Might want to check that.

usmarine1975

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #69 on: November 21, 2014, 05:41:33 AM »
Popped as in tube split over a foot in length.  I figured that with the first tube but the second one went through the night. And 50 psi isn't usually over inflated. Twisted tube is a thought but I was careful and had tube partially inflated when I put it in.  Also the used tube is fine. I sent a message to the seller but guessing they will say the same. 

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #70 on: November 21, 2014, 05:56:34 AM »
Damn. Split that big sounds like a manufacturing defect. Split on the seam?

usmarine1975

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #71 on: November 21, 2014, 06:34:35 AM »
Damn. Split that big sounds like a manufacturing defect. Split on the seam?

I will look tonight.  I have replaced multiple tubes with no issue so it would seem to me these two are defective.  But the others have all been used.  My own thinking is that new tires shouldn't be any different if anything should be less likely to fail.  Just glad I wasn't half way to work when it blew.

I sent a message to the seller.  considering the price I will probably just look for new tubes elsewhere.  The tires seem solid.

SweetTPi

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #72 on: November 21, 2014, 06:54:53 AM »
I hate waking up all ready to ride and finding the tire(s) totally flat. The only non-defect possibility I can think of that I would think of is that the tubes were caught between the tire and the rim, and burst due to the pinching after they were inflated.  But I don't know why there would be a difference between old and new tubes.

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #73 on: November 21, 2014, 07:03:45 AM »
So I noticed something about when I do certain calculations. I don't remember where I had initially heard it (4 hour work week/World is Flat/Something), but it's the concept of your real hourly wage. I know it's kind of a common knowledge thing around these parts, but I realized I do something on the occasion that I calculate this metric. If I ride in, I don't count the time it takes, or bike maintenance, or anything else. If I drive in, I throw everything in there, including the time, gas, maintenance, etc. I think that it's because when I hop in the car, I consider work to start. When I hop on the bike, I have this awesome ride to do before I start working.

Do you guys feel the same? Does anyone else do this with their calculations?

johnny847

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #74 on: November 21, 2014, 08:52:44 AM »
So I noticed something about when I do certain calculations. I don't remember where I had initially heard it (4 hour work week/World is Flat/Something), but it's the concept of your real hourly wage. I know it's kind of a common knowledge thing around these parts, but I realized I do something on the occasion that I calculate this metric. If I ride in, I don't count the time it takes, or bike maintenance, or anything else. If I drive in, I throw everything in there, including the time, gas, maintenance, etc. I think that it's because when I hop in the car, I consider work to start. When I hop on the bike, I have this awesome ride to do before I start working.

Do you guys feel the same? Does anyone else do this with their calculations?
I am within walking distance of my lab, so I don't ever drive to work. Heck, my car is permanently parked at my lab. So I can't speak from experience, but I think it's probably valid - biking is enjoyable for you, and driving is not. Although it is still time taken away from being with family and/or friends.

In the end though, it depends what you are using this real hourly wage metric for. I had a similar discussion about whether to include cycling specific food that I buy in my cycling cost per mile. The conclusion was if I am biking to save money, then it's probably logical to include it (but still a bit problematic because now I'm including that cost but not include any health expense savings). But, if cycling were an activity that replaced some other cardio exercise of a similar intensity that I used to do, then it wouldn't really make sense to do so, because I would have been consuming  a similar amount of calories regardless.

Thegoblinchief

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #75 on: November 22, 2014, 09:21:39 AM »
Had a good ride in today despite freezing rain making well salted arterials the only safe option because I forgot just how much higher my saddle needs to be with my winter boots versus my trainers. (Almost an inch higher)

It's amazing how badass you can feel just by getting the right fit on the bike.

usmarine1975

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #76 on: November 22, 2014, 01:13:38 PM »
I got a note from eBay seller that they would replace my tubes.  Finally got the bike rideable.  I even upgraded my lights.  The cheaper ones are not very condusive for the dark. New rear light even shoots a lazer on either side of my bike.   That should be interesting. Now to get pedaling again.  No trouble with either used tube that I put in. I am guessing the new ones were defective. They did not split on the seam.

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #77 on: November 24, 2014, 01:26:55 PM »
I'll just leave this right here:


Thegoblinchief

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #78 on: November 24, 2014, 02:24:08 PM »
Excited to try out my new studded tires tonight on an errand run. The roads probably won't be terribly sloppy, but we are supposed to get a couple inches of slush.

For thus curious, I got Schwalbe Marathon Winters in 700x35. I had to tweak my fenders a tad to ensure clearance. Hopefully there's no issues when I actually get out in the elements.

Mrs. PoP

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #79 on: November 24, 2014, 05:00:01 PM »
I'll just leave this right here:



Awesome.  =)

Thegoblinchief

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #80 on: November 24, 2014, 06:36:18 PM »
Studded tires rock!

usmarine1975

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #81 on: November 25, 2014, 07:24:45 AM »
I have looked at them but not sure I am going to get them just yet.  Will try to bike this first winter without them.  We don't have long periods of snow and ice.  It's usually only a couple days. 

This month is not gonna be a record month for me.  Between the tire flat and time to repair, Hunting season, and last week at work commuting just hasn't been on the list.  I am hoping to make up for it by biking 3 days a week in the morning before everyone gets up next week.  We shall see hopefully I can get my miles back up next month.  Not hopefully going to do it.  If I don't I expect someone to come and face punch me.

jamal utah

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #82 on: November 25, 2014, 10:35:09 AM »
Sounds like a least a portion of you guys use Strava.  I started a MMM Strava Club here: http://www.strava.com/clubs/Mrmm

It may be easier to track mileage this way.  I emailed this idea to MMM a while back, but didn't get a response.  I figured that I would start it up myself and pass it off to someone associated with the blog if it took off.  Anyways it may be easier than google docs for tracking.

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #83 on: November 25, 2014, 10:42:32 AM »
Sounds like a least a portion of you guys use Strava.  I started a MMM Strava Club here: http://www.strava.com/clubs/Mrmm

It may be easier to track mileage this way.  I emailed this idea to MMM a while back, but didn't get a response.  I figured that I would start it up myself and pass it off to someone associated with the blog if it took off.  Anyways it may be easier than google docs for tracking.

Ah, this isn't necessarily for tracking mileage. We all use something else to actually track miles, this is more for comparison and challenging each other. I use Tracks to actually track, but the month challenge has been a staple for a couple of years. It's just a fun place to share your mileage, stories, etc as opposed to just tracking. Thanks for the link though. I've never used Strava, and don't intend to, but I'll include the link to your club at the beginning of each month.

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #84 on: November 25, 2014, 11:17:05 AM »
Cool.  Looks like you guys are putting up some pretty good numbers.  Looking forward to joining the challenge.

Thegoblinchief

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #85 on: November 25, 2014, 11:27:08 AM »
I use Strava to track rides where I'm not sure how long I'm going to bike, but most of my destinations involve known mileage, so I don't bother burning battery on the GPS.

jamal utah

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #86 on: November 25, 2014, 12:01:33 PM »
Yeah my old verizon phone couldn't even last for a 3 hour ride.  The gps would eat through the battery pretty quick.  However, my Moto G through Republic Wireless is great.  I commute ~17 miles each way to work and typically use Strava just to keep track of everything.  It usually takes me between 50 minutes and 1 hour depending on the wind.  It probably only uses about 10 - 15% battery. 

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #87 on: November 25, 2014, 12:12:55 PM »
Yeah my old verizon phone couldn't even last for a 3 hour ride.  The gps would eat through the battery pretty quick.  However, my Moto G through Republic Wireless is great.  I commute ~17 miles each way to work and typically use Strava just to keep track of everything.  It usually takes me between 50 minutes and 1 hour depending on the wind.  It probably only uses about 10 - 15% battery.

My Moto X does great (except when it's cold and the battery goes all wonky-see post above) as far as batter life. I listen to music on speakers, use GPS and accelerometer (which is probably just GPS) with MyTracks, and occassionally hit up some Ingress Portals. Gotta love Republic!!

That being said, what part of CO do you live in? Obviously the flat part :P. I hit about 40-50 minutes for my ~9+ mile ride on my MTB. I'm still adjusting to biking more regularly, plus it's awesome for off-roading. What kind of bike do you ride, what is your route like, how long have you been riding, and what kind of shape are you in? Just trying to understand that badassness. :-)

Also, look forward to seeing you in the challenges. Feel free to join in this month. Russ is our local guy who makes us all look bad, and I'm hoping he'll jump in next month (think 800ish miles/month).

jamal utah

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #88 on: November 25, 2014, 12:26:17 PM »
I live in Broomfield and work in Boulder.  My commute is fairly flat ~650 ft elevation gain each way. Its undulating hills mostly.  I ride a Moots Vamoots road bike.  The bike isn't particularity mustachian but it was an engagement gift from my wife.  My prior bike was a 10 year old trek road bike.  I've gotten in about 2,600 commuting miles this year since April.  I was riding 4 - 5 days a week (35 each way) until the cold weather this month and the time change. The darkness on my way home has made me a little hesitant to continue. I can tolerate the cold but 17 miles is a long way to go in the dark during rush hour.

I added myself to the challenge this month, but I've only ridden a handful of days.  I put in around 600 miles in October.

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #89 on: November 25, 2014, 12:34:08 PM »
I live in Broomfield and work in Boulder.  My commute is fairly flat ~650 ft elevation gain each way. Its undulating hills mostly.  I ride a Moots Vamoots road bike.  The bike isn't particularity mustachian but it was an engagement gift from my wife.  My prior bike was a 10 year old trek road bike.  I've gotten in about 2,600 commuting miles this year since April.  I was riding 4 - 5 days a week (35 each way) until the cold weather this month and the time change. The darkness on my way home has made me a little hesitant to continue. I can tolerate the cold but 17 miles is a long way to go in the dark during rush hour.

I added myself to the challenge this month, but I've only ridden a handful of days.  I put in around 600 miles in October.

All bikes are Mustachian!! :-) Always better than cars. Granted, you are talking to someone who paid as $300 for my latest bike off of craigslist, and $400 for my car. :-)

So I am still nowhere near your level. I'll get there though. :-)

jamal utah

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #90 on: November 25, 2014, 12:38:29 PM »
Thanks for the encouragement. I'm looking forward to mixing it up with you guys.

jamal utah

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #91 on: November 25, 2014, 02:46:04 PM »
By all means, recommend away. Noise doesn't bother me. I'm not a big impulse buyer, so the more knowledge I have, the better.

For Canadians, MEC seems to be a favorite source, but for us in the States, I really like Sierra Trading Post's e-mail sales but will occasionally buy stuff from REI.

Head: cheap neoprene balaclava + taping over the vent holes of your helmet with packing tape

Torso: base layer is a thin synthetic long-sleeve shirt. Most of mine are Kenyon Polarskins because they were dirt cheap on STP. Mid layer is my spring pullover fleece jacket, which works for most winter temps below freezing but not super cold. Outer layer is a Marmot PreCip (GoreTex-like material) jacket.

Hands: I have some Dakine ski/snowboard gloves. They're pretty warm but I might need to add a thin liner layer for the really cold days, or days when I'm out for long periods.

Legs: synthetic base layer - same brands as above. Outer layer is usually cotton sweats unless it's either very cold or wet, in which case I have Marmot PreCip pants.

Feet: I know you like your powered upstroke, but I like the grip of traction-pin pedals combined with NOT having my feet hooked in when conditions are shit. Above freezing I wear my standard sneakers with wool socks, but below freezing I have ridiculously warm hunting boots, which also work great as winter hiking footwear. I could do without the camo aesthetic, but they're well built (Red Wings) and have 1000g Thinsulate insulation, which is rated to -40F. If you're taking really long rides in the winter, no matter what the boot, you might need to dismount occasionally to walk. (I definitely needed to do this last winter.) The motion helps stimulate blood flow in your toes. I also curl my toes every couple minutes when actively pedaling to do the same thing.

Keeping your LEGS warm does help keep your FEET warmer, so consider adding leg layers unless you're getting sweaty legs.

Avoid cotton like the plague, even for mid and outer layers.

Here are my thoughts on winter cycling attire.

Torso:  I wear this base layer (http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1003842_-1_400068__400068) with a normal cycling jersey.  If its below 30 degrees I add this: http://www.eddiebauer.com/product/accelerant-jacket/38832119/_/A-ebSku_0880446707000080__38832119_catalog10002_en__US?showProducts=111&backToCat=&previousPage=SRC&tab=&color=283

The accelerant jacket has a little bit of down and helps with the wind.  It is also form fitting so it doesn't create a lot of drag.  It also has thumb loops, which is nice to prevent the sleeves from creeping up.  EB stuff goes on sale all the time, so you can probably get a good deal on this jacket if you are diligence. 

Arms: I use pearl izumi arm warmers that have a little bit of a fleece lining.  I like using arm warmers with short sleeved jerseys because it gives me the option to shed layers without getting off my bike if I get too hot.

Legs:  Pearl izumi thermal tights without chamois.  I put on regular cycling tights over these.

Hands: I got these gloves (http://www.amazon.com/Pearl-Izumi-Softshell-Lobster-Glove/dp/B004N62HMQ) and they are pretty awesome.  Probably too warm unless is under 40 degrees.  I had thinner gloves before but the wind just shot right through them.

Feet:  thin wool socks.  You can get some cycling specific ones pretty cheap.  I also use these shoe covers: http://www.amazon.com/Pearl-Izumi-Elite-Barrier-X-Large/dp/B004N62JH4/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1416951701&sr=1-2&keywords=cycling+shoe+covers

The shoe covers make a huge difference.  These would be overkill IMHO unless is was below 30. 

Head:  A thin neoprene skull cap. The one I have I think is intended for runners. Helmet.






jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #92 on: November 25, 2014, 04:06:39 PM »
By all means, recommend away. Noise doesn't bother me. I'm not a big impulse buyer, so the more knowledge I have, the better.

For Canadians, MEC seems to be a favorite source, but for us in the States, I really like Sierra Trading Post's e-mail sales but will occasionally buy stuff from REI.

Head: cheap neoprene balaclava + taping over the vent holes of your helmet with packing tape

Torso: base layer is a thin synthetic long-sleeve shirt. Most of mine are Kenyon Polarskins because they were dirt cheap on STP. Mid layer is my spring pullover fleece jacket, which works for most winter temps below freezing but not super cold. Outer layer is a Marmot PreCip (GoreTex-like material) jacket.

Hands: I have some Dakine ski/snowboard gloves. They're pretty warm but I might need to add a thin liner layer for the really cold days, or days when I'm out for long periods.

Legs: synthetic base layer - same brands as above. Outer layer is usually cotton sweats unless it's either very cold or wet, in which case I have Marmot PreCip pants.

Feet: I know you like your powered upstroke, but I like the grip of traction-pin pedals combined with NOT having my feet hooked in when conditions are shit. Above freezing I wear my standard sneakers with wool socks, but below freezing I have ridiculously warm hunting boots, which also work great as winter hiking footwear. I could do without the camo aesthetic, but they're well built (Red Wings) and have 1000g Thinsulate insulation, which is rated to -40F. If you're taking really long rides in the winter, no matter what the boot, you might need to dismount occasionally to walk. (I definitely needed to do this last winter.) The motion helps stimulate blood flow in your toes. I also curl my toes every couple minutes when actively pedaling to do the same thing.

Keeping your LEGS warm does help keep your FEET warmer, so consider adding leg layers unless you're getting sweaty legs.

Avoid cotton like the plague, even for mid and outer layers.

Here are my thoughts on winter cycling attire.

Torso:  I wear this base layer (http://www.performancebike.com/bikes/Product_10052_10551_1003842_-1_400068__400068) with a normal cycling jersey.  If its below 30 degrees I add this: http://www.eddiebauer.com/product/accelerant-jacket/38832119/_/A-ebSku_0880446707000080__38832119_catalog10002_en__US?showProducts=111&backToCat=&previousPage=SRC&tab=&color=283

The accelerant jacket has a little bit of down and helps with the wind.  It is also form fitting so it doesn't create a lot of drag.  It also has thumb loops, which is nice to prevent the sleeves from creeping up.  EB stuff goes on sale all the time, so you can probably get a good deal on this jacket if you are diligence. 

Arms: I use pearl izumi arm warmers that have a little bit of a fleece lining.  I like using arm warmers with short sleeved jerseys because it gives me the option to shed layers without getting off my bike if I get too hot.

Legs:  Pearl izumi thermal tights without chamois.  I put on regular cycling tights over these.

Hands: I got these gloves (http://www.amazon.com/Pearl-Izumi-Softshell-Lobster-Glove/dp/B004N62HMQ) and they are pretty awesome.  Probably too warm unless is under 40 degrees.  I had thinner gloves before but the wind just shot right through them.

Feet:  thin wool socks.  You can get some cycling specific ones pretty cheap.  I also use these shoe covers: http://www.amazon.com/Pearl-Izumi-Elite-Barrier-X-Large/dp/B004N62JH4/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1416951701&sr=1-2&keywords=cycling+shoe+covers

The shoe covers make a huge difference.  These would be overkill IMHO unless is was below 30. 

Head:  A thin neoprene skull cap. The one I have I think is intended for runners. Helmet.

Thanks for the advice and recommendations. I'm actually good unless it's <20. I will take this into consideration, though. Thanks again!!

joseveri

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #93 on: November 26, 2014, 08:38:40 AM »
I'm a newbie to the forum and want to get involved.  I tried the form and it didn't seem to add me. Any advice or do I need to wait til Dec?

I've been 100% bike commuting in Chicago now for a month and I'm loving it. 13.5 miles each way.  Lowest temp I've seen is 6F so far with -10F wind chill.  Very fun project getting the gear dialed in and getting out and suffering like a pig each day :)


JP

jordanread

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #94 on: November 26, 2014, 08:51:15 AM »
I'm a newbie to the forum and want to get involved.  I tried the form and it didn't seem to add me. Any advice or do I need to wait til Dec?

I've been 100% bike commuting in Chicago now for a month and I'm loving it. 13.5 miles each way.  Lowest temp I've seen is 6F so far with -10F wind chill.  Very fun project getting the gear dialed in and getting out and suffering like a pig each day :)


JP

I got you added. You now have a sheet. I don't know why it didn't work initially, but it recorded your responses, so I matched those. Your sheet name is Severinj. Happy cycling.

Thegoblinchief

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #95 on: November 26, 2014, 09:12:19 AM »
I've been 100% bike commuting in Chicago now for a month and I'm loving it. 13.5 miles each way. 
JP

That's quite the ride to tackle every day. Good on you!

joseveri

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #96 on: November 26, 2014, 09:28:08 AM »
I've been 100% bike commuting in Chicago now for a month and I'm loving it. 13.5 miles each way. 
JP

That's quite the ride to tackle every day. Good on you!

Thanks!  I look forward to it everyday.  Like I said,  it's been a cool project to figure out how to make it work. 

I picked up a pair of studded tires but debating when to put them on and whether to put both on or just one on the front.  My commute is probably 25% gravel 75% asphalt.  It is pretty dry right now with almost no ice or snow. Conditions change really quickly so I am thinking about putting just one on the front to prep for the snow/ice but I wanted to know if there is any weirdness of riding studs on asphalt when it is dry, other than the noise?  Does it ruin or pull out the studs?

Thegoblinchief

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #97 on: November 26, 2014, 09:34:23 AM »
I just got studded tires this week, so my experience is limited. Mine (Schwalbe HS 396 Marathon Winter) are definitely slower than pure road tires but they're not terribly slow. I actually kind of like the chatter of the studs. I've read they can get pulled out, but the main issue seems to be hard cornering or braking.

I like having the option of staying in the bike lane or in 1/3 lane position even when, during a storm or for the next day or two afterwards, that section of the street isn't fully cleared and I'd risk losing traction with standard tires. The grip on mine is incredible. You can still slip, but it's way less hairy than staying stable with road tires. I made it through last winter on road tires, but my arms had to work a lot harder to maintain balance when moving through ruts and whatnot.

Russ said he put 3000 miles on the same tires I have last winter (just in a slightly different size) and the studs have almost no wear to them.

joseveri

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #98 on: November 26, 2014, 09:39:53 AM »
Thanks for the comments.  I have the same tires and am eager to try them.  Thanks also for the add.  I've updated my miles and joined the strava crew!  Stoked to keep this rolling.

Kmp2

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Re: November Cycling Challenge 2014
« Reply #99 on: November 26, 2014, 12:47:52 PM »
I thought the marathon's recommended dry setting the studs on dry asphalt with no hard braking/cornering before riding them on ice. I only make a few klick's on dry pavement before it snowed, but the LBS I bought them from seemed to think it didn't matter much.

If you have dry pavement keep your studded tires inflated up and you should roll pretty quickly, if conditions change let some air out and they'll work better on ice but slow you down a bit.

They seem to be highly recommended for my city's highly variable winter conditions. (above freezing today, and expected to hit -20F in a day or two... and back up above freezing sometime next week - gotta love mountains).

I was really hoping to try a dry run of my new downtown commute this weekend, now that I'm almost over my cough, but -20F is probably below my tolerance for getting lost in :). So I guess December it is for me other than maybe another short ride to the grocery store.