Author Topic: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020  (Read 401 times)

Trifele

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Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« on: December 05, 2019, 04:57:59 AM »
Hello gardeners!  I didn't see a thread yet for the coming year, so thought I would get things started.  Those of us in mild climates may still have some things growing in the garden, and our more northern friends are starting to get their seed catalogs and plan for the spring. 

I'll start.  I'm in North Carolina, US zone 7a, and still have some greens growing.  We've had a few nights below freezing here and the chicory looks rough.  I will be pulling that soon.  The chard is going strong.  I protect it with mid-weight row cover if it's going to get below 30 degrees or so.  I put milk jugs 2/3 full of water next to the plants as heat sinks under the row cover.  That extends the green growing season by 1-2 months.

I've also been taking advantage of the cool temperatures to plant and transplant a bunch of perennials.  In the last week I've planted 4 apple trees (babies that I grafted last year), and transplanted 4 blueberry bushes inside the protection of our deer fence.

For the coming year's vegetable production I've got a brand new 4' X 24' in-ground bed coming on line, which brings me up to a total of 4.  I'm planning the usual tomatoes, potatoes, greens, peppers, cukes, zucchini, and squash.

What are you up to with your garden?
« Last Edit: December 05, 2019, 11:39:24 AM by Trifele »

Éowynd

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020 (US)
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2019, 09:17:59 AM »
I have hardneck garlic that was planted in October for next year.  These include several different varieties such as 'Music' and 'Chesnook Red' which are my favorite ones.

My sister and I created a new 30' x 40' garden that we intend to put a deer fence around in the spring.  We will split this space in half for our vegetable garden next year.  My sister also has a 8' x 10' unheated greenhouse (hoop house) that keeps lettuce alive from the first frost in October until it gets really cold and dark here in January.

A couple of months ago, my 2 year old apricot tree was taken out by a deer.  I'm guessing it was a deer; all I know is that the tree was snapped in half in spite of the netting surrounding it.  I have to decide if I want to buy another apricot tree or put something else in that spot.

Did you use a specific rootstock to graft the apple trees?  I've grafted differed apple scions on established young trees but I've never grafted a scion on a rootstock.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020 (US)
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2019, 10:04:30 AM »
Thanks @Trifele for getting this started. I got my first seed catalogue a couple of days ago but was already dreaming and scheming of garden 2020.  My 2019 garden ended poorly with me being too sick to finish harvesting.  I left so much in the ground but you can only do what you do.  Next year will be better!


Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020 (US)
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2019, 10:41:29 AM »
Did you use a specific rootstock to graft the apple trees?  I've grafted differed apple scions on established young trees but I've never grafted a scion on a rootstock.

That's cool Eowynd!  I haven't yet grafted onto an established tree, but I was thinking of trying that this winter.  Yes -- I grafted onto "Geneva 890" rootstock, which is a hardy disease-resistant semi-dwarf.  It was my first time grafting, so I talked to the guys at Cummins Nursery in New York -- http://www.cumminsnursery.com/rootstocks.htm -- to get their recommendation.  I was really happy with the G-890.  It's super vigorous.

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020 (US)
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2019, 11:11:40 AM »
Just saw this thread and was quite excited to see it. Though the title has me wondering...are Canadians allowed to participate?

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020 (US)
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2019, 11:36:59 AM »
Just saw this thread and was quite excited to see it. Though the title has me wondering...are Canadians allowed to participate?

Haha yes of course!  Apologies to our Canadian/European friends!  Will modify the title now.  :)
« Last Edit: December 05, 2019, 12:56:04 PM by Trifele »

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2019, 12:24:33 PM »
:)

Indio

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2019, 05:29:41 PM »
@Trifele You're way ahead of me. I haven't even started thinking about Spring. A few more weeks of cold weather, will get me dreaming about playing in the garden.
I've got radish, cilantro, mesculin, parsley, arugula growing under frost cloth and UV resistant tarp outdoors. Every weekend, I harvest enough to last for weekday salads. Indoors I moved grow lights to a 4 level rack with heat mats. I wrapped the rack with cinexpensive heat reflective blankets to bounce the light around and keep the seedlings warm. Growing basil, sunflower and amaranth greens. I usually have a few amaranth plants growing every year, but I'm thinking of expanding the growing space into where I let the chickens free range. With protection, when the plants get large enough, they should drop seed that the hens can graze on. Hoping the plan will work.
BTW, I wrapped the beehives with 5 layers of agribon. If and when polar vortex hits, I hope that will keep them warmer than the black landscape fabric I've used in the past.

Éowynd

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020 (US)
« Reply #8 on: December 06, 2019, 08:17:26 AM »
Did you use a specific rootstock to graft the apple trees?  I've grafted differed apple scions on established young trees but I've never grafted a scion on a rootstock.

That's cool Eowynd!  I haven't yet grafted onto an established tree, but I was thinking of trying that this winter.  Yes -- I grafted onto "Geneva 890" rootstock, which is a hardy disease-resistant semi-dwarf.  It was my first time grafting, so I talked to the guys at Cummins Nursery in New York -- http://www.cumminsnursery.com/rootstocks.htm -- to get their recommendation.  I was really happy with the G-890.  It's super vigorous.

Grafting is awesome!  Apple trees seem pretty easy to work with; I got 4 takes out of 6 tries.  I also tried grafting plum scions on a plum tree but it must have been too late in the spring or something because none of the 3 grafts took.

lv2glrfy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #9 on: December 06, 2019, 09:42:45 AM »
HI, I would love to participate! I'm quite literally at ground floor currently--I've never grown a garden before and I'm intimidated by the thought of starting, but I'm very very determined to get at least one edible thing from my yard this year!! I'm in Georgia zone 7b.

My yard is extremely shady and forest-like, so I'm expecting that I can never grow much beyond some greens, herbs, and perhaps...berries? My goal is to start some lettuce, spinach, and maybe kale indoors in Februaryish. I don't really know when to start shade-loving herbs/fruits, but my guess is not until the summer months...which, around here, means March :)

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #10 on: December 06, 2019, 02:55:58 PM »
Welcome @lv2glrfy!  Starting simple is the best!  I would suggest researching how many hours of sunlight various plants need, and measure how many hours your various potential planting areas get.  It'll help you decide what to put where.  Here's an article: https://www.almanac.com/content/garden-plan-vegetables-grow-partial-shade

Hello @Indio!  Wow, you're way ahead of me in terms of what you still have going in the garden. Very impressive!

Yes @Eowynd, I agree -- grafting is completely awesome.  It's the biggest gardening thrill there is, imo.  :)

horsepoor

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #11 on: December 06, 2019, 11:11:09 PM »
I'll be following along.  I'm in Idaho, so we're fully done until at least March.  I really should go get a couple truckloads of manure to compost though, as things haven't frozen up completely yet.  I like to have the beds topped with partially composted manure and mulched over with straw by this time, but it just didn't happen this year.  Oh well.

Next year I'm planning to grow plenty of squash, alliums and peppers, along with the usual 15-20 tomato plants, herbs, lettuces etc.

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own - 2020
« Reply #12 on: Today at 02:53:42 AM »
Welcome back @horsepoor!  I too meant to get another truckload of horse manure down this fall, but it doesn't look like I'll get it done before it snows.  With the last load I did the same as you -- spread it thick and then put straw on top.