Author Topic: May Cycling Challenge 2016  (Read 23834 times)

aetherie

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #50 on: May 23, 2016, 12:00:22 PM »
For starters, you could plan to carpool on days where the forecast calls for rain, at least until you feel prepared. And you won't have to worry about riding in the winter for 6 months - one thing at a time! Just know that it's definitely possible, especially for <3 miles and with the option to carpool if the roads get too icy.

But as for preparing for rain:
  • Keeping extra clothes and a towel at the office is a good idea. Make sure to include shoes and socks.
  • I have a rain jacket and pants, similar to this, and honestly they work well enough that I haven't bothered putting on fenders yet.
  • You'll also want a waterproof bag for whatever stuff you're carrying back and forth with you.
  • I just let my hair get wet and then put it up in a bun, but I'd imagine you could easily wear a shower cap under your helmet to keep it dry.
  • Get some good lights for visibility on the roads - but you'll want those regardless of the weather.

Source: For the last year I've been doing what you're considering doing. I bike the 3.5 miles to work almost every day, but on the worst weather days FH goes slightly out of his way to drop me off and pick me up. It's been working great for us!
Thanks aetherie, I didn't even think about shoes and socks!
When I said thick hair, I mean thick hair. I've been charged extra to get it cut because there's so much. I can't even get it into a pony tail when it's wet because it's too heavy and the water adds thickness and the bands break (my cats love me because they're always tons of broken hairbands around). I'll have to practice bun-making (it's so thick it's even hard to put in a bun but part of that is my ineptitude at doing anything with my hair) to see if that might help. I was thinking maybe a cheap hairdryer at work but I don't know if there are outlets in the bathroom... I'll have to look. I don't mind getting rained on on my way home as long as it's not cold, just need to make sure I still look professional while at work

What about a single braid down the back? That's one of my go-to "professional-looking" styles and it works great with wet hair (assuming you could get a hairband around the end of the braid).

Also there should definitely be outlets in the bathroom. I'm pretty sure that's standard.

Jakejake

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #51 on: May 23, 2016, 01:49:30 PM »
I don't think I'd like a shower cap on my head while biking - especially if it's warm, that would end up feeling gross and sweaty. I made a helmet liner that's like a shower cap that fits over the helmet. I used the instructables directions here: http://www.bikerumor.com/2009/10/04/how-to-make-a-custom-helmet-cover/ and made mine out of lycra. It's not technically waterproof fabric but it's been water repellent enough - and it sits up above the vents - so that my hair under the helmet hasn't gotten wet even when the rest of me was soaked.

EngineerYogi

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #52 on: May 24, 2016, 11:20:12 AM »
Considering I've never ridden further than 5 miles I'm pretty happy I handled this just fine. ... Total for the day was 29.1 miles, 4 beers, and some bar food. ;)
I am impressed that you went from 5 miles to a 29 mile ride!

Me too! Lol. I'm glad I had someone to drag me along, I wouldn't have gone on that ambitious of a ride on my own. I've been weight lifting for a few years now and am in pretty good shape overall, I bought the bike last month though so I'm working up to riding it more frequently and for further distances.

jasonthelee

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #53 on: May 24, 2016, 05:39:21 PM »
I'm really new to the party on this but I just "discovered" the Strava app after using Runkeeper for the past few years.  Since I ride solo most of the time, I really like the Segments portion that lets me compare my latest ride to previous ones and with other riders.  Also cool to see the avg power estimate after each ride.  Sorry to sound like a commercial but just wanted to share in case I wasn't the last person on earth to use this app. 

EngineerYogi

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #54 on: May 24, 2016, 08:13:51 PM »
I'm really new to the party on this but I just "discovered" the Strava app after using Runkeeper for the past few years.  Since I ride solo most of the time, I really like the Segments portion that lets me compare my latest ride to previous ones and with other riders.  Also cool to see the avg power estimate after each ride.  Sorry to sound like a commercial but just wanted to share in case I wasn't the last person on earth to use this app.

I've been using jogtracker, but I saw my friends' Strava and it looks way more capable and cooler. I'm definitely considering switching.

TrMama

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #55 on: May 25, 2016, 11:08:12 AM »
For starters, you could plan to carpool on days where the forecast calls for rain, at least until you feel prepared. And you won't have to worry about riding in the winter for 6 months - one thing at a time! Just know that it's definitely possible, especially for <3 miles and with the option to carpool if the roads get too icy.

But as for preparing for rain:
  • Keeping extra clothes and a towel at the office is a good idea. Make sure to include shoes and socks.
  • I have a rain jacket and pants, similar to this, and honestly they work well enough that I haven't bothered putting on fenders yet.
  • You'll also want a waterproof bag for whatever stuff you're carrying back and forth with you.
  • I just let my hair get wet and then put it up in a bun, but I'd imagine you could easily wear a shower cap under your helmet to keep it dry.
  • Get some good lights for visibility on the roads - but you'll want those regardless of the weather.

Source: For the last year I've been doing what you're considering doing. I bike the 3.5 miles to work almost every day, but on the worst weather days FH goes slightly out of his way to drop me off and pick me up. It's been working great for us!
Thanks aetherie, I didn't even think about shoes and socks!
When I said thick hair, I mean thick hair. I've been charged extra to get it cut because there's so much. I can't even get it into a pony tail when it's wet because it's too heavy and the water adds thickness and the bands break (my cats love me because they're always tons of broken hairbands around). I'll have to practice bun-making (it's so thick it's even hard to put in a bun but part of that is my ineptitude at doing anything with my hair) to see if that might help. I was thinking maybe a cheap hairdryer at work but I don't know if there are outlets in the bathroom... I'll have to look. I don't mind getting rained on on my way home as long as it's not cold, just need to make sure I still look professional while at work

What about a single braid down the back? That's one of my go-to "professional-looking" styles and it works great with wet hair (assuming you could get a hairband around the end of the braid).

Also there should definitely be outlets in the bathroom. I'm pretty sure that's standard.
I haven't mastered that one either...I really am incompetent when it comes to doing anything with my hair. Another thing I need to practice :)

And it sure seems like there should be outlets but I don't remember seeing any

I have also had long, thick, wavy/curly hair. Currently, it's short, but I understand the dilemma. Start with a good haircut. Go to a decent salon. The stylist should both shorten and "thin" your hair. There are various ways of thinning, but they're pretty much all good. When I get my haircut I don't care how much shorter she cuts it, but I do let her know I want it to be smaller. She thinks I'm hilarious ;-)

Then, make sure you're using enough conditioner. Even with shorter, thinned hair I use a 2 in 1 shampoo and conditioner, plus a leave in anti-frizz type cream. For my daughters (whose hair is longer) we also use an oil-based detangling spray. Dry hair is frizzy hair and curly hair tends to be more dry than straight hair.

When you bike in on rainy days, make sure your hair is in a low bun or braid. This will keep it from getting really wet. You could also wear a thin toque under your helmet or get a lycra helmet cover. When you get to work, you may need to redo the updo if it's gotten messy.

Holy crap, I can't believe I wrote all that. I almost sound like a real girl.

Eric222

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #56 on: May 25, 2016, 02:19:56 PM »
I had a friend today ask about how (what route) I bike commute to work!  He's in the process of shopping for a bike and then I'm going to show him a few different routes one of these weekends.  We live in the same neighborhood and bike to the same general workplace.  #OneLessPersonStuckOnTheBus. :D

EngineerYogi

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #57 on: May 26, 2016, 08:52:33 AM »

I have also had long, thick, wavy/curly hair. Currently, it's short, but I understand the dilemma. Start with a good haircut. Go to a decent salon. The stylist should both shorten and "thin" your hair. There are various ways of thinning, but they're pretty much all good. When I get my haircut I don't care how much shorter she cuts it, but I do let her know I want it to be smaller. She thinks I'm hilarious ;-)

Then, make sure you're using enough conditioner. Even with shorter, thinned hair I use a 2 in 1 shampoo and conditioner, plus a leave in anti-frizz type cream. For my daughters (whose hair is longer) we also use an oil-based detangling spray. Dry hair is frizzy hair and curly hair tends to be more dry than straight hair.

When you bike in on rainy days, make sure your hair is in a low bun or braid. This will keep it from getting really wet. You could also wear a thin toque under your helmet or get a lycra helmet cover. When you get to work, you may need to redo the updo if it's gotten messy.

Holy crap, I can't believe I wrote all that. I almost sound like a real girl.

I only know this word because my dad has a funny story about it from a skiing accident. In America we call them hats. ;)

TrMama

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #58 on: May 26, 2016, 11:50:59 AM »

I have also had long, thick, wavy/curly hair. Currently, it's short, but I understand the dilemma. Start with a good haircut. Go to a decent salon. The stylist should both shorten and "thin" your hair. There are various ways of thinning, but they're pretty much all good. When I get my haircut I don't care how much shorter she cuts it, but I do let her know I want it to be smaller. She thinks I'm hilarious ;-)

Then, make sure you're using enough conditioner. Even with shorter, thinned hair I use a 2 in 1 shampoo and conditioner, plus a leave in anti-frizz type cream. For my daughters (whose hair is longer) we also use an oil-based detangling spray. Dry hair is frizzy hair and curly hair tends to be more dry than straight hair.

When you bike in on rainy days, make sure your hair is in a low bun or braid. This will keep it from getting really wet. You could also wear a thin toque under your helmet or get a lycra helmet cover. When you get to work, you may need to redo the updo if it's gotten messy.

Holy crap, I can't believe I wrote all that. I almost sound like a real girl.

I only know this word because my dad has a funny story about it from a skiing accident. In America we call them hats. ;)

But a toque is a specific kind of hat. Just saying "hat" is way too vague ;-)

EngineerYogi

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #59 on: May 26, 2016, 12:10:11 PM »

I have also had long, thick, wavy/curly hair. Currently, it's short, but I understand the dilemma. Start with a good haircut. Go to a decent salon. The stylist should both shorten and "thin" your hair. There are various ways of thinning, but they're pretty much all good. When I get my haircut I don't care how much shorter she cuts it, but I do let her know I want it to be smaller. She thinks I'm hilarious ;-)

Then, make sure you're using enough conditioner. Even with shorter, thinned hair I use a 2 in 1 shampoo and conditioner, plus a leave in anti-frizz type cream. For my daughters (whose hair is longer) we also use an oil-based detangling spray. Dry hair is frizzy hair and curly hair tends to be more dry than straight hair.

When you bike in on rainy days, make sure your hair is in a low bun or braid. This will keep it from getting really wet. You could also wear a thin toque under your helmet or get a lycra helmet cover. When you get to work, you may need to redo the updo if it's gotten messy.

Holy crap, I can't believe I wrote all that. I almost sound like a real girl.

I only know this word because my dad has a funny story about it from a skiing accident. In America we call them hats. ;)

But a toque is a specific kind of hat. Just saying "hat" is way too vague ;-)

Google will do, it does shows results to what I commonly refer to as a "beanie" or sometimes a "watch cap." Urban Dictionary reveals that "toque" is definitely a Canadian word.

Jakejake

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #60 on: May 26, 2016, 06:49:10 PM »
It's a Michigan (UP) word too. My ex - from the UP - used it regularly, and as a private joke my dad worked it into a NYT crossword puzzle. (Fun facts that have nothing to do with cycling)

ohyonghao

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #61 on: May 29, 2016, 10:18:24 PM »
Fantastic ride up and over a mountain pass today.  The pass is currently still closed to cars so cyclists get to ride the 27mi stretch of road with no car traffic.  Road a total of 54.5mi and over 4000ft of elevation.  Fantastic day and great finish to the month.

jasonthelee

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #62 on: May 31, 2016, 10:00:31 PM »
Fantastic ride up and over a mountain pass today.  The pass is currently still closed to cars so cyclists get to ride the 27mi stretch of road with no car traffic.  Road a total of 54.5mi and over 4000ft of elevation.  Fantastic day and great finish to the month.

How's the grade on the ride?  Thought about getting down there before road's open.

ohyonghao

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #63 on: May 31, 2016, 10:02:59 PM »
Fantastic ride up and over a mountain pass today.  The pass is currently still closed to cars so cyclists get to ride the 27mi stretch of road with no car traffic.  Road a total of 54.5mi and over 4000ft of elevation.  Fantastic day and great finish to the month.

How's the grade on the ride?  Thought about getting down there before road's open.

Gradient hits 7-8% at the most, though it is mostly 5% on the West side and around 6% on the East.  You can view my Strava here.

jordanread

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Re: May Cycling Challenge 2016
« Reply #64 on: June 01, 2016, 06:28:10 AM »