Author Topic: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread  (Read 204914 times)

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1050 on: November 14, 2015, 05:52:40 AM »
Nice to see people starting their gardens, it will give us something to dream about.

We have had several hard frosts, so now the gardening consists of cleanup and putting away.  I am washing all the seed starter equipment, then it will go into storage for next spring.  Seed starting mix needs to be moved from the garage to the basement, otherwise it will be frozen solid when I need it.

My sweet potatoes are yummy.  I have a question for people who have grown them more - some of them are perfect, some have big splits or creases down the length - what causes that?  It isn't size related.  Plus a few look fine from the outside, but the centers are hollow and off colour.  Possible causes?

Jon_Snow

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1051 on: November 14, 2015, 07:47:33 AM »
I walked by a cactus garden yesterday. My little PNW island garden may as well be on another planet compared to where I am now.

And I agree with R@63...hearing about active garden exploits, courtesy of our Southern Hemisphere members, is nice.


Tom Bri

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1052 on: November 14, 2015, 08:31:42 PM »
Cilantro is super easy to re-seed. Let the seeds dry (can be harvested partially green, but older is better) Save them in a cool, dry, dark place and just scatter them where you want them in the early spring. Even easier, I don't bother 'saving' the seeds. I just pick the seed heads and put them on the ground where I want them to grow the next year. The seeds fall down and sprout very well. I have only planted cilantro once, about 8 years ago, and have never failed to get new to grow, with no effort at all.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1053 on: November 14, 2015, 08:40:45 PM »
Quote
Nice to see people starting their gardens, it will give us something to dream about.

Quote
And I agree with R@63...hearing about active garden exploits, courtesy of our Southern Hemisphere members, is nice.

You're welcome, and likewise. Jon-Snows garden pics had me smiling and getting the green itch all through winter. ( those arms had nothing to do with it)

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1054 on: November 14, 2015, 08:45:18 PM »
Cilantro is super easy to re-seed. Let the seeds dry (can be harvested partially green, but older is better) Save them in a cool, dry, dark place and just scatter them where you want them in the early spring. Even easier, I don't bother 'saving' the seeds. I just pick the seed heads and put them on the ground where I want them to grow the next year. The seeds fall down and sprout very well. I have only planted cilantro once, about 8 years ago, and have never failed to get new to grow, with no effort at all.

Thankyou,  Tom Bri.  I might try letting the seed heads dry off a bit more and put them straight in the garden as you say. I have just the spot.  I love keeping seeds in the soil.  I did this with parsley last year, and had a whole carpet of parsley :) , running to seed just now.

FerrumB5

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1055 on: November 14, 2015, 10:38:38 PM »
Cilantro is indeed easy to grow. I have few hundred seeds (spheres) now from my outside garden (replanted in 3-season porch now), hand picked. Hint: in case you didn't know, every cilantro seed sphere is TWO seeds, each can grow fine if divided into two. Profit.
Also growing parsley (which I prefer over cilantro, unlike DW), dill (my favorite), basil. Put some new soil in pot a few months back - got FREE 2 strawberries now growing out of seeds that were probably in that soil. Cannot complain.

Astatine

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1056 on: November 16, 2015, 02:56:03 AM »
And planted a random snow pea that we got for cheap at a local fundraiser. $2 for a plant. Planted it under the trellis where one tomato plant had died (damn earwigs! *shakes fist*) and cleared mulch around it again. Other two cherry tomatoes have grown and will hopefully survive any future predation.

Damnit. Slaters ate the snow pea!!! That's a first. At least snow peas aren't an essential part of our diet like zucchini are.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1057 on: November 16, 2015, 07:25:28 AM »
What are slaters?

Here the pea stealers are ordinary - rabbits and groundhogs.  And the worst culprit - my dog.

And planted a random snow pea that we got for cheap at a local fundraiser. $2 for a plant. Planted it under the trellis where one tomato plant had died (damn earwigs! *shakes fist*) and cleared mulch around it again. Other two cherry tomatoes have grown and will hopefully survive any future predation.

Damnit. Slaters ate the snow pea!!! That's a first. At least snow peas aren't an essential part of our diet like zucchini are.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1058 on: November 16, 2015, 12:23:56 PM »
 Currently frustrated because I pulled everything up/brought it in in preparation for our first freeze earlier this week, and it didn't freeze. It now looks like we won't have a freeze until sometime in December (freakishly late for here.)

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1059 on: November 16, 2015, 12:40:41 PM »
My sweet potatoes are yummy.  I have a question for people who have grown them more - some of them are perfect, some have big splits or creases down the length - what causes that?  It isn't size related.  Plus a few look fine from the outside, but the centers are hollow and off colour.  Possible causes?

If you haven't solved this via Google, it's just like with carrots and some other root veggies - too much moisture at the end of the growing season will cause them to crack/split. At least that would be my primary guess.


RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1061 on: November 17, 2015, 06:45:21 AM »
Hi Astatine
Here they would be called sow bugs (they are really crustaceans).  Mostly they eat dead plant material, so I am surprised they are hitting your peas.  Maybe just using them for a safe place to hide?

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1062 on: November 17, 2015, 10:15:35 AM »
Growing up we called those potato bugs or roly-polys.  :)
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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1063 on: November 17, 2015, 11:31:38 AM »
In my hood, they are "wood bugs".

Astatine

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1064 on: November 17, 2015, 03:12:32 PM »
Hi Astatine
Here they would be called sow bugs (they are really crustaceans).  Mostly they eat dead plant material, so I am surprised they are hitting your peas.  Maybe just using them for a safe place to hide?

We only had one snow pea, and it was a long stem, maybe 20cm (er, 8 inches I think? not sure) with a few leaves. Not really anywhere to hide, plus there is a lot of mulch around for slaters to live under (ie there is no shortage of slater hiding places). DH went out the morning after I planted it and it was being swarmed with slaters and had been eaten. I guess it's possible that the dastardly earwigs had eaten it first and then the slaters swarmed, but that's never happened before. As in, earwigs just strip the new plants and slaters are normally nowhere to be seen. So weird. So annoying.

Growing up we called those potato bugs or roly-polys.  :)

In my hood, they are "wood bugs".

LOL so many different names.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1065 on: November 18, 2015, 12:00:31 PM »
Hi Astatine
Here they would be called sow bugs (they are really crustaceans).  Mostly they eat dead plant material, so I am surprised they are hitting your peas.  Maybe just using them for a safe place to hide?

We only had one snow pea, and it was a long stem, maybe 20cm (er, 8 inches I think? not sure) with a few leaves. Not really anywhere to hide, plus there is a lot of mulch around for slaters to live under (ie there is no shortage of slater hiding places). DH went out the morning after I planted it and it was being swarmed with slaters and had been eaten. I guess it's possible that the dastardly earwigs had eaten it first and then the slaters swarmed, but that's never happened before. As in, earwigs just strip the new plants and slaters are normally nowhere to be seen. So weird. So annoying.

Growing up we called those potato bugs or roly-polys.  :)

In my hood, they are "wood bugs".

LOL so many different names.

Oh it hurts when that happens.  I would be tempted to blame the earwigs, I have seen them strip things (well, the plant was fine one evening, stripped the next morning).

I have never had anything strip a pea vine like that, so no ideas, as I said the main vine damage here comes from the dog.  Are your days getting too hot to replant?  Peas are easy to grow in cool weather, not so much in hot.  If your soil is on the dry side you can pre-soak until you just see the root starting to grow, then plant before the root breaks the seed coat (prevents root damage).  Peas (especially snow peas and edible-podded) are so yummy and worth growing in the home garden.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1066 on: November 18, 2015, 05:38:42 PM »
Thanks Retired63. Today is supposed to be 34C so possibly a bit too hot but the main limiting factor is I have no energy (DH does garden maintenance but has zero interest in learning how to plant things). I suspect we are done for our spring planting now. My new chemo has wiped me out plus I'm sick (ongoing fever). I'll just continue to post our successes and failures :)

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1067 on: November 19, 2015, 08:42:45 AM »
Good luck with the health issues. 

Around here 34C is high summer, the peas would have stopped blooming weeks ago.  Unless yours was heat resistant, it would be just sitting there complaining anyway.   I hope you have lots of heat lovers planted and ready to appreciate life.

Do you get to just lie out in the garden and soak up the warmth and vitamin D yourself sometimes? 
 
Thanks Retired63. Today is supposed to be 34C so possibly a bit too hot but the main limiting factor is I have no energy (DH does garden maintenance but has zero interest in learning how to plant things). I suspect we are done for our spring planting now. My new chemo has wiped me out plus I'm sick (ongoing fever). I'll just continue to post our successes and failures :)

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1068 on: November 19, 2015, 09:23:35 AM »
This year's garden isn't quite put to bed yet, and I'm already psyched to start next year's garden.  I just put in my order with Pinetree seeds and might buy a few more varieties of peppers from a different vendor.  2016 is going to be the year of the chiles since I've been getting into making my own hot sauces and chile powders. 

So far I've brought in a couple pickup loads of compost from the stable and have a full compost bins of leaves and kitchen scraps plus a huge compost pile behind the chicken coop as well.

Kale, beets and chard are still still going out there, but I've noticed that the beets really quit putting on size about 2 months ago.  The learning curve for fall gardening has been steep for me.  It's so hot and dry here in the summer that it's hard to get fall seeds going and hit that sweet spot where they have enough time to get to edible size before it cools off to the point that growth grinds to a halt.

Astatine

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1069 on: November 19, 2015, 03:49:58 PM »
Good luck with the health issues. 

Around here 34C is high summer, the peas would have stopped blooming weeks ago.  Unless yours was heat resistant, it would be just sitting there complaining anyway.   I hope you have lots of heat lovers planted and ready to appreciate life.

Do you get to just lie out in the garden and soak up the warmth and vitamin D yourself sometimes? 

High summer is Jan/Feb for us. The forecast for summer is El Nino, which translates to hot and dry conditions. Jan/Feb will likely have many days in the high 30s, probably a week above 40C. I'm hoping it won't be any worse than that this summer. I hate summer. Today will be 36C in the shade and high winds. We had a near-frost less than a month ago, so our temperature ranges can swing quite wildly in the transition to summer.

We have cherry tomatoes and zucchinis planted as annuals. We have a bunch of perennials (fruit trees, strawberries, herbs) that hopefully will survive the summer with occasional deep watering. We have had successful tomato and zucchini crops over summer in the past but we haven't had a full-on El Nino year since I first started growing them. We shall see... (there is a reason for mega mulch - it's the only way to keep plants alive over summer without completely drying out on hot and windy days)

I'm not a huge fan of sun bathing. I don't like the heat (ugh) and our UV levels are pretty brutal (my country has the highest rate of melanomas in the world). But maybe I should do a bit of sitting outside early in the day before the UV and heat get too revolting.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1070 on: November 19, 2015, 11:26:56 PM »
39.5C here, at 5pm. Snow and sugar peas still flowering: I hope they don't stop.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1071 on: November 20, 2015, 02:22:05 AM »
Re the roley-poleys of the numerous names: they will (if they are many enough) eat your crop. In fact, if you get an infestation they can clear out all things growing. It's rare, but not unheard of, so I wouldn't asume they are harmless if they are pressent in large numbers.

Snow hit this morning. Chilies have been ok (as in: alive and very slowly ripening fruit) until now, but this marks the final end for our growing season.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1072 on: November 20, 2015, 10:05:59 AM »
We are having a very mild fall - nights are consistently below freezing, days above - yesterday was hot -   +14C.  With rain of course, but at least it wasn't snow.  I have seen years where we had 6" of snow by now, so this is easy living, with more time to do all the last minute gardening chores.  Spring is usually the more volatile season, we can go from winter to almost summer back to winter in a week or two - it can be hard on the early flowering fruit trees when they start to break flower dormancy and then get hit with temperatures well below 0C.  And it means tomatoes don't go out until the last week of May and peppers the first week of June.

Astatine, when it is hot I also do everything outside in the early morning or late late afternoon - enough sun for vitamin D, not enough for a burn, and the temperatures are better.  Noon is for mad dogs and Englishmen, right? and we are neither.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1073 on: November 20, 2015, 02:06:39 PM »

[/quote]
We have cherry tomatoes and zucchinis planted as annuals. We have a bunch of perennials (fruit trees, strawberries, herbs) that hopefully will survive the summer with occasional deep watering. We have had successful tomato and zucchini crops over summer in the past but we haven't had a full-on El Nino year since I first started growing them. We shall see... (there is a reason for mega mulch - it's the only way to keep plants alive over summer without completely drying out on hot and windy days)
[/quote]

Tomatoes should survive the heat and dry, they like heat and dry and produce better fruit (up to a point).
I'd suggest NOT keeping them upright though. Let them run over the ground and put down extra roots from their stems. I actually bury the stems under a layer of dirt/compost. Seems to really help.
Zucchini? Let them die! :-)
Do you have frost in the winter? If not, the tomatoes should survive and produce again. They are not annuals in warm climates.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1074 on: November 20, 2015, 05:55:30 PM »
Re the roley-poleys of the numerous names: they will (if they are many enough) eat your crop. In fact, if you get an infestation they can clear out all things growing. It's rare, but not unheard of, so I wouldn't asume they are harmless if they are pressent in large numbers.

Thanks for the warning! I didn't realise the benign-seeming slaters can be ravenous beasties in certain circumstances. And lol @ bolded bit.

Astatine, when it is hot I also do everything outside in the early morning or late late afternoon - enough sun for vitamin D, not enough for a burn, and the temperatures are better.  Noon is for mad dogs and Englishmen, right? and we are neither.

Very sensible. We did go for a short walk yesterday late afternoon. DH has now mowed the lawns so being outside is a bit more appealing (grass makes me itchy).


Quote
We have cherry tomatoes and zucchinis planted as annuals. We have a bunch of perennials (fruit trees, strawberries, herbs) that hopefully will survive the summer with occasional deep watering. We have had successful tomato and zucchini crops over summer in the past but we haven't had a full-on El Nino year since I first started growing them. We shall see... (there is a reason for mega mulch - it's the only way to keep plants alive over summer without completely drying out on hot and windy days)

Tomatoes should survive the heat and dry, they like heat and dry and produce better fruit (up to a point).
I'd suggest NOT keeping them upright though. Let them run over the ground and put down extra roots from their stems. I actually bury the stems under a layer of dirt/compost. Seems to really help.
Zucchini? Let them die! :-)
Do you have frost in the winter? If not, the tomatoes should survive and produce again. They are not annuals in warm climates.

Thanks for your reply. We have very limited space in our garden, so we're growing to try growing them upwards, not sprawling, for once. I'm not sure what the climate is where you live, but our hot dry summers are brutal, particularly El Nino ones. I'm a bit inland so humidity can get extremely low on the bad fire danger days (think single digit relative humidity, temps above 40C or 100F and unrelenting hot winds from the western deserts). Keeping stuff alive in those conditions is challenging, particularly if we slip into drought conditions.

Yep, we have frosts in winter because we're a bit inland. They can get as low as -7C (or 20F) so anything even slightly frost sensitive tends to die by June. Tomatoes are definitely annuals in my climate zone. Because of the frosts, most people plant their tomatoes in early November and growing season finishes anywhere between April and June.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2015, 05:57:04 PM by Astatine »

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1075 on: November 22, 2015, 08:58:50 AM »
I can't let tomatoes sprawl here. The fruit rots or gets munched on by insects long before it ripens. The bed I forgot to tower until the plants were too unruly produced a fraction of the good fruit my towered bed did.

horsepoor nice on getting the order in already, wow. I have Pinetree's book already but I'm waiting for my other vendors to arrive so I can pick and choose. I'm going to try and keep it all within one mainstream book if at all possible since I don't need many seeds this year, and then I have another order for a tiny seed company that only takes orders between Jan-April.

I had bad luck planting fall broccoli here so I can empathize with how hard it is to time things. My fall carrots did okay considering the terrible spot I picked for them.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1076 on: November 22, 2015, 09:51:36 AM »
Yes, now the challenge is to not get tempted and order MORE seeds before spring.  I LOVE all the different squash varieties that Baker Creek carries, and could easily get carried away ordering those, but they take a ton of space and I know we won't eat them all.

I think instead of trying to start fall crops in the height of summer, I might try to save some space and put in slower-maturing seedlings around June and hope that they don't bolt.  Maybe set up a shade clothed area for them.  I've basically given up on my blueberries and most of the asparagus, so that frees up a ton of room to experiment with other things.

Last week I put the garlic in, and filled the rest of the bed with potatoes.  I know they're traditionally planted in spring, but each year I miss a few when I harvest, and those regrow in the spring, so I don't see why a fall planting won't work.  My dad left me with a bunch of little Yukon golds that were sprouting and had green spots so no better place to put them than in the ground. 

Yesterday and got all the kernels off of my cobs of Bloody Butcher corn.  I was disappointed with the yield from the corn patch, so I was surprised that the kernels filled up a 1/2 gallon mason jar plus another quart.  Hoping it will grind to cornmeal adequately in my Blendtec and we can enjoy some cornbread.

Next year I'm going to do a patch of black beans instead of the corn.  Hoping bush beans will interplant with squash better than the corn did (I spaced the Bloody Butcher fairly widely but it still shaded the squash too much).  I have yet to see a really successful 3-sisters planting, but maybe with shorter corn it would work.

It's supposed to hit the upper 40's today, so I'm going to finish cleaning up and mulching once the frost burns off.  It's a good feeling to have everything put to bed and everything stowed and ready for next season before the ground freezes.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1077 on: November 22, 2015, 10:05:02 AM »
3 Sisters - My knowledge is totally book knowledge. Carol Deppe has a decent treatment of it in both of her recent books if you own them or can get them via the library. The TL;DR of it is (from memory):

1. Corn - hills spaced quite wide, I think 48-60" IIRC.

2. Beans - Let the corn get established, then sow the  pole beans (pre-soaked).

3. Squash - Any variety in theory works. Sow at the same time as the corn, about 1 hill for every 3-4 corn hills.

Another way to do it is plant is ditch the third sister (squash), plant corn at closer to conventional spacing (usually 24-30") in row for OP/heirloom types, and plant pole beans after they're about a foot to 18" high. According to her, ANY pole bean variety will work at the EDGE of a corn planting, but there are certain beans shade tolerant enough to work on the inside rows.

Haven't tried any of that myself. Don't have the fertility for corn and don't really want to devote the space either.

On grinding in a blender, the final meal tends to get HOT, which degrades some of the flavor and nutritive value. A 'hack' for that is to put the whole corn in the freezer for a day to chill down before grinding. You can also grind corn pretty fast in a hand mill like the Corona grinder if the Blendtec doesn't pan out. One pass very coarse to crack, then a second pass with the plates tighter to get a finer meal.

Tom Bri

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1078 on: November 22, 2015, 01:18:50 PM »
I have had good luck planting the beans and corn at the same time. I usually alternate one bean one corn down the row. But if they get out of whack, one or the other can get too far ahead and shade out the other. Sometimes you have to gently remove the climbing beans from the corn and drape it lower on the stalk.
This year I had lots of volunteer tomatoes growing under the corn. They seemed healthy, but didn't  produce many fruit until the corn was done and had died back some, letting more light in.

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1079 on: December 05, 2015, 10:30:18 AM »
We are garden newbies! This year we did well with herbs, tomatoes, pepper and lettuce. I expected to better with squash and zucchini, but it didn't happen. Will need to do more research next time!

I just covered by raised garden bed for the season. We just did soil + cardboard + Mulch/Bark layer with leftovers from the summer, so I hope this is enough to protect the garden and not strip out all of the nutrients over the winter as the cardboard gets broken down.

Do I need to go back and add more plant matter (i.e. leaves) and some compost to help rejuvenate the soil?

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1080 on: December 05, 2015, 10:35:52 AM »
Goblin Chief, thanks for the pointers.  I don't plan to grow corn next year, but I'll try interplanting black bush beans with winter squash and see how it goes.

We are garden newbies! This year we did well with herbs, tomatoes, pepper and lettuce. I expected to better with squash and zucchini, but it didn't happen. Will need to do more research next time!

I just covered by raised garden bed for the season. We just did soil + cardboard + Mulch/Bark layer with leftovers from the summer, so I hope this is enough to protect the garden and not strip out all of the nutrients over the winter as the cardboard gets broken down.

Do I need to go back and add more plant matter (i.e. leaves) and some compost to help rejuvenate the soil?


Dry leaves are a "brown" (carbon source) similar to the cardboard.  If you want to up your fertility, you'll want to add a nitrogen source.  If you can get goat or rabbit poo, you can add it directly to the garden without composting.  With that said, more compost is always better!

Tom Bri

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1081 on: December 05, 2015, 11:18:29 AM »

[/quote]

Dry leaves are a "brown" (carbon source) similar to the cardboard.  If you want to up your fertility, you'll want to add a nitrogen source.  If you can get goat or rabbit poo, you can add it directly to the garden without composting.  With that said, more compost is always better!
[/quote]

Dry leaves are great, like he says, for adding carbon to the soil, and it is carbon that catches and holds the nitrogen you need for plants to grow. So, add the leaves. I usually dig a deep trench in the fall and pile the leaves in, then cap with a thin layer of dirt and garbage. Then next time I collect leaves do another layer until the leaf fall season is done. Then all winter long the garbage and fireplace ash goes on top. In the spring I cap the whole thing with a layer of dirt and plant into that. The leaves will rot over the summer and create a deep carbon layer. This has been working very well for me the last ten years. I don't bother to actually compost any more, just bury it all deep.
This fall I started adding all the recyclable paper in the trench. We'll see how that goes, but I expect it to act similar to the leaves except maybe be slower to break down. Since it is all a couple of feet down, it shouldn't matter. With lots of pure carbon added, you do need to make sure there is a good nitrogen source, manure or garbage, or the plants will have a hard time getting enough.

Astatine

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1082 on: December 05, 2015, 02:58:33 PM »
We seem to have successfully got 4 zucchini plants growing!!! Huzzah.  So I suspect we will have a huge zucchini glut this summer (assuming we can keep all of them alive) but one of my favourite things is giving away our surplus produce to friends. Any surplus will not go to waste.

Our two cherry tomato plants are growing beautifully and have already started to  flower. We have a few tiny tomatoes already starting to grow. Very exciting. We are going away for a week in January (a very hot and dry month here) so hopefully they will survive over that period.

My nectarine tree out the front has shot up hugely over spring. I reckon it grew a metre (3 feet) in the space of a couple of months. I pulled off most of the baby nectarines because most of the branches are still very spindly and thin. But, the ones I left (on the thicker branches) are growing nicely and look beautiful. I'm amazed the parrots haven't found them yet. We have an ornamental plum tree out the back (grows tiny plums) which are already getting stripped by currawongs and parrots.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1083 on: February 14, 2016, 04:03:07 PM »
It's 2016 now and this thread has 23 pages.  Shall we start a new thread for the new year?

It's -22 outside now (that's Celsius) so I am staying happy with catalogues.  So many choices.

Rosy

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1084 on: February 14, 2016, 04:25:13 PM »
A new thread would be great, it took forever to open.

Chilly in Florida, but up to 70 F by noon, then cooling off again. Must water soonest, only managed to water half the garden on Saturday and will be gone most of the day tomorrow - but at least I got the veggies.

Rural

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1085 on: February 14, 2016, 05:27:07 PM »
 I believe cilantro, kale, and lettuce (outside in the atrium) and basil (inside in the kitchen) are all going to overwinter successfully. The hot peppers pepper (also in the kitchen) are just about done, but it's just about time to start new seeds, anyway.  I did not get any tomatoes or peppers started this weekend, so it's on the agenda for next.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1086 on: February 14, 2016, 05:46:45 PM »
@Rosy, Rural - let's start a new one instead of reviving this one. 

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1087 on: February 14, 2016, 05:47:45 PM »
Just be sure to add a link here to the new one!

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting/Growing Your Own...The Garden Thread
« Reply #1088 on: February 14, 2016, 05:57:09 PM »
I hope this link works, good idea.
http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/throw-down-the-gauntlet/plantinggrowing-your-own-in-2016/

MOD NOTE: PLEASE SEE THE ABOVE LINK FOR PLANTING YOUR GARDEN 2016!
« Last Edit: February 14, 2016, 08:41:54 PM by swick »