Author Topic: Cowspiracy  (Read 3522 times)

gt7152b

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Cowspiracy
« on: October 06, 2015, 07:35:39 AM »
Just saw this documentary on Netflix and can't get it out of my head. Saw one article calling it the vegan virus so beware if you are a meat lover. Here's an overview:

http://ecowatch.com/2014/10/10/cowspiracy-exposes-animal-agriculture/

I will definitely be cutting down my meat consumption, especially beef. Don't know if I can cut out eggs, poultry, and fish completely but I am going to be headed in that direction with small steps. Hard to imagine purchasing beef ever again after learning of the inefficiency and damage of production.

Thegoblinchief

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2015, 08:22:24 AM »
We've been having a discussion about it here: http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/off-topic/who-has-watched-the-documentary-cowspiracy/

There's every reason to get away from factory farmed meat. That does NOT mean getting away from all meat. Pastured animal products are among the most sustainable forms of current agriculture.

Larsg

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #2 on: December 06, 2015, 03:52:14 PM »
When I was in my teens, I was invited by my an uncle to watch a cattle branding - this ranch by today's terms would still be considered a sustainable, grass fed beef farm...but after watching what happens which is pretty typical, I have never eaten beef again. I won't go into details but it was a blood bath of removing horns, nuts - some young ones die because they go too far, and then all the shots, and then finally the burning brand. All the cries, blood running down their legs and faces....we are barbarians in a modern day age and should be ashamed. It would be one thing if that was the only thing to eat to survive but it's not. Those days are long gone. I respect to each his own and know it's a personal choice. But, after I saw that, I never looked back. I have recently stopped eating all chicken, even the best organic, free range. Still eat fish. Result is that I feel fantastic, mind feels sharper, more energy, don't really miss it all that much. It does require more planning and creativity but that is what this is all about - to use our imagination, develop new skills, better health, become better people because we can.

Icecreamarsenal

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2016, 10:15:58 AM »
I recently read 'How Not To Die' and was searching the forums for veganism and came upon this thread.  I will definitely watch cowspiracy this coming week.

zephyr911

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #4 on: November 16, 2016, 11:00:55 AM »
I know people who are vegans and vegetarians, and who recommend that movie.
Personally, I've damn near given up all forms of beef for cost reasons alone, and I think the rising cost in recent years reflects the fact that the resource inputs for producing it are higher.
Our protein intake is probably 80% poultry and fish, some pork, and an occasional burger or steak for variety.

alleykat

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #5 on: November 16, 2016, 02:28:44 PM »
When I was in my teens, I was invited by my an uncle to watch a cattle branding - this ranch by today's terms would still be considered a sustainable, grass fed beef farm...but after watching what happens which is pretty typical, I have never eaten beef again. I won't go into details but it was a blood bath of removing horns, nuts - some young ones die because they go too far, and then all the shots, and then finally the burning brand. All the cries, blood running down their legs and faces....we are barbarians in a modern day age and should be ashamed. It would be one thing if that was the only thing to eat to survive but it's not. Those days are long gone. I respect to each his own and know it's a personal choice. But, after I saw that, I never looked back. I have recently stopped eating all chicken, even the best organic, free range. Still eat fish. Result is that I feel fantastic, mind feels sharper, more energy, don't really miss it all that much. It does require more planning and creativity but that is what this is all about - to use our imagination, develop new skills, better health, become better people because we can.


I didn't actually see the real thing, but I watched if Slaughter Houses had Glass Walls, Earthlings and a few other documentaries and I was done. All beef, chicken, pork, no more.  It is heartbreaking what these animals go through. Just heartbreaking.  I even gave up fish but now I do have fish every once in a while.  Sometimes I just feel I need a solid meal if that makes sense.  But, that is it.  I  turned 95% vegetarian with occasional fish. I am much happier knowing I am not adding to their misery.   

Icecreamarsenal

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #6 on: November 18, 2016, 06:47:25 AM »
I'm not vegan or vegetarian, but have definitely moved to a more plant-based diet.  Labels and all the baggage that comes with it are not for me, but I eat meat/fish/chicken/eggs/dairy around 2 meals out of the 21 for the week, so about 10%.
For me, it has more to do with health than ethical reasons.
I've recently developed an interest in hunting, of all things, specifically bow-hunting for deer.  Long story, but it mostly stems from what Zuckerberg said, about only eating meat from animals that he's hunted.  Factory farming leads to a lot of disconnect between food sources and consumer.

TheAnonOne

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #7 on: November 18, 2016, 10:43:23 AM »
Trigger warning..

I grew up hunting and having family friends with farms and livestock. I've seen what some animals go through, but still can mentally separate livestock from pets and the like.

While I now live in a city and only occasionally see this stuff, I still eat meat and I still go hunting.

I think it's harder or more shocking to people who grew up sheltered from the realities of farming that have a more violent reaction to learning about it.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #8 on: November 19, 2016, 08:02:25 AM »
Trigger warning..
........

I think it's harder or more shocking to people who grew up sheltered from the realities of farming that have a more violent reaction to learning about it.

I agree.  Though it is unlikely that any of your family friends had 'factory' farms, in the terms of the worst that some of the documentaries expose. But I wonder if those that grew up on farms are more 'normalized' to the process - does this mean it's a ok practice? People in SE Asia sometimes don't think much of young children working in factories; it's much more appalling to Western nations. While I still eat a shit-ton of meat, and feel extremely healthy and great because of it, I can understand how others would make different choices.

Icecreamarsenal

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #9 on: November 22, 2016, 07:43:15 PM »
Trigger warning..

I grew up hunting and having family friends with farms and livestock. I've seen what some animals go through, but still can mentally separate livestock from pets and the like.

While I now live in a city and only occasionally see this stuff, I still eat meat and I still go hunting.

I think it's harder or more shocking to people who grew up sheltered from the realities of farming that have a more violent reaction to learning about it.

I hear you.  I remember going to a restaurant in NYC that had 'freshly-killed chicken'.  This seemed to disturb some of the people I had gone with.  What would be better, chicken killed years ago?
Asking around the table, it seemed most, if not all, had not only never killed an animal for meat, but preferred to dissociate the meat with the animal.
It's a weird way to live.
Anyway, just finished watching the movie.  The 'protagonist' of the story almost sobs and dry heaves as one of the omnivores in the movie butchers a duck.  I love me my Peking duck, and I'll butcher a duck if need be.
That being said, I'm still at 89.5% of weekly meals being vegan.

deborah

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #10 on: November 22, 2016, 07:55:59 PM »
When I was at school, we had our school farm, and did 2 years of Agricultural Science. We had to neuter lambs, prune peaches, shear sheep, drive the tractor... I can just about remember every single lesson I attended - it was great!

Hotstreak

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #11 on: November 22, 2016, 08:35:12 PM »
We've been having a discussion about it here: http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/off-topic/who-has-watched-the-documentary-cowspiracy/

There's every reason to get away from factory farmed meat. That does NOT mean getting away from all meat. Pastured animal products are among the most sustainable forms of current agriculture.


+1.


Better to eat pastured animals than corn or soy, for instance.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2016, 04:18:06 AM »
I hear you.  I remember going to a restaurant in NYC that had 'freshly-killed chicken'.  This seemed to disturb some of the people I had gone with.  What would be better, chicken killed years ago?
Asking around the table, it seemed most, if not all, had not only never killed an animal for meat, but preferred to dissociate the meat with the animal.
It's a weird way to live.
Anyway, just finished watching the movie.  The 'protagonist' of the story almost sobs and dry heaves as one of the omnivores in the movie butchers a duck.  I love me my Peking duck, and I'll butcher a duck if need be.
That being said, I'm still at 89.5% of weekly meals being vegan.
I'm not sure I've ever experienced a bad way to serve duck.

darknight

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2016, 11:25:01 AM »
I've read a lot about it, watch forks over knives. I agree that we need to be more cautious. Personally, I'm a hunter and the majority (like 90+%) of the read meat I eat is wild deer. I don't really like supporting big meat industry. My father always taught me to appreciate the animals and the sacrifice they give when you take one. Killing and preparing the meat is similar to the regard we give home grown vegetables-You don't throw extra away and appreciate every bite. I usually am able to shoot 2-4 white tail does (in my area you can buy multiple deer tags, some seasons run for 4 months). Red meat is so rich in nutrients that I choose to eat it (I work out 5-6 days/week). I've seen first hand with siblings and cousins have severe health issues from being vegan/veterinarian and not  being cognizant about nutrients. (My cousin was admitted to the hospital for extreme nutrient deprivation with from a vegan lifestyle). I'm all for those eating styles, just be coherent about what you take in. I love quality, wild red meat.

Icecreamarsenal

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #14 on: November 24, 2016, 08:19:27 AM »
I've read a lot about it, watch forks over knives. I agree that we need to be more cautious. Personally, I'm a hunter and the majority (like 90+%) of the read meat I eat is wild deer. I don't really like supporting big meat industry. My father always taught me to appreciate the animals and the sacrifice they give when you take one. Killing and preparing the meat is similar to the regard we give home grown vegetables-You don't throw extra away and appreciate every bite. I usually am able to shoot 2-4 white tail does (in my area you can buy multiple deer tags, some seasons run for 4 months). Red meat is so rich in nutrients that I choose to eat it (I work out 5-6 days/week). I've seen first hand with siblings and cousins have severe health issues from being vegan/veterinarian and not  being cognizant about nutrients. (My cousin was admitted to the hospital for extreme nutrient deprivation with from a vegan lifestyle). I'm all for those eating styles, just be coherent about what you take in. I love quality, wild red meat.

Extreme nutrient deprivation from a vegan lifestyle <-- Doing it so so wrong!  Technically, french fries and beer is vegan...

ck25

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #15 on: November 24, 2016, 08:28:26 AM »
I think it's harder or more shocking to people who grew up sheltered from the realities of farming that have a more violent reaction to learning about it.
I tend to disagree. I grew up going fishing on my dad's boat every weekend and from as young as I can remember I would cry and beg for him to throw them back. Eventually they stopped bringing me, but witnessing the slaughter and gutting took a toll and I became vegetarian at age 13 and vegan at 14. Not sooner because parents didn't trust me to make my own decisions until then.

There are compelling reasons to be vegan for health and environment so I think that's eventually the way people will go, even if they're not compelled morally.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Cowspiracy
« Reply #16 on: November 24, 2016, 09:41:37 AM »
I've read a lot about it, watch forks over knives. I agree that we need to be more cautious. Personally, I'm a hunter and the majority (like 90+%) of the read meat I eat is wild deer. I don't really like supporting big meat industry. My father always taught me to appreciate the animals and the sacrifice they give when you take one. Killing and preparing the meat is similar to the regard we give home grown vegetables-You don't throw extra away and appreciate every bite. I usually am able to shoot 2-4 white tail does (in my area you can buy multiple deer tags, some seasons run for 4 months). Red meat is so rich in nutrients that I choose to eat it (I work out 5-6 days/week). I've seen first hand with siblings and cousins have severe health issues from being vegan/veterinarian and not  being cognizant about nutrients. (My cousin was admitted to the hospital for extreme nutrient deprivation with from a vegan lifestyle). I'm all for those eating styles, just be coherent about what you take in. I love quality, wild red meat.

Extreme nutrient deprivation from a vegan lifestyle <-- Doing it so so wrong!  Technically, french fries and beer is vegan...

When looked at it that way, I've absolutely eaten vegan for stretches of time.