Author Topic: Put up my first Rain Barrel  (Read 6321 times)

usmarine1975

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Put up my first Rain Barrel
« on: July 15, 2014, 03:20:40 PM »
I put up a rain barrel using a diverter I found on Ebay, a barrel I found on Craigslist and a spigot purchased at Lowes grand total expense of $60.00  Last two days Barrel is over half full. 

RyanHesson

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #1 on: July 15, 2014, 08:15:51 PM »
How much water do you have to collect before that's paid for? Seems like it would have to be a lot. Unless there's something I'm missing.

johnintaiwan

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2014, 03:21:52 AM »
for anyone else interested, make sure it is legal where ever you are. Many places take rain barrels very seriously.

usmarine1975

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2014, 09:02:17 AM »
It is legal in my State and those States where it is not are re looking at the issue of a homeowner collecting his rainwater.

As far as the cost and how long, I didn't do the math.  The money isn't the reason I am doing it. 

I only posted the price because most  rain barrels for sale start at around $120.00 in the retail world.

I will be able to use this water to water my Garden which will help reduce my grocery bill and I won't be using City Water to do so as I live in the City.

If I was able to get off the City water grid which I am not my monthly bill is around 65/month.  So if I can save 5/month using the barrel I will have the barrel paid for in 1 year.  I am not counting on this it generally depends on how much I can use it to off set any other normal outside usage of my water.  I could have used a cheaper Diverter or just put the down spout in it to cut my cost in half.  If I added a second barrel to the existing barrel my cost would also be cut as I wouldn't need the diverter and could store more water. with minimal cost mainly the barrel and connecting pipes. 

You should check your local ordinances to make sure it's legal.  My City has a group pushing for rain barrels at every event in the City selling their barrels as stated for $120.00 for just the barrel.

ToughMother

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2014, 09:34:05 AM »
Nice job!!! 

I had no clue that rain barrels were such evil entities in some locations!  Anyway, I have one on both the front and back of my house and it meets all my watering needs which is completely awesome.  Our water/sewer bills are being increased 10-15% each year for the last two and next three years (trying to catch up on poorly maintained city infrastructure).  Since they compute water/sewer needs by looking at water consumption and multiplying by 2, any water I don't used is doubly saved.

Long live your rain barrel!! (Mine ran me about $60 each too...previously used food-grade barrels)

wild wendella

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2014, 09:56:08 AM »
I must be very naive.  Why would a rain barrel be illegal?

usmarine1975

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #6 on: July 16, 2014, 10:11:45 AM »
In states where droughts are common they call it Water Rights and homeowners don't always have those rights.  Or from my understanding you wouldn't want a business with a huge building collecting all the water off of it and trying to sell it to others around him for high prices while at the same time hurting the ground water directly around him. Basically only those who could afford water would have it forcing the common man out of the area.

mrsggrowsveg

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #7 on: July 16, 2014, 10:34:58 AM »
We traded some hay for large rain collection containers last year.  Also our house has an underground rain fed cistern with a pump.  We never pay for our gardening/livestock water.

usmarine1975

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #8 on: July 16, 2014, 10:39:27 AM »

dragoncar

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #9 on: July 16, 2014, 12:20:09 PM »
I too would like to see a cost-benefit analysis of this.

edit:  here's an example blurb that says 3-6 year payback period but it's obviously very dependent on local conditions:

http://horttech.ashspublications.org/content/24/1/156.abstract


and here's an even better article... I think I will probably go with low-water gardening vs. rain barrels:

http://owendell.com/blog/general/roll-out-the-rain-barrels
« Last Edit: July 16, 2014, 12:27:50 PM by dragoncar »

smalllife

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #10 on: July 16, 2014, 12:41:13 PM »
I got a rain barrel for free that I need to get a divert-er for, thanks for the kick in the butt!

For me it's not about the pennies saved per gallon, but the water treatment and infrastructure needs that I reduce by simply storing the rainfall that would otherwise wash away.  Next year's project is to have diverters off of downspouts tied to soaker hoses to disperse the run off.

usmarine1975

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #11 on: July 16, 2014, 01:31:44 PM »
I will watch my water bill to see if we notice a significant reduction.  I don't imagine we will but I track it anyway and can let you know.  For me it wasn't so much the cool hype or the idea of saving money.  I just wanted to do it.

Hedge_87

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #12 on: July 18, 2014, 06:26:26 AM »
I'll be looking at doing something like this when we get moved to our new house. On a similar note.  A local farmer in this area just built a BIG building to house all/most of his equipment. He installed an underground tank to collect the water off the building. He guesses he should be able to collect enough water to take care of all his spraying* needs without having to pull water out of his well. I thought this was pretty cool for an area where everybody else is drilling "irrigation" wells like crazy and selling water to the fracking companies. I just can't see how everybody thinks they can just keep pulling water out of the ground indefinitely.

*before you start going all. He should be going organic. this guy is in commercial agriculture not your local vegetable farmer.

johnintaiwan

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2014, 07:27:10 PM »
I just can't see how everybody thinks they can just keep pulling water out of the ground indefinitely.


Especially when people are taking the water before it even has a chance to get to the ground...

Hedge_87

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2014, 06:33:49 AM »
it does hit the ground. just at certain times of year and mixed with some nasty chemicals that kill anything other than the genetically modified super crops these guys are planting.

briandougherty

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2014, 07:40:42 AM »
Make sure to clean your barrel occasionally and try to get a sense what contaminants might be coming off of your roof if you're using it to water edible plants.  It can be either roofing material itself or sometimes it's just atmospheric heavy metals will collect there waiting to be carried away in the next rain into your barrel.

lizzzi

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2014, 09:51:24 AM »
My great-grandmother and four great-aunts always used the water from the rain barrel to wash their hair. This was way out in the country in West Virginia , going back to when my grandmother used to visit down there starting in 1913. She said her m-i-l and four s-i-l's all had long, bright red hair--and it was a sight to see as they washed it in the rain barrel outside the back door and then stood drying it in the sun. (Anybody here from Jackson County?)

Murdoch

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #17 on: July 19, 2014, 09:29:49 PM »
Rain barrels, otherwise known as water tanks here in Australia, are very common.
Some councils have made it compulsory that all new developments have water tanks as part of the build.
Rain is collected directly off the roof, which here is usually corrugated iron and safe.
Many years ago most tanks were also corrugated iron, but polyethelene is now the most common.
Mostly it is used to garden and piped to grey waste (toilets etc), and helps reduce water bills, and preserves water supplies in our often drought ridden regions. During bad droughts, it is common to be put onto water restrictions in whole cities/councils for months at a time. Washing cars becomes a big no-no, as does watering lawns, unless it is coming from a tank.
It is mandatory for them to have screens on the top, as mosquito's are a big problem if left open, and it's usually advised that the water isn't used for drinking.
Very effective when used in the right regions and climates.

Murdoch

Goldielocks

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Re: Put up my first Rain Barrel
« Reply #18 on: July 21, 2014, 02:08:48 AM »
I too would like to see a cost-benefit analysis of this.

edit:  here's an example blurb that says 3-6 year payback period but it's obviously very dependent on local conditions:

http://horttech.ashspublications.org/content/24/1/156.abstract


and here's an even better article... I think I will probably go with low-water gardening vs. rain barrels:

http://owendell.com/blog/general/roll-out-the-rain-barrels

This is funny... Our rain barrel is sold by the city for $30.. Heavily discounted..  Ours came with the house...

The reason is it is really wet here 9 months of the year... The local building code is about NOT letting rain pour off your property and on to neighbors.  But. Dry for 2 months in summer when city treatment  system can't keep up.  Mainly because of yard use.

Payback?  Hmmm. I get free water ( flat rate of $880 per year for water, sewer, trash and recycling)..  Rain barrel $30.
Ability to water during summer months while there are bans on city water use for lawns and gardens... Very high value.