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General Discussion => Share Your Badassity => Topic started by: skyrefuge on January 30, 2013, 03:15:07 PM

Title: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on January 30, 2013, 03:15:07 PM
I've been meaning to post a thread about sewing for a long time, and another thread (https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/clothes-don%27t-look-right-the-solution-is-not-new-clothes/) over at the General forum finally prodded me to do it. This is really long, so I broke it into three posts. The first two posts are mostly me just showing off, so you can skip to the third one if you just want to learn how I learned, or see if it's something right for you.

The Problem:
Sometime in 2010, I discovered that most off-the-rack dress shirts that fit my neck are consequently way too baggy for my torso. I believe I finally came to this realization when I was "forced" to buy a concert t-shirt in "medium" since they were out of "large", and I discovered how much better the "medium" looked on my 6'4" 180lb. frame. In retrospect it's painfully obvious how terrible I looked, but I had apparently become used to the look of ill-fitting clothes, simply because most off-the-rack shirts are designed for average Americans, who are fat (and also not as tall as I am). 

Below is the most extreme example that I had buried in my closet, but it's actually not too much worse than an average non-fitted shirt sold to fat Americans these days:
(http://tpom.com/img/brown_big.JPG)

This is the slimmest-fitting off-the-rack shirt I've been able to find, and it's far better than the example above, but still not as good as I'd like.
(http://tpom.com/img/green.JPG)

Solution Attempt #1: Buy a Custom Shirt
So I ordered a custom shirt from propercloth.com, for $150 (I paid for a $50 upgrade to a higher-end fabric). It arrived in a fancy box, with a nice letter that explained that some of the measurements were a bit longer than specified, but that it would shrink to exact size after a wash. And it did. Except for the chest being perhaps a bit wide, all the measurements were bang-on, so as far as I'm concerned, they did an excellent job of delivering exactly what I'd ordered. Here are the two shirts from above, along with my new custom shirt, showing the relative sizes:
(http://tpom.com/img/shirt_comparison.JPG)

And the result is just what I was looking for. Except for the ridiculous price, I was very satisfied:
(http://tpom.com/img/proper_cloth_f.JPG)

Solution #2: Make my own Custom Shirt
Once I finally got a well-fitting shirt, one of the first things I discovered is that I don't have any pants that fit either. It's almost impossible to find pants that are simultaneously long enough (~35" inseam) and narrow enough (~31" waist) for me. In fact, pants with a 35-36" inseam are very rare in *any* waist size. So without really being aware of it, apparently my solution to this problem for years has been to get pants that are far too loose in the waist, so they sit very low on my hips, which allows the too-short legs to reach the right point on my shoes. This becomes a problem when wearing a closely-fitted shirt, because, when tucked in, it tends to sag out at the bottom, and when untucked, it has to stretch out around the too-wide pants. So I ordered a pair of nice pants from Bonobos that fit my waist, and the customer is expected to (re)hem to the proper length. In learning the proper way to hem pants, I did a lot of investigation into the way pants (and then shirts) are constructed. None of it really seems like rocket science, so I thought "c'mon, how hard can this really be? Maybe I can do it myself!" It was awesome later on to then hear MMM speak similarly about welding, or other construction skills he has picked up over time.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on January 30, 2013, 03:15:50 PM
So instead of buying another $150 shirt or $100 pants, I bought a $150 sewing machine, and with the help of some library books and the Internet, started teaching myself how to sew. Up 'til then I knew how to sew a button on by hand, and was able to hem those pants by hand, but that was the extent of my sewing knowledge. First I mended some shorts and tailored some too-big t-shirts, and eventually got to the point where I could start experimenting with men's dress shirts. I almost completely deconstructed that huge, billowy shirt in the first post, recut all the pieces to match a pattern I created based on my Proper Cloth shirt, and sewed them all back together. I had to convert it to short-sleeves since I moved the armholes in 3-4", which would have made the long sleeves way too short. It was really just an experiment to hone my skills, but the result ended up actually being wearable:

(http://tpom.com/img/brown_big.JPG)(http://tpom.com/img/brown_mod.JPG)

So, I've now converted what could have been a very-dangerous desire for $150 shirts into a much more Mustachian idea to make my own clothes. My biggest goal in the whole process was to make sure that no one thought my home-made clothes looked like "clothes that someone made at home":
(http://mccallpattern.mccall.com/filebin/images/product_images/Full/M4530.jpg)

Apparently I surpassed that goal: experience revealed that not only did my clothes not look home-made, they must have looked substantially better than the store-bought clothes I had been wearing before, as the number of girls randomly hitting on me increased exponentially (from like 0). Woo hoo!

One of my first from-scratch shirts (making your own lets you get creative with the fabric design too!):
(http://tpom.com/img/midwestern0.JPG)(http://tpom.com/img/midwestern1.JPG)

Once I got good enough at making them for myself, I made one custom-fit for my brother:
(http://tpom.com/img/lumberjack0.jpg)(http://tpom.com/img/lumberjack1.jpg)

Then I turned to pants. First, I altered a pair of khakis I had from Express. Took the waist in a couple inches, and slimmed the legs a bit (they're the same pants, the color is just different due to different lighting. And I might have been sandbagging a bit by not ironing them in the "before" picture!)
(http://tpom.com/img/khaki0.jpg)(http://tpom.com/img/khaki1.jpg)

And then a pair made from scratch:
(http://tpom.com/img/pants.jpg)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on January 30, 2013, 03:16:18 PM
How did learn this skill? I first needed a sewing machine. I read a fair number of reviews, couldn't understand why so many individual models are marketed by sewing machine manufacturers, and ended up getting a Brother CS-6000i (http://www.amazon.com/Brother-Affordable-60-Stitch-Computerized-Free-Arm/dp/B000JQM1DE) new for $150. That's relatively cheap in the sewing-machine world, and it seemed to be described as a good value for the money and had lots of really good Amazon reviews. So far it's done everything I've needed it to do (and even quite a bit more...haven't found a use for most of the wacky decorative stitches yet!)  Surely even better values could be found on Craigslist, particularly since basic sewing-machine technology hasn't changed much over the years. Though the one thing I would miss in an older non-"computerized" machine is the ability to automatically stitch buttonholes.

Another "new technology" thing I'm happy to have sprung for is a rotary cutter (http://www.amazon.com/45mm-Olfa-Heavy-Duty-Rotary/dp/B0001DS9P4/) (and self-healing mat (http://www.amazon.com/9891-24-Inch-36-Inch-Self-Healing-Double-Sided/dp/B0006SDOFO/)) to cut out fabric pieces. It must have been way more annoying (and less-accurate) in the old days to cut things out with scissors.

Then I went to the library and checked out a couple of general sewing books to get an idea of the basics. I don't remember the titles, but I think most libraries would have similar books (though it's funny/annoying that at least in my library, the sections for 'quilting', 'embroidery', and 'knitting' are each like 5 times the size of the straight-up 'sewing' section).

A related annoying thing (as a guy) was discovering how female-focused even sewing books are. I saw one pattern book where there were 10 sections, and the 10th was "Men's and Children's Clothing". Men don't even get 1/10th of the book to themselves! Luckily, David Coffin was there to rescue me with his excellent Shirtmaking: Developing Skills For Fine Sewing (http://www.amazon.com/Shirtmaking-Developing-Skills-Fine-Sewing/dp/1561582646). The book goes in-depth in both basic sewing techniques (at least those required for the task at hand), and in detailing specifically how to design, fit, and construct men's dress shirts. Most importantly, he very much has the same philosophy as I do in wanting professional-looking results, so he has researched the way the real tailors make shirts and how they're different than some of the methods instructed in home-sewing patterns you might buy.

I also then got his Making Trousers (http://www.amazon.com/Making-Trousers-Men-Women-Multimedia/dp/1589234499), and it's helpful, but is mostly an exploration of different design options and contains very little about sewing techniques.

Google searches taking me to various sewing blogs or YouTube videos have been helpful from time to time as well, when I encounter a specific issue or have a new question pop up.

So, is sewing your own clothes a Mustachian thing to do?  From a financial perspective, no. Home sewers, buying at retail, pay extremely inflated prices for various things. I can get an entire shirt at a thrift shop for the price of a set of buttons on one of my own shirts. A Craigslisted sewing machine might pay for itself over time though, because once you have it and know how to use it, you can find lots of other things to repair/tailor/create besides from-scratch clothing.

But I maintain that it's totally Mustachian from a DIY, teach-yourself-new-skills perspective. Given how female-biased the activity is, I was surprised to discover how it's actually a very "manly" thing to do.  It involves a whole lot of geometry, math, thinking in 3D-space, operating complex electric machinery, following detailed instructions, etc., all things that we're supposed to believe women are utterly hopeless at! It's basically the same thing as the manly sport of woodworking, except you're designing and building things out of cloth instead of wood. Unfortunately, unlike MMM's welding, I don't think it's quite a skill that can lead to riches, since you'd be competing with an enormous worldwide clothing industry that has FAR lower costs.

But if you're a tall, thin guy who is interested in attracting members of the opposite sex, then I would say that, if not quite Mustachian, it can be at least help you achieve your goals more-economically than paying someone else to custom-make your shirts!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Welmoed on January 30, 2013, 03:45:48 PM
Good for you for tackling making your own clothes!! Once you discover what it feels like to wear something that REALLY fits properly, it's so hard to go back to ready-to-wear. I make a lot of my own clothes as well, and also sew for my husband and daughter (my son lives in t-shirts and jeans, so the only thing I sew for him is costumes).
One thing I will recommend you look into is pattern drafting software. As you no doubt have discovered, patterns can be expensive!! I use software to draft custom-fitted patterns, and have saved so much over buying all these patterns individually. The one I use is called PatternMaster, and they have a package for menswear called Tailor Made. www.wildginger.com (http://www.wildginger.com) (no affiliation, just a very happy user).
You are so right about the creative freedom; mixing and matching fabrics can be a hoot. Unfortunately, fabric can be expensive too; watch for sales and start looking at the good online stores such as Fabrics.com (http://Fabrics.com) and Fabricmartfabrics.com (http://Fabricmartfabrics.com). And consider joining an online sewing group; one I run is called the Creative Machine (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/creativemachine/ (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/creativemachine/). Yes, it's pretty heavy on the distaff side, but we do have a number of active male members who participate.
Keep up the great work and happy sewing!!!
--Welmoed
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: amyable on January 30, 2013, 03:58:17 PM
I am extremely impressed with your pants.  I'm sure you know that pants are a notoriously difficult garment to fit to the body, and these look completely professional.  I've been sewing for about three years, but I tend to use my skills for curtains, comforters, etc. and the occasional alteration. 
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Kriegsspiel on January 30, 2013, 05:05:58 PM
That's crazy awesome.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: frompa on January 30, 2013, 05:56:50 PM
Very fine job on your sewing, both for having the chutzpah to take on the project in such an independent way, and for how well you've carried it out.  I really enjoy sewing, too, though years ago I realized that sewing can be as much a consumer activity as anything else -- all the equipment, doo dads, new patterns every season, every year, more and better fabrics.  I learned that I could make my own patterns.  I bought a HUGE roll of tracing paper.  Then I found basic clothes I liked, dirt cheap from the thrift store, and used the cheap clothes to trace the pattern pieces on the paper. Sometimes, I'd even find something I liked but the fabric was shitty or full of holes, I'd get it for a song, then take it home and actually take it apart for even more accurate tracing on my huge roll of paper.  I cut out the pieces on the paper and,  Voila!! my own pattern, which I could use on infinite kinds of fabric.  I also enjoy altering quality used clothes. Obviously, this is a lot of fuss for something to wear, but I enjoy the process, and developing the skills, as it seems you also are doing.    Keep it up, dude!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Sylly on January 30, 2013, 06:00:39 PM
This is awesome!

But if you're a tall, thin guy who is interested in attracting members of the opposite sex, then I would say that, if not quite Mustachian, it can be at least help you achieve your goals more-economically than paying someone else to custom-make your shirts!

I think this holds true if you have a non-standard body type, period. SO has the somewhat opposite problem you do, short with athletic build. Anything that fits neck and shoulder is too long and billowy. Anything that fits lower torso and has the right arm length chokes him and would probably rip at the shoulders if he moves his arms.

You've just given me a skill to aspire to. I'll definitely look into picking up sewing in the (hopefully near) future.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: arebelspy on January 30, 2013, 06:02:56 PM
You did an amazing job.

I can't find pants that fit me (too thin/tall), so this is quite intriguing to me.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Milkman666 on January 30, 2013, 06:38:02 PM
This has got to be one of the few places where all the straight guys will think this is AWESOME, and is something they should try.

I took a sewing class in high school, and quite liked it.... it may be time to give it another go!

Great job!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Jimbo on January 30, 2013, 08:19:48 PM
Holy crap, this is impressive!!

My wife sews her own dresses and it always impresses me and everybody else... But i never thought of trying for my shirts... I guess I always mangae to find shirts I like... Plus I don't own a lot.

The one shirt with the different fabric in the collar and cuff is crazy nice. I would wear that any day.

Kudos mate, you get one Renaissance Man point. Ah, make that 20!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: N on January 30, 2013, 09:10:11 PM
really nice!
you can also find fabric at the thrift store, too. Sheets, other linens, and often, remnants, etc.
or buy a larger shirt in a fabric or pattern you like and remake it.

kudos!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: savingtofreedom on January 30, 2013, 09:43:59 PM
Super impressed.  Thanks for the very detailed post.  My husband has the same issue.   With the introduction of slim fitting shirts we have been able to find some decent options.

I looked into learning how to sew and I really need to attempt it again. I agree that the cost is much more than buying something high quality on sale but being able to tailor things can be very helpful.

Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: daymare on January 30, 2013, 10:48:24 PM
Quote
Apparently I surpassed that goal: experience revealed that not only did my clothes not look home-made, they must have looked substantially better than the store-bought clothes I had been wearing before, as the number of girls randomly hitting on me increased exponentially (from like 0). Woo hoo!

I love this.

I love the thread in general, as well, & actually ordered that same sewing machine off Amazon a few days ago (using credit card points ... woohoo).  It should get here tomorrow and I'm planning to buy some fabric this weekend (I live in DC but there's a Joanne's store in Falls Church that's not too bad to get to by subway & bus).  I recently read Elizabeth Kline's 'Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion' and found it informative as well as motivating.  I've decided to spend <$500 for all of next year on clothes (I'm giving myself a bit of a buffer because I have 4 weddings to go to this summer and at least one will probably require a new fancy dress).  Otherwise -- should be easy given I have way too many clothes already, and I'm excited to learn a new skill.  I started knitting about a year ago and so far have made a scarf, hat, and finished a sock, so I'm excited to add to my list of practical skills.  It feels great to actually make something after spending all day in a job that's all about intellectual creation (aka innovative ways of analyzing problems, smart ways to query data).

The ability to customize clothes & get a great fit definitely seem like advantages for making your own clothes.  As a woman, I've never actually found collared shirts that fit all parts of me well, so (I sympathize and) I'd love to follow in your footsteps with some construction of shirts.  I think I'm a ways away, but have a fairly easy first project: a sheer maxi skirt with an opaque mini underneath, similar to a skirt I saw at Zara last summer but didn't buy due to its ridiculous price and lack of work appropriateness.

I'd be curious to hear from others about how they get fabric -- I'll soon be living a few blocks away from a fairly large Goodwill store, so I figure I may be able to find some decent fabric in XL sizes that I can then cut down to make me-sized clothing.  I know that Joanne's has some great sales on low-quality but machine-washable yarn, so I assume they occasionally have great deals for fabric as well.  And of course, tailoring existing clothes hopefully will involve minimal cost.  What are other sources people have found for fabric?  It's truly unfortunate that the fast-fashion clothes are likely cheaper than buying decent fabric, but I'm really looking forward to having clothes that fit well.  Goodbye, too-large and unflattering t-shirts: can't wait for my 'this is what a feminist looks like' t-shirt to actually look good on me!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: John74 on January 30, 2013, 11:31:22 PM
Very impressive!

I love building pieces of furniture for the house and a decade ago decided to teach myself how to sew in order to make upholstered furniture - sofas, ottomans, headboards, etc... I later branched out and tackled other sewing projects like draperies, bedding, and table linens. This skill saved us thousands of dollars over the years. Last year my wife saw an upholstered headboard she liked in a store. They were asking $1,200 for it (plus delivery)!!! I built a replica for less than $200 using reclaimed lumber and a few yards of very good quality linen fabric. Looks terrific too. My aunt is a tailor and she thinks I have skills. But making my own clothes seems like a daunting project. Maybe I'll have to give it a try. The hurdle is getting good fabric at a decent price. I can get a perfectly tailored shirt at Banana Republic for less than $50 (using my Wednesday 40% off coupons). Fabric is pretty expensive around here and I am not sure it would be financially advantageous to make my own shirts at this point.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: kt on January 31, 2013, 01:29:57 AM
very, very impressive. definitely does not look homemade, think of it as tailor-made instead!
i like how you worked up to making it from scratch. i've thought about this before but i'm not highly creative or patient. but i'm sure i can make some adjustments as a starter.
thanks for the inspiration!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Worsted Skeins on January 31, 2013, 04:14:40 AM
Skyrefuge--I am impressed!  Well done and thanks for the Shirtmaking book link.  That is one I had not seen.

Those who might want additional hand holding on a shirt making project might want to look at the Colette Negroni Pattern (http://www.colettepatterns.com/shop/negroni).  There is also an accompanying "sew along" on the Male Pattern Boldness website (http://malepatternboldness.blogspot.com/2011/01/mpb-mens-shirt-sew-along.html)--lots of info on sewing for men on that site as well.

As many have noted, a lot of ready made clothing is junk--but so is much of the fabric at places like JoAnns. You really do have to scrutinize.  I put the finishing touches on a wool knit jacket yesterday.  The fabric came from Fashion Fabrics Club which is not a club but an online store. They have great deals but you cannot feel the fabric before buying.

The charity shops occasionally have fabric or yarn.  Without labels though you are sometimes guessing what the fiber content is. Look online for some tests you can conduct to determine what the fiber is.

The idea that sewing is a female sport just baffles me. I taught my son to sew when he was in elementary school.  A good first project is a simple pair of pajama pants.  He has since made things like a fleece jacket and is the master of the bow tie.  Although he is a minimalist, he has an old student Singer sewing machine in his dorm room, something he picked up for $5 at a charity shop. 

Yeah, you don't always save a bunch with sewing (although you can if the stars are in alignment), but you can get what you want.  I'd rather sit at my sewing machine than stroll through a mall!



Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: boy_bye on January 31, 2013, 06:02:53 AM
Amazing job on your handmade clothes!!  I make a lot of my own clothes, too, and most of the fabrics I use are vintage -- better quality, and many times far cheaper than the shitty stuff you can get at Jo-Ann. In fact I ran a custom dressmaking business for a few years, because off the rack clothing sucks and is designed to fit an extremely narrow range of body proportions which I and like 90% of the population simply don't fit into.

Button down shirts and pants are impressive! I mostly sew dresses -- a simple shift style that I wear with tights and cardigans in the winter, and with sandals in the summer -- and skirts. Which are a lot easier. I really like sewing -- especially designing and fitting garments different kinds of garments. But I find a lot of really detailed finishing work to be tedious, so the projects i sew for myself tend to be a little more slapdash than yours. :)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: kolorado on January 31, 2013, 08:11:45 AM
I've been sewing for 20+ years and I am absolutely stunned by your work. It is AWESOME! I'm all kinds of inspired by your skills. WTG and TFS!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: NumberCruncher on January 31, 2013, 08:27:12 AM
In retrospect it's painfully obvious how terrible I looked, but I had apparently become used to the look of ill-fitting clothes, simply because most off-the-rack shirts are designed for average Americans, who are fat (and also not as tall as I am). 

As a fat American, I can attest that off-the-rack shirts are certainly not designed for me, either!

Awesome job on the sewing! Once I move and get a little more space for my sewing machine, I have some big plans too. :)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Jill the Pill on January 31, 2013, 08:37:52 AM
This is just wonderful -- good for you!  I'd love to learn some alternatives to Jo-Ann's expensive crap monopoly. 
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: jba302 on January 31, 2013, 09:22:03 AM
Great thread, I will have to keep an eye on this and try to convince the wife to let me buy a machine at some point. We both have trouble with clothes (I powerlift, big quads smaller waist, and she's just tiny). Seems the XXXXXXXXL clothes are almost always on heavy sale, sounds like it would be worth it to tear down one of those massive garments and self-tailor it wouldn't it?
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: anastrophe on January 31, 2013, 09:34:22 AM
Another "new technology" thing I'm happy to have sprung for is a rotary cutter (http://www.amazon.com/45mm-Olfa-Heavy-Duty-Rotary/dp/B0001DS9P4/) (and self-healing mat (http://www.amazon.com/9891-24-Inch-36-Inch-Self-Healing-Double-Sided/dp/B0006SDOFO/)) to cut out fabric pieces. It must have been way more annoying (and less-accurate) in the old days to cut things out with scissors.

Have you considered purchasing a serger? Normally I would not advise this to home sewers, because it's overkill for almost everyone's use--but you are making very professional-looking items and for your projects, it might be a real help. A serger cuts and overlocks your seam allowance very quickly and gives very professional seams, and can be very convenient for sewing with knits. Not a necessity by any means, but a real step up when making clothes that don't look "home made". They are pricey but I see decent older sergers go for $100-$200 on Craigslist, if you don't care about the newer features like jet-air threading (which no Mustachian should need).
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Phoebe on January 31, 2013, 09:48:42 AM
Nice job - that is super impressive!!!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on January 31, 2013, 11:05:19 AM
Thanks everyone for the generous compliments! The unspoken but implicit compliments from female strangers who make eyes at me are nice, but it's also great to have some explicit feedback from people who know what I'm up to, especially from people who know much more than I do about sewing!

One thing I will recommend you look into is pattern drafting software.

Ah, interesting, I wasn't aware that such software existed. I bought a couple of patterns early on, mostly just to help me understand construction methods. I never actually made something based on a store-bought pattern, and I hadn't anticipated ever buying any more (I developed my own from body-measurements + copying/modifying existing clothing), but as I've thought more about making clothes for other people, I've been curious to find an efficient way to adapt my self-created patterns to different sizes. Or even just have a digital storage format for my personal pattern. I'll check out their demo, thanks!

I am extremely impressed with your pants.  I'm sure you know that pants are a notoriously difficult garment to fit to the body, and these look completely professional.

ha, thanks. They actually benefit from careful posing, because the fit isn't *quite* what I want it to be (unlike my shirts that I wouldn't change at all). And yes, apparently I do know about the notoriousness of pants, as told by the denim fabric that's been laying on my floor, uncut, with pattern shapes on top of it for nearly a year. I've literally spent hours just trying to conceptualize how the 2D pieces of fabric curve into a 3D shape, so I can figure out what adjustments I need to improve the fit where I want without breaking it somewhere else. I really just need to run some experiments on cheap fabric, but can't get myself to do even that because I haven't built the confidence yet.

I really enjoy sewing, too, though years ago I realized that sewing can be as much a consumer activity as anything else -- all the equipment, doo dads, new patterns every season, every year, more and better fabrics.

Yeah, early on when reading sewing forums and stuff, I discovered that there is a large overlap in the populations of "home sewers" and "hoarders". :-) Luckily, I don't have much of a "collector" personality, though when my sister-in-law asked me a couple months ago if I wanted to go to Pendleton Woolen Mills with her, I was like "uh, I probably shouldn't, since I still have fabric from when we went last year", but I went anyway. :-( To my credit, tonight I'll finish the shirt whose fabric I bought on that trip (though the pants fabric from a year ago is still waiting for me to dial in my pants pattern!)

I learned that I could make my own patterns.  I bought a HUGE roll of tracing paper.  Then I found basic clothes I liked, dirt cheap from the thrift store, and used the cheap clothes to trace the pattern pieces on the paper. Sometimes, I'd even find something I liked but the fabric was shitty or full of holes, I'd get it for a song, then take it home and actually take it apart for even more accurate tracing on my huge roll of paper.  I cut out the pieces on the paper and,  Voila!! my own pattern, which I could use on infinite kinds of fabric.

Awesome, I can very much relate. So much of my pattern-creation is based on analyzing/copying/measuring (parts of) existing clothing that I have. I haven't actually yet gone to a thrift shop for items to copy/deconstruct yet, but that's just because I have enough things buried in my own closet that I've taken apart either just to study or to alter.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on January 31, 2013, 11:18:56 AM
I think this holds true if you have a non-standard body type, period. SO has the somewhat opposite problem you do, short with athletic build. Anything that fits neck and shoulder is too long and billowy. Anything that fits lower torso and has the right arm length chokes him and would probably rip at the shoulders if he moves his arms.

Good point! I'm so aware of my own peculiarities that I forget that there are all sorts of ways to be non-standard. Sounds like you'd have a very good use for such a newly-acquired skill.  :-)

This has got to be one of the few places where all the straight guys will think this is AWESOME, and is something they should try.

haha, yeah, some of the straight guys I've told have been perhaps a bit skeptical, and somehow the "it's just like woodworking!" argument doesn't bring them over, though the "you'll get a lot more attention from women!" seems to help.  :-)

I took a sewing class in high school, and quite liked it.... it may be time to give it another go!

Definitely! It's funny how many people I've talked to have some memory about sewing in high school/middle school that traumatized them and put them off it for life (I never had a sewing class in school). So the fact that you actually liked it then makes you a strong candidate for liking it now!

My wife sews her own dresses and it always impresses me and everybody else... But i never thought of trying for my shirts... I guess I always mangae to find shirts I like... Plus I don't own a lot.

The one shirt with the different fabric in the collar and cuff is crazy nice. I would wear that any day.

Yeah, like I said, it makes more sense the more non-standard your body is, so if you do well off the rack it doesn't make a lot of sense. Though from your side it sounds like it might be the creative customization that would be the draw.  :-)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on January 31, 2013, 12:50:41 PM
I love the thread in general, as well, & actually ordered that same sewing machine off Amazon a few days ago

ha, great choice!

It feels great to actually make something after spending all day in a job that's all about intellectual creation (aka innovative ways of analyzing problems, smart ways to query data).

Completely agreed. When I started sewing, I figured that I would really like the results (if I was successful), but I was surprised to discover how much I like the process. The sound of the machine, the feel of the fabric moving through my hands, the smell of the iron opening the seams...  And I came to the exact same conclusion as you on why I enjoyed it so much: actually creating something tactile in front of my own eyes is so different from the abstract typing-into-a-computer I do in my day job.

The ability to customize clothes & get a great fit definitely seem like advantages for making your own clothes.  As a woman, I've never actually found collared shirts that fit all parts of me well, so (I sympathize and) I'd love to follow in your footsteps with some construction of shirts.

The Shirtmaking book I linked does spend a little bit of time discussing the variations needed in fitting procedures to make a pattern work for a woman (and then has a whole section of all kinds of wacky variations, like 18th-century shirts), so if collared shirts I something you like, I'd definitely recommend the book.

I think I'm a ways away, but have a fairly easy first project: a sheer maxi skirt with an opaque mini underneath, similar to a skirt I saw at Zara last summer but didn't buy due to its ridiculous price and lack of work appropriateness.

Hot. :-) And yeah, that sounds like a good first project.

I'd be curious to hear from others about how they get fabric

Given my personal desires that put me more to the snobbish side of "quality", as well as my focus on cotton shirting material, Joann's has never been that useful to me. They simply don't have a lot of fabric in that category. I've also never done actual thrift-shop raiding, but some of my own stuff that I've modified has been buried in my closet for 15 years, so that's basically the same thing and means it could be a totally valid approach.

For stupid-expensive not-on-sale shirting fabrics (usually something like $15-20/yd, or $30/shirt, yikes), I've ordered from Farmhouse Fabrics (http://www.farmhousefabrics.com), shopped locally at independent old-school Fishman's Fabrics in Chicago, and *love* Pendleton's Umatilla wool from their outlet store in Portland.

Good luck, look forward to seeing your own thread here sometime!  :-)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: nubbs180 on January 31, 2013, 12:56:46 PM
I have to say, if you're making your own clothes with high-quality, high cost fabrics, they should last forever, and not need replacing.  In this respect (needing less) DIY garment construction is very Mustachian.

I'm still a novice at alterations, so the following link has helped me some when trying to make things fit correctly.
https://agrilifebookstore.org/publications_browse2.cfm?keywordid=62
They have different PDF pages for different fit problems and how you can work them out.

One of my goals this year is to put together a my-style, fitting wardrobe that I can wear everyday, and get rid of the things in my closet that I have and don't wear. 
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on January 31, 2013, 01:13:10 PM
I love building pieces of furniture for the house and a decade ago decided to teach myself how to sew in order to make upholstered furniture - sofas, ottomans, headboards, etc... I later branched out and tackled other sewing projects like draperies, bedding, and table linens. This skill saved us thousands of dollars over the years.

Awesome. I totally love how it was just a natural outgrowth of furniture-building for you (and then how it went further than that). I definitely plan on doing some upholstery stuff in the future, and in fact my "teaching myself how to sew" inspired my parents to figure out how to re-upholster their 4 kitchen chairs, which they did for something like $5 in materials, and they look great.

i'm not highly creative or patient.

I didn't think that I was at all creative either (in terms of fashion sense), but apparently it comes out naturally when choices are opened up to you.

But the "patient" part might be more important. I think my patience is a critical reason why I've been successful at making my stuff not look homemade. Even now, after making a bunch of shirts based on a similar design, I still mess stuff up laughably often. Some is stuff that must be redone ("whoops, attached that sleeve to the wrong side!"), but others ("that seam is a bit stretched and not like the other one") are things that I could "get away with", but somehow I still have the patience to say "No. Stop. Undo it and try again". And then I have the patience (most of the time!) to calmly and carefully remove the stitching without breaking anything even worse.

Button down shirts and pants are impressive! I mostly sew dresses -- a simple shift style that I wear with tights and cardigans in the winter, and with sandals in the summer -- and skirts. Which are a lot easier. I really like sewing -- especially designing and fitting garments different kinds of garments. But I find a lot of really detailed finishing work to be tedious, so the projects i sew for myself tend to be a little more slapdash than yours. :)

I have a significant number of female friends who have suggested how much they'd love it if I could make something for them, and I've always said that I have enough trouble fitting stuff to my own body, so it will really take me some time before I'm able to move on to not just other peoples' bodies, but bodies that curve in totally different ways than mine. But you bring up a balancing point: the precision and detail might not be as critical. Hmm.

I do always find it amazing what percentage of time goes into the "little stuff" like collars or sleeve plackets. It's especially pronounced in pants, where it seems like you could literally just cut out four pieces of fabric, stitch them together, and be done. Until you want them to have pockets, and a closure to allow you to get them on and off. All that "little stuff" ends up being like 80% of the work. Which, luckily, I don't (yet?) find tedious.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: GuitarStv on January 31, 2013, 01:24:14 PM
BADASS!

I will have to look into this.  Clothing seems tailored for fat people these days.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: boy_bye on January 31, 2013, 01:35:29 PM
BADASS!

I will have to look into this.  Clothing seems tailored for fat people these days.

huh? maybe at wal-mart. but not in real stores. clothing is designed to fit specific people called 'fit models' who are basically people with perfectly proportioned figures. if your body proportions don't match the proportions the clothes are designed for, then shit is not going to fit you whether you're fat or skinny or whatever.

i am waiting for the day when i can do a 3D body scan of myself with my phone, upload it to a website, and have custom clothes built for me based on that scan. i was working toward this with my dressmaking company -- even hired a 3D engineer for a while to work on it -- but wasn't able to marshall the resources to take it all the way.

i think that's got to be the future of fashion, though. bodies are different. and it's not just fat bodies are different from fit bodies -- even fit bodies have lots of variation. some people are super curvy, others are straight up and down. there's really not a way to make mass-produced clothes that actually fit people well. i want tech-enabled custom!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on January 31, 2013, 01:35:52 PM
Have you considered purchasing a serger?

I've certainly thought about it, but haven't been able to justify it yet. My impression was that they're mostly good for overlocking unfinished edges of fabric. Since the majority of my work has been men's shirts, where all the seams are enclosed, that wouldn't be useful, but it could be very nice once I start doing more pants (I just used my machine's "overlock" stitch for the one pair of pants I made, and that's not the greatest). I also have an anti-knit bias at the moment, so no help there. But maybe there are other good uses I'm not aware of at the moment?
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Debbie M on January 31, 2013, 03:58:35 PM
So much of my pattern-creation is based on analyzing/copying/measuring (parts of) existing clothing that I have. I haven't actually yet gone to a thrift shop for items to copy/deconstruct yet, but that's just because I have enough things buried in my own closet that I've taken apart either just to study or to alter.

You could search in thrift stores for the pants that fit perfectly except for being too short.  This could get you through the 3-D wackiness of (non-elasticized) pants.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: MrsKensington on January 31, 2013, 08:21:23 PM
Wow. Amazing. This forum never disappoints and your post is a lovely and informative surprise. Thanks for posting it.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Self-employed-swami on February 01, 2013, 06:22:40 AM
My comment relates to the last photo, which for some reason, I can't quote:

Nice bum, where ya from?











Ok, pretty sexual-harassmentish, but that's the first thing that popped into my mind :)

My husband sews a lot, so you really aren't alone.  He hems his pants, but mostly does quilting.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Miss Stachio on February 01, 2013, 09:36:56 AM
Holy batman, this is inspiring!  Great job!  I used to make dresses in high school, not very well, but wearable.  Luckily I'm a popular clothing size so finding nicely fitted clothes at thrift stores is pretty easy but.. it may be time to go digging through CL for a sewing machine.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: anastrophe on February 01, 2013, 10:32:12 AM
Have you considered purchasing a serger?

I've certainly thought about it, but haven't been able to justify it yet. My impression was that they're mostly good for overlocking unfinished edges of fabric. Since the majority of my work has been men's shirts, where all the seams are enclosed, that wouldn't be useful, but it could be very nice once I start doing more pants (I just used my machine's "overlock" stitch for the one pair of pants I made, and that's not the greatest). I also have an anti-knit bias at the moment, so no help there. But maybe there are other good uses I'm not aware of at the moment?

You are correct, they are mostly good for overlocking unfinished edges. (It's nothing like the crappy overlock stitch on your machine, though.) Not helpful if you are french-seaming your shirts, but for pants, yes, it's like magic. You can also simply serge the seams together and not bother also sewing a separate seam, which works pretty well depending on your fabric. I used to be afraid of knits too but I would suggest you might try to get over your anti-knit bias because knits are nice for things besides women's tops and dresses--not just t-shirts, but pajamas, bathrobes, whatever you want. Some tutorials, etc here are helpful: http://sewaholic.net/a-big-list-of-tips-for-sewing-knits/

Pattern drafting software is pretty cool but you can do the same thing low-tech by deconstructing things that fit you well, altering patterns for specific fit issues, etc. I've found that once I had a few basic patterns that fit perfectly all I needed to do was learn how to make small stylistic changes like different sleeves, collars, pockets, and with different fabrics it looks like I have totally different items even though they're all the same basic patterns.

IMO it is not worth buying full retail price for fabric, I alter clothes from thrift stores, use old quality sheets, and wait for the 40% coupon at Jo-Ann fabrics and buy nothing but one cut of fabric. The markup is absurd.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: daymare on February 01, 2013, 10:40:21 AM
People have made a lot of great points about tradeoffs of efficiency/time/cost for making various garments -- ie making a shirt from a nice fabric from scratch may cost more than bringing in a shirt that was bought prior, simple skirts vs. complex construction, garments that will last much longer than certain store-bought items if properly constructed and maintained.

What have people found to be the most impactful sewing (or even knitting)?  I've found (in knitting, I assume sewing might be similar) that much of the utility comes from the ability to customize, rather than on cost alone -- materials can be expensive (and construction can be time consuming).  I could buy a scarf for less than the materials cost to make one.  On the other hand, my hat is of much nicer material than a hat you'd buy at Target, I can make it exactly the size/pattern/color that I want.  I actually haven't ever found wool socks in the US that I love (still wear older-than-me pure wool socks that my grandmother knitted whenever I go skiing), so that would be a more 'useful' project than others.  (Of course, being self-sufficient and have skills is impossible to put a price on.)

I suppose functional items like pillow cases would be both easy and cheap to make, so sewing would allow you to save money and launder less frequently/change covers more often (I absolutely hate doing laundry).  A friend has made kitchen towels and bathroom rugs with very cheap/machine washable yarn that knits up quickly.

Quote
I really enjoy sewing, too, though years ago I realized that sewing can be as much a consumer activity as anything else -- all the equipment, doo dads, new patterns every season, every year, more and better fabrics.

Ain't that the truth.  I see this a lot (and have to consciously avoid not falling into this myself) -- people want to commit to learning a skill or trade, and think that buying 'things' you need is the way to make that commitment.  Not so: you need to put time and effort into learning skills and producing results, as it's ultimately too easy to abandon a project if all you've committed is money (especially in our days where some have a fuzzy concept of the value of money).

Got my new sewing machine and spent an hour trying to figure out how it works.  I will totally brag about my latest knitting endeavor, though -- a sock! (Trying to build my skills, so this is the third thing I knitted, though I did up having to restart it twice, and straying from the pattern anyway)  I think it will be awhile before I sew anything post-worthy, but I would love to see what others have done.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: StarswirlTheMustached on February 01, 2013, 04:00:48 PM
The shirt book is totally on my list. I'm more interested in altering what's in my wardrobe now than replacing it with bespoke pieces, however. Anyone have good resources in menswear alterations?

But the "patient" part might be more important. I think my patience is a critical reason why I've been successful at making my stuff not look homemade. Even now, after making a bunch of shirts based on a similar design, I still mess stuff up laughably often. Some is stuff that must be redone ("whoops, attached that sleeve to the wrong side!"), but others ("that seam is a bit stretched and not like the other one") are things that I could "get away with", but somehow I still have the patience to say "No. Stop. Undo it and try again". And then I have the patience (most of the time!) to calmly and carefully remove the stitching without breaking anything even worse.

Something tells me I'd go all Hulk and tear the offending seam by hand, ruining everything. I suck like that.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: greenmimama on April 06, 2014, 06:59:41 AM
I am bumping this because it is crazy impressive, also I want to be able to find it later.

Very impressed OP! Those clothes look great on you!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: CarDude on April 06, 2014, 08:36:54 AM
I am bumping this because it is crazy impressive, also I want to be able to find it later.

Very impressed OP! Those clothes look great on you!

Crazy impressive is what I came here to write. I've always been interested in the idea of making clothes, but never followed up on it.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: momo5 on April 06, 2014, 07:09:31 PM
I'm so impressed by those shirts and pants! I've been sewing for about 15 years off and on. I've made only two wearable garments for myself, but I made all of my kids cloth diapers, swimsuits and pj's (I love my serger for knits! you probably dont need one for tailoring shirts though, especially if the seams are all folded in, forgot what that's called, french seams? maybe?). I dont have your attention to detail which is why I would not attempt my dh's clothing (similar issues to yours). He found some million dollar shirt that fits him and buys them used on ebay.

my son recently asked me to teach him to sew, right now he's making a tote bag. I hope one day he can make his own clothes too.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Daisy on April 06, 2014, 08:10:48 PM
Interesting thread. The clothes you sew definitely highlight your fit physique.

I took sewing lessons as a child but haven't done much with it as an adult. I thought about it recently after a shopping trip. However, the low price of clothes, the multiple sales, and my recent introduction to thrift stores makes me think it's not worth the effort.

As you say though, the benefit may come in tailoring clothes to meet specific body differences you may have with the average person out there that clothes are made for. My "weak spot" is bigger thighs than the average woman out there, I guess. Although I did read an article recently about Olympic skiers having this same issue with pants. Most pants that fit through my thighs have a few extra inches around my waist. It's hard to find something that fits right.

Dug up the article:
http://sports.yahoo.com/blogs/fourth-place-medal/downhill-skiers-pants-015757117.html;_ylt=A0LEVxbhCEJTLHMAL0VXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTEzN2I3cGdsBHNlYwNzcgRwb3MDMwRjb2xvA2JmMQR2dGlkA1FCQUNLMV8x
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: sunnyca on April 06, 2014, 11:35:25 PM
I'm so impressed!  This is a skill I've been meaning to pick up for a while- at least basic alternations. I'm short, so all my pants need to be altered, which can get pricey.

You've inspired me!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: 1967mama on April 07, 2014, 01:52:56 AM
Your post has inspired me to dust off my sewing machine after many years in storage.  I am a self-taught seamstress, so just the basics, but surely I could make some pyjama pants for my teens!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Osprey on April 07, 2014, 04:22:39 AM
Oh wow. Those clothes look amazing. You would definitely see some admiring glances from me if we happened to pass each other on the street!
I have been sewing for years but lack the patience for anything more complex than skirts and alterations. I also tend to take shortcuts and end up with less than professional results. You definitely put a lazy sewist like me to shame.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: happyfeet on April 07, 2014, 06:37:56 AM
Wow. You did an amazing job.  Totally impressed!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: homehandymum on April 07, 2014, 03:13:08 PM
This is awesome.  My DH has a narrow waist and huge thighs, so can never find pants that fit.

I've even got books out of the library right now on altering clothes to fit, and there is even a section on men's trousers!  (a miracle!  like you, I've been really frustrated by the lack of attention to men's tailoring in the sewing books).

So all that I've been waiting for is to make the right measurements and actually move beyond the 'thinking and planning' stage, into the 'actually cutting the fabric' stage.

You've given me the courage I need :)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: TrMama on April 07, 2014, 03:47:59 PM
I realize I'm way late to this party, but I just had to comment on your amazing sewing skills. Your topstitching looks perfect and the fit is spot on. I've been sewing since I was a kid (aka 20+ years) and your clothes look great.

If you're interested in branching out from button downs and khakis you could try looking at patterns from Burda and Jalie. Both brands are known for making well drafted patterns that have a consistent fit.

Plus, if you ever decide to procreate with any of those hot women who are hitting on you, you'll be able to quickly and cheaply fix all the itty bitty clothes your spawn will attempt to destroy. (Says the woman who spent 2 hours dealing with her family's mending this weekend in order to save over $100.)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: zinnie on April 07, 2014, 03:53:04 PM
I am very impressed. Your stuff looks amazing. Very inspiring; thanks! I have always wanted to do this but have stuck to very simple alterations so far. And now I will read the rest of this thread to see how/where you learned all of this... :)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: greenmimama on April 08, 2014, 06:39:15 AM
+1 to mending my boys clothing, it feels like my part time job.

To the OP, wouldn't it be cheaper to purchase clearance shirts and rework them, since fabric is so expensive!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Silverwood on April 08, 2014, 12:41:36 PM
Im not even done reading it yet and I had to pause to comment. I am beyond impressed!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: katie on April 08, 2014, 02:58:57 PM
Nicely done, OP!  I have sewn for years (thank you, 4-H!), but for many years now it has just been quilts, random projects, and mending.  My husband is a very similar frame to you - he is 6'2" and 165 lbs on his "heavy" days.  I hate how dress pants fit him.  I should tear apart a pair of his and see if I can fix them, like you did.  I would love to have all my dresses custom made, but making clothes fit a curvy girl and look good is hard.  Maybe someday though.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Thegoblinchief on April 08, 2014, 03:41:07 PM
Hawt. Seriously impressive. I need to learn basic stitching to patch knees and hem my DW's clothes.

I don't need more clothes right now, but I'm totally bookmarking this for the future.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: deborah on April 08, 2014, 04:06:53 PM
You have done very, very well in your clothes making so far. Congratulations!!!

However, as you seem to want to improve, I have included the following suggestions.

As you say, your trousers aren't quite what they could be. It looks to me as if the crotch is too low, and not deep enough (needs to be further up the pattern length, and the point where the four trouser pieces join needs to be further out - that part of the pattern needs to be wider). I have had problems with this too. One problem when trousers are too big is that a correct pattern usually needs extra material where the crotch needed to be adjusted. I don't know the trouser making book you have, but most of my sewing books have a section on fitting problems and how to fix them. It also looks to me as if you don't have enough ease between the shoulders at the back of your shirt.

When patternmaking, you are usually expected to make a toille first (this is out of a very cheap, light coloured, but similar weight material - often calico). Use a pen to mark all the seam lines and darts etc. onto the fabric, and sew it up. Try it on, and have a friend work out where it doesn't fit right. Get them to cut it where it is too narrow, and add a bit of fabric behind (with pins) to make it the right width. Get them to make darts where it is too wide. Make a new pattern from the butchered toille, and try again. This is why you use very cheap material.

One further note - shears are used in the fashion industry in preference to rotary cutters because as you use your pattern, you can (and often do) remove very thin slices of your pattern each time you rotary cut it, gradually making it smaller.

You should look out patternmaking books in your library - "Patternmaking for Fashion Design" by Helen Joseph-Armstrong is the standard text used in a number of places (it has a small section on men's clothing). I also have "Metric Pattern Cutting for Menswear" by Winifred Aldrich. Both books show you how to make a pattern for just about anything from scratch.

Lastly, the main reason that there is so much more written about women's patterns, is men's patterns have less variety.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: lifejoy on April 08, 2014, 04:41:04 PM
WOOOOOOOOW SO Impressive!!!!!!!! Way to go!!!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: B L I S S on April 08, 2014, 05:27:51 PM
Impressive.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: PMG on April 09, 2014, 12:56:20 PM
I love love love this!!

You did great work on these! I loved seeing you refashion things and make them from scratch!  Nothing fits like handmade tailored clothing.

You didn't pick easy things to start with either.  Nice work.  You have my admiration!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: netskyblue on April 12, 2014, 12:24:44 PM
I knit sweaters, and about a year ago tried to get into making dress slacks.  I made a muslin, made changes onto my pattern, and then a family friend asked to borrow my sewing machine.  I'm still waiting to get it back :(

You should go from making your own clothes to save money to the next logical step - making clothes for other people to EARN money!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: kimmarg on April 13, 2014, 07:20:19 AM

What have people found to be the most impactful sewing (or even knitting)?  I've found (in knitting, I assume sewing might be similar) that much of the utility comes from the ability to customize, rather than on cost alone -- materials can be expensive (and construction can be time consuming).  I could buy a scarf for less than the materials cost to make one.  On the other hand, my hat is of much nicer material than a hat you'd buy at Target, I can make it exactly the size/pattern/color that I want.  I actually haven't ever found wool socks in the US that I love (still wear older-than-me pure wool socks that my grandmother knitted whenever I go skiing), so that would be a more 'useful' project than others.  (Of course, being self-sufficient and have skills is impossible to put a price on.)

I suppose functional items like pillow cases would be both easy and cheap to make, so sewing would allow you to save money and launder less frequently/change covers more often (I absolutely hate doing laundry).  A friend has made kitchen towels and bathroom rugs with very cheap/machine washable yarn that knits up quickly.

I've found basic alterations worth the money. I buy my favorite brand of pants at an outlet store where they tend to have only the 'long' size. Im not a long but happily shorten them to fit.  Similarly for my husbands scrubs - length is easy to change and well worth it. I also do fine with curtains, pillow cases, sewing sheets together to make comforter covers. I have none of the (very admirable) patience of the OP so I stick to the basics.

Knitting wise hats and mittens are great. I actually don't knit socks because I wear them out too quickly. The only wool socks I wear now are from the Darn Tough company in Vermont. They guarantee you won't put a hole in them and if you do, mail them in and they replace them free! (Which I have done once so far) Their stuff is pricey, but since it is good for a lifetime I buy socks and stick to knitting hats.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: mm1970 on April 13, 2014, 08:34:42 AM
Okay, I am very very impressed.  I took sewing in HS.  I made a couple of dresses when I was in college.  But in general, my skills in sewing lend themselves more towards household items (quilts, pillows, curtains, window seat covers), and less to clothing.  I think it's my patience level.  I have future plans to build a couch/chaise and upholster it myself.

But many of my friends make clothing for themselves and/or their husbands (sewing or knitting).  I always am impressed at how you can get exactly what you want.

Maybe when my youngest gets a little older, I'll give it another go. These days, I mostly just take the jeans-with-ripped-knees (I have an 8 year old son) and turn them into shorts. 

Pants though.  So I'm short and stocky.  Longer torso, short legs.  It's getting a LITTLE better but for the most part, if I find a pair of pants that fits on the hips/thighs/butt area, it is inches (5+) too big at the waist.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Freckles on April 13, 2014, 11:31:31 AM
BADASS!

I will have to look into this.  Clothing seems tailored for fat people these days.

huh? maybe at wal-mart. but not in real stores. clothing is designed to fit specific people called 'fit models' who are basically people with perfectly proportioned figures. if your body proportions don't match the proportions the clothes are designed for, then shit is not going to fit you whether you're fat or skinny or whatever.

This is true.  I know a fit model.  Her body looks nothing like mine.  When I met her and learned of her job, I realized why clothes never fit me.

Skyrefuge, awesome work!!!  Let me know if you ever need me to get you something from Portland's Pendelton outlet store.  :)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: greaper007 on April 14, 2014, 09:39:39 PM
Man who sews here!    The biggest problem I have is finding fabric that I like.    Places like JoAnn seem to only have fabric for old women.    Some online stores seem to have nice stuff, but it's really difficult to tell without touching it.   You can order swatches, but that takes forever and it's an additional expense.

What do you guys do about finding decent fabric?
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: oldtoyota on April 15, 2014, 11:13:18 PM
This is inspirational! Thank you. A friend gave me her sewing machine when she moved, and I would love to put it to use.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: steveo on April 16, 2014, 05:36:44 AM
As per everyone else's comments that is freaken awesome.

I buy tailored shirts and suits and pants. I don't only get tailored (but basically all my work clothes are tailored) and some are cheap Internet tailored however its completely unmustachian but I hate getting shitty fitting clothes.

I was thinking about doing this recently. I have holes in my tailored pants but I keep wearing them because I don't want to buy new ones. They have been fixed already once before.

I can't see myself doing this but I think it is awesome.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: T-Rex on April 24, 2014, 03:52:06 AM
Awesome! I used to tailor all my clothes myself!

My proudest achievement: bought a puffy 80's black patchwork leather jacket with elastics at the sleeves and waist (yes hideous but I saw the potential!) new with tags for $14.

I spent a month working on it every night while watching movies. I cut it up removed the elastics and tailored it into a badass tight fitting motorcycle jacket. Whenever I wear it, people compliment it and ask where I bought it (hah!)  and some have offered to buy it from me (never).

I just don't have the time in the military, but I look forward to it in the future.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: SJS on April 28, 2014, 05:57:34 PM
Flippin Fabulous!! I am SO SO SOOOOOOOOOO impressed with the shirts you made from scratch - SERIOUSLY, I cannot believe how awesome they are!   You are gonna make some chic an amazing husband with those sewing skills!!  You go, boy!! ;-)   

On the topic of clothes and being frugal - I can't believe how many folks waste so much money on dry cleaning when most items you can wash at home yourself!! Unbelievable when I hear/see the bills people are paying for dry cleaning! 

Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: k8esfolly on May 05, 2014, 04:53:04 PM
Awesome job, OP, the fit and finish looks great!

Although you can't make clothes for less than you can go out and buy them, generally, there are a few areas where that's not true…if, like the OP, you're an unusual size/shape, you can come out ahead.

The thing that's stupid-easy and cheap is underpants.  Men, women, and children. You can make six pair in about an hour for the cost of a few yards of elastic plus a few t-shirts at the thrift store.  They wear well and can be adjusted for your figure (the wonderfulness of being wedgie-free can't be overestimated). Even if you purchase fabric for them, you'll still pay less than decent-quality store-bought.

Harder, but perhaps the highest payoff of all is making bras, especially, again, if you're an unusual size or shape.  You can spend upwards of a hundred bucks on a single good-quality bra, 50 if you're buying "cheaper" ones…You can really splurge on materials and make one for 20$.

I agree with others also, mending and tailoring can both pay off, big time, and you certainly don't need fancy equipment for that.

And the payoff of really understanding and valuing the work in the clothes you wear, regardless of who made them, is pretty cool, even if you can't measure it in $$$.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: sheepgetlambs on October 30, 2014, 11:51:43 PM
To the person making shorts out her son's jeans with ripped knees: A friend put a large red patch behind the rip in her son's jeans and embroidered a monster, complete with teeth, on the front. The red is the inside of the mouth, and it opens and closes when her son bends his leg.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: sheepgetlambs on October 30, 2014, 11:56:53 PM
I love you whole point of getting clothes to fit you propertly. I sew badly so I only use my sewing machine for mending and small projects like recovering cushions. I have found, however, that when we travel to Sweden (every three years) I can find clothes there that fit me better than anywhere else on earth. Relatives we visited in Denmark said I have a "Scandinavian build." It is an amazing feeling to have sleeves, shoulders, torso, all fit. This past June I bought two dresses, three shirts, and a jacket. That's a lot for me because I normally hate shopping and have very little interest in clothes. Based on my past purchases from Sweden, these items will easily last me 10 years and will be worn a lot. (They are my go-to pieces. I just love them and feel confident and comfortable when wearing them.)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: SingleMomDebt on October 31, 2014, 09:17:27 AM
I LOVE to sew but Hate cutting out patterns. So from experience.... You have some MAD Skills! Nice job.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: tofuchampion on October 31, 2014, 12:49:44 PM
Holy what.  You look AWESOME, and I'm jealous of your skills.

I've been wanting a sewing machine for a while (I know some basics but want to learn quilting and clothing alterations); will have to check out your model.  So thanks for that, too!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: MarciaB on October 31, 2014, 05:02:44 PM
I've been thinking about this.

Last year, I paid at least a few hundred to get my clothes tailored.

Sewing is a great skill and can be used as a side income. I used to have a little home-based business where I did alterations (hemming, shorting jacket sleeves, replacing zippers and the like). Good income! And now that fewer and fewer people sew, it makes even more sense.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Pigeon on November 03, 2014, 12:13:13 PM
I love this thread.  OP, your creations are amazing.  You look great.

I grew up in a fairly frugal family.  My parents had six kids and they were able to put us all through college on one salary.  My dad was Mr. DoItYourself.  He and my uncle built the house I grew up in and my uncle's house with their own hands.  I don't remember anyone ever coming to our house to do any work whatsoever.

At one point, the couch in the living room was showing its age.  Dad started tinkering with it, and before too long, he decided to reupholster it himself.  It came out pretty well and he did other furniture, and ended up buying a sewing machine.

My oldest sister dated a guy with an uncle in the garment business.  My folks were chatting with him at a party, and lo and behold, he had a lot of extra fabric left over that he had to dispose of, usually not huge lengths, but often several yards of the same pattern.  He started shipping us cartons of free fabric.

Dad started sewing in earnest.  Every night in the winter, he would get home from his engineering job, eat dinner, and disappear to the basement to sew.  He made his four daughters (me included) and my mom some really lovely dresses and outfits.  He made our prom gowns and the bridesmaids gowns when we got married. He made all the curtains in the house.  He made himself some really nice tailored Pendleton sport coats.  It was awesome, and nearly all free.

The funny thing though, was that it was the family's dirty little secret that Dad sewed.  Some families have criminals, some have drug addicts, some have funny uncles.  We had a Dad who sewed.  When they went to a fabric store to buy notions, he would tell my mother what to get and he would lurk outside the shop.  She couldn't sew on a button, so often she would go thought a hilarious routine pantomiming her questions about what weight of interfacing or what length zipper to buy through the window, while he'd pretend he wasn't watching.

I can sew a bit, enough to do simple alterations and killer Halloween costumes and curtains.  A few years back, I asked dh to buy me a cheap, basic sewing machine for Christmas.  The school where he teaches was just getting rid of a bunch of sewing machines and instead of getting me a new $125 Brother, he got a used one for a song.  I hit the jackpot--it's a Bernina.  It doesn't do fancy stuff, but it is an absolute joy to use, much better than anything else I've ever used.  If you see one cheap on Craigslist, go for it.  I recently lost a bunch of weight, and I'm taking stuff in.  If fabric wasn't so expensive, I'd do more sewing. 

 
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: 2ndTimer on November 04, 2014, 11:22:10 AM
I love the story of the Dad who sewed!!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Fodder on November 04, 2014, 12:59:26 PM
This was an awesome thread.  OP - your creations are amazing.  It doesn't matter how expensive a badly-fitted shirt is.....it looks frumpy and dumpy.  Your altered version, and your own creation look AMAZING on you.  And I love the accent fabric at the cuffs.

This makes me want to alter some of my husband's shirts.  He has more of a standard build (6', 195 lbs), but even then, so many shirts are loose and billowy and just don't look good.  There are some stores that have more fitted versions (Mexx and Express come to mind), but he has a few shirts hanging in the closet that I know would benefit from some light alteration.

I need to think long and hard about the rotary cutter and mat.  I'd love to have one....I may ask around in our local Buy Nothing group to see if anyone has one they no longer need.  I really REALLY hate cutting things out with scissors.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: falcondisruptor on November 04, 2014, 04:27:01 PM
Wow!  I have a sewing machine, but I've only used it for very basic things.  I get frustrated when I see the cost of cloth versus completed clothes.  I do hope to learn to alter my clothes though because I can't seem to find things that fit the way they're supposed to.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on November 04, 2014, 10:08:59 PM
Wow, I had no idea this thread was still going! And it's among the 50 most-viewed threads in this subforum! If I'm ever feeling down I'll have to come  back here to read a bunch of people saying how awesome I am. So thanks! :-)

I'll get to some more responses soon, but at the moment, an update:
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Worsted Skeins on November 05, 2014, 04:34:09 AM
Fabulous update skyrefuge!  You continue to inspire.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: arebelspy on November 05, 2014, 07:26:56 AM
Fabulous update skyrefuge!  You continue to inspire.

+1. You should start a blog. Even if infrequently updated, a place to post your creations would be cool.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: 2ndTimer on November 05, 2014, 08:28:01 AM
You are totally cool and totally mustachian. 
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Fodder on November 05, 2014, 09:15:16 AM
Your stuff is so awesome!!!!!!

I love your updates - your girlfriend is lucky to have you! :)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Freckles on November 05, 2014, 11:01:16 AM
I agree with Fodder, your girlfriend totally lucked out with you!  Also, she makes a good redhead.  :)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: 1967mama on November 05, 2014, 01:51:18 PM
Thanks for the update and photos! The Rennaissance Faire outfit is FANTASTIC!

I agree with the above poster -- I'd love to see your creations on a blog from time to time.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: MandalayVA on November 05, 2014, 02:28:09 PM
That is super-impressive.  You could definitely turn your skills into a lucrative side hustle.  The Renaissance costume is lovely!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Dicey on November 06, 2014, 03:21:46 PM
I'm even later to the party, but I'm jumping in anyway as the water looks fine, indeed.

Skyrefuge, this thread is a complete sham. It is not about sewing at all! This is a personal ad, plain as day...

And baby, I hope it works for you! You deserve to find an awesome mustachian partner. Congratulations on your resourcefulness. If I wasn't so damn happily married and a lot older, I'd be beating a PM path to your door. Good luck to you! I can't wait to hear the next chapter of your story.

Edit: Somehow it escaped me that there was a page two. Don't know how I missed this thread the first time around. Glad to see your social life has taken a turn for the better. Congratulations to you both. You look like you know how to have fun together! You have a nice writing style, so I hope you'll keep posting. BTW, the cool thing about sewing is the same as riding a bike. Once you've mastered the skill, you won't lose it.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: fireferrets on November 06, 2014, 05:06:20 PM
skyrefuge you are super cool.

My bf is of Asian decent, so he's got a slimmer frame than most and doesn't fit any American clothing. Either we have to buy him clothing from alibaba (aka straight from China) or look in the boys section of stores (which he considers humiliating). After reading your thread I am very motivated to see if I can start making him clothing for his future needs. :D
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: lpep on November 06, 2014, 05:19:12 PM
Holy crap! This is inspiring. I've been thinking about re-learning how to sew, since as a 6'0" woman... finding clothes that fit right is tough.

How long did it take you to go from zero to tailor-level?
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: NataliaDuma on September 12, 2015, 12:51:07 AM
It looks really good. Learning the skill of sewing can really help you a lot financially for learning the skill doesn't only let you save on the cost of having the sewing job done by somene else but it can also be a source of income as well.

Being able to mend your own clothes and custom fit it to your size and built is really special.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Pigeon on September 12, 2015, 09:32:17 AM
Wow! The new creations are awesome. And you guys are adorable together.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: stripey on September 12, 2015, 10:26:22 AM
Well done.

Female here, but need to modify button-up shirts for similar reasons or make from scratch. Most shirts fit me terribly off-the-rack as 'broad shoulders' is usually assumed to mean broad in other places that I am not (!). Will admit to occasionally starting with men's shirts sometimes and then modifying (buttons end up on the other side, but who cares! :)  )

Sounds like you like sewing for similar reasons to me- it appeals to my analytical/mathematical side.
Same reason knitting does too-- customising knitting (where you actually make something fit properly) is all about the numbers.

You may not need to make a lot of clothes for yourself either, if you're making them well by hand. They'll last !
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: wordnerd on September 12, 2015, 12:37:18 PM
Awesome! I don't know that I'll ever be that good--my attention to detail is lacking--but you've inspired me to check out some books on sewing and learn the basics. At the very least I should be able to make some stuff for my baby-on-the-way. I doubt he'll mind if my early work isn't perfect.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Nickels Dimes Quarters on September 12, 2015, 02:42:43 PM
Wow. You have talent!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: GuitarStv on December 30, 2015, 05:47:20 PM
BADASS!climate change

I will have to look into this.  Clothing seems tailored for fat people these days.

huh? maybe at wal-mart. but not in real stores. clothing is designed to fit specific people called 'fit models' who are basically people with perfectly proportioned figures. if your body proportions don't match the proportions the clothes are designed for, then shit is not going to fit you whether you're fat or skinny or whatever.

This is true.  I know a fit model.  Her body looks nothing like mine.  When I met her and learned of her job, I realized why clothes never fit me.

YMMV.  I regularly cycle and have been religiously lifting weights for several years now . . . so have broad shoulders, a tiny waist, and large thighs/ass.  My experience is that most shirts are cut tight in the shoulders and arms/baggy in the waist.  Pants that are big enough to fit my thighs into are gigantic in the waist.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Basenji on February 26, 2016, 03:26:42 PM
Bumping because awesome and I gotta expand my repertoire beyond throw pillow covers and draperies.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: RetiredAt63 on March 01, 2016, 07:55:49 AM
Don't knock that!  I have some second hand formal pleated drapes and valance that I will have to modify to fit my living room window.  They are not going to be easy, I am so tempted to take them and the measurements to a seamstress, but I do sew and should be able to do this myself.

First I have to paint the living room.  They are part of my staging plan for the house as I get ready for my move.

Bumping because awesome and I gotta expand my repertoire beyond throw pillow covers and draperies.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: maco on March 02, 2016, 01:16:01 PM
Another "new technology" thing I'm happy to have sprung for is a rotary cutter (http://www.amazon.com/45mm-Olfa-Heavy-Duty-Rotary/dp/B0001DS9P4/) (and self-healing mat (http://www.amazon.com/9891-24-Inch-36-Inch-Self-Healing-Double-Sided/dp/B0006SDOFO/)) to cut out fabric pieces. It must have been way more annoying (and less-accurate) in the old days to cut things out with scissors.

I am horrendous with wheely cutters. I tried cutting my curtains (straight lines! Using a straight edge!) with one, and I'd just veer off at random. I haven't been brave enough to try one on clothing, where I actually need to be precise and can't go "know what? I'll just make the curtains an inch narrower. Nobody'll notice."

I trace my pattern pieces onto the fabric with chalk, then I cut them out using my hefty Gingher sewing shears.

I purchased the Craftsy class on making dress shirts last year, but I haven't had the guts (or bandwidth!) to do it yet. I did learn that my hate for sewing machines would probably be significantly reduced if I had more presser feet for my machine. I'm not precise enough for edge stitching / top stitching with a machine, so all my "it has to look good" sewing is done by hand. I'm attaching a photo of me in my wedding dress. The sleeves are hand sewn because I didn't want visible serger stitching and similar showing through them with them being sheer. The rest is done on the machine except that I did the chest by hand because getting a concave and a convex curve to match up on a sewing machine while sewing silk charmeuse? No. Utter failure.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: PARedbeard on March 04, 2016, 08:33:04 AM
I can't believe I have never seen this thread before! This is something I have to get into, but I have zero sewing experience. Anyone have a good place to find resources for a newbie?
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: maco on March 04, 2016, 09:15:39 AM
I can't believe I have never seen this thread before! This is something I have to get into, but I have zero sewing experience. Anyone have a good place to find resources for a newbie?
You can get sewing machines on Craigslist or similar and books from the library. It might be worth it to pay for a beginner sewing class at your local JoAnn Fabrics or similar, though, so you have someone who can diagnose issues quickly as you're just getting started. My sister in law keeps a copy of Sewing For Dummies around (despite having been a professional costumer!) to diagnose sewing machine issues and "hmm where's that wrinkle coming from?" issues.

I have liked the classes I've bought on the Craftsy platform. They're video classes. You can bookmark important parts in the video and make notes, and you can ask the teacher questions. If you sign up and make a wishlist of classes, they'll eventually notify you "hey, classes in your wishlist are now on discount!" too.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Parizade on March 04, 2016, 10:13:57 AM
Great thread!

One of my favorite online sewing resources is http://sewing.patternreview.com/

Sewers from all over the world post reviews of patterns they have tried, with photos of the resulting clothing. This alone would be incredibly valuable to me

They also provide online classes, challenges, contests, and sewing machine reviews and a forum where you can ask any question that wasn't answered elsewhere.

I have never paid for membership, though I may  someday. What they offer is certainly worth it.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: nnls on March 06, 2016, 01:15:58 AM
I am super impressed with the OP. Might be time to get out my sewing machine and try to make some things.

When my great aunt died when I was about 10 she left me her sewing machine (she has been teaching me to sow before this, but I had only made myself some PJ's and a few pillowcases) I am pretty sure the machine is still at my mums house, I should dig it out and set it up in my spare room and try to make something.

Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Sweetloveginger on March 08, 2016, 07:49:51 AM
This is awesome!

I have been sewing for years, but never had to confidence to do anything more than skirts. I don't think I have the patience to do a really nice job like OP. Maybe I should just start.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: loftygoal on March 08, 2016, 01:56:27 PM
Omg this is amazing! I've sewed a few of my own tops and dresses, but realized I was starting to dread working on my projects. I do not have the patience for sewing whatsoever, so I donated my sewing patterns and one of my sewing machines. I'm so impressed with people that have the patience and perseverance for sewing their own clothes.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: AdiposeFinn on March 08, 2016, 06:53:15 PM
This is so awesome! Someone probably mentioned this already but the tailored clothes make you look like a model.

This is a skill I need to learn. I have some nice Pendleton wool shirts but they are cut very loose. It would be great to be able to cut them apart and re-sew them for a tailored look. The fabric is of course top-of-line and will last forever but I haven't worn them in a while partially because they are so baggy. If they were tailored I would definitely wear them more... no... all the time.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: stashgrower on October 26, 2016, 08:46:17 PM
Very impressed!! Your custom clothes look really good on you (and your gf). I am inspired :) I was daunted by shirts but you helped me see that it is achievable.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: stripey on November 09, 2016, 03:14:10 AM
Another "new technology" thing I'm happy to have sprung for is a rotary cutter (http://www.amazon.com/45mm-Olfa-Heavy-Duty-Rotary/dp/B0001DS9P4/) (and self-healing mat (http://www.amazon.com/9891-24-Inch-36-Inch-Self-Healing-Double-Sided/dp/B0006SDOFO/)) to cut out fabric pieces. It must have been way more annoying (and less-accurate) in the old days to cut things out with scissors.

I am horrendous with wheely cutters. I tried cutting my curtains (straight lines! Using a straight edge!) with one, and I'd just veer off at random. I haven't been brave enough to try one on clothing, where I actually need to be precise and can't go "know what? I'll just make the curtains an inch narrower. Nobody'll notice."

I trace my pattern pieces onto the fabric with chalk, then I cut them out using my hefty Gingher sewing shears.

I purchased the Craftsy class on making dress shirts last year, but I haven't had the guts (or bandwidth!) to do it yet. I did learn that my hate for sewing machines would probably be significantly reduced if I had more presser feet for my machine. I'm not precise enough for edge stitching / top stitching with a machine, so all my "it has to look good" sewing is done by hand. I'm attaching a photo of me in my wedding dress. The sleeves are hand sewn because I didn't want visible serger stitching and similar showing through them with them being sheer. The rest is done on the machine except that I did the chest by hand because getting a concave and a convex curve to match up on a sewing machine while sewing silk charmeuse? No. Utter failure.

That's really lovely work. Funny, I love rotary cutters, particularly for knits where they sometimes have a mind of their own but I agree that sometimes a decent set of scissors wins out.

You'll hear naysayers, but I'm a big fan of French seams for sheer and semi-sheer fabrics, and I'll quite happily do them on a gathered sleeve head too. It'll show through but will still look okay... well at least to my eyes.

I LOVE my stitch-in-the-ditch foot.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: MrsDinero on November 09, 2016, 03:48:49 AM
So glad I found this thread.  Your shirts and clothes are awesome!  Very inspiring
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Slinky on November 09, 2016, 03:58:45 PM
So fabulous! I mostly buy my jeans, t-shirts, underwear, and some of my socks, but make most of everything else I wear. I share OP's goal to have my clothing handmade, but not look homemade, which is mostly in the attention to details and redoing things that don't meet standards. And ironing properly! Custom fit dress shirts for my husband are one of those items perpetually getting pushed down my todo list though. I usually manage to hem his work pants for him, but I'm always busy working on some new project. My latest obsession is full length skirts made from my handwoven fabric. It's so neat to not only make your own clothing, but also the fabric!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: LadyStache in Baja on November 09, 2016, 04:08:28 PM
Posting for inspiration
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: deborah on November 19, 2016, 06:33:26 PM
The problem with rotary cutters is that they can trim off the edge of a pattern, so if you are using it a lot, it can change significantly in size. But BIG scissors are awesome!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Dicey on November 20, 2016, 09:56:04 AM
Would be nice if OP would return for an update.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on November 21, 2016, 05:14:36 PM
ha, thanks to everyone who keeps resurfacing this thread, I had no idea it would survive this long! Unfortunately, it gets more activity than my sewing machine does these days. :-(

Shortly after my last update (2 years ago!) I did finally make my second shirt out of Pendleton wool I'd had sitting around forever. I love it just as much as the first one, they're the two favorite shirts I've ever owned. Might be picking up more wool in Portland this Christmas to see if I can make one for the lady.

(http://www.tpom.com/img/pendleton_red.jpg)

Beyond that, I've done a bunch of random repairs, some hemming, and made another set of matching raincovers for the lady's front panniers that she got for her second bike tour that we did through Canada and the Northeast US in late summer.

(http://www.tpom.com/img/pink_rain_covers.jpg)

And then just a few weeks ago, I did a fairly slapdash-but-successful effort at my Halloween costume (just mine, her's was storebought, and at least the 3rd time she'd worn it, but this was the first time she had a Roger for her Jessica!)

(http://www.tpom.com/img/roger_rabbit.jpg)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: arebelspy on November 21, 2016, 05:47:23 PM
Good to hear from you, skyrefuge.

People have missed you (http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/whatever-happened-to/msg1010609/#msg1010609)!

That is a good looking shirt.  Cute Halloween costume, too.  :)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: stashgrower on November 22, 2016, 11:48:19 PM
Nice shirt, and great costumes!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Dicey on November 23, 2016, 12:29:07 AM
Nice job matching that plaid! Thanks for the update, skyrefuge.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: former player on November 23, 2016, 02:18:08 AM
You are looking happy as well as beautifully turned out.  Love the Roger Rabbit costume.

Congratulations.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: aerofreaky` on November 23, 2016, 08:29:36 PM
Nice work. I've done some major modifications to lab coats for my wife. They turned out to be a better fit than those commercially available and they didn't take long at all to complete.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Slinky on December 16, 2016, 11:01:47 AM
It's gotten cold around here and we're expecting snow so I layered up warmly this morning. Out of the 8 items I am wearing today, I made 6 myself.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on October 20, 2018, 02:43:24 PM
At long last, a new project to show off! This one is likely to be my crowning achievement: a green velvet tuxedo for my wedding.

And unlike most of my other projects, this one is actually somewhat mustachian from a cost perspective. Materials were about $250, and $200 of that was for 6 yards of the green velvet, of which I only actually used about half of it (for this project, I didn't really want to risk running short, or waste too much time figuring out how to lay the pattern pieces to optimize fabric usage). Certainly I could have rented a tux for less than that, except that we wanted me in a green velvet tux, and no rental place has such a thing. There are a few luxury fashion houses that may sell something similar, but I would have been looking at more like $2500 in that case. And it still wouldn't have been an absolute perfect fit like this one is.

There are certainly some flaws to be found (at least by me), which is slightly disappointing solely because it was my *wedding* tuxedo. But from the perspective of *me* making my own wedding tuxedo (it was my first-ever attempt at a jacket, 2nd pair of pants, and I'd never worked with velvet before), I'm super-proud of how it turned out. Just got our first pictures back, and every time I see it from an angle I can't normally see it, I'm like "damn, that's a great-looking tux!!"

(note that the boutonniere, crafted by my bride and her bridesmaids, has some Pendleton wool fabric from one of my above shirts)

(http://www.tpom.com/img/wedding_tux.JPG)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: former player on October 20, 2018, 02:50:42 PM
That is a great way to resurrect an old thread.

Congratulations on both wedding and tux.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Mrs.Piano on October 20, 2018, 06:07:23 PM
Oh, how wonderful! Congratulations!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Freckles on October 20, 2018, 09:23:22 PM
Nice job! It looks great, and congratulations on the wedding.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: lizh on October 20, 2018, 09:45:07 PM
@skyrefuge That tux is pretty fucking fantastic! Congrats. And you look amazing!  Love this story!  I remember your first posts and love this latest update.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Dicey on October 20, 2018, 11:51:34 PM
I think the juxtaposition of the burlap boutonnierre against the velvet tuxedo is hilariously charming and the tuxedo itself is smashing!  Congratulations on your handiwork and your new path in life. And more pictures would be lovely.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: skyrefuge on October 21, 2018, 08:45:31 PM
Thanks all for providing the compliments I was fishing for! ;-)

I think the juxtaposition of the burlap boutonnierre against the velvet tuxedo is hilariously charming
 

haha, the design theme for our wedding was "Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings Go To the Renaissance Faire". Nothing too overt, but she's more on the Harry Potter side and I'm more on the LotR side, so with my whole outfit I was going a bit for that Hobbit/tweedy/British scholar vibe.

Quote
And more pictures would be lovely.

What? Show off more of our wedding? You don't have to ask me twice, or really even once! I'll show off my bride as well this time, since her outfit was pretty swell too.

(http://www.tpom.com/img/wedding_tux_02.JPG)
(http://www.tpom.com/img/wedding_tux_03.JPG)

And if you now just want to keep going and see the rest of the day, you can check out our photographer's blog: https://www.jppstudios.com/blog/ (he did call it the "most unique wedding of the year (and probably my career)", after all!)
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Dicey on October 21, 2018, 09:31:18 PM
Wow, that was fun!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: chrisgermany on October 21, 2018, 11:02:15 PM
Congratulations, many happy years to you 2 and thanks for sharing.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: Freckles on October 22, 2018, 06:57:47 PM
Wow, that looks to have been an awesomely fun wedding. Beautiful, too! Thanks for sharing the pictures.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: mm1970 on October 23, 2018, 01:51:43 PM
Oooh, what an awesome update.  It looks amazing!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: SimpleCycle on October 23, 2018, 04:40:53 PM
This thread is epic!  Congratulations!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: jeninco on October 23, 2018, 05:19:53 PM
Those photos are amazing! And your tux is absolutely spectacular -- congratulations!
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: One on October 24, 2018, 11:47:43 AM
Congratulations on your wedding!.... I have the same problem with clothes as you.  Tall and thin, here's a couple of shirts I buy in medium tall, you can usually get 30 to 50 percent off because of sales.

http://www.eddiebauer.com/product/mens-chutes-microfleece-shirt/13302940?showProducts=&sizetype=&size=

http://www.eddiebauer.com/product/mens-eddies-favorite-flannel-slim-fit-shirt/13401602?showProducts=&sizetype=&size=
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: erutio on October 24, 2018, 01:04:58 PM
You've managed to top your already-badass-OP with updates that get even more badass and awesome.

Congratulations, thanks for the update.  You two look so happy together.
Title: Re: My secret and successful journey to making my own clothes
Post by: RetiredAt63 on November 03, 2018, 11:57:52 AM
She reminds me of Arwen and Galadriel in the movie, love the cloak and the Celtic knotwork.