Author Topic: Coffee  (Read 10580 times)

nereo

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #50 on: October 30, 2020, 07:53:04 AM »
What I find interesting about coffee (and caffeine in particular) is that we've been searching for some long-term, horrible health effects of ingesting 100-300mg+ of caffeine a day, and we've been doing this for 70+ years, and so far every potential link is tentative and correlative at best.

Even among individuals who drink 3+ cups of coffee a day for decades, it's been hard to identify a long-term health risk that isn't present in similar levels among similar, non-caffeine drinking counterparts.

I'm not saying caffeine consumption is good for you per se... just that negative effects - if they exist - seem far less important than, say, mild exercise or reducing sugar consumption.

Malcat

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #51 on: October 30, 2020, 08:43:33 AM »
What I find interesting about coffee (and caffeine in particular) is that we've been searching for some long-term, horrible health effects of ingesting 100-300mg+ of caffeine a day, and we've been doing this for 70+ years, and so far every potential link is tentative and correlative at best.

Even among individuals who drink 3+ cups of coffee a day for decades, it's been hard to identify a long-term health risk that isn't present in similar levels among similar, non-caffeine drinking counterparts.

I'm not saying caffeine consumption is good for you per se... just that negative effects - if they exist - seem far less important than, say, mild exercise or reducing sugar consumption.

The only well supported risk I know of is with respect to bone density. With a sedentary population, this, IMO, is a fairly big deal. But yeah, 100-300mg is a pretty reasonable amount of caffeine, but if someone is drinking Starbucks coffee, that's one coffee, not three.

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #52 on: October 30, 2020, 09:05:01 AM »
Tangentially, I found a workaround for getting Starbucks without paying Starbucks prices. I just use Starbucks gift cards I get for free for various things to buy bags of their whole coffee beans and then I grind them and brew them at home. It's the same thing as what you get in one of their shops but you don't have to wait in line or pay over $2/cup for it. Of course, that wouldn't help the people who just go to Starbucks to buy $5 coffee-flavored milkshakes.

mntnmn117

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #53 on: October 30, 2020, 10:13:03 AM »
What's wrong with sludge?  It rinses right out of the cup.

I use a French press, and I don't mind the sludge. DH hates it though.

ETA, I forgot to ask, @HMman are you asking to have your coffee ground for a French press? Because the grind is supposed to be much bigger than for drip coffee because the water spends so much time in contact with the coffee. It should almost be small chunks instead of powdery grounds. It makes a huge difference in the sludge amount as well.

Yes, the beans are ground for a French press. I also hate the sludge, and the little bit I get drives me nuts - I nurse my cup of coffee for a while, so it causes the last third or so to taste bitter and overbrewed. It's not a huge deal, but it bugs me enough that I'd like to get rid of it.

@nobody and @WhiteTrashCash I'm surprised to hear the stainless steel filters work as well as the paper ones, so I'll have to look in to that. Thanks!

You can fix the sludge and the bitterness by adding a step. I've found the french press is best when after brewing you transfer everything to an insulated carafe or teapot. Coffee shouldn't sit on the grind past 4-5min. It avoids the second cup tasting bitter and the process of pouring into another vessel and helps settle the sludge out. I'm wondering about your grind too. With a decent burr grinder your french press you shouldn't get much sludge.

JoJo

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #54 on: November 05, 2020, 09:36:41 AM »
I've started drinking Folgers this summer and it's OK for me.  Costco has a huge canister that lasts a couple months, and it's on sale every once in awhile, costing a little over $7.  So daily coffee costs only cents per day. 

cashistrash

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #55 on: December 25, 2020, 10:18:51 AM »
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

grantmeaname

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #56 on: December 25, 2020, 11:25:34 AM »
Lots of coffee is better than the aldi store brand, yes.

nereo

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #57 on: December 25, 2020, 11:34:42 AM »
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

maisymouser

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #58 on: December 25, 2020, 02:01:04 PM »
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

How long can unroasted beans last if they are in a cool dark place?

nereo

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #59 on: December 25, 2020, 05:51:18 PM »
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

How long can unroasted beans last if they are in a cool dark place?
A few months, easy.  Thatís why theyíre shipped around the globe unroasted but are roasted at good coffee shops just days before being used or sold.

maisymouser

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #60 on: December 25, 2020, 06:29:04 PM »
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

How long can unroasted beans last if they are in a cool dark place?
A few months, easy.  Thatís why theyíre shipped around the globe unroasted but are roasted at good coffee shops just days before being used or sold.

OK, follow-up question- how much weight do they lose after being roasted? Trying to estimate how much roasted coffee I would need to consume in 3ish months if I go that route. Thanks! :)

Edit: Google tells me 12-25% weight loss upon roasting. Apologies for the unnecessary post :P

sparkytheop

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #61 on: December 25, 2020, 09:10:30 PM »
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

How long can unroasted beans last if they are in a cool dark place?
A few months, easy.  Thatís why theyíre shipped around the globe unroasted but are roasted at good coffee shops just days before being used or sold.

OK, follow-up question- how much weight do they lose after being roasted? Trying to estimate how much roasted coffee I would need to consume in 3ish months if I go that route. Thanks! :)

Edit: Google tells me 12-25% weight loss upon roasting. Apologies for the unnecessary post :P

I actually documented everything the first few times I roasted beans, until I could kind of get it down.  I do pretty small batches.

5 oz pre-roasted (about one cup in volume), 4.1 oz final weight (about 11 oz volume)

I do dark roast, light roast would lose less weight.

eyesonthehorizon

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #62 on: January 20, 2021, 06:43:56 PM »
Lots of coffee is better than the aldi store brand, yes.
Aldi's single-origin organic bags are SHOCKINGLY good for $4.50/bag.

grantmeaname

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #63 on: January 21, 2021, 06:19:49 AM »
I'll have to try them. How many ounces is each bag?

reader321

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #64 on: January 21, 2021, 02:36:16 PM »
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

How long can unroasted beans last if they are in a cool dark place?

"Rule of 15":
  • Green/unroasted beans stay fresh for 15 months (from the arrival/import date) if stored properly
  • Roasted coffee is freshest for the first 15 days, although people recommend letting your roasts sit for about 24 hours to fully offgas
  • Ground coffee is best brewed within 15 minutes (although I never do this, as my programmable drip machine needs to be prepped the night before)

These guidelines are obviously debated to death. I think the first two bullets are probably the most critical.

eyesonthehorizon

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #65 on: January 24, 2021, 06:44:37 PM »
The organic Aldi bags at $4.50 for 12oz were the ones I'm referring to, & they usually have two origins at any given time, whole-bean. Forms a good middle option between boutique roastery & the 3lb Costco bags. If you're the only one in the household drinking it, it isn't a lifestyle/ you don't roast your own, & you want small amounts of something good that's still cheap I find it sits quite well in a spot between quantity, quality, & cost.

grantmeaname

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #66 on: January 24, 2021, 07:24:26 PM »
Awesome, I will give those a shot. Their flavored coffee is ghastly, so it's good to know they have something a bit better to offer.

nereo

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #67 on: January 25, 2021, 04:54:14 PM »
Awesome, I will give those a shot. Their flavored coffee is ghastly, so it's good to know they have something a bit better to offer.

Iíve yet to find anywhere that has flavored coffee that I like.  If I want caramel or coconut (or whatever flavor) coffee the only way itís tolerable to me is to add caramel syrup, or coconut cream or... 
Adding artificial flavor to the beans always tastes fake to me.  And not in a good way.

grantmeaname

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #68 on: January 25, 2021, 05:17:43 PM »
I don't generally  take my coffee with sugar so try and avoid the syrups. My old grocery store had a counter that would flavor coffee for you for free which was rad. Now I use extracts occasionally - a couple drops of hazelnut or almond extract.

Retireatee1

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #69 on: January 25, 2021, 06:53:46 PM »
I was in the roasting game for a while many years ago.  I enjoyed roasting 2-3 days worth of beans at a time, and you could tell the difference in freshness.  I did save some money, but coffee is pretty cheap.  The roaster takes a lot of abuse, and over time started to break down from the heat.  So I had to replace this, and then had to replace that.  I ran it in the garage and it was a big smoky stinky mess.  Eventually I ceased my roasting activities.  But I think about getting back in from time to time.

nereo

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #70 on: January 26, 2021, 06:29:06 AM »
I was in the roasting game for a while many years ago.  I enjoyed roasting 2-3 days worth of beans at a time, and you could tell the difference in freshness.  I did save some money, but coffee is pretty cheap.  The roaster takes a lot of abuse, and over time started to break down from the heat.  So I had to replace this, and then had to replace that.  I ran it in the garage and it was a big smoky stinky mess.  Eventually I ceased my roasting activities.  But I think about getting back in from time to time.

what did you use for a roaster (model/type/size)?

I've found a frying pan watched carefully works great, but you are limited to about 4oz at a time (about what we might use in a day or two.

Retireatee1

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #71 on: January 26, 2021, 09:39:55 AM »
what did you use for a roaster (model/type/size)?

I've found a frying pan watched carefully works great, but you are limited to about 4oz at a time (about what we might use in a day or two.

It was the entry-level Fresh Roast model from 15 years ago.  It was a good product, perhaps the new models are more durable.  I'd be inclined to step up to a half-pound capacity if I got back into it.  Roasting twice a week can be inconvenient.

keyvaluepair

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #72 on: January 29, 2021, 02:26:52 PM »
I roast about once every 1.5 months but then I drink 2 cups of espresso each day. I could afford the fancy pants coffee from speciality roastery, but when I can roast it myself for a lot cheaper, why even bother. And it makes a really nice present for neighbors too, which is another bonus.

Personally, I can't go back to drinking crap coffee. Also, the whirly pop seems fine but I am strongly considering moving to a heat gun + bread maker (thrift store) option because I'm lazy.

In terms of dechaffing, I use 2 methods - lungs while roasting and a small tabletop fan when cooling the coffee when swapping between the 2 thrift store colanders .....

Syonyk

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #73 on: January 31, 2021, 01:39:29 PM »
Personally, I can't go back to drinking crap coffee.

Yeah... for the past few years, people have asserted I'm a coffee snob, and my assertions that I hand grind small batches for single cup Aeropress, of beans obtained from various people I know... hasn't really helped my case.  Anymore, I just accept it, and offer to make people a cup.

I haven't gotten into roasting myself yet, simply because I know people who are way more into that than I am, and I'm happy to pay them for their skills/interest.

$17 for a 12oz bag, once a month, of something different each time... that covers most of my coffee, with some New Mexican Pinion coffee to fill in the gaps.  It's low enough in cost that it's just not worth too much further optimization, and the stuff is legitimately good.

TomTX

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #74 on: February 06, 2021, 10:00:03 AM »
Could be fun if roasting your own coffee interests you. It does not for me and Iím ok with my current cost of ~$.26 per mug of coffee at home. The savings wouldnít be worth the effort unless I enjoyed the activity itself.
Or just quit coffee all together and save $1.82/week, $7.28/month, $87.36/year etc. And that's if you only drink one cup a day!

It's a fair point @Dicey but even drinking 1-2 cups a day, I would happily pay $160 for the pleasure of that morning brew. One of those little pleasures that I'm not willing to sacrifice to retire one month early (or whatever the math would end up working out to).

That said, I had a no-coffee-challenge for myself to kind of reset/recalibrate my caffeine habit this week and it was quite successful. Looking forward to drinking less coffee overall moving forward.

I enjoy my 2 mugs of coffee most mornings. But yeah, I've taken a week off to reset occasionally. Thinking of getting decaf beans and making half-caf. After the 2 mugs I'm typically off caffeine the rest of the day.

TomTX

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #75 on: February 06, 2021, 10:01:52 AM »
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

I like the flavor of the coffee when using an unbleached paper filter, and it makes transferring the depleted ground to the compost easier since the paper composts just fine as well.

WhiteTrashCash

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #76 on: February 06, 2021, 06:48:11 PM »
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

I like the flavor of the coffee when using an unbleached paper filter, and it makes transferring the depleted ground to the compost easier since the paper composts just fine as well.

I am just trying to be environmentally-friendly and save some money at the same time. Even when paper is recycled, it is the product of cutting down trees to be disposed of and a reusable filter can just be used indefinitely so it costs less as well.

American GenX

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #77 on: February 06, 2021, 07:07:01 PM »
I actually switched from a reusable copper filter to disposable filters a couple years back.  It made it easier, was well worth it, and I don't have to waste water cleaning the reusable filter every time.

TomTX

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #78 on: February 06, 2021, 07:21:30 PM »
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

I like the flavor of the coffee when using an unbleached paper filter, and it makes transferring the depleted ground to the compost easier since the paper composts just fine as well.

I am just trying to be environmentally-friendly and save some money at the same time. Even when paper is recycled, it is the product of cutting down trees to be disposed of and a reusable filter can just be used indefinitely so it costs less as well.
*shrug* Reusable filters need to be rinsed after each use.

We're getting WAY into the weeds here.

nereo

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #79 on: February 07, 2021, 05:30:02 AM »
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

I like the flavor of the coffee when using an unbleached paper filter, and it makes transferring the depleted ground to the compost easier since the paper composts just fine as well.

I am just trying to be environmentally-friendly and save some money at the same time. Even when paper is recycled, it is the product of cutting down trees to be disposed of and a reusable filter can just be used indefinitely so it costs less as well.
*shrug* Reusable filters need to be rinsed after each use.

We're getting WAY into the weeds here.

Agreed.  I mean, technically one could bury the used paper filters and coffee grounds, thus sequestering the carbon - which would make it carbon-negative (to the tune of a few grams/week) provided your filters were made from sustainably managed forests.

...but I just find them easier to compost. Coffee grounds and paper filters make some of the best soil enhancers known to man (see my comment upthread). 

eyesonthehorizon

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #80 on: February 07, 2021, 10:02:34 AM »
Not sure of your brewing method but to minimize waste/ ecological & economic burden, just save the graywater from any rinsing regardless of filter material. If I have to use a brewer with a cone/cup filter, the whole filter & grounds assembly goes to compost that day, but I prefer the flavor & ease of the aeropress; immersion compared to drip seems to get better extraction & thus saves money/ shipping fuel/ ecological burden on coffee, too.

An aeropress uses flat filters so it's easy to pop the coffee puck into the compost bin, blast remnants on the (paper or metal) filter in its basket with the vegetable sprayer into that day's graywater bowl, then toss the whole thing on the drying rack. Paper filters for it are almost cheaper than dirt but when they reuse so easily with water I'd already need for plants, why not? Same process if I'm using a metal filter that day - I vary depending on the flavor I want - so I don't have to think before caffeine, the whole routine's on autopilot & takes two aromatic minutes from the point I finish grinding beans. Efficiency is the highest form of beauty, right?

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #81 on: February 07, 2021, 11:19:06 AM »
Not sure of your brewing method but to minimize waste/ ecological & economic burden, just save the graywater from any rinsing regardless of filter material. If I have to use a brewer with a cone/cup filter, the whole filter & grounds assembly goes to compost that day, but I prefer the flavor & ease of the aeropress; immersion compared to drip seems to get better extraction & thus saves money/ shipping fuel/ ecological burden on coffee, too.

I like Aeropress quite a bit, but I found that I required a lot of ground coffee to get a cup that I like (roughly 30g vs the ~17g I use when making a double espresso with an actual 9 bar espresso machine).  When your tastebuds are accustomed to coffee beans that range from $14-$20/lb, an Aeropress cup ends up costing about $1.  Better than paying $3+ at a cafe, but $1-$2/day probably works out to 1% of our family's annual budget, or 2-3% if I include my wife's consumption.

Of course the bigger problem is having developed a preference for expensive coffee in the first place!

eyesonthehorizon

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #82 on: February 10, 2021, 12:21:19 AM »
...I found that I required a lot of ground coffee to get a cup that I like (roughly 30g...
I suspect this may be an expectations issue; an aeropress is making something comparable to other immersion methods like a press pot, but those aren't quite like an espresso, since it's the pressure which causes emulsion of the oils into that thick mouthfeel, & nothing filtered through paper will taste or feel like a creamy espresso. However - if you're ever away from your machine you might want to try your aeropress with a metal filter & a more aggressive, extended pressure just to see if it better suits your own tastes. I usually grind pretty fine for aeropress, about as for espresso, brew in an 90-120s timeframe, & come away using about 20g of coffee, filtering with paper if I want something crisp & clean to contemplate, or metal if I want it richer.

The overlap between the aeropress audience & that of a proper 9-bar press is significant but not the majority, I think. If you want to invest in equipment for efficiency in your hobby & experience a significant difference from doing so, that's potentially very fulfilling - I'd never turn down a free espresso machine, though I've held off paying for one. Without that level of commitment, a $30 plunger is a great solution.

nereo

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #83 on: February 10, 2021, 12:47:37 PM »
...I found that I required a lot of ground coffee to get a cup that I like (roughly 30g...
I suspect this may be an expectations issue; an aeropress is making something comparable to other immersion methods like a press pot, but those aren't quite like an espresso, since it's the pressure which causes emulsion of the oils into that thick mouthfeel, & nothing filtered through paper will taste or feel like a creamy espresso. However - if you're ever away from your machine you might want to try your aeropress with a metal filter & a more aggressive, extended pressure just to see if it better suits your own tastes. I usually grind pretty fine for aeropress, about as for espresso, brew in an 90-120s timeframe, & come away using about 20g of coffee, filtering with paper if I want something crisp & clean to contemplate, or metal if I want it richer.

The overlap between the aeropress audience & that of a proper 9-bar press is significant but not the majority, I think. If you want to invest in equipment for efficiency in your hobby & experience a significant difference from doing so, that's potentially very fulfilling - I'd never turn down a free espresso machine, though I've held off paying for one. Without that level of commitment, a $30 plunger is a great solution.

This post got me wondering, so I did what any scientist does and carefully take some measurements.  Iíve got a fancy-pants espresso machine that we got early on in the pandemic for around $400. The whole-bean coffee (pre-roasted) we buy costs 2.1Ę/gram, and I use 12 grams.  FWIW thatís actually more than what I read a single-shot should be (itís closer to a double), but thatís just me and my preferences.  So each Cafť Americano runs me just a hair over 25Ę.  Like you, Iíve found that I need a lot more coffee in an aeropress to get the desired strength, around 30g, which makes those cost 63Ę/serving. Electricity is a tiny fraction of a cent (1.5kw x 1 minute/60min*hourē-1 x 14Ę/hour  =  0.35Ę per shot).  Obviously the aeropress has only human power, and I didnít consider replacement filters

So whereís the breakeven point for me?  COnsidering my wife and I each have at least one drink/day and often more on the weekends (and when WFH) I think a conservative estimate puts us at 1,000 drinks/year combined. Compared to the aeropress (price difference of ~$370) weíd need to consume 973 espresso drinks before the break-even point, which weíd do in our 11th month.  If I went back to the Uber-cheap green coffee beans it would take almost three years, but while I enjoy the process life is too complicated with our younginí right now, and the simplification is worth it.  Run-running the numbers with the high-end, fancy-pants, boutique beans sold at my local coffee roaster ($15/12oz) has a cost of 4.4Ę/gram, or 53Ę with the espresso machine and $1.32 with the aeropress. Thatís 468 drinks to recoup the cost of the fancy-pants espresso machine, or roughly 6 months with our coffee habits.

YMMV

keyvaluepair

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #84 on: February 16, 2021, 08:38:46 PM »
I mean, I have to spend $ on something :-). My car is nearly 28 years old, slightly younger than my marriage! And tents, backpacking boots just aren't that expensive. So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

maisymouser

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #85 on: February 17, 2021, 05:56:33 PM »
I mean, I have to spend $ on something :-). My car is nearly 28 years old, slightly younger than my marriage! And tents, backpacking boots just aren't that expensive. So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

YOU AREN'T ONE OF USSSSSSS!!!!!!!!

(Full disclosure: I upgraded my life by routinely buying and drinking coffee. Totally worth it)

eyesonthehorizon

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #86 on: February 23, 2021, 09:25:08 PM »
Summarized: math
I literally sat bolt upright & started waving my hands in joy at this post. I love good data.
Especially if I can use it to potentially, eventually, justify caving on buying a toy.

keyvaluepair

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #87 on: February 26, 2021, 06:47:23 PM »
I mean, I have to spend $ on something :-). My car is nearly 28 years old, slightly younger than my marriage! And tents, backpacking boots just aren't that expensive. So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

YOU AREN'T ONE OF USSSSSSS!!!!!!!!

(Full disclosure: I upgraded my life by routinely buying and drinking coffee. Totally worth it)
Aha, but you didn't read carefully enough. My list was coffee, beer and bacon! I'd still have to go easy on the bacon else I'd die of cholesterol poisoning at a young(ish) age!

Dictionary Time

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #88 on: February 26, 2021, 07:17:27 PM »
So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

Iím now waiting patiently for the Bacon topic.  We smoked some pork belly from Costco a while back and it was amazing. But that takes a lot of wood and I havenít run the numbers. Maybe someone will do it for me?

WhiteTrashCash

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #89 on: February 27, 2021, 07:03:36 AM »
So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

Iím now waiting patiently for the Bacon topic.  We smoked some pork belly from Costco a while back and it was amazing. But that takes a lot of wood and I havenít run the numbers. Maybe someone will do it for me?

I love bacon, but I have stuck to turkey bacon for cholesterol reasons. If you donít think too hard and donít look at it too hard, you can kinda sorta almost convince yourself that itís actually bacon (possibly, if you try hard.)

Retireatee1

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #90 on: February 27, 2021, 11:28:58 AM »

We've made coffee like that too for a long time. BUT - possible cholesterol connection.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=coffee+cholesterol

Supposedly the paper filters help. We reserve the French Press or unfiltered coffee for the weekends now.

Your supporting evidence is a search link to duckduckgo? 

TomTX

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Re: Coffee
« Reply #91 on: February 27, 2021, 07:16:14 PM »
So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

Iím now waiting patiently for the Bacon topic.  We smoked some pork belly from Costco a while back and it was amazing. But that takes a lot of wood and I havenít run the numbers. Maybe someone will do it for me?

I cut, split and dry my own wood - which is good exercise. Since it's from trees which need to be pruned anyway, net cash outlay is effectively zero. Possibly, I suppose I should amortize the splitting axe. Unless it should be categorized under fitness equipment. I will wear chainsaw chaps when splitting for safety, but those were a required purchase for using the chainsaw. Note: After reviewing numerous chainsaw chaps test videos, I went with the big name brand chaps - not the cheap ones. The performance difference was significant.

ObCoffee: Earlier in the pandemic I was consuming basically a pot a day. Body eventually objected, so I went cold turkey* for awhile and then went back at half a pot a day, which seems sustainable. Grounds get composted, of course.

*Not turkey bacon. I've tried the samples numerous times at Costco. Doesn't qualify as bacon.