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General Discussion => Share Your Badassity => Topic started by: keyvaluepair on August 27, 2020, 12:30:46 PM

Title: Coffee
Post by: keyvaluepair on August 27, 2020, 12:30:46 PM
I've found the cheapest way to get good coffee is to roast it yourself.

I source beans from greencoffee.coop or Happymug, though I get more from the coop. I use a popcorn popper to roast at the desired temperature. Informally it seems that the cost of green beans can be 3-5x cheaper than the comparable roast since these are high quality beans.

This is my third year roasting and I regret why I didn't start earlier
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: moneypitfeeder on August 29, 2020, 05:41:05 PM
I looked at greencoffee.coop and there was no way to view prices/coffee available/options, and there was no way to see that information. Do you need to be registered just to view the posts? I realize you need to be registered to post, but just to check it out, that seems ridiculous.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: LetItGrow on August 30, 2020, 06:20:13 AM
Iíve been interested in this myself. Hope others with experience give their stories.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: keyvaluepair on September 02, 2020, 02:29:57 PM
I looked at greencoffee.coop and there was no way to view prices/coffee available/options, and there was no way to see that information. Do you need to be registered just to view the posts? I realize you need to be registered to post, but just to check it out, that seems ridiculous.
Yes, need to be signed in. This site is completely volunteer driven, so they don't have a lot of IT bandwidth. Just saying
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: moneypitfeeder on September 02, 2020, 09:28:04 PM
@keyvaluepair do you mind posting a few examples of cost per lb? I realize that cost might shift often, but I also don't want to sign up for yet another site that I don't use.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: keyvaluepair on September 04, 2020, 07:33:13 AM
Right now, pickings are slim, we are waiting for some single origin Guatemala to show up, but:
==
All are single origin, eco coffees. Cost $3.50 a pound. Farm is Gerezin Farm (Ivan Caxeta).

I like the red bourbon and the peaberry natural quite a bit as an espresso base. There have been exceptional Kenyan and Ethiopian coffees I've bought from the site. Generally, the price is about $1 a pound cheaper than happymug - which is my other buying site.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: maisymouser on September 04, 2020, 11:40:08 AM
Oh, cool! Posting to follow. I have *really* gotten on the coffee train this past few years. I don't have high-end tastes when it comes to coffee, though I do love and enjoy the "good" stuff. I have an air popper for my popcorn (best $16 appliance investment ever) so I will totally have to check this out... when my current coffee runs out.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: maisymouser on September 04, 2020, 11:40:49 AM
@keyvaluepair do you mind posting a few examples of cost per lb? I realize that cost might shift often, but I also don't want to sign up for yet another site that I don't use.

Amen to that, thanks for asking. Signing up for free to view prices is one of my pet peeves. And thanks @keyvaluepair for obliging.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: the_gastropod on September 04, 2020, 11:47:46 AM
Ahhh Iím really interested in trying to roast my own beans. But I live in a small studio apartment in a highrise building, so no outdoor space to let the chaff fly. Any pro tips for taming the mess indoors?
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: eyesonthehorizon on September 04, 2020, 03:41:13 PM
Containing chaff: damp cloth in the airstream of the outlet end could help, but I might start looking for outlets at the park... or roast on the burner in a whirly-pop, although I'm not sure how much smoke you get as I've only daydreamed about this so far.
Thanks for the suggested green coffee sources, keyvaluepair!
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: moneypitfeeder on September 04, 2020, 06:09:22 PM
Thank you @keyvaluepair for posting examples. I'll have to research what is involved with the roasting/chaff/safety, I naively thought you could just roast them in the oven.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: sparkytheop on September 04, 2020, 10:28:04 PM
When motivated, and it's a windy day, I also roast my own.  I use a whirly-pop.  Took a few tries to get the right heat and timing down, but even my worst results were pretty good.  When I'm not motivated, I use beans from Costco.

I'll have to check out that site, seems cheaper than what I've used.  5 oz pre-roast weight became 4.1 oz after roasting, but the beans expand and take up more room (6 oz volume became 8 oz volume).  Now I just fill my container about 2/3 so that it all fits after it's roasted.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Syonyk on September 26, 2020, 12:12:16 PM
I keep trying to insist to people that my hand-ground, single cup Aeropress coffee is just because it's convenient, not because I'm a coffee snob, but... nobody seems to agree with me.

What's the price on green beans?  I tend to splurge on the beans and I buy from various people I know who've gotten pretty far into roasting - it doesn't impact my bottom line meaningfully to spend a tiny bit more on beans and support someone's small business.  I spend a few dollars a week on coffee, but it's real, honest, single source coffee, not "a milk and sugar based meal with coffee flavoring" as seems popular...
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: alienbogey on September 29, 2020, 12:07:17 AM
i started roasting with a $3 thrift store air popper, then I kept modding it, then when i was sure i really liked roasting I splurged on a Gene Cafe roaster.

I buy my beans online from Sweet Maria's. 
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Dicey on September 29, 2020, 06:47:06 AM
I looked at greencoffee.coop and there was no way to view prices/coffee available/options, and there was no way to see that information. Do you need to be registered just to view the posts? I realize you need to be registered to post, but just to check it out, that seems ridiculous.

@keyvaluepair do you mind posting a few examples of cost per lb? I realize that cost might shift often, but I also don't want to sign up for yet another site that I don't use.
Wait, is this the Share Your Badassity section of the MMM Forum, home of the Original Facepunch? That's a lot of whinging over a few keystrokes.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: ericrugiero on October 04, 2020, 02:27:06 PM
Cool.  The greencoffee coop seems like a good source.  I've tried roasting my own a couple times with both a whirly pop and just a pan on the side burner of grill.  It's really not that hard but there is a learning curve to recognize when the beans are "done" to your liking.  The only place I've ordered is from amazon at about $6.50/lb including shipping. 
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: mntnmn117 on October 09, 2020, 12:29:27 PM
If you roast in popcorn air popper can it still be used for popcorn?
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: GuitarStv on October 09, 2020, 12:56:44 PM
The cheapest way to get coffee is to only drink the free stuff in your office . . . and just not drink it otherwise.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on October 09, 2020, 01:37:04 PM
If you roast in popcorn air popper can it still be used for popcorn?
Not really.  The oils in the beans will permanently tinge popcorn with a coffee flavor... and not in a good way (trust me, I thought "coffee-infused popcorn" would be good,,, but it just tastes vaguely bitter and burnt).  If you still want to make popcorn you'll need a dedicated air popper.

Another method you cna use is just to roast beans over the stovetop in a dry skillet.  You need to constantly move the beans to avoid scortching but it works well with zero stuff to buy (other than the beans).
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: diapasoun on October 09, 2020, 03:39:37 PM
Oh no. I don't need another hobby. This is so tempting though. I don't drink a ton of coffee, but this just sounds fun. And if it lets me save on my beans...

Maybe I should request green coffee beans as a Christmas gift. :3

Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on October 09, 2020, 04:47:16 PM
Oh no. I don't need another hobby. This is so tempting though. I don't drink a ton of coffee, but this just sounds fun. And if it lets me save on my beans...

Maybe I should request green coffee beans as a Christmas gift. :3

I mean, as hobbies go, it's about as low cost, low commitment, low learning curve as you can get.

Just spend $3 on some green coffee beans and roast them in a dry skillet, making sure to stir constantly.  If you find you enjoy freshly roasted coffee... go NUTS and pick up an air popper at your local thrift shop.  OMG that's almost $10 invested!!
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: diapasoun on October 09, 2020, 05:20:46 PM
Oh, the worry is definitely more about the part where I'm already overbooked time-wise on hobbies than it is about the money. I'll happily invest $10 (or even more! gasp!) in a hobby that brings me real joy.

It is, at least, very low commitment. That is good when you're not sure about time. ;)
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: sparkytheop on October 09, 2020, 05:33:28 PM
The cheapest way to get coffee is to only drink the free stuff in your office . . . and just not drink it otherwise.

My work only provides bottled water because they have to (5 gallon jugs and dispensers, the well water tests positive for e coli and other junk a few times a year).  They will no longer provide cups to drink it with though, so there is no way they'd supply free coffee.

Besides, life isn't worth living if you have to give up every vice.  I'm happy keeping this one and just finding ways to keep it inexpensive.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: cool7hand on October 10, 2020, 09:47:49 AM
I agree with sparkytheop. Everyone should be free to implement MMM's suggestions to fit their own vision of FIRE.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: JetBlast on October 23, 2020, 04:03:41 PM
Could be fun if roasting your own coffee interests you. It does not for me and Iím ok with my current cost of ~$.26 per mug of coffee at home. The savings wouldnít be worth the effort unless I enjoyed the activity itself.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on October 23, 2020, 04:54:35 PM
Could be fun if roasting your own coffee interests you. It does not for me and Iím ok with my current cost of ~$.26 per mug of coffee at home. The savings wouldnít be worth the effort unless I enjoyed the activity itself.
Have you tried it?
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Dicey on October 23, 2020, 07:23:24 PM
Could be fun if roasting your own coffee interests you. It does not for me and Iím ok with my current cost of ~$.26 per mug of coffee at home. The savings wouldnít be worth the effort unless I enjoyed the activity itself.
Or just quit coffee all together and save $1.82/week, $7.28/month, $87.36/year etc. And that's if you only drink one cup a day!

Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Pigeon on October 23, 2020, 07:37:37 PM
Could be fun if roasting your own coffee interests you. It does not for me and Iím ok with my current cost of ~$.26 per mug of coffee at home. The savings wouldnít be worth the effort unless I enjoyed the activity itself.
Or just quit coffee all together and save $1.82/week, $7.28/month, $87.36/year etc. And that's if you only drink one cup a day!

Not worth the cost of a divorce attorney.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: maisymouser on October 23, 2020, 08:06:09 PM
Could be fun if roasting your own coffee interests you. It does not for me and Iím ok with my current cost of ~$.26 per mug of coffee at home. The savings wouldnít be worth the effort unless I enjoyed the activity itself.
Or just quit coffee all together and save $1.82/week, $7.28/month, $87.36/year etc. And that's if you only drink one cup a day!

It's a fair point @Dicey but even drinking 1-2 cups a day, I would happily pay $160 for the pleasure of that morning brew. One of those little pleasures that I'm not willing to sacrifice to retire one month early (or whatever the math would end up working out to).

That said, I had a no-coffee-challenge for myself to kind of reset/recalibrate my caffeine habit this week and it was quite successful. Looking forward to drinking less coffee overall moving forward.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: WhiteTrashCash on October 23, 2020, 08:12:52 PM
Wow, I had no idea it was this easy to roast your own coffee beans. I may try this when I run out of Starbucks gift cards that I've been using to pick up free bags of dark roast beans.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Dicey on October 23, 2020, 08:58:54 PM
Could be fun if roasting your own coffee interests you. It does not for me and Iím ok with my current cost of ~$.26 per mug of coffee at home. The savings wouldnít be worth the effort unless I enjoyed the activity itself.
Or just quit coffee all together and save $1.82/week, $7.28/month, $87.36/year etc. And that's if you only drink one cup a day!

It's a fair point @Dicey but even drinking 1-2 cups a day, I would happily pay $160 for the pleasure of that morning brew. One of those little pleasures that I'm not willing to sacrifice to retire one month early (or whatever the math would end up working out to).

That said, I had a no-coffee-challenge for myself to kind of reset/recalibrate my caffeine habit this week and it was quite successful. Looking forward to drinking less coffee overall moving forward.
Dudes, it was a joke. But this exchange triggered a memory. I feel a Dicey TaleTM coming on...

I love the smell of good coffee, even though I don't drink it. Back in the late 80's, my roommate's boyfriend (now husband) used to work for a well-known coffee roastery in Beverly Hills. A man used to come in to their shop and collect their empty burlap sacks. They finally asked him what he did with them. Said he used them to groom horses and the horses loved the smell of coffee on the bags. One day, the man came in and gave them two tickets to the horse races at Santa Anita (google it). My friends were thrilled to discover they were tickets to the owner's private box. Yeah, the dude was no mere horse groomer. My friends placed a long shot bet and won $800. Nice return on those used burlap bags.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: norajean on October 24, 2020, 05:47:39 AM
There is no one size fits all solution for the coffee problem billions face every day. There are hundreds of solutions of differing cost, complexity and quality. Many people employ several and vary by day. We do pour over for single cups, thermal French press for more coffee, Korean instant for afternoon cups, and Italian hand pump for espresso.  We have tried Nespresso and Keurig, hoping the convenience justified the cost but found the quality severely lacking.

Iím ok with letting an expert do the bean roasting since there are so many around Portland.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: WhiteTrashCash on October 24, 2020, 07:42:59 AM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on October 24, 2020, 07:44:01 AM
There is no one size fits all solution for the coffee problem billions face every day. There are hundreds of solutions of differing cost, complexity and quality. Many people employ several and vary by day. We do pour over for single cups, thermal French press for more coffee, Korean instant for afternoon cups, and Italian hand pump for espresso.  We have tried Nespresso and Keurig, hoping the convenience justified the cost but found the quality severely lacking.

Iím ok with letting an expert do the bean roasting since there are so many around Portland.

That just reminded me - apparently there's over 25,000 unique coffee drinks one can order at Dunkin alone...

What's Korean instant? 
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nobody on October 24, 2020, 07:00:35 PM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

To add to this, another option is a Vietnamese coffee maker/filter.  The one I have is completely stainless steel and cost about $5.  It's good for making single cups of coffee.  It's a gravity fed contraption, so no electricity, also, no paper filters needed.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: HMman on October 26, 2020, 09:52:37 AM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

To add to this, another option is a Vietnamese coffee maker/filter.  The one I have is completely stainless steel and cost about $5.  It's good for making single cups of coffee.  It's a gravity fed contraption, so no electricity, also, no paper filters needed.

That's funny you both mention switching to stainless steel filters from paper, as I've been recently contemplating the opposite. For the one or two cups of coffee I'll make a week I use a french press, and have the beans ground appropriately at the roasters. Despite getting the beans ground on a good quality machine (I assume!), I'll always end up with a bit of coffee sludge at the bottom, and have been considering getting some paper filters to run the coffee through after brewing to catch that. I've also read that the paper filters capture some of the oils from the beans that are linked with adverse blood lipid outcomes, but I don't know how solid the science is on that. If true, it would be another bonus to doing so. Do either of you have issues with coffee sludge with the stainless steel filters?
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: WhiteTrashCash on October 26, 2020, 10:56:11 AM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

To add to this, another option is a Vietnamese coffee maker/filter.  The one I have is completely stainless steel and cost about $5.  It's good for making single cups of coffee.  It's a gravity fed contraption, so no electricity, also, no paper filters needed.

That's funny you both mention switching to stainless steel filters from paper, as I've been recently contemplating the opposite. For the one or two cups of coffee I'll make a week I use a french press, and have the beans ground appropriately at the roasters. Despite getting the beans ground on a good quality machine (I assume!), I'll always end up with a bit of coffee sludge at the bottom, and have been considering getting some paper filters to run the coffee through after brewing to catch that. I've also read that the paper filters capture some of the oils from the beans that are linked with adverse blood lipid outcomes, but I don't know how solid the science is on that. If true, it would be another bonus to doing so. Do either of you have issues with coffee sludge with the stainless steel filters?

My reusable filter has really fine mesh, so I haven't had any problems with sludge. To me, it looks and tastes just as good as when I was using paper filters, except for the reduction in cost and environmental stuff.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nobody on October 27, 2020, 11:57:24 PM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

To add to this, another option is a Vietnamese coffee maker/filter.  The one I have is completely stainless steel and cost about $5.  It's good for making single cups of coffee.  It's a gravity fed contraption, so no electricity, also, no paper filters needed.

That's funny you both mention switching to stainless steel filters from paper, as I've been recently contemplating the opposite. For the one or two cups of coffee I'll make a week I use a french press, and have the beans ground appropriately at the roasters. Despite getting the beans ground on a good quality machine (I assume!), I'll always end up with a bit of coffee sludge at the bottom, and have been considering getting some paper filters to run the coffee through after brewing to catch that. I've also read that the paper filters capture some of the oils from the beans that are linked with adverse blood lipid outcomes, but I don't know how solid the science is on that. If true, it would be another bonus to doing so. Do either of you have issues with coffee sludge with the stainless steel filters?

No, I don't have issues with sludge.  I do bloom the coffee grounds first, which may help prevent that from happening.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Malcat on October 28, 2020, 05:29:06 AM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

To add to this, another option is a Vietnamese coffee maker/filter.  The one I have is completely stainless steel and cost about $5.  It's good for making single cups of coffee.  It's a gravity fed contraption, so no electricity, also, no paper filters needed.

That's funny you both mention switching to stainless steel filters from paper, as I've been recently contemplating the opposite. For the one or two cups of coffee I'll make a week I use a french press, and have the beans ground appropriately at the roasters. Despite getting the beans ground on a good quality machine (I assume!), I'll always end up with a bit of coffee sludge at the bottom, and have been considering getting some paper filters to run the coffee through after brewing to catch that. I've also read that the paper filters capture some of the oils from the beans that are linked with adverse blood lipid outcomes, but I don't know how solid the science is on that. If true, it would be another bonus to doing so. Do either of you have issues with coffee sludge with the stainless steel filters?

A French press is very different. There will always be some degree of leakage with a French press, so you will always get sludge.

I don't know what metal filters others are using, but DH uses an aeropress with a metal filter and it's completely different than the metal mesh in the French press. It's also sealed, so there's no way for sludge to get through.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: norajean on October 28, 2020, 05:35:05 AM
What's wrong with sludge?  It rinses right out of the cup.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Malcat on October 28, 2020, 06:15:09 AM
What's wrong with sludge?  It rinses right out of the cup.

I use a French press, and I don't mind the sludge. DH hates it though.

ETA, I forgot to ask, @HMman are you asking to have your coffee ground for a French press? Because the grind is supposed to be much bigger than for drip coffee because the water spends so much time in contact with the coffee. It should almost be small chunks instead of powdery grounds. It makes a huge difference in the sludge amount as well.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on October 28, 2020, 07:04:54 AM
What's wrong with sludge?  It rinses right out of the cup.

I use a French press, and I don't mind the sludge. DH hates it though.

ETA, I forgot to ask, @HMman are you asking to have your coffee ground for a French press? Because the grind is supposed to be much bigger than for drip coffee because the water spends so much time in contact with the coffee. It should almost be small chunks instead of powdery grounds. It makes a huge difference in the sludge amount as well.

If you are feeling spendy, like French Press coffee but hate sludge, you might want to check out Espro brand (https://www.amazon.com/Espro-Coffee-Insulated-Brushed-Stainless/dp/B011WTMNWA/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?dchild=1&keywords=Espro+P6&qid=1603890231&s=home-garden&sr=1-2-spons&psc=1&spLa=ZW5jcnlwdGVkUXVhbGlmaWVyPUFORVJDNTQ3NVVRSEUmZW5jcnlwdGVkSWQ9QTAzOTY0NjhBU0Y5U1lQUktYTUYmZW5jcnlwdGVkQWRJZD1BMDMzMjIyNTNLTzBLWTRNVlNGOEImd2lkZ2V0TmFtZT1zcF9hdGYmYWN0aW9uPWNsaWNrUmVkaXJlY3QmZG9Ob3RMb2dDbGljaz10cnVl).  <<facepunch for suggesting it!>>
It uses a double basket-filter instead of the normal circular disks, with a silicone gasket.  Manages to make a sludge-free cup of french press (or very close to it). But damn are they pricy, at 3x the cost of other insulated French Press coffee makers.  But basically a 'buy-it-for-a-really-long-time' kind of purchase.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: HMman on October 28, 2020, 09:11:38 AM
What's wrong with sludge?  It rinses right out of the cup.

I use a French press, and I don't mind the sludge. DH hates it though.

ETA, I forgot to ask, @HMman are you asking to have your coffee ground for a French press? Because the grind is supposed to be much bigger than for drip coffee because the water spends so much time in contact with the coffee. It should almost be small chunks instead of powdery grounds. It makes a huge difference in the sludge amount as well.

Yes, the beans are ground for a French press. I also hate the sludge, and the little bit I get drives me nuts - I nurse my cup of coffee for a while, so it causes the last third or so to taste bitter and overbrewed. It's not a huge deal, but it bugs me enough that I'd like to get rid of it.

@nobody and @WhiteTrashCash I'm surprised to hear the stainless steel filters work as well as the paper ones, so I'll have to look in to that. Thanks!
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Malcat on October 28, 2020, 10:09:59 AM
What's wrong with sludge?  It rinses right out of the cup.

I use a French press, and I don't mind the sludge. DH hates it though.

ETA, I forgot to ask, @HMman are you asking to have your coffee ground for a French press? Because the grind is supposed to be much bigger than for drip coffee because the water spends so much time in contact with the coffee. It should almost be small chunks instead of powdery grounds. It makes a huge difference in the sludge amount as well.

Yes, the beans are ground for a French press. I also hate the sludge, and the little bit I get drives me nuts - I nurse my cup of coffee for a while, so it causes the last third or so to taste bitter and overbrewed. It's not a huge deal, but it bugs me enough that I'd like to get rid of it.

@nobody and @WhiteTrashCash I'm surprised to hear the stainless steel filters work as well as the paper ones, so I'll have to look in to that. Thanks!

Have you tried and aeropress?
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: HMman on October 28, 2020, 11:13:00 AM
What's wrong with sludge?  It rinses right out of the cup.

I use a French press, and I don't mind the sludge. DH hates it though.

ETA, I forgot to ask, @HMman are you asking to have your coffee ground for a French press? Because the grind is supposed to be much bigger than for drip coffee because the water spends so much time in contact with the coffee. It should almost be small chunks instead of powdery grounds. It makes a huge difference in the sludge amount as well.

Yes, the beans are ground for a French press. I also hate the sludge, and the little bit I get drives me nuts - I nurse my cup of coffee for a while, so it causes the last third or so to taste bitter and overbrewed. It's not a huge deal, but it bugs me enough that I'd like to get rid of it.

@nobody and @WhiteTrashCash I'm surprised to hear the stainless steel filters work as well as the paper ones, so I'll have to look in to that. Thanks!

Have you tried and aeropress?

I haven't, no. Seeing as it's sludge-free enough for your husband, it sounds like it would be worth a try. I'll start with a second filtration step first, though, and see if I can continue to get use out of my French press. It looks like Aeropresses are fairly inexpensive, but the less kitchen gadgets the better.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Malcat on October 28, 2020, 12:43:39 PM
What's wrong with sludge?  It rinses right out of the cup.

I use a French press, and I don't mind the sludge. DH hates it though.

ETA, I forgot to ask, @HMman are you asking to have your coffee ground for a French press? Because the grind is supposed to be much bigger than for drip coffee because the water spends so much time in contact with the coffee. It should almost be small chunks instead of powdery grounds. It makes a huge difference in the sludge amount as well.

Yes, the beans are ground for a French press. I also hate the sludge, and the little bit I get drives me nuts - I nurse my cup of coffee for a while, so it causes the last third or so to taste bitter and overbrewed. It's not a huge deal, but it bugs me enough that I'd like to get rid of it.

@nobody and @WhiteTrashCash I'm surprised to hear the stainless steel filters work as well as the paper ones, so I'll have to look in to that. Thanks!

Have you tried and aeropress?

I haven't, no. Seeing as it's sludge-free enough for your husband, it sounds like it would be worth a try. I'll start with a second filtration step first, though, and see if I can continue to get use out of my French press. It looks like Aeropresses are fairly inexpensive, but the less kitchen gadgets the better.

It makes very different coffee, it's closer to espresso, so it's pretty strong.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Samuel on October 28, 2020, 01:20:29 PM
I don't drink coffee anymore but I do have an aeropress around for guests. People have universally been quite satisfied with the output. It does produce very strong coffee but since you have boiling water on hand anyways it's easy to cut it to the desired strength. Only real downside is if you need to make several servings at once since it takes a few minutes per cup.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: HMman on October 28, 2020, 04:22:23 PM
It makes very different coffee, it's closer to espresso, so it's pretty strong.

Hmmm, I do like my coffee strong. You're definitely selling me on this device, haha.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Just Joe on October 29, 2020, 02:35:44 PM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

We've made coffee like that too for a long time. BUT - possible cholesterol connection.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=coffee+cholesterol

Supposedly the paper filters help. We reserve the French Press or unfiltered coffee for the weekends now.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: WhiteTrashCash on October 30, 2020, 07:02:53 AM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

We've made coffee like that too for a long time. BUT - possible cholesterol connection.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=coffee+cholesterol

Supposedly the paper filters help. We reserve the French Press or unfiltered coffee for the weekends now.

Thanks for the heads up on that. I read some more about it and it appears to only be a concern for people who drink a lot of coffee each day. I generally have one cup on weekdays and two cups on weekends, so I think I'll be okay. I use a very small one person coffee pot, so the amounts I make are generally quite small.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on October 30, 2020, 07:53:04 AM
What I find interesting about coffee (and caffeine in particular) is that we've been searching for some long-term, horrible health effects of ingesting 100-300mg+ of caffeine a day, and we've been doing this for 70+ years, and so far every potential link is tentative and correlative at best.

Even among individuals who drink 3+ cups of coffee a day for decades, it's been hard to identify a long-term health risk that isn't present in similar levels among similar, non-caffeine drinking counterparts.

I'm not saying caffeine consumption is good for you per se... just that negative effects - if they exist - seem far less important than, say, mild exercise or reducing sugar consumption.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Malcat on October 30, 2020, 08:43:33 AM
What I find interesting about coffee (and caffeine in particular) is that we've been searching for some long-term, horrible health effects of ingesting 100-300mg+ of caffeine a day, and we've been doing this for 70+ years, and so far every potential link is tentative and correlative at best.

Even among individuals who drink 3+ cups of coffee a day for decades, it's been hard to identify a long-term health risk that isn't present in similar levels among similar, non-caffeine drinking counterparts.

I'm not saying caffeine consumption is good for you per se... just that negative effects - if they exist - seem far less important than, say, mild exercise or reducing sugar consumption.

The only well supported risk I know of is with respect to bone density. With a sedentary population, this, IMO, is a fairly big deal. But yeah, 100-300mg is a pretty reasonable amount of caffeine, but if someone is drinking Starbucks coffee, that's one coffee, not three.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: WhiteTrashCash on October 30, 2020, 09:05:01 AM
Tangentially, I found a workaround for getting Starbucks without paying Starbucks prices. I just use Starbucks gift cards I get for free for various things to buy bags of their whole coffee beans and then I grind them and brew them at home. It's the same thing as what you get in one of their shops but you don't have to wait in line or pay over $2/cup for it. Of course, that wouldn't help the people who just go to Starbucks to buy $5 coffee-flavored milkshakes.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: mntnmn117 on October 30, 2020, 10:13:03 AM
What's wrong with sludge?  It rinses right out of the cup.

I use a French press, and I don't mind the sludge. DH hates it though.

ETA, I forgot to ask, @HMman are you asking to have your coffee ground for a French press? Because the grind is supposed to be much bigger than for drip coffee because the water spends so much time in contact with the coffee. It should almost be small chunks instead of powdery grounds. It makes a huge difference in the sludge amount as well.

Yes, the beans are ground for a French press. I also hate the sludge, and the little bit I get drives me nuts - I nurse my cup of coffee for a while, so it causes the last third or so to taste bitter and overbrewed. It's not a huge deal, but it bugs me enough that I'd like to get rid of it.

@nobody and @WhiteTrashCash I'm surprised to hear the stainless steel filters work as well as the paper ones, so I'll have to look in to that. Thanks!

You can fix the sludge and the bitterness by adding a step. I've found the french press is best when after brewing you transfer everything to an insulated carafe or teapot. Coffee shouldn't sit on the grind past 4-5min. It avoids the second cup tasting bitter and the process of pouring into another vessel and helps settle the sludge out. I'm wondering about your grind too. With a decent burr grinder your french press you shouldn't get much sludge.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: JoJo on November 05, 2020, 09:36:41 AM
I've started drinking Folgers this summer and it's OK for me.  Costco has a huge canister that lasts a couple months, and it's on sale every once in awhile, costing a little over $7.  So daily coffee costs only cents per day. 
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: cashistrash on December 25, 2020, 10:18:51 AM
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: grantmeaname on December 25, 2020, 11:25:34 AM
Lots of coffee is better than the aldi store brand, yes.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on December 25, 2020, 11:34:42 AM
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: maisymouser on December 25, 2020, 02:01:04 PM
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

How long can unroasted beans last if they are in a cool dark place?
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on December 25, 2020, 05:51:18 PM
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

How long can unroasted beans last if they are in a cool dark place?
A few months, easy.  Thatís why theyíre shipped around the globe unroasted but are roasted at good coffee shops just days before being used or sold.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: maisymouser on December 25, 2020, 06:29:04 PM
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

How long can unroasted beans last if they are in a cool dark place?
A few months, easy.  Thatís why theyíre shipped around the globe unroasted but are roasted at good coffee shops just days before being used or sold.

OK, follow-up question- how much weight do they lose after being roasted? Trying to estimate how much roasted coffee I would need to consume in 3ish months if I go that route. Thanks! :)

Edit: Google tells me 12-25% weight loss upon roasting. Apologies for the unnecessary post :P
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: sparkytheop on December 25, 2020, 09:10:30 PM
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

How long can unroasted beans last if they are in a cool dark place?
A few months, easy.  Thatís why theyíre shipped around the globe unroasted but are roasted at good coffee shops just days before being used or sold.

OK, follow-up question- how much weight do they lose after being roasted? Trying to estimate how much roasted coffee I would need to consume in 3ish months if I go that route. Thanks! :)

Edit: Google tells me 12-25% weight loss upon roasting. Apologies for the unnecessary post :P

I actually documented everything the first few times I roasted beans, until I could kind of get it down.  I do pretty small batches.

5 oz pre-roasted (about one cup in volume), 4.1 oz final weight (about 11 oz volume)

I do dark roast, light roast would lose less weight.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: eyesonthehorizon on January 20, 2021, 06:43:56 PM
Lots of coffee is better than the aldi store brand, yes.
Aldi's single-origin organic bags are SHOCKINGLY good for $4.50/bag.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: grantmeaname on January 21, 2021, 06:19:49 AM
I'll have to try them. How many ounces is each bag?
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: reader321 on January 21, 2021, 02:36:16 PM
Aldis and Sams have coffee about $2.65 / lb.  Anything better than that?

Large (e.g. 12lb) sacks of unroasted beans from a quality shop will be much better than Aldis or Sams, and will cost about the same (if not a bit less).

How long can unroasted beans last if they are in a cool dark place?

"Rule of 15":

These guidelines are obviously debated to death. I think the first two bullets are probably the most critical.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: eyesonthehorizon on January 24, 2021, 06:44:37 PM
The organic Aldi bags at $4.50 for 12oz were the ones I'm referring to, & they usually have two origins at any given time, whole-bean. Forms a good middle option between boutique roastery & the 3lb Costco bags. If you're the only one in the household drinking it, it isn't a lifestyle/ you don't roast your own, & you want small amounts of something good that's still cheap I find it sits quite well in a spot between quantity, quality, & cost.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: grantmeaname on January 24, 2021, 07:24:26 PM
Awesome, I will give those a shot. Their flavored coffee is ghastly, so it's good to know they have something a bit better to offer.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on January 25, 2021, 04:54:14 PM
Awesome, I will give those a shot. Their flavored coffee is ghastly, so it's good to know they have something a bit better to offer.

Iíve yet to find anywhere that has flavored coffee that I like.  If I want caramel or coconut (or whatever flavor) coffee the only way itís tolerable to me is to add caramel syrup, or coconut cream or... 
Adding artificial flavor to the beans always tastes fake to me.  And not in a good way.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: grantmeaname on January 25, 2021, 05:17:43 PM
I don't generally  take my coffee with sugar so try and avoid the syrups. My old grocery store had a counter that would flavor coffee for you for free which was rad. Now I use extracts occasionally - a couple drops of hazelnut or almond extract.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Retireatee1 on January 25, 2021, 06:53:46 PM
I was in the roasting game for a while many years ago.  I enjoyed roasting 2-3 days worth of beans at a time, and you could tell the difference in freshness.  I did save some money, but coffee is pretty cheap.  The roaster takes a lot of abuse, and over time started to break down from the heat.  So I had to replace this, and then had to replace that.  I ran it in the garage and it was a big smoky stinky mess.  Eventually I ceased my roasting activities.  But I think about getting back in from time to time.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on January 26, 2021, 06:29:06 AM
I was in the roasting game for a while many years ago.  I enjoyed roasting 2-3 days worth of beans at a time, and you could tell the difference in freshness.  I did save some money, but coffee is pretty cheap.  The roaster takes a lot of abuse, and over time started to break down from the heat.  So I had to replace this, and then had to replace that.  I ran it in the garage and it was a big smoky stinky mess.  Eventually I ceased my roasting activities.  But I think about getting back in from time to time.

what did you use for a roaster (model/type/size)?

I've found a frying pan watched carefully works great, but you are limited to about 4oz at a time (about what we might use in a day or two.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Retireatee1 on January 26, 2021, 09:39:55 AM
what did you use for a roaster (model/type/size)?

I've found a frying pan watched carefully works great, but you are limited to about 4oz at a time (about what we might use in a day or two.

It was the entry-level Fresh Roast model from 15 years ago.  It was a good product, perhaps the new models are more durable.  I'd be inclined to step up to a half-pound capacity if I got back into it.  Roasting twice a week can be inconvenient.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: keyvaluepair on January 29, 2021, 02:26:52 PM
I roast about once every 1.5 months but then I drink 2 cups of espresso each day. I could afford the fancy pants coffee from speciality roastery, but when I can roast it myself for a lot cheaper, why even bother. And it makes a really nice present for neighbors too, which is another bonus.

Personally, I can't go back to drinking crap coffee. Also, the whirly pop seems fine but I am strongly considering moving to a heat gun + bread maker (thrift store) option because I'm lazy.

In terms of dechaffing, I use 2 methods - lungs while roasting and a small tabletop fan when cooling the coffee when swapping between the 2 thrift store colanders .....
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Syonyk on January 31, 2021, 01:39:29 PM
Personally, I can't go back to drinking crap coffee.

Yeah... for the past few years, people have asserted I'm a coffee snob, and my assertions that I hand grind small batches for single cup Aeropress, of beans obtained from various people I know... hasn't really helped my case.  Anymore, I just accept it, and offer to make people a cup.

I haven't gotten into roasting myself yet, simply because I know people who are way more into that than I am, and I'm happy to pay them for their skills/interest.

$17 for a 12oz bag, once a month, of something different each time... that covers most of my coffee, with some New Mexican Pinion coffee to fill in the gaps.  It's low enough in cost that it's just not worth too much further optimization, and the stuff is legitimately good.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: TomTX on February 06, 2021, 10:00:03 AM
Could be fun if roasting your own coffee interests you. It does not for me and Iím ok with my current cost of ~$.26 per mug of coffee at home. The savings wouldnít be worth the effort unless I enjoyed the activity itself.
Or just quit coffee all together and save $1.82/week, $7.28/month, $87.36/year etc. And that's if you only drink one cup a day!

It's a fair point @Dicey but even drinking 1-2 cups a day, I would happily pay $160 for the pleasure of that morning brew. One of those little pleasures that I'm not willing to sacrifice to retire one month early (or whatever the math would end up working out to).

That said, I had a no-coffee-challenge for myself to kind of reset/recalibrate my caffeine habit this week and it was quite successful. Looking forward to drinking less coffee overall moving forward.

I enjoy my 2 mugs of coffee most mornings. But yeah, I've taken a week off to reset occasionally. Thinking of getting decaf beans and making half-caf. After the 2 mugs I'm typically off caffeine the rest of the day.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: TomTX on February 06, 2021, 10:01:52 AM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

I like the flavor of the coffee when using an unbleached paper filter, and it makes transferring the depleted ground to the compost easier since the paper composts just fine as well.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: WhiteTrashCash on February 06, 2021, 06:48:11 PM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

I like the flavor of the coffee when using an unbleached paper filter, and it makes transferring the depleted ground to the compost easier since the paper composts just fine as well.

I am just trying to be environmentally-friendly and save some money at the same time. Even when paper is recycled, it is the product of cutting down trees to be disposed of and a reusable filter can just be used indefinitely so it costs less as well.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: American GenX on February 06, 2021, 07:07:01 PM
I actually switched from a reusable copper filter to disposable filters a couple years back.  It made it easier, was well worth it, and I don't have to waste water cleaning the reusable filter every time.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: TomTX on February 06, 2021, 07:21:30 PM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

I like the flavor of the coffee when using an unbleached paper filter, and it makes transferring the depleted ground to the compost easier since the paper composts just fine as well.

I am just trying to be environmentally-friendly and save some money at the same time. Even when paper is recycled, it is the product of cutting down trees to be disposed of and a reusable filter can just be used indefinitely so it costs less as well.
*shrug* Reusable filters need to be rinsed after each use.

We're getting WAY into the weeds here.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on February 07, 2021, 05:30:02 AM
If anyone is looking for another cheap way to reduce coffee costs, my wife bought me a reusable filter made from plastic and mesh for a couple dollars on Amazon and it's replaced my paper filters for over a year now. It works just as well and it not only saves money but also reduces paper waste in landfills. It's worth checking out if you don't already have one.

I like the flavor of the coffee when using an unbleached paper filter, and it makes transferring the depleted ground to the compost easier since the paper composts just fine as well.

I am just trying to be environmentally-friendly and save some money at the same time. Even when paper is recycled, it is the product of cutting down trees to be disposed of and a reusable filter can just be used indefinitely so it costs less as well.
*shrug* Reusable filters need to be rinsed after each use.

We're getting WAY into the weeds here.

Agreed.  I mean, technically one could bury the used paper filters and coffee grounds, thus sequestering the carbon - which would make it carbon-negative (to the tune of a few grams/week) provided your filters were made from sustainably managed forests.

...but I just find them easier to compost. Coffee grounds and paper filters make some of the best soil enhancers known to man (see my comment upthread). 
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: eyesonthehorizon on February 07, 2021, 10:02:34 AM
Not sure of your brewing method but to minimize waste/ ecological & economic burden, just save the graywater from any rinsing regardless of filter material. If I have to use a brewer with a cone/cup filter, the whole filter & grounds assembly goes to compost that day, but I prefer the flavor & ease of the aeropress; immersion compared to drip seems to get better extraction & thus saves money/ shipping fuel/ ecological burden on coffee, too.

An aeropress uses flat filters so it's easy to pop the coffee puck into the compost bin, blast remnants on the (paper or metal) filter in its basket with the vegetable sprayer into that day's graywater bowl, then toss the whole thing on the drying rack. Paper filters for it are almost cheaper than dirt but when they reuse so easily with water I'd already need for plants, why not? Same process if I'm using a metal filter that day - I vary depending on the flavor I want - so I don't have to think before caffeine, the whole routine's on autopilot & takes two aromatic minutes from the point I finish grinding beans. Efficiency is the highest form of beauty, right?
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Bird In Hand on February 07, 2021, 11:19:06 AM
Not sure of your brewing method but to minimize waste/ ecological & economic burden, just save the graywater from any rinsing regardless of filter material. If I have to use a brewer with a cone/cup filter, the whole filter & grounds assembly goes to compost that day, but I prefer the flavor & ease of the aeropress; immersion compared to drip seems to get better extraction & thus saves money/ shipping fuel/ ecological burden on coffee, too.

I like Aeropress quite a bit, but I found that I required a lot of ground coffee to get a cup that I like (roughly 30g vs the ~17g I use when making a double espresso with an actual 9 bar espresso machine).  When your tastebuds are accustomed to coffee beans that range from $14-$20/lb, an Aeropress cup ends up costing about $1.  Better than paying $3+ at a cafe, but $1-$2/day probably works out to 1% of our family's annual budget, or 2-3% if I include my wife's consumption.

Of course the bigger problem is having developed a preference for expensive coffee in the first place!
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: eyesonthehorizon on February 10, 2021, 12:21:19 AM
...I found that I required a lot of ground coffee to get a cup that I like (roughly 30g...
I suspect this may be an expectations issue; an aeropress is making something comparable to other immersion methods like a press pot, but those aren't quite like an espresso, since it's the pressure which causes emulsion of the oils into that thick mouthfeel, & nothing filtered through paper will taste or feel like a creamy espresso. However - if you're ever away from your machine you might want to try your aeropress with a metal filter & a more aggressive, extended pressure just to see if it better suits your own tastes. I usually grind pretty fine for aeropress, about as for espresso, brew in an 90-120s timeframe, & come away using about 20g of coffee, filtering with paper if I want something crisp & clean to contemplate, or metal if I want it richer.

The overlap between the aeropress audience & that of a proper 9-bar press is significant but not the majority, I think. If you want to invest in equipment for efficiency in your hobby & experience a significant difference from doing so, that's potentially very fulfilling - I'd never turn down a free espresso machine, though I've held off paying for one. Without that level of commitment, a $30 plunger is a great solution.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: nereo on February 10, 2021, 12:47:37 PM
...I found that I required a lot of ground coffee to get a cup that I like (roughly 30g...
I suspect this may be an expectations issue; an aeropress is making something comparable to other immersion methods like a press pot, but those aren't quite like an espresso, since it's the pressure which causes emulsion of the oils into that thick mouthfeel, & nothing filtered through paper will taste or feel like a creamy espresso. However - if you're ever away from your machine you might want to try your aeropress with a metal filter & a more aggressive, extended pressure just to see if it better suits your own tastes. I usually grind pretty fine for aeropress, about as for espresso, brew in an 90-120s timeframe, & come away using about 20g of coffee, filtering with paper if I want something crisp & clean to contemplate, or metal if I want it richer.

The overlap between the aeropress audience & that of a proper 9-bar press is significant but not the majority, I think. If you want to invest in equipment for efficiency in your hobby & experience a significant difference from doing so, that's potentially very fulfilling - I'd never turn down a free espresso machine, though I've held off paying for one. Without that level of commitment, a $30 plunger is a great solution.

This post got me wondering, so I did what any scientist does and carefully take some measurements.  Iíve got a fancy-pants espresso machine that we got early on in the pandemic for around $400. The whole-bean coffee (pre-roasted) we buy costs 2.1Ę/gram, and I use 12 grams.  FWIW thatís actually more than what I read a single-shot should be (itís closer to a double), but thatís just me and my preferences.  So each Cafť Americano runs me just a hair over 25Ę.  Like you, Iíve found that I need a lot more coffee in an aeropress to get the desired strength, around 30g, which makes those cost 63Ę/serving. Electricity is a tiny fraction of a cent (1.5kw x 1 minute/60min*hourē-1 x 14Ę/hour  =  0.35Ę per shot).  Obviously the aeropress has only human power, and I didnít consider replacement filters

So whereís the breakeven point for me?  COnsidering my wife and I each have at least one drink/day and often more on the weekends (and when WFH) I think a conservative estimate puts us at 1,000 drinks/year combined. Compared to the aeropress (price difference of ~$370) weíd need to consume 973 espresso drinks before the break-even point, which weíd do in our 11th month.  If I went back to the Uber-cheap green coffee beans it would take almost three years, but while I enjoy the process life is too complicated with our younginí right now, and the simplification is worth it.  Run-running the numbers with the high-end, fancy-pants, boutique beans sold at my local coffee roaster ($15/12oz) has a cost of 4.4Ę/gram, or 53Ę with the espresso machine and $1.32 with the aeropress. Thatís 468 drinks to recoup the cost of the fancy-pants espresso machine, or roughly 6 months with our coffee habits.

YMMV
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: keyvaluepair on February 16, 2021, 08:38:46 PM
I mean, I have to spend $ on something :-). My car is nearly 28 years old, slightly younger than my marriage! And tents, backpacking boots just aren't that expensive. So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: maisymouser on February 17, 2021, 05:56:33 PM
I mean, I have to spend $ on something :-). My car is nearly 28 years old, slightly younger than my marriage! And tents, backpacking boots just aren't that expensive. So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

YOU AREN'T ONE OF USSSSSSS!!!!!!!!

(Full disclosure: I upgraded my life by routinely buying and drinking coffee. Totally worth it)
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: eyesonthehorizon on February 23, 2021, 09:25:08 PM
Summarized: math
I literally sat bolt upright & started waving my hands in joy at this post. I love good data.
Especially if I can use it to potentially, eventually, justify caving on buying a toy.
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: keyvaluepair on February 26, 2021, 06:47:23 PM
I mean, I have to spend $ on something :-). My car is nearly 28 years old, slightly younger than my marriage! And tents, backpacking boots just aren't that expensive. So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

YOU AREN'T ONE OF USSSSSSS!!!!!!!!

(Full disclosure: I upgraded my life by routinely buying and drinking coffee. Totally worth it)
Aha, but you didn't read carefully enough. My list was coffee, beer and bacon! I'd still have to go easy on the bacon else I'd die of cholesterol poisoning at a young(ish) age!
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Dictionary Time on February 26, 2021, 07:17:27 PM
So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

Iím now waiting patiently for the Bacon topic.  We smoked some pork belly from Costco a while back and it was amazing. But that takes a lot of wood and I havenít run the numbers. Maybe someone will do it for me?
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: WhiteTrashCash on February 27, 2021, 07:03:36 AM
So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

Iím now waiting patiently for the Bacon topic.  We smoked some pork belly from Costco a while back and it was amazing. But that takes a lot of wood and I havenít run the numbers. Maybe someone will do it for me?

I love bacon, but I have stuck to turkey bacon for cholesterol reasons. If you donít think too hard and donít look at it too hard, you can kinda sorta almost convince yourself that itís actually bacon (possibly, if you try hard.)
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: Retireatee1 on February 27, 2021, 11:28:58 AM

We've made coffee like that too for a long time. BUT - possible cholesterol connection.

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=coffee+cholesterol

Supposedly the paper filters help. We reserve the French Press or unfiltered coffee for the weekends now.

Your supporting evidence is a search link to duckduckgo? 
Title: Re: Coffee
Post by: TomTX on February 27, 2021, 07:16:14 PM
So what remains? Coffee, beer and bacon.

Iím now waiting patiently for the Bacon topic.  We smoked some pork belly from Costco a while back and it was amazing. But that takes a lot of wood and I havenít run the numbers. Maybe someone will do it for me?

I cut, split and dry my own wood - which is good exercise. Since it's from trees which need to be pruned anyway, net cash outlay is effectively zero. Possibly, I suppose I should amortize the splitting axe. Unless it should be categorized under fitness equipment. I will wear chainsaw chaps when splitting for safety, but those were a required purchase for using the chainsaw. Note: After reviewing numerous chainsaw chaps test videos, I went with the big name brand chaps - not the cheap ones. The performance difference was significant.

ObCoffee: Earlier in the pandemic I was consuming basically a pot a day. Body eventually objected, so I went cold turkey* for awhile and then went back at half a pot a day, which seems sustainable. Grounds get composted, of course.

*Not turkey bacon. I've tried the samples numerous times at Costco. Doesn't qualify as bacon.