Author Topic: Caddyshock  (Read 6036 times)

hybrid

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Caddyshock
« on: June 02, 2013, 08:26:38 PM »
Well, the missus and I took the biggest step possible on the quicker road to financial independence - we turned in our resignation to our country club.  We have been members eight years and I thoroughly enjoy golfing and the people there, so this was not an easy decision for us (I am sure many of you are laughing at the very notion of spending $575 a month at a club, but lots of people do it, including many who are financially independent).  Thing is, we aren't financially independent yet and I would very much like to be.  Or, at the very least, have a much bigger safety cushion than we have now.

I had been considering this for several months but it wasn't until I discovered this site via the Washington Post that I was able to take a new perspective on things.  Lots of things bring a great deal of joy to my life besides golf, so filling the void should not prove to be a great challenge.  And whereas one of my goals was to finally shoot par (and I got oh so close a few times...) my newest goal is to get the missus retired near the end of 2016.

My friends and family were surprised to hear I had started biking home on occasion, and that I had lost weight, and that we had found a number of ways to quit consuming so much.  But when they heard I was giving up the club?  Caddyshocked.

FlorenceMcGillicutty

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2013, 08:51:33 PM »
Nice job. I can relate to this because my hubs and I are high earners, high spenders but trying to do much better. But wow, $575/mo! Holy cow that's a lot of money! That will go a looong way towards getting you and your wife to retirement.

You did the right thing. I like how you said that even though you enjoy the club, you can't afford it right now because you're not FI. That's the kind of thinking I need too. Thanks for the reminder.

Hey, added bonuses of quitting the club are picking up new, cool hobbies, and getting away from people who think it's normal to spend $7000/yr on golf. :)

hybrid

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #2 on: June 02, 2013, 09:06:35 PM »
Indeed.  Bonus points if you can name my favorite (and very Mustachian) hobby from my icon picture.  Of course, the dues at the club were "only" $375 a month, but once you throw in cart fees, food, alcohol, tournament fees, etc.  And that wasn't including the funds for clubs, balls, shoes....  It's a ridiculously expensive pastime but also really easy to get sucked into, and the feeling of exclusivity is intoxicating (most people cannot afford this but I can, therefore I must be a made man, give yourself a little pat on the back....).  Funny thing is, I work in IT as  a mid-grade systems admin, missus is a career letter carrier with the USPS.  Yes, we make very good coin compared to most, but there are many people who make much more than us.  We could afford the club because we were always a little Mustachian to begin with (no fancy car, affordable house, etc.).  But it is simply too high a price to pay.  Were money not an issue?  It makes me quite happy, and I would have gladly stayed.  That's what made the decision tough.  But I was happy before the club, and I'll be happy after it as well.  MMMs post about people rapidly settling to a level of contentedness after a big change really drove that point home.  I'll miss it some, and not for long.

Paul der Krake

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #3 on: June 02, 2013, 09:20:19 PM »
Woohoo, one more golfer on the forums! There are a couple threads lying around discussing the various tricks we use to play on a budget, a quick search should bring them up for you.

Congratulations and welcome to the forums!

markstache

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #4 on: June 02, 2013, 10:19:31 PM »
Bonus points if you can name my favorite (and very Mustachian) hobby from my icon picture.

I'll leave it for others to pick up. I've always played that at someone else's house. Need to introduce the missus to that. The wife and I played several rounds of Dominion last night. Your hobby is a good way to make a Mustachian fore-some.

jamccain

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2013, 10:46:57 PM »
But when they heard I was giving up the club?  Caddyshocked.

Ha ha, classic!

imustachemystash

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2013, 10:50:49 PM »
Hmmm, is your hobby quilting?

hybrid

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2013, 04:57:34 AM »
Hmmm, is your hobby quilting?

No, if the picture were larger and clearer you could see it is not a quilt pattern, but it sure looks like one...

cerberusss

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #8 on: June 03, 2013, 05:38:51 AM »
Hmmm, is your hobby quilting?

No, if the picture were larger and clearer you could see it is not a quilt pattern, but it sure looks like one...

Is that a picture of the Settlers of Catan board?

Because I've got a very inexpensive related hobby: with a group of colleagues, we leave work on time once a week, and at a colleague's house, play board games. We get some pizza and drinks, and play for the whole evening. Great fun, and does not cost you an arm and a leg.

hybrid

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #9 on: June 03, 2013, 07:02:46 AM »
Bing bing bing, we have a winner!  Yes indeed, most of my closest friends and I really enjoy Eurogaming, which must be even easier to find people to do in the Netherlands...  ;-)  I haven't played Settlers much in a long time (moved on to different games), but anyone who has ever played Eurogames will instantly recognize a Settlers board.

arebelspy

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #10 on: June 03, 2013, 07:21:13 AM »
I haven't played Settlers much in a long time (moved on to different games), but anyone who has ever played Eurogames will instantly recognize a Settlers board.

+1.  Saw it instantly from your first post.  We've been playing Dominion a lot, but have recently started moving on from that as well.

Congrats on your mindset switch, and prioritizing what is important to you!

I like how you said that even though you enjoy the club, you can't afford it right now because you're not FI. That's the kind of thinking I need too. Thanks for the reminder.

Totally agree.  I have a quite copied into my "Good Quotes" file from a poster on this board, sol, that reminds me of this and helps keep me in that mindset.  He said:
Quote
Personally, I consider myself "in the red" because I don't yet have enough assets to support my current lifestyle without working.  I'm living on borrowed time, because my current consumption obligates me to continue working and saving to grow my stash.  I won't think of myself as "out of debt" until I'm financially independent, because until then I'm borrowing from my own future.
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Jamesqf

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2013, 01:16:46 PM »
My friends and family were surprised to hear I had started biking home on occasion, and that I had lost weight...

Which is perhaps an added benefit of giving up the club: too many people think that because they've played a round or two of golf, they've gotten  exercise.

hybrid

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2013, 01:47:39 PM »
On a cart, I agree completely.  But I almost always walked (which was cheaper and healthier), and a five mile walk is a five mile walk.  Mrs Hybrid (who is a letter carrier and gets plenty of exercise already) usually took the cart.

My problem with weight came from all the usual suspects, but golf wasn't one of them.  It was one of the few positives in my favor.  Biking home from work (about a 45 minute ride) as much as I can will offset much of that.   

Jamesqf

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #13 on: June 03, 2013, 04:57:51 PM »
...a five mile walk is a five mile walk.

But a five mile walk with frequent breaks, though better than riding a cart, is still not a five mile run.  Did it get your heart rate up into the aerobic training range?

arebelspy

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #14 on: June 03, 2013, 06:30:43 PM »
...a five mile walk is a five mile walk.

But a five mile walk with frequent breaks, though better than riding a cart, is still not a five mile run.  Did it get your heart rate up into the aerobic training range?

Latest research actually indicates that may not matter.

In fact, if you expend the same amount of energy walking as running (which means you will likely have to do it 1.5-2x as long or so), walking may actually be better.

His five mile walk may be like running 3 miles or so.

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/05/29/is-it-better-to-walk-or-run/?ref=health

Quote
[N]ew science shows that walking can be at least as valuable as running—and in some instances, more so. A study published this month that again plumbed data from the Runners and Walkers Health Study found that both runners and walkers had equally diminished risks of developing age-related cataracts compared to sedentary people, an unexpected but excellent benefit of exercise.

And in perhaps the most comforting of the new studies, published last month in Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology and again using numbers from the versatile Runners and Walkers Health Study, runners had far less risk of high blood pressure, unhealthy cholesterol profiles, diabetes and heart disease than their sedentary peers. But the walkers were doing even better. Runners, for instance, reduced their risk of heart disease by about 4.5 percent if they ran an hour a day. Walkers who expended the same amount of energy per day reduced their risk of heart disease by more than 9 percent.

Of course, few walkers match the energy expenditure of runners. “It’s fair to say that, if you plan to expend the same energy walking as running, you have to walk about one and a half times as far and that it takes about twice as long,” said Paul T. Williams, a staff scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories...
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hybrid

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2013, 05:03:12 AM »
My completely unscientific opinion on the matter is that my body was well adapted to the long, slow walks that come from golf so I was probably "optimized" in how many calories I burned doing it.  You can't walk five miles without burning energy, but I bet my body burned less than some others.

The bike riding is pushing me into a different direction.  I work in downtown Richmond, which is by the James River.  So my ride home is a lot more uphill than down, and just over 7 miles.  Yes indeed, a much higher heart rate during that exercise as a result.

For senior citizens, golf and tennis can be great forms of exercise and I met several folks in my club who were well past traditional retirement that kept very fit by golfing several times a week because, well, a five mile walk is a five mile walk.  :)  If money is no issue, golf has much going for it once you get to a certain age.

Jamesqf

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Re: Caddyshock
« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2013, 11:36:02 AM »
Well, if golf's what floats your boat.  I prefer doing the 5 mile walk (often longer) on some trail or other in the local mountains, along with a couple of dogs.  Cheaper than golf, too, even adding in the cost of the dog food :-)