Author Topic: Rental Property & Net Worth  (Read 7930 times)

Nudel

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Rental Property & Net Worth
« on: August 19, 2013, 06:16:48 PM »
Hello landlords, how do you calculate the rental property towards your net worth?

For example, let's say a property is taxed at $100K, an estate agent says it's valued at $115, it's insured for $120. Which number would you use? In the example I assume there is no mortgage because you've used your awesome mustache funds to pay in cash for the house at some point.

Daleth

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Re: Rental Property & Net Worth
« Reply #1 on: August 19, 2013, 06:20:18 PM »
The taxation value is totally irrelevant to everything on earth other than property tax.

I wouldn't bet on anything other than what it would sell for on the open market, minus the real estate agent's commission and all seller-paid closing costs.

honobob

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Re: Rental Property & Net Worth
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2013, 12:38:59 PM »
You're describing a liquidation value.  Net worth would just be market value minus liabilities.

Johnny Aloha

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Re: Rental Property & Net Worth
« Reply #3 on: August 20, 2013, 05:42:32 PM »
Net worth would just be market value minus liabilities.

This.

mpbaker22

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Re: Rental Property & Net Worth
« Reply #4 on: August 20, 2013, 06:02:52 PM »
In the example I assume there is no mortgage because you've used your awesome mustache funds to pay in cash for the house at some point.

Bad assumption.  I am in the process of buying my first place.  I'm putting 20% down and taking out the largest loan I can, even though I have another 20-40% in stocks.  I think my stocks will get a better return than my interest rate.  I think many other people here are doing the same, if not using the other cash to buy more properties.

I will be counting the market value minus my mortgage towards the net worth.

Daleth

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Re: Rental Property & Net Worth
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2013, 10:26:23 AM »
In the example I assume there is no mortgage because you've used your awesome mustache funds to pay in cash for the house at some point.

Bad assumption.  I am in the process of buying my first place.  I'm putting 20% down and taking out the largest loan I can, even though I have another 20-40% in stocks.  I think my stocks will get a better return than my interest rate.  I think many other people here are doing the same, if not using the other cash to buy more properties.

I will be counting the market value minus my mortgage towards the net worth.

The mortgage-free thing was just for my example. Good point about the rate of return. If the return on the rental property was higher than what could be achieved through stocks or other investment vehicles it could change the plan.

It certainly is in my case. We've got two rentals whose rate of returns are, respectively, 18% and 26% (I'm rounding). Because the rent is more than covering the cost of the mortgage (i.e. the renters are buying our house for us), I don't even count that when I calculate the ROR. I base the ROR on the following:
A: What we put into it to buy it and get it ready to rent (down payment, closing costs, renovation/spiffing up costs). This is our only actual investment, since as mentioned above the renters are paying the mortgage for us.
B: What it's bringing in per year ABOVE AND BEYOND the cost of the mortgage (in other words if the mortgage is $850 and the rent is $1850--which it is in one case (mortgage is in the $830's, for purposes of this post I'm rounding up)--then it's bringing in $12k a year).

Then divide A into B, and voila, ROR. I should probably add up maintenance costs each year, and if I did it would bring down the ROR, but not by much. That being said, I should probably also factor in the fact that the renters are buying us an appreciating asset, which would boost the ROR, but what am I, an accountant?!?! No.

hybrid

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Re: Rental Property & Net Worth
« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2013, 01:58:57 PM »
In the example I assume there is no mortgage because you've used your awesome mustache funds to pay in cash for the house at some point.

Bad assumption.  I am in the process of buying my first place.  I'm putting 20% down and taking out the largest loan I can, even though I have another 20-40% in stocks.  I think my stocks will get a better return than my interest rate.  I think many other people here are doing the same, if not using the other cash to buy more properties.

I will be counting the market value minus my mortgage towards the net worth.

+1 regarding value, but it's all relative anyway.  If we had to sell the rental home for some reason we would lose part of the value to our realtor and another part to capital gains.  In our case the goal is to pay off the mortgage in the next three years.  We have a large amount of retirement money in equities already.  It's a more conservative play for us, but we are at an age where a more conservative play makes some sense.   

Nords

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Re: Rental Property & Net Worth
« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2013, 10:02:21 PM »
If we had to sell the rental home for some reason we would lose part of the value to our realtor and another part to capital gains. 
In the U.S. you'd also lose a chunk of the profits to depreciation recapture taxes, and depending on the size of the gains you might be subject to a huge serving of AMT.

"Value of the rental property" is an interesting question.  Most people count on their residence's equity because the cap gains might be sheltered from taxes.  Not so easy to do with rentals if you're trying to raise cash.  Our rental property has a pretty healthy assessment, and it compares well to the market appraisals, but I suspect we'd lose at least 20% of the sale to taxes.