Author Topic: Not to be morbid but....  (Read 3375 times)

RaveOregon

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Not to be morbid but....
« on: November 27, 2013, 01:54:01 PM »
Has anyone had any experience with a tenant who dies?

Can't find a ton of info on that situation and I am curious of anyone has had any experience with it. For the record I am not asking this retroactively; no one is actually dead.

Russ

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Re: Not to be morbid but....
« Reply #1 on: November 27, 2013, 02:00:43 PM »
This has happened to a relative of mine a long time ago. I think the cops took the body and all the tenant's stuff went in the trash when nobody came to pick it up.

Boz86

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Re: Not to be morbid but....
« Reply #2 on: November 27, 2013, 03:19:46 PM »
Depending on the circumstances/jurisdiction you may have to get a Hazmat crew in to clean.

Frankies Girl

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Re: Not to be morbid but....
« Reply #3 on: November 27, 2013, 05:53:46 PM »
I'm not a landlord, but I did hire a crime scene cleanup group to take care of my dad's hoarder house. They rocked. Expensive for a full hoarding situation, (worth every penny tho) but I imagine it isn't too terrible for the "spot" cleaning in the event of a violent/messy/undiscovered death. They remove anything that was in contact with the deceased or contaminated with body fluids - furnishings, carpet/flooring, and deal with cleaning the area using proper equipment/biological cleaners and properly dispose of everything. They will not clean the whole house or remove non-compromised items, and in some cases, they might leave cut out holes in carpeting or drywall, but some can repair (depends on the crew's expertise and how much you want to pay them as opposed to just getting a regular contractor in to repair). Your insurance may cover the costs, and you can discuss with the cleaner and your agent to make sure before contracting them in.

I would imagine if it's a non-violent death that is discovered quickly (before the body starts to decompose) then you'd just need to call in to the local law enforcement (non-emergency number, but I can't imagine that you'd get in trouble for calling 911 for a dead body) to get the ball rolling on the body removal and get clearance to remove property. I'd clean out the fridge or any food issues and make sure there are no pets that need care, but otherwise leave it alone for at least a week after if it was a non-crime.

I'd also make sure that anyone you're renting to has an emergency contact. In the event your tenant dies, you can make sure to give to the authorities and then contact after to find out who can come get the property/furnishings (although I'd give it at least a week or two before bothering bereaved family). I would think you should contact a lawyer to see what your state laws are regarding disposition of the property and make sure there's no specific responsibilities and the minimum amount of time that you need to give them to remove the property. If they owe you money, you'd need to contact the estate/family member and submit a formal claim on the estate.


http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090303203426AAVwf4k
^a little info there

and boy am I coming across as crazy morbid... :D
« Last Edit: November 27, 2013, 06:03:08 PM by Frankies Girl »

Nords

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Re: Not to be morbid but....
« Reply #4 on: November 30, 2013, 10:28:31 PM »
Has anyone had any experience with a tenant who dies?
Can't find a ton of info on that situation and I am curious of anyone has had any experience with it. For the record I am not asking this retroactively; no one is actually dead.
Well, this is certainly going to dampen your landlord aspirations.

I guess at some point you'd have to figure out who's executing the will, and make sure that the deceased's possessions are returned to them.  Your state tenant-landlord code will help you figure out whether you're obligated to store their belongings until the executor takes possession, and also help you determine how to claim any unpaid rent or storage charges. 

tryan

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Re: Not to be morbid but....
« Reply #5 on: December 02, 2013, 08:36:49 AM »
Really only an issue if the person lived alone.  I the ones I had (hanging in basement & heart attack) the surviving family dealt with it.

SunshineGirl

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Re: Not to be morbid but....
« Reply #6 on: December 02, 2013, 09:40:49 AM »
We had a tenant die in a bike accident, so not on the property, thank goodness. The police got in touch with us looking for next of kin, which we were able to provide from the application. We asked the father if he'd prefer we box things up or if he wanted to do it (we did it), and I think all his furniture was donated to Goodwill.

The father was an easy person to work with, which made things relatively easy.