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Learning, Sharing, and Teaching => Real Estate and Landlording => Topic started by: KateFIRE on May 01, 2021, 10:07:42 PM

Title: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: KateFIRE on May 01, 2021, 10:07:42 PM
I just want to rant. It seems to me that there is some strategy to pricing low. It puts the seller in control and gets the buys to waive appraisals and inspections. Itís raising home prices everywhere and there are no consequences to this strategy because they donít have to sell the house to you even if you offer asking price and they have no other offers! Forcing the sale if they have no other offers and they refuse to sell would make sellers price higher and the power would come back to the buyer. People donít waive appraisals and inspections when they offer under asking price.

We have offered on 6 homes in Colorado. We have offered above asking price on every house. On Wednesday we offered on a house $11k over asking price. It had just been listed, but the buyers wanted to wait until Monday to collect offers all weekend so they didnít accept our offer. Our offer expired, but I bet they told the other buyers ďwe have another offer above asking priceĒ. This is a white lie because our offer expired!

Also every house that we have offered on we offer on twice, once the original offer and again after our realtor hears about how many offers they have over asking price and ďI donít feel comfortable saying, but significantly higherĒ offers. Then the realtor says ďdo you want to offer again?Ē, but what if these other offers are made up? They donít show you the other offers and the winning offer is not required to buy the home or pay anything if they decline after winning. There could be some major fraud with this system! You go to jail for years for stealing $10k from a store, but I bet there are plenty of realtors who manipulate bidding wars to the tune of thousands and have no consequences.

Another strategy with pricing low is that if they donít get the bidding war that they want, sellers can relist at a higher price. Relisting higher makes the home seem desirable, like you had so much attention you had to relist higher! Instead of lowering the price which says ďwe are having trouble selling, you can offer less than askingĒ. So listing low and getting the bidding war is a power move for sellers, but also leads to the potential for lying realtors and fraud.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Malcat on May 01, 2021, 10:22:31 PM
Of course there is a strategy to pricing low.

However, where I live, people usually price low if they are holding offers. Meaning, they'll list for a limited time and the owners won't see any offers until the end of that time, at which point they see all the offers at once.

They usually price 15% below what they want, and then the hotter the market, the higher over asking the top offers will be.

Hot markets encourage lying and fraud regardless of whether or not a listing is listed low. That's just the nature of insane markets, crazy shit starts happening.

Hot markets suck for buyers, they just do. I'm sorry you're stuck trying to buy at an epically bad time. I know it's frustrating.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: KateFIRE on May 01, 2021, 10:33:24 PM
Do you feel that there is something that could be done to cut down on the fraud? What about making offers visible to all parties?

Yes, Iíll admit that Iím sad that we keep losing. We are a family of 5, 2 adults working + 3 kids, and we canít seem to buy after selling our house a few months ago. We are strongly considering giving up on living in Colorado and moving to Texas. I guess we are too stubborn to overpay, which fills us with regret. Now we are considering moving everyone to a new community and new schools. Itís really sad.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: secondcor521 on May 01, 2021, 11:06:53 PM
Do you feel that there is something that could be done to cut down on the fraud? What about making offers visible to all parties?

Yes, Iíll admit that Iím sad that we keep losing. We are a family of 5, 2 adults working and we canít seem to buy after selling our house a few months ago. We are strongly considering giving up on living in Colorado and moving to Texas. I guess we are too stubborn to overpay, which fills us with regret. Now we are considering moving everyone to a new community and new schools. Itís really sad.

Someone somewhere else mentioned that as part of their escalation clause that the seller had to show them a copy of the other offer.

Around here it used to be that earnest money was actually held in escrow when an offer was made.  Then if an offer was accepted and then the buyer backed out or reneged for a non-legitimate reason (as determined by a court or arbitration in case of disagreement) then the seller got the escrow funds.  I understand now that is not necessarily how things are done nowadays and that the earnest money is only escrowed in case of an accepted offer.

I agree it's frustrating to be a buyer.  My DS26 will be a FTHB soon, and the market here is as hot as it has ever been.  On the one hand, I don't want him to overpay in a hot market.  On the other hand, I don't want him to be forever chasing his entry into home ownership.  Lately I think my advice to him will be to save up, make offers he feels good about, be patient and keep at it until it works out.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Psychstache on May 02, 2021, 12:04:15 AM
Do you feel that there is something that could be done to cut down on the fraud? What about making offers visible to all parties?

Yes, Iíll admit that Iím sad that we keep losing. We are a family of 5, 2 adults working and we canít seem to buy after selling our house a few months ago. We are strongly considering giving up on living in Colorado and moving to Texas. I guess we are too stubborn to overpay, which fills us with regret. Now we are considering moving everyone to a new community and new schools. Itís really sad.

LOL if this is how you fell sure hope you are not considering any major metro area in Texas. Same issues you describe but the weather sucks.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: KateFIRE on May 02, 2021, 12:16:08 AM
I am a long time Texan before we moved to Colorado, so I can say with confidence that you get more house for your money in metro Texas than in metro Colorado.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: onecoolcat on May 02, 2021, 12:38:13 AM
Everyone is chasing a limited supply of homes right now.  There will be a correction eventually its a sellers market for the foreseeable future.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: AccidentialMustache on May 02, 2021, 06:49:41 AM
We're looking to sell a home in flyover country and hearing similar things from our realtor. Buyers they are working with are in multiple-offer-with-escalation-clauses and still not winning a home. This only got bad in the last few months and is largely a supply problem. There are ~20% or less of the normal homes on the market. If you need one, you pay or you don't get it.

It is very strange, because we sailed through the 2008/2009 crash with barely a blip. No drop, no recovery. House prices have never been exploding here (too much farmland to build on keeps the price down), but the housing market isn't capable of building new supply on the timeframe of constrained used supply due to covid.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: clarkfan1979 on May 02, 2021, 07:26:32 AM
Of course there is a strategy to pricing low.

However, where I live, people usually price low if they are holding offers. Meaning, they'll list for a limited time and the owners won't see any offers until the end of that time, at which point they see all the offers at once.

They usually price 15% below what they want, and then the hotter the market, the higher over asking the top offers will be.

Hot markets encourage lying and fraud regardless of whether or not a listing is listed low. That's just the nature of insane markets, crazy shit starts happening.

Hot markets suck for buyers, they just do. I'm sorry you're stuck trying to buy at an epically bad time. I know it's frustrating.

I realize that you are ranting and it is frustrating. However, I would try to come up with a strategy. I agree that lying and fraud are more likely to occur in hot markets. Listing price doesn't seem relevant.

I bought a foreclosure in June 2018. The bank listed it too low on purpose. However, I was able to use this too my advantage. In psychology, people will anchor to the list price, even though the list price has no real value.

The median price for the neighborhood was around 800K. The bank listed the home for 549K. The house needed about 100K worth of work or 50K if I did some of the work myself.

We offered 603K, which was 10% over asking. After all bids were collected we were told that there were 9 offers total and we were #2. After one week the highest bidder lost interest and the deal went to us.

The house appraised for 615K "as is". We made 50K of necessary repairs and it was immediately worth 750K. After 3 years of appreciation, it's now worth around 950K. The median price of the neighborhood is now around one million.

In the end, I was thankful the bank listed the house too low. It's pretty much the main reason why I was able to get the house. We had previously looked at around 20-25 houses for about 18 months.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: maizefolk on May 02, 2021, 07:40:01 AM
I understand your frustration, KateFIRE. This is the second thread you've posted about not liking the way housing prices/markets work right now, at least the second one I've read. It sounds really hard.

That said, I don't think laws about listing prices are going to do anything to address the fundamental issue that lots of people with lots of money are trying to buy a limited number of houses which gives sellers a lot of power and potential buyers much less. If such a law existed, people would just list their houses for 5x as much as they hoped to sell for, and still ask people to put in whatever their "best" offer was even though all the offers would be below the asking price.

I'd just say recognize that the frustration you are feeling right now isn't the result of anyone acting unethically. Not sellers who would like to get as much money as they can for their house (wouldn't you in their place?) and not the other potential buyers who are willing to spend as much money as they can to own a house (wouldn't you in their place?). It is the result of this fundamental mismatch in supply and demand that isn't any particular person's fault, yet creates effects on how each of us lives our lives. Getting angry at the others swept up in the same supply/demand mismatch isn't going to change anyone's behavior. It will, however, make you feel worse than you already do to no particular end.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Malcat on May 02, 2021, 08:35:37 AM
Of course there is a strategy to pricing low.

However, where I live, people usually price low if they are holding offers. Meaning, they'll list for a limited time and the owners won't see any offers until the end of that time, at which point they see all the offers at once.

They usually price 15% below what they want, and then the hotter the market, the higher over asking the top offers will be.

Hot markets encourage lying and fraud regardless of whether or not a listing is listed low. That's just the nature of insane markets, crazy shit starts happening.

Hot markets suck for buyers, they just do. I'm sorry you're stuck trying to buy at an epically bad time. I know it's frustrating.

I realize that you are ranting and it is frustrating. However, I would try to come up with a strategy. I agree that lying and fraud are more likely to occur in hot markets. Listing price doesn't seem relevant.

I bought a foreclosure in June 2018. The bank listed it too low on purpose. However, I was able to use this too my advantage. In psychology, people will anchor to the list price, even though the list price has no real value.

The median price for the neighborhood was around 800K. The bank listed the home for 549K. The house needed about 100K worth of work or 50K if I did some of the work myself.

We offered 603K, which was 10% over asking. After all bids were collected we were told that there were 9 offers total and we were #2. After one week the highest bidder lost interest and the deal went to us.

The house appraised for 615K "as is". We made 50K of necessary repairs and it was immediately worth 750K. After 3 years of appreciation, it's now worth around 950K. The median price of the neighborhood is now around one million.

In the end, I was thankful the bank listed the house too low. It's pretty much the main reason why I was able to get the house. We had previously looked at around 20-25 houses for about 18 months.

Are you saying I'm ranting?

I'm not ranting at all. I know about listing low because I did it myself.

I'm also not ranting about fraud in hot markets, it's just a reality of hot markets. Some agents will get caught, some won't. That's the nature of fraud.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Roland of Gilead on May 02, 2021, 08:47:06 AM
I *think* the market is going to improve, but not very soon.   Building materials are so high right now that "used" homes are actually underpriced still in some areas and there are not as many new builds going on because people are waiting for materials to come down in price.

There is a hidden high inflation going on out there which is not being reported by the government although people like Buffett acknowledge it.

https://news.yahoo.com/warren-buffett-we-are-seeing-substantial-inflation-and-are-raising-prices-220539307.html (https://news.yahoo.com/warren-buffett-we-are-seeing-substantial-inflation-and-are-raising-prices-220539307.html)
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: norajean on May 02, 2021, 08:49:24 AM
Report fraudulent behavior to your local board of realtors.  Otherwise, get on with your purchase strategy.  Move down the price scale to where you can blow other buyers out of the water with your high bid.  Ask to see the competing offers.  Never waive appraisal or inspection.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Cranky on May 02, 2021, 09:10:36 AM
Even here in flyover country, houses are selling fast with multiple offers. It is what it is. I'm glad we bought our new house last fall, for sure.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Roland of Gilead on May 02, 2021, 09:26:29 AM
It is for a different topic but they really need to raise interest rates to get a handle on this situation.   Way too much easy loan money out there which is why people can buy $800,000 homes on a $100,000 income.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: jeromedawg on May 02, 2021, 10:00:35 AM
It is for a different topic but they really need to raise interest rates to get a handle on this situation.   Way too much easy loan money out there which is why people can buy $800,000 homes on a $100,000 income.

I'm very curious about this because a lot of people say that lending standards have tightened (e.g. the hair dresser making $50k can no longer take a $600k loan or whatever).
How is this situation that much different? I guess more people are putting in way higher down payments? My lender told me I could take a loan out that was at least 5-6x my salary. It only takes one bit of long term job loss to really screw things over if I were to actually take a loan that big.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: jeromedawg on May 02, 2021, 10:02:55 AM
Report fraudulent behavior to your local board of realtors.  Otherwise, get on with your purchase strategy.  Move down the price scale to where you can blow other buyers out of the water with your high bid.  Ask to see the competing offers.  Never waive appraisal or inspection.

If you come in at all cash, you may not need to waive either of those. But I think YMMV depending on the location. If it's a super hot on fire market like the Bay Area or SoCal, I think the 'expectation' is that you'll still waive the appraisal, because it seems to me like there often multiple cash offers lined up...all with people very much willing to waive all contingencies :T
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Malcat on May 02, 2021, 10:08:28 AM
It is for a different topic but they really need to raise interest rates to get a handle on this situation.   Way too much easy loan money out there which is why people can buy $800,000 homes on a $100,000 income.

If this is the obvious solution, then why do you think it hasn't been done?

Housing market cooling is a major priority here in Canada, but for various reasons, raising the prime rate isn't one of the approaches the government is proposing.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Psychstache on May 02, 2021, 10:36:27 AM
Everyone is chasing a limited supply of homes right now.  There will be a correction eventually its a sellers market for the foreseeable future.

No doubt, but you are still going to be getting into nonstop multi offer bidding wars down here, so that doesn't solve OPs problem.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Dicey on May 02, 2021, 10:40:48 AM
Some day, when you're the seller, you'll hope for a situation like this again. Real Estate is always, always cyclical.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Paul der Krake on May 02, 2021, 11:33:01 AM
Be mad at your local government and the NIMBYs for restricting the supply of housing.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Abe on May 02, 2021, 08:13:10 PM
The government cannot force someone to sell private property if they have not been found guilty of a illegal action. An offer is just that, an offer to provide money for the house. The seller is not obligated to sell unless your contract specifically says that. The asking price is just a starting point, everyone knows that.

I think people are in bidding wars because the news is constantly yammering about record-low interest rates. It's not worth saving a few dozen (yes dozen) dollars a month on your mortgage for an unsatisfactory house. There will be other houses and honestly whatever someone is looking at that isn't being bought for them through a shell corporation isn't that unique. Something similar will show up again eventually. In the meantime it's probably a good idea to not get caught up into whatever this wave is going to crash into. I guess the difference now is that theoretically everyone over-spending on houses can afford to do so, thus it won't be a giant wave of defaults.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: FINate on May 02, 2021, 10:37:28 PM
I just want to rant. It seems to me that there is some strategy to pricing low. It puts the seller in control and gets the buys to waive appraisals and inspections. Itís raising home prices everywhere and there are no consequences to this strategy because they donít have to sell the house to you even if you offer asking price and they have no other offers! Forcing the sale if they have no other offers and they refuse to sell would make sellers price higher and the power would come back to the buyer. People donít waive appraisals and inspections when they offer under asking price.

People waive appraisals and inspections to sweeten the offer. That this is happening on all cash over asking offers only shows how imbalanced the RE market is. To the extent that this doesn't happen with lower offers is more likely because of financing requirements. That is, it's coincidental rather than causal.

Besides, if this idea ever became law (not gonna happen) it still wouldn't work. Instead, sellers would list with an exceptionally high price (say 150% of approximate market value) knowing they will get a bunch of competing bellow asking offers such that the true market value is discovered without triggering an accidental forced sell for less.

As others have mentioned, the real culprit isn't individual sellers or the real estate industry. It's governments beholden to existing homeowners that have done everything in their power to stop development of new housing, usually in the name of "neighborhood character" or a faux-environmentalism that has more to do with protecting one's view of nature than actually protecting the planet.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Malcat on May 03, 2021, 06:55:56 AM
I just want to rant. It seems to me that there is some strategy to pricing low. It puts the seller in control and gets the buys to waive appraisals and inspections. Itís raising home prices everywhere and there are no consequences to this strategy because they donít have to sell the house to you even if you offer asking price and they have no other offers! Forcing the sale if they have no other offers and they refuse to sell would make sellers price higher and the power would come back to the buyer. People donít waive appraisals and inspections when they offer under asking price.

People waive appraisals and inspections to sweeten the offer. That this is happening on all cash over asking offers only shows how imbalanced the RE market is. To the extent that this doesn't happen with lower offers is more likely because of financing requirements. That is, it's coincidental rather than causal.

Besides, if this idea ever became law (not gonna happen) it still wouldn't work. Instead, sellers would list with an exceptionally high price (say 150% of approximate market value) knowing they will get a bunch of competing bellow asking offers such that the true market value is discovered without triggering an accidental forced sell for less.

As others have mentioned, the real culprit isn't individual sellers or the real estate industry. It's governments beholden to existing homeowners that have done everything in their power to stop development of new housing, usually in the name of "neighborhood character" or a faux-environmentalism that has more to do with protecting one's view of nature than actually protecting the planet.

Is it?

Because our market is absolutely insane up here where I am in Canada and no one is suppressing development. It's actively being encouraged in my area.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Roland of Gilead on May 03, 2021, 08:20:14 AM

Because our market is absolutely insane up here where I am in Canada and no one is suppressing development. It's actively being encouraged in my area.

Then why is your market so insane there?  Canada has cheap lumber and a good amount of area to build.   I guess the population is concentrated in just a tiny portion though which is the main reason real estate is expensive there?
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Malcat on May 03, 2021, 08:50:58 AM

Because our market is absolutely insane up here where I am in Canada and no one is suppressing development. It's actively being encouraged in my area.

Then why is your market so insane there?  Canada has cheap lumber and a good amount of area to build.   I guess the population is concentrated in just a tiny portion though which is the main reason real estate is expensive there?

Yeah, like 90% of our population lives in cities, and we don't have many of those. Plus we don't just have domestic buyers, we also have foreign investors buying properties in our biggest cities.

The market is fucking bonkers at this moment though because supply dropped so much with covid. There are multiple high rises going in within a few blocks from me, but those won't do anything to cool the market right now.

People just don't want to sell right now, too many unknowns, so everyone is hunkering down.

My mom just sold a plot of land that for 95K, which she couldn't even sell for 45K a few years ago. Buyers are desperate. It's not that there isn't land, there is, but land close enough to resources is tricky to find. We don't have countless smaller communities.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: minority_finance_mo on May 03, 2021, 09:19:37 AM
As someone saving as a first-time homebuyer at this point in my late 20s, it's really disheartening to see the price of homes increase so significantly in the last year. Makes you feel like if you didn't get on the boat in time, you're left off the ride. I bet you that's what's driving some of this erratic behavior also.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Dicey on May 03, 2021, 09:24:20 AM
I want to add that government restrictions on setting home prices is about the worst idea ever. Allowing Supply and Demand to determine housing prices is the absolute fairest way to go about it.

To anyone who complains about housing prices, I suggest some serious self examination. Do you have cable? A giant-screen TV? Anything Apple, especially a late-model I-phone? Monthly subscriptions? A fancy car? Eat out? Use Door Dash? Buy brand-new clothes? Take expensive vacations? Further, are you doing everything you can to maximize your income?

As a singleton who never made a lot of money and always lived in a HCOLA, my first two properties required creative thinking and sacrifice. It was absolutely worth the effort.

To @minority_finance_mo's cross post. Study the history of the real estate market. It is always cyclical. Buy low, sell high doesn't just apply to the stock market. FOMO is arguably the worst reason to buy a house you can't afford.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Roland of Gilead on May 03, 2021, 09:39:51 AM
I want to add that government restrictions on setting home prices is about the worst idea ever. Allowing Supply and Demand to determine housing prices is the absolute fairest way to go about it.

Not really.   The problem with saying it should just be supply and demand is that the government heavily regulates the housing market with zoning, permits, tax laws, etc.   

It is like the drug market.  People are clamoring to have the government step in and regulated drug prices because supply and demand just doesn't work.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: maizefolk on May 03, 2021, 09:53:48 AM
As someone saving as a first-time homebuyer at this point in my late 20s, it's really disheartening to see the price of homes increase so significantly in the last year. Makes you feel like if you didn't get on the boat in time, you're left off the ride. I bet you that's what's driving some of this erratic behavior also.

I can completely understand feeling that way. And I suspect you are right that a lot of people are all feeling that way is part of what is driving the spike in home prices, which in turn is making even more people feel disheartened and/or that buying a house right now has become an urgent priority. Despite the very real root causes*, it becomes something of a self-reinforcing cycle.

*Low interest rates, highly paid people with newly remote jobs moving out of VHCOL cities to HCOL or MCOL cities, people being willing to spend more on homes when they've been mostly shut up inside their house/apartment for a year, frustration with constantly losing bidding wars (like the OP) leading people to conclude "screw it, I'm putting in an offer for 30% over asking, let's just get this done.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: secondcor521 on May 03, 2021, 09:59:11 AM
As someone saving as a first-time homebuyer at this point in my late 20s, it's really disheartening to see the price of homes increase so significantly in the last year. Makes you feel like if you didn't get on the boat in time, you're left off the ride. I bet you that's what's driving some of this erratic behavior also.

I can completely understand feeling that way. And I suspect you are right that a lot of people are all feeling that way is part of what is driving the spike in home prices, which in turn is making even more people feel disheartened and/or that buying a house right now has become an urgent priority. Despite the very real root causes*, it becomes something of a self-reinforcing cycle.

*Low interest rates, highly paid people with newly remote jobs moving out of VHCOL cities to HCOL or MCOL cities, people being willing to spend more on homes when they've been mostly shut up inside their house/apartment for a year, frustration with constantly losing bidding wars (like the OP) leading people to conclude "screw it, I'm putting in an offer for 30% over asking, let's just get this done.

Another feedback loop is on the supply side.  Some people considering selling may see prices rising rapidly and think either "Well, let's list later when we can get 20% more" and/or "We can sell for a lot, but that means we're going to have to pay more for our replacement home"  Neither of these are Homo economicus thoughts, but still possible.

I dunno what breaks these cycles.  They probably just break like a fever dream.  Perhaps interest rates go up and the price drops shake up the market zeitgeist.  Or a modest recession happens and people get scared.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: GuitarStv on May 03, 2021, 10:02:09 AM
I want to add that government restrictions on setting home prices is about the worst idea ever. Allowing Supply and Demand to determine housing prices is the absolute fairest way to go about it.

If we're going that way, then all government home ownership incentives should be removed.

My understanding is that in the US there isn't taxation of rental incomes, there are tax deductions for mortgage/property tax, and there is not always a tax on capital gains for homes.  So the government is already pretty heavily involved in altering supply/demand.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Roland of Gilead on May 03, 2021, 10:05:06 AM
If we're going that way, then all government home ownership incentives should be removed.

My understanding is that in the US there isn't taxation of rental incomes, there are tax deductions for mortgage/property tax, and there is not always a tax on capital gains for homes.  So the government is already pretty heavily involved in altering supply/demand.

In addition to those, you also have some local tax issues that are grossly unfair, like California's real estate tax.   You can have one person in a house paying $5,000 a year in tax and a person in the exact same style/size house next door paying $15,000 a year or more.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: minority_finance_mo on May 03, 2021, 11:46:38 AM
In addition to those, you also have some local tax issues that are grossly unfair, like California's real estate tax.   You can have one person in a house paying $5,000 a year in tax and a person in the exact same style/size house next door paying $15,000 a year or more.

Why would that be?
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: maizefolk on May 03, 2021, 12:03:16 PM
In addition to those, you also have some local tax issues that are grossly unfair, like California's real estate tax.   You can have one person in a house paying $5,000 a year in tax and a person in the exact same style/size house next door paying $15,000 a year or more.

Why would that be?

California passed prop 13 back in the 1970s which restricts the growth of property taxes while the same person owns a property to well below the rate of inflation (less alone the rate of growth in property values).

While this was passed with good intentions -- don't want people kicked out of their homes because they cannot afford the growing tax bill -- it has functioned to shift the cost of running the state from older and, in aggregate, much wealthier households who have lived in the same house for decades onto younger and, in aggregate, poorer households who bought their houses much more recently.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Dicey on May 03, 2021, 12:07:53 PM
I want to add that government restrictions on setting home prices is about the worst idea ever. Allowing Supply and Demand to determine housing prices is the absolute fairest way to go about it.

If we're going that way, then all government home ownership incentives should be removed.

My understanding is that in the US there isn't taxation of rental incomes, there are tax deductions for mortgage/property tax, and there is not always a tax on capital gains for homes.  So the government is already pretty heavily involved in altering supply/demand.
I'm not a tax professional, but I am damn sure I pay taxes on my rental income. I am also positive i paid a shitload of capital gains taxes on the portion of the gains that were over the (relatively modest for a HCOLA) limit. Paging @seattlecyclone.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: FINate on May 03, 2021, 12:27:08 PM
Is it?

Because our market is absolutely insane up here where I am in Canada and no one is suppressing development. It's actively being encouraged in my area.

Markets are not isolated islands, especially in a remote work world. I can't speak to what's going on in Canada, but in the USA no-growth West Coast regions are essentially exporting their manufactured housing shortage (https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/12/business/economy/california-housing-crisis.html). Even pro-growth areas are having difficulty keeping up with the surge in demand, made worse by COVID shortages. It's a mess, though hopefully areas actually building housing will catch up in a year or so.

Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: seattlecyclone on May 03, 2021, 12:33:31 PM
I want to add that government restrictions on setting home prices is about the worst idea ever. Allowing Supply and Demand to determine housing prices is the absolute fairest way to go about it.

If we're going that way, then all government home ownership incentives should be removed.

My understanding is that in the US there isn't taxation of rental incomes, there are tax deductions for mortgage/property tax, and there is not always a tax on capital gains for homes.  So the government is already pretty heavily involved in altering supply/demand.
I'm not a tax professional, but I am damn sure I pay taxes on my rental income. I am also positive i paid a shitload of capital gains taxes on the portion of the gains that were over the (relatively modest for a HCOLA) limit. Paging @seattlecyclone.

True, taxes are definitely owed on rental income. You do get to deduct expenses such as repairs, mortgage interest, and depreciation against that rental income, and you only pay tax on the net. The depreciation bit especially makes it so that many landlords show a loss on paper even when the unit is cash-flow positive. There's a provision called a "1031 exchange" that lets you sell a rental property, buy another one, and defer any capital gains taxes until you sell the second property. Then if you hold that rental home until you pass away the cost basis steps up to market (wiping out any unrealized gains) and your heirs get to start the depreciation all over again based on the structure's value at that time. Do it right and rental properties can be a really nice tax shelter.

Note that I have zero first-hand expertise with landlording so my knowledge in this area is at more of a surface level than the aspects of the tax code I have experienced myself.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Michael in ABQ on May 03, 2021, 08:34:58 PM
It is for a different topic but they really need to raise interest rates to get a handle on this situation.   Way too much easy loan money out there which is why people can buy $800,000 homes on a $100,000 income.

If this is the obvious solution, then why do you think it hasn't been done?


The US government has just added $5-6 trillion in debt in the last 15 months or so. Right now that's all borrowed money with nominal interest. Raise interest rates and all of the sudden the $400 billion in interest on our $28 trillion in national debt becomes $600 billion or $800 billion. And to think, a decade ago our national debt was half what it is today (roughly $14 trillion in 2011.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Malcat on May 03, 2021, 08:42:05 PM
It is for a different topic but they really need to raise interest rates to get a handle on this situation.   Way too much easy loan money out there which is why people can buy $800,000 homes on a $100,000 income.

If this is the obvious solution, then why do you think it hasn't been done?


The US government has just added $5-6 trillion in debt in the last 15 months or so. Right now that's all borrowed money with nominal interest. Raise interest rates and all of the sudden the $400 billion in interest on our $28 trillion in national debt becomes $600 billion or $800 billion. And to think, a decade ago our national debt was half what it is today (roughly $14 trillion in 2011.

So then not actually a good solution I gather.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: The_Dude on May 04, 2021, 12:07:58 AM
Weíve been house hunting in California and have family friends that are realtors and brokers. Most of them have been doing this since the 90ís and theyíve never seen the level of bidding wars going on. As others have said, inventory is crazy low.

One of the houses we bid on sold for $50k over asking and had 27 offers. They only accepted offers for 48 hours (becoming the norm). Another house we bid on sold for $100k over asking and received 50 offers in 48 hours. It is insane!!
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Dicey on May 04, 2021, 01:05:23 AM
I want to add that government restrictions on setting home prices is about the worst idea ever. Allowing Supply and Demand to determine housing prices is the absolute fairest way to go about it.

If we're going that way, then all government home ownership incentives should be removed.

My understanding is that in the US there isn't taxation of rental incomes, there are tax deductions for mortgage/property tax, and there is not always a tax on capital gains for homes.  So the government is already pretty heavily involved in altering supply/demand.
I'm not a tax professional, but I am damn sure I pay taxes on my rental income. I am also positive i paid a shitload of capital gains taxes on the portion of the gains that were over the (relatively modest for a HCOLA) limit. Paging @seattlecyclone.

True, taxes are definitely owed on rental income. You do get to deduct expenses such as repairs, mortgage interest, and depreciation against that rental income, and you only pay tax on the net. The depreciation bit especially makes it so that many landlords show a loss on paper even when the unit is cash-flow positive. There's a provision called a "1031 exchange" that lets you sell a rental property, buy another one, and defer any capital gains taxes until you sell the second property. Then if you hold that rental home until you pass away the cost basis steps up to market (wiping out any unrealized gains) and your heirs get to start the depreciation all over again based on the structure's value at that time. Do it right and rental properties can be a really nice tax shelter.

Note that I have zero first-hand expertise with landlording so my knowledge in this area is at more of a surface level than the aspects of the tax code I have experienced myself.
Thanks @seattlecyclone!
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Linea_Norway on May 04, 2021, 03:24:43 AM
Laws for fining brokers who make the listing price too low exist, in Norway. Here, a listing price should be so realistic that a seller wants to sell for it. When we sold our house, the broker clearly communicated that to us. Sometimes we read in the paper that some house is listed too low, but that often reaches the news.
Brokers are also by law mandated to provide a list of offers to the buyer, so that the buyer can investigate how realistic the other offers were. Normal procedure is that each offer is communicated immediately to all potential buyers who signed up for that. Even this can go wrong. We were once in a bidding round where the broker didn't inform us of the last bid. A pity for the seller, as we might had been willing to offer more.

In Norway we have another issue outside the big cities. Building a house costs more than you will ever get back when you sell it, as houses in the district are cheap. Therefore banks are not willing to provide mortgages to young people who want to take the chance building a new house there. Therefore everyone is depending on those few already existing houses. Some communities are now asking cabin owners to sell their cabin, so people can live in it.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Fishindude on May 04, 2021, 05:58:59 AM
I agree it is a very BS unethical way to price / sell something.
Imagine if you walked into the store, saw milk for $3.00 per gallon, grabbed a jug then had to bid higher for it to get it, when you went up to the check out.
If you are going to advertise at a particular price, you should be obligated to sell at that price.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: norajean on May 04, 2021, 06:47:04 AM
Weíve been house hunting in California and have family friends that are realtors and brokers. Most of them have been doing this since the 90ís and theyíve never seen the level of bidding wars going on. As others have said, inventory is crazy low.

One of the houses we bid on sold for $50k over asking and had 27 offers. They only accepted offers for 48 hours (becoming the norm). Another house we bid on sold for $100k over asking and received 50 offers in 48 hours. It is insane!!

Many parts of California have been hot markets for decades. We were house shopping the Bay Area 14 years ago and routinely being blown out of the water by all cash bids $200,000 over asking.  We sold our house there last month and the process was the same as 2007 - list two weeks with two open houses before accepting bids, then ask competitors to top high bid.  Our buyer had a loan but waived appraisal, which made no sense to me but it all worked out.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: omachi on May 04, 2021, 07:12:11 AM
I agree it is a very BS unethical way to price / sell something.
Imagine if you walked into the store, saw milk for $3.00 per gallon, grabbed a jug then had to bid higher for it to get it, when you went up to the check out.
If you are going to advertise at a particular price, you should be obligated to sell at that price.
Imagine thinking houses were a homogenous commodity like a gallon of milk.

If you don't want to pay more than the listed price, don't. Nobody can make you. If nobody ever offered more than list price, this wouldn't even be a discussion. In this market, though, people will. They understand that the price they are willing to pay is related to the value they place on the property, which may be higher than the listed price. Some of them will also not get the house, but I somehow doubt they're stating that it should be illegal to not accept an offer above the listed price.

Also, does anybody actually think that the asking/listed price is some final price and the first one to offer it wins? Isn't it understood that the seller is saying hey, this is a big, hard to price asset and I'd be willing to sell it for this, perhaps less if I don't get any other offers, but if somebody offers me more I'm under no obligation to take the smaller number?
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: GuitarStv on May 04, 2021, 07:22:16 AM
I agree it is a very BS unethical way to price / sell something.
Imagine if you walked into the store, saw milk for $3.00 per gallon, grabbed a jug then had to bid higher for it to get it, when you went up to the check out.
If you are going to advertise at a particular price, you should be obligated to sell at that price.
Imagine thinking houses were a homogenous commodity like a gallon of milk.

If you don't want to pay more than the listed price, don't. Nobody can make you. If nobody ever offered more than list price, this wouldn't even be a discussion. In this market, though, people will. They understand that the price they are willing to pay is related to the value they place on the property, which may be higher than the listed price. Some of them will also not get the house, but I somehow doubt they're stating that it should be illegal to not accept an offer above the listed price.

Also, does anybody actually think that the asking/listed price is some final price and the first one to offer it wins? Isn't it understood that the seller is saying hey, this is a big, hard to price asset and I'd be willing to sell it for this, perhaps less if I don't get any other offers, but if somebody offers me more I'm under no obligation to take the smaller number?

Homogenous commodity vs unique one I don't think matters.  If you go back through human history you would see that the idea of a fixed/constant price at all is a very modern one.  Haggling and bargaining has usually been a much more normal state for people selling/trading any goods.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: ender on May 04, 2021, 07:25:32 AM
I agree it is a very BS unethical way to price / sell something.
Imagine if you walked into the store, saw milk for $3.00 per gallon, grabbed a jug then had to bid higher for it to get it, when you went up to the check out.
If you are going to advertise at a particular price, you should be obligated to sell at that price.

Is it a BS unethical approach to make real estate offers for under asking price, too?
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: maizefolk on May 04, 2021, 07:31:38 AM
For homogenous goods it is possible to conduct price discovery by selling goods and changing the price (lowering it if you sell too few of the good, raising it if you're constantly out of stock) until supply and demand are aligned.

For unique goods, there isn't any effective way to discover what the market clearing price is until it is actually sold.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: GreenEggs on May 04, 2021, 07:34:30 AM
Everyone hears about the low-interest rates and the high cost of lumber being part of the housing supply problem.  But nobody mentions what shutting down the Southern border has done to create the labor shortage.  Building housing requires a lot of hard-working low skilled labor. 


ICE shut down immigration under Trump and it seems Biden has continued to keep immigrants out. 




Getting back to the crazy RE market conditions, I don't understand why the demand doesn't wane.  Why do so many people want to subject themselves to such a cruel market?  Where are the sellers planning to go?  Don't they realize that by selling they will become buyers?  The gains from their sale will just evaporate when they go shopping for a replacement.  So, my question is "Who's actually winning?" in this market? 


Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Roland of Gilead on May 04, 2021, 07:48:30 AM
Boise Cascade is winning.  Their stock has gone from $20 to $65 a share in the past year because they have raised prices on lumber up to 500%.

If drug companies do that kind of shit during a crisis they get hauled before Congress or tossed in jail but it is ok for lumber?
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: GuitarStv on May 04, 2021, 08:10:30 AM
Getting back to the crazy RE market conditions, I don't understand why the demand doesn't wane.  Why do so many people want to subject themselves to such a cruel market?  Where are the sellers planning to go?  Don't they realize that by selling they will become buyers?  The gains from their sale will just evaporate when they go shopping for a replacement.  So, my question is "Who's actually winning?" in this market?

It's the bitcoin effect.  Prices go up for a while, people see rising prices and decide that prices will always rise, then they become terrified that they'll miss out on all the easy money so dump more cash into the market . . . this makes prices rise more and causes more people to dump money into the market.  Then the people who just stupidly plowed money in because everyone else was doing it look like geniuses which convinces more people to do the same.

Works great for a while.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: maizefolk on May 04, 2021, 08:23:03 AM
So, my question is "Who's actually winning?" in this market?

People whose kids have left home for work/college and are downsizing.
People with newly remote jobs who are selling houses in VHCOL cities and locating to HCOL/MCOL cities.
People who just inherited the family house when their parents passed away.
People who started real estate developments/homebuilding pre-COVID and are finally getting their houses ready to sell.
People looking to time the market by selling now and renting at much lower prices than just a mortgage payment, let alone maintenance, in many VHCOL cities.

I'm sure there are other categories as well.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: omachi on May 04, 2021, 08:35:55 AM
Homogenous commodity vs unique one I don't think matters.  If you go back through human history you would see that the idea of a fixed/constant price at all is a very modern one.  Haggling and bargaining has usually been a much more normal state for people selling/trading any goods.

maizefolk said it for me on price discovery with homogenous goods.

I was also going to add to my post that housing may seem odd because much of the west doesn't seem to haggle anymore, many places even over large purchases like new cars, but decided against it. While the past is instructive, we live now and sell standardized goods at more or less fixed prices. Yet houses are anything but homogenous, especially used ones. Even the houses in cookie cutter neighborhoods end up with prices that can differ by a good amount after people live in them for any period of time. So I didn't think anybody actually thought a house listing was a buy it now sort of price, much less that it'd be unethical to accept a higher offer.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: GreenEggs on May 04, 2021, 08:38:58 AM
So, my question is "Who's actually winning?" in this market?

People whose kids have left home for work/college and are downsizing.
People with newly remote jobs who are selling houses in VHCOL cities and locating to HCOL/MCOL cities.
People who just inherited the family house when their parents passed away.
People who started real estate developments/homebuilding pre-COVID and are finally getting their houses ready to sell.
People looking to time the market by selling now and renting at much lower prices than just a mortgage payment, let alone maintenance, in many VHCOL cities.

I'm sure there are other categories as well.




Don't forget the Realtors.  ;)
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Roland of Gilead on May 04, 2021, 08:42:31 AM

Don't forget the Realtors.  ;)

I am not 100% sure on that one.  There are a ton of realtors and not many houses on the market.  I read somewhere (might not be true) that in some states there were 2 realtors for each house being listed for sale.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: ender on May 04, 2021, 08:46:35 AM

Don't forget the Realtors.  ;)

I am not 100% sure on that one.  There are a ton of realtors and not many houses on the market.  I read somewhere (might not be true) that in some states there were 2 realtors for each house being listed for sale.

Yup.

Realtors make more on volume than they do on price, by far.

It's much better to sell 2x houses than to sell one house for 20% more (of course, if it's 1 at twice the cost it's perhaps better for them, due to hassle factors).
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: jeromedawg on May 04, 2021, 08:50:26 AM
Everyone hears about the low-interest rates and the high cost of lumber being part of the housing supply problem.  But nobody mentions what shutting down the Southern border has done to create the labor shortage.  Building housing requires a lot of hard-working low skilled labor. 


ICE shut down immigration under Trump and it seems Biden has continued to keep immigrants out. 




Getting back to the crazy RE market conditions, I don't understand why the demand doesn't wane.  Why do so many people want to subject themselves to such a cruel market?  Where are the sellers planning to go?  Don't they realize that by selling they will become buyers?  The gains from their sale will just evaporate when they go shopping for a replacement.  So, my question is "Who's actually winning?" in this market?

Do you have any numbers on the labor shortage? Interesting perspective there and it does make sense.

Honestly, I think a lot of people are in a mode of desperation and FOMO - the idea is that prices are going to keep going up so we need to get in NOW. I can't help but think there's some form of overextending going on for the people who are that desperate. Other than that, I heard there has been an uptick in investors (and particularly institutional....https://www.wsj.com/articles/if-you-sell-a-house-these-days-the-buyer-might-be-a-pension-fund-11617544801) that are coming in and scooping up houses.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: GreenEggs on May 04, 2021, 09:07:26 AM
Everyone hears about the low-interest rates and the high cost of lumber being part of the housing supply problem.  But nobody mentions what shutting down the Southern border has done to create the labor shortage.  Building housing requires a lot of hard-working low skilled labor. 


ICE shut down immigration under Trump and it seems Biden has continued to keep immigrants out. 




Getting back to the crazy RE market conditions, I don't understand why the demand doesn't wane.  Why do so many people want to subject themselves to such a cruel market?  Where are the sellers planning to go?  Don't they realize that by selling they will become buyers?  The gains from their sale will just evaporate when they go shopping for a replacement.  So, my question is "Who's actually winning?" in this market?

Do you have any numbers on the labor shortage? Interesting perspective there and it does make sense.

Honestly, I think a lot of people are in a mode of desperation and FOMO - the idea is that prices are going to keep going up so we need to get in NOW. I can't help but think there's some form of overextending going on for the people who are that desperate. Other than that, I heard there has been an uptick in investors (and particularly institutional....https://www.wsj.com/articles/if-you-sell-a-house-these-days-the-buyer-might-be-a-pension-fund-11617544801 (https://www.wsj.com/articles/if-you-sell-a-house-these-days-the-buyer-might-be-a-pension-fund-11617544801)) that are coming in and scooping up houses.


I don't have any numbers, but it seems that I've heard labor has been an issue for all industries during Covid, and industries relying on immigrant labor have been especially hard-hit by shortages. I think Ag and Construction are the main two. 


It seems that we might need to consider opening the borders or consider freeing nonviolent offenders as a source of cheap labor.  It would seem that either move could be good for gaining democratic votes too.  But, that's getting off-topic.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Roland of Gilead on May 04, 2021, 09:11:05 AM
Is it lack of immigration causing labor problems or is it the stimulus payments and fairly generous unemployment benefits?
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: GreenEggs on May 04, 2021, 09:18:54 AM
Is it lack of immigration causing labor problems or is it the stimulus payments and fairly generous unemployment benefits?




I'll go with C - "All of the above" 
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: FINate on May 04, 2021, 09:21:03 AM
Residential construction employment never fully recovered from the Great Recession. See Figure 3 here (https://eyeonhousing.org/2020/11/residential-construction-employment-is-higher-than-a-year-ago/).
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Malcat on May 04, 2021, 09:50:03 AM
Is it lack of immigration causing labor problems or is it the stimulus payments and fairly generous unemployment benefits?

Canada has been paying out 24K/yr to people unemployed due to covid, and it has contributed to our already short labour market, but it hasn't slowed building as far as I know of.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: maizefolk on May 04, 2021, 10:00:29 AM
Net border crossings into the USA from Mexico have been declining essentially ever since the turn of the century.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Jesstache on May 04, 2021, 10:40:01 AM
So, my question is "Who's actually winning?" in this market?

People whose kids have left home for work/college and are downsizing.
People with newly remote jobs who are selling houses in VHCOL cities and locating to HCOL/MCOL cities.
People who just inherited the family house when their parents passed away.
People who started real estate developments/homebuilding pre-COVID and are finally getting their houses ready to sell.
People looking to time the market by selling now and renting at much lower prices than just a mortgage payment, let alone maintenance, in many VHCOL cities.

I'm sure there are other categories as well.

In our case, we're listing our property just outside the bay area in a week and we are going to move back into our previous house in OR that we've been renting out for the past 3 years (we relocated out of state for a job and knew it was only for a few years, lucky timing that now is when it works out for us to move back). 

Don't also forget landlords who own rental properties that can sell and net a tidy profit after taxes.  We have strongly considered selling one of our other rental properties but the tax hit this year would be larger than if we wait until FIRE.

One thing to mention about list price vs sales price.  We have seen the comps in our neighborhood and we know our house is likely to sell above asking.  How much is anyone's guess but we're seeing $30k-$100k in the comps.  Talking with our realtor, what we actually list at is heavily dependent on what the property will actually appraise for.  The fact that people are willing to waive appraisal and pay above the amount most buyers can get a loan for by bringing tons of cash to the table can't be assumed when setting your list price, according to her, even if that's what they're seeing.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Michael in ABQ on May 04, 2021, 07:48:39 PM
My mom just bought a new car recently. She remarked how all the dealerships were practically empty of new cars but had rows and rows of used cars. Lots of people are flush with cash and recognize that inflation is going up so they might as well buy now.

There are a lot of markets where prices have just continued to rise year over year. Even if things seem overpriced at the moment, waiting longer doesn't mean they're going to drop.

I keep thinking there will be a wave of foreclosures once the various moratoriums end, but there doesn't seem to be anything yet.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: FINate on May 04, 2021, 08:08:01 PM
I keep thinking there will be a wave of foreclosures once the various moratoriums end, but there doesn't seem to be anything yet.

I think this is unlikely because the primary pandemic related mortgage relief is forbearance rather than a simple foreclosure moratorium. For those experiencing COVID-19 related hardship, missed payments are essentially tacked on to the end rather than being due as a lump sum. If financial hardship persist past the forbearance period (typically 12 months, but up to 18 months in some cases) I suppose this could result in a wave of foreclosures, though it seems likely that dates will be extended as needed to prevent mass disruption.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: ysette9 on May 04, 2021, 08:53:06 PM
We moved to Seattle last summer and are trying to find a SFH to rent. The market is hot here, as it seems to be in a lot of places right now. Apparently in a move to try to reduce discrimination in landlords selecting who to rent to, the law here is that landlords have to rent to the first qualified applicant who gets their paperwork in. In our limited experience so far that seems to make for some weird situations.

Previously we were a bit arrogant when applying for a rental knowing that we have stellar credit, great income, no debt, non smokers, no pets, blah blah blah. Now it seems that this doesn't matter except that it means we pass the minimum bar. Now she who has the fastest fingers on the laptop (and the fastest internet connection) wins. We got our applications in in under 30 minutes from when the rental application link went live, and we were beat out by someone else with faster fingers. I wish it were a bidding situation where we could have offered to pay more per month for rent as you would happen in a house purchase situation. As it is one person got lucky, a bunch of other people walked away empty-handed and frustrated (as the OP), and the landlord missed out on potential additional monthly income.

I'm not sure what the answer is. Tight markets seem to be tough all around.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Roland of Gilead on May 04, 2021, 09:09:58 PM
I thought when Seattle did that first come first serve tenant stuff that landlords would just set the minimum credit score to 800 or something to weed out deadbeats and the whole thing would backfire on Seattle (as most things Seattle does do).
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: okonumiyaki on May 04, 2021, 09:38:56 PM
In Australia a fair % of houses get sold by auction, especially if in hot market or relatively unique.  In Sydney think it is around 40%.  Would seem to solve the issue. 
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Cassie on May 05, 2021, 12:18:33 AM
Due to a divorce we sold our house and I bought a condo. There were 6 offers on the condo. The asking price was 11k over what it would appraise for and bidders were told you must have the money to bridge the difference.  I ended up in a bidding war with another person. I paid 20k over asking. Because I had money I could do that and I was most likely to get the mortgage as I was only borrowing 85k.  I priced our house 10k under because I wanted a fast sale. We had 33 showings in 3 days and 4 offers. We took the offer that was most likely to close and was 30k over. In the end we came down 13k more for repairs.  Because my exís loan fell through at the last minute my condo sellers learned 4 days before closing that it wouldnít happen. They gave me a week to be in escrow. I wasnít going to screw around and lose the condo I really wanted.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Michael in ABQ on May 05, 2021, 06:39:37 AM
We moved to Seattle last summer and are trying to find a SFH to rent. The market is hot here, as it seems to be in a lot of places right now. Apparently in a move to try to reduce discrimination in landlords selecting who to rent to, the law here is that landlords have to rent to the first qualified applicant who gets their paperwork in. In our limited experience so far that seems to make for some weird situations.

Previously we were a bit arrogant when applying for a rental knowing that we have stellar credit, great income, no debt, non smokers, no pets, blah blah blah. Now it seems that this doesn't matter except that it means we pass the minimum bar. Now she who has the fastest fingers on the laptop (and the fastest internet connection) wins. We got our applications in in under 30 minutes from when the rental application link went live, and we were beat out by someone else with faster fingers. I wish it were a bidding situation where we could have offered to pay more per month for rent as you would happen in a house purchase situation. As it is one person got lucky, a bunch of other people walked away empty-handed and frustrated (as the OP), and the landlord missed out on potential additional monthly income.

I'm not sure what the answer is. Tight markets seem to be tough all around.

We tried to get permission from our landlord to run a business from our home. No customers, no employees, just storing some products on shelves in the garage and mailing them out via the same UPS/FedEx trucks that already drive down the street daily. When I went to drop off a letter with the owner of the management company she said they are receiving an average of 17 applications on each SFH for rent. This is in Albuquerque, not exactly a red hot coastal market.


Let supply and demand function. Yes it's frustrating when other people are willing to pay more, but the alternative isn't better in the long run. The market will find a way around whatever policy government puts in place. If you were on the other side it sure would be frustrating to find out several buyers were willing to pay more than the asking price but you were forced to sell at the asking price.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Samuel on May 05, 2021, 11:37:41 AM
We moved to Seattle last summer and are trying to find a SFH to rent. The market is hot here, as it seems to be in a lot of places right now. Apparently in a move to try to reduce discrimination in landlords selecting who to rent to, the law here is that landlords have to rent to the first qualified applicant who gets their paperwork in. In our limited experience so far that seems to make for some weird situations.

Previously we were a bit arrogant when applying for a rental knowing that we have stellar credit, great income, no debt, non smokers, no pets, blah blah blah. Now it seems that this doesn't matter except that it means we pass the minimum bar. Now she who has the fastest fingers on the laptop (and the fastest internet connection) wins. We got our applications in in under 30 minutes from when the rental application link went live, and we were beat out by someone else with faster fingers. I wish it were a bidding situation where we could have offered to pay more per month for rent as you would happen in a house purchase situation. As it is one person got lucky, a bunch of other people walked away empty-handed and frustrated (as the OP), and the landlord missed out on potential additional monthly income.

I'm not sure what the answer is. Tight markets seem to be tough all around.

I haven't moved apartments since this went into effect but I'm definitely not looking forward to re-entering the fray. It seems like this law will negatively impact me because I'm a pretty model tenant with solid income and financials who likes to rent well below their means. I qualify for expensive fancy apartments with more stringent requirements but will instead be competing for middle and lower range apartments with looser requirements where my trump cards are now worthless.

In practice these laws seem pretty difficult to enforce, impacting honest landlords but not the dishonest ones willing to fib about the order in which applications are received.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: KateFIRE on May 05, 2021, 04:07:48 PM
To anyone who complains about housing prices, I suggest some serious self examination. Do you have cable? A giant-screen TV? Anything Apple, especially a late-model I-phone? Monthly subscriptions? A fancy car? Eat out? Use Door Dash? Buy brand-new clothes? Take expensive vacations? Further, are you doing everything you can to maximize your income?

This is a mustachian forum, of course we are frugal. Don't have cable, don't have one subscription, don't really buy much of anything. Maybe that's why this jump in home prices hurts even more. If we weren't so fugal we might be happier offering $40K over asking price and pulling numbers out of thin air just to win. I make $65K a year, but home prices are rising at the same pace as my income... if I saved 100%. People are making more money off assets than working.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: KateFIRE on May 05, 2021, 05:20:56 PM
I agree with a lot of posters that FOMO is driving up prices. There is a fear that inflation is rising and this will continue. If you don't buy now, you will be paying even more in 3 months.

The housing shortage is a bit surprising to me... where did these people come from? When you ask, people say California, but then why is there a shortage of homes in California too! Everyone who buys a house was living somewhere else before. There are more homes (139.64 million in 2019) than households (128.58 million in 2019) in the US so not much of a shortage, but possibly the percentage of vacant homes is higher. I know that there is some temporary situations of people occupying 2 homes right now. My sister bought a home last summer and renovated it while she lived in her rental. Our neighbor bought a house a month ago and the rental that they were living in needs some updates so is vacant now. My grandma owns two homes, but won't sell until she dies to avoid the capital gains (when you die, the home steps up to current values). The home is vacant.

I also think there is a rise in single adult households and singles buying homes. Maybe this increased the number of households, since it can't be attributed to immigration or a lowered death rate (US death rate increased 16% in 2020). Statistics show that many homeowners are the older generations.

I also read about the 18 year housing cycle... this theory that housing prices peak every 18 years on average... according to the article we will reach the peak in 2024... sounds about right! Although I wonder how the pandemic sped up or held back this cycle.

Unfortunately I can't wait for this housing market to crash because I have a family and time is money... can't spend 3 years without stability for our kids. We will keep trying to buy in this boom and just live there forever!!
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Malcat on May 05, 2021, 06:31:59 PM
Apparently up here in Canada, they're already reporting that the bidding wars are easing up as the end of covid is in sight and supply is starting to flow back into the market.

I'll be curious to see what happens in the US.

It's always really interesting to compare and contrast since the regulations are so different, and yet the issue has been so parallel.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Dicey on May 05, 2021, 11:12:28 PM
To anyone who complains about housing prices, I suggest some serious self examination. Do you have cable? A giant-screen TV? Anything Apple, especially a late-model I-phone? Monthly subscriptions? A fancy car? Eat out? Use Door Dash? Buy brand-new clothes? Take expensive vacations? Further, are you doing everything you can to maximize your income?

This is a mustachian forum, of course we are frugal. Don't have cable, don't have one subscription, don't really buy much of anything. Maybe that's why this jump in home prices hurts even more. If we weren't so fugal we might be happier offering $40K over asking price and pulling numbers out of thin air just to win. I make $65K a year, but home prices are rising at the same pace as my income... if I saved 100%. People are making more money off assets than working.
Dear @KateFIRE, when you've read as many posts on thus forum as I have, you will know that loads of folks are not frugal, [shocker] even on this forum.

I was never a high earner either. Here's a synopsis of what I did. I bought my first house at age 30 in the town i grew up in, which is not where i was living. I rented it out. Sold it 8 years later for very little profit, but I learned a ton. Bought the next property (where I did live) on a short sale and moved in. Doubled my money in 4 years. Lather, rinse repeat.

Everyone has to start somewhere, but starting at the top is very risky. Don't let FOMO lead to a bad decision.

BTW, your last sentence is kind of a head scratcher. That is the mustachian ideal, whether you're a homeowner or not. That's what people are referring to when they say, "This shit works", because it does. It really does.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: KateFIRE on May 06, 2021, 06:32:10 AM
BTW, your last sentence is kind of a head scratcher. That is the mustachian ideal, whether you're a homeowner or not. That's what people are referring to when they say, "This shit works", because it does. It really does.

Workers and consumers make our world go round, not asset owners and investors. Making 4%/yearly off an investment is a sustainable pull from a healthy economy. When asset holders are pulling 20% to 100% away from workers, thatís not healthy! US household net worth increase $6.9 trillion in 4th quarter of 2020. US GDP increase by 309.2 billion in the same quarter. Here is an old article, but still relevant: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.forbes.com/sites/jessecolombo/2018/08/24/u-s-household-wealth-is-experiencing-an-unsustainable-bubble/amp/
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Dicey on May 06, 2021, 07:43:57 AM
BTW, your last sentence is kind of a head scratcher. That is the mustachian ideal, whether you're a homeowner or not. That's what people are referring to when they say, "This shit works", because it does. It really does.

Workers and consumers make our world go round, not asset owners and investors. Making 4%/yearly off an investment is a sustainable pull from a healthy economy. When asset holders are pulling 20% to 100% away from workers, thatís not healthy! US household net worth increase $6.9 trillion in 4th quarter of 2020. US GDP increase by 309.2 billion in the same quarter. Here is an old article, but still relevant: https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.forbes.com/sites/jessecolombo/2018/08/24/u-s-household-wealth-is-experiencing-an-unsustainable-bubble/amp/
Hmmm, my first thought is, if you really believe that, why are you here? Mustachians are definitely owners and investors who eschew consumerism. My second thought is that if you believe it's unsustainable per the article you quoted, why are you worrying? Just plan on buying during the next downturn.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: KateFIRE on May 06, 2021, 08:35:49 AM
One thing Iíve learned is that things last a lot longer than I think! I have also tried to time things before and Iím really bad at it! So even though I think that this is a housing bubble, Iím not going to wait it out in my momís basement. Lol

I donít think itís anti mustachian to value workers above investors. I appreciate as an investor we are profiting off of others work and we shouldnít starve the workers with no assets. Mustachian teaches to save 25 times your yearly expenses to generate one year 4%. Taking out a mortgage of 6x your income and generating 1 year of income gains in net worth appreciation is okay to question! Donít want to be blind!
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Jon Bon on May 06, 2021, 11:46:33 AM
You have every right to be frustrated and frankly pissed off. I mean its bullshit for folks like yourself to put their lives on hold for a year, I completely agree with that.

I don't think this has much to do with investors making or losing money. During the last recession the Fed figured out they could just print money and assets would go up. So that is what they did then, and that is what they are doing now. Between that and 0% interest rates the "prices" of houses has exploded. Sure all of us sitting on houses love the price increases as unfair as it may be.

At some point folks are going to need to sell, and unless folks like yourself can afford buy it then well prices would need to adjust. Since wages are not going up 15% a year or whatever RE has done, it has to end at some point.

I guess I don't have a ton of advice for you other then stick to what you know. Focus on logic and not emotion, get all your ducks in a row and when something comes up go for it 100%. Be organized and professional, many of your competitors will not be!

Also for a fun read look up the south seas company, tulip mania, or john law. They are some good reads and help you keep your wits about you!

Good luck and good hunting.

Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Abe on May 07, 2021, 07:55:38 PM
Unfortunately I can't wait for this housing market to crash because I have a family and time is money... can't spend 3 years without stability for our kids. We will keep trying to buy in this boom and just live there forever!!

Are there no places to rent in your area? You don't necessarily need a house to have stability, especially when housing prices are going up faster than rents in some areas.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Linea_Norway on May 08, 2021, 12:34:30 AM
I agree with a lot of posters that FOMO is driving up prices. There is a fear that inflation is rising and this will continue. If you don't buy now, you will be paying even more in 3 months.

The housing shortage is a bit surprising to me... where did these people come from? When you ask, people say California, but then why is there a shortage of homes in California too! Everyone who buys a house was living somewhere else before. There are more homes (139.64 million in 2019) than households (128.58 million in 2019) in the US so not much of a shortage, but possibly the percentage of vacant homes is higher. I know that there is some temporary situations of people occupying 2 homes right now. My sister bought a home last summer and renovated it while she lived in her rental. Our neighbor bought a house a month ago and the rental that they were living in needs some updates so is vacant now. My grandma owns two homes, but won't sell until she dies to avoid the capital gains (when you die, the home steps up to current values). The home is vacant.

I also think there is a rise in single adult households and singles buying homes. Maybe this increased the number of households, since it can't be attributed to immigration or a lowered death rate (US death rate increased 16% in 2020). Statistics show that many homeowners are the older generations.

I also read about the 18 year housing cycle... this theory that housing prices peak every 18 years on average... according to the article we will reach the peak in 2024... sounds about right! Although I wonder how the pandemic sped up or held back this cycle.

Unfortunately I can't wait for this housing market to crash because I have a family and time is money... can't spend 3 years without stability for our kids. We will keep trying to buy in this boom and just live there forever!!

Where these people come from? I think many were living with their parents for a way too long time. Or living in a rental, maybe shared with others. If all these people now can get a mortgage, many will be willing to buy their own place. They are also competing against landlords who buy up houses for rentals. And like you say, many elderly are living in a (too) large house and don't move out of it, blocking the options for younger families to move into a bigger house. And indeed, more singels.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: ender on May 08, 2021, 07:53:28 AM
The housing shortage is a bit surprising to me... where did these people come from?

Population increasing over time with new housing starts dropping dramatically since 2006.

https://www.statista.com/statistics/219963/number-of-us-house-sales/

We're still even close to the number of new houses built in the early 2000s.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Botany Bae on May 08, 2021, 08:27:46 AM
I know around here quite a few have sold to investors and they are still sitting empty 3-4 months later (not renting, nothing). You can look at the records and see who bought them, and driving by them reveals them empty and no remodeling happening. I'm guessing it's speculators hoping prices go up even more then they flip as-is, or those hoping to sell higher for development. We're in a rental shortage as well, and some recent zoning changes are allowing infill housing and teardowns for multi-family housing. A house on a large lot by us was torn down recently so a small apartment complex could go in.

The "We Buy Houses" folks are out in force, with every corner littered with their flyers. 
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: penguintroopers on May 09, 2021, 08:09:06 AM
I can agree with the frustration. Two years ago we made the decision pay off all of our student debt ($103k) as something to get us prepared for buying our first home. Now I see that if we had just gotten a down payment together ASAP we would have been able to just ride the 30% appreciation to get us to a net balance between our assets and liabilities rather than owe nothing but have nothing... And this is just from appreciation alone, we wouldn't have to bust our butts on OT and shoveling $4k+ out the door every month.

I try to not let it sting me too much as there's no way we could have predicted crazy increases like this. We figured the appreciation would be something like 5% or so. We have been able to move states in that time period for a new job for myself, but seeing 10, 15, 20% increases YoY means we literally are loosing ground every time we try to put together a down payment, or at BEST just keeping up... and this is a household with two well compensated young professionals who are shoveling in every penny they can towards a down payment, and we haven't even gotten into how now appraisals are coming up short and buyers have to bridge the gap out of pocket.

I don't see how anyone can buy in this market unless they're already on the property ladder, have very large incomes, or have very large subsidies from parents. I'd love to hear how I'm just overly doom and gloom but the situation seems bleak.

And to everyone saying just wait for the dip, I've seen far too many stories like ours with buyers sidelined over the crazy prices to think that the current flow of people looking to buy will slow at any time, because once we see the slightest percent decrease those sidelined buyers are back in the market.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Dicey on May 09, 2021, 02:14:05 PM
And to everyone saying just wait for the dip, I've seen far too many stories like ours with buyers sidelined over the crazy prices to think that the current flow of people looking to buy will slow at any time, because once we see the slightest percent decrease those sidelined buyers are back in the market.
The real estate market is currently in an extended frenzied situation. Frenzies tend to end badly for many. Sure, right now, your decision seems like the wrong one, but life is long and new opportunities will appear on the horizon. Try thinking of it as being red-shirted, not permanently sidelined. If nothing else, you have the chance to build a stronger financial foundation.

At 22, I was determined to buy my own house, and it took me until I was 30 to pull it off. That first house was a rental. I didn't buy a house (it was a tiny condo, actually) that I could live in myself until I was 38. At 63, I am real estate rich. I still believe if I had invested along the line of JLCollinsNH's Simple Path to Wealth strategy, I would have been better off. https://jlcollinsnh.com/stock-series/

Try to see this for the opportunity that it is, even if it doesn't seem so now.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Finances_With_Purpose on May 10, 2021, 11:02:52 PM
It is for a different topic but they really need to raise interest rates to get a handle on this situation.   Way too much easy loan money out there which is why people can buy $800,000 homes on a $100,000 income.

I'm very curious about this because a lot of people say that lending standards have tightened (e.g. the hair dresser making $50k can no longer take a $600k loan or whatever).
How is this situation that much different? I guess more people are putting in way higher down payments? My lender told me I could take a loan out that was at least 5-6x my salary. It only takes one bit of long term job loss to really screw things over if I were to actually take a loan that big.

Lending standards may have tightened some versus 2008 in particular, however, it's now easy to get the cheapest money in history.  When rates are low, prices can go way up--because people can afford the payments even on a much lower income.  People aren't putting in higher down payments, they're just more willing to take on much larger principle balances because the interest is so low that the payments are low too.  As rates rise, you can't afford as much house on the same income.  If rates were higher, you might only get 2-4 times your salary, or less, depending upon how high rates went.   

Rising rates would absolutely help house prices to stop going so high.  Even though that's not the whole story.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Finances_With_Purpose on May 10, 2021, 11:04:14 PM
Be mad at your local government and the NIMBYs for restricting the supply of housing.

And the national government, while you're at it, for restricting the rates of return, i.e., the interest rates.  (Can't have the rates go up on all that debt now, can they?  Especially when we're hitting the ATM up for a few trillion more per year...) 
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Finances_With_Purpose on May 10, 2021, 11:45:16 PM
Here's the only thing I know for an absolute certainty: I wish I had a time machine so that I could see where this is all going... 

I'm sorry @KateFIRE .  I really am.  This market is abysmal.  I don't envy you.

And for what it's worth, we're personally avoiding becoming buyers in this market because it's just too speculative and bananas to me. 

If anything, I can offer this encouragement: impossible things tend not to last forever.  This situation, whatever it is, isn't sustainable. 

At least we have the forums to commiserate/vent on.  I agree with @secondcor521 about how this ends: who knows, but likely one of those ways.  And @Michael in ABQ beat me to the point about why the government won't raise rates to slow this situation down.  And @Jon Bon is spot on with that advice.

For @penguintroopers , I have a story.  I was in your situation once.  I made the same mistake.  Could have bought a house for a very low price, and very affordable one to me then, that would easily list for north of $1M or more, even before this current run-up.  Only God knows what it might be worth today.  I didn't make that mistake again: I saved, gathered up a down payment, and bought rather than waiting for another bust.  In retrospect, it looks to have been a good move.  But don't let your near-miss get you down...there will be future opportunities. 

Here are my passing observations about this market:
1.  Supply is insanely low.  When we bought our house, we had numerous options--we even went under contract on a very similar house very close to here. 

But tonight, I did a test tonight to see, out of curiosity, how easy it would be to buy one like it now, since I would like to move for various reasons (but not far away).  We bought our (small) house for a reasonable price only a few years ago.  I hopped onto the real estate listings, and put in only a few criteria to filter house listings: size, bedrooms, lot size, and then the geographic area, of course.  There isn't a single house listed within many miles of here for less than 4x what we paid only a few years ago, but most are closer to 20x what we paid--or more.  There's simply zero supply.  I had to get really far away, in a cheaper direction (i.e. where wildlife drastically outnumber people), before it opened up even slightly--and even then the prices were absurd. 

Big neighborhoods close to here used to have dozens of houses for sale at any one time.  Now, it's 0-2, if that. 

Maybe supply dropped because of COVID.  And home-building restrictions.  And the fact that Americans and their employers all glob themselves into the same few dozen major urban areas.  And people didn't want to sell.  Whatever the reasons, prices will stay high as long as there are no houses to buy.  I don't know what I would pay for a house like this here, today...but I know exactly how many one could buy this week.  Zero.  (And I've been casually looking for months...it's constantly this way.) 

2.  Rates drive prices, too, and, as @Michael in ABQ mentioned, the government isn't going to do a (good) thing about that.  After all, that might actually cause a Congressman somewhere to have to a few extra minutes' work next year actually, I don't know, balancing a budget, finding more revenue, cutting expenses, or...any of the other things a Congressman purports do for a living.  We can't have that, now can we? 

3.  Real estate is acting more like an asset than a good.  Goods adjust to supply/demand, but instead, we're seeing enormous price spikes followed by more price spikes, with a lot of anecdotal evidence that investors, and even lots of foreign investors, are buying up the existing stock, especially in hot markets.  And assets go way up...and way down.  Housing is starting to look more like the S&P 500 and less like the price of a bar of gold, or a loaf of bread.  Who knows what next year will bring, though.

4.  Inflation is the elephant in the room.  Are house prices really going up...or are all prices going up?  And if so, how much so?  And what about wages?  Or is this just stagflation?  (Queue up time machine.)  I don't know about you guys, but several of my inflation hedges are getting off-the-charts returns this year.  Yet I also think purchasable housing has had a historically unbelievable supply constraint for whatever reasons. 

--

Regardless of how all of this plays out, the current imbalance seems more likely to swing back towards' buyers' favor (yay for @KateFIRE ) eventually than it does to go farther towards sellers, even if it does persist like this for longer than people expect.  But if we knew for sure, we wouldn't be here grousing about it...we would be out making money off of it.  And for the short term, who knows. 

One thing to consider: if you're wanting a house, consider putting your house/down-payment savings into things that move very closely with the housing market, rather than keeping them in cash.  I wouldn't normally recommend that, but as a protection, that might lock your savings into something that can hedge itself and keep your purchasing power in place, so you're at least not getting farther and farther behind. 

The fastest way to fix the national housing situation will be for supply to increase--people sell more houses--or demand to decrease--nobody wants to buy them anymore.  Or maybe we build a ton more, all of a sudden (supply increase).  Of those, supply seems the most likely to move first, since a supply shortage seems to be what got us here.  And houses can be built, especially at absurd prices.  But who knows...

Like you, @KateFIRE , we will be anxiously watching the housing market to see what happens next.  And wishing you the best.   
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Fishingmn on May 11, 2021, 11:00:03 AM
I just want to rant. It seems to me that there is some strategy to pricing low. It puts the seller in control and gets the buys to waive appraisals and inspections. Itís raising home prices everywhere and there are no consequences to this strategy because they donít have to sell the house to you even if you offer asking price and they have no other offers! Forcing the sale if they have no other offers and they refuse to sell would make sellers price higher and the power would come back to the buyer. People donít waive appraisals and inspections when they offer under asking price.

We have offered on 6 homes in Colorado. We have offered above asking price on every house. On Wednesday we offered on a house $11k over asking price. It had just been listed, but the buyers wanted to wait until Monday to collect offers all weekend so they didnít accept our offer. Our offer expired, but I bet they told the other buyers ďwe have another offer above asking priceĒ. This is a white lie because our offer expired!

Also every house that we have offered on we offer on twice, once the original offer and again after our realtor hears about how many offers they have over asking price and ďI donít feel comfortable saying, but significantly higherĒ offers. Then the realtor says ďdo you want to offer again?Ē, but what if these other offers are made up? They donít show you the other offers and the winning offer is not required to buy the home or pay anything if they decline after winning. There could be some major fraud with this system! You go to jail for years for stealing $10k from a store, but I bet there are plenty of realtors who manipulate bidding wars to the tune of thousands and have no consequences.

Another strategy with pricing low is that if they donít get the bidding war that they want, sellers can relist at a higher price. Relisting higher makes the home seem desirable, like you had so much attention you had to relist higher! Instead of lowering the price which says ďwe are having trouble selling, you can offer less than askingĒ. So listing low and getting the bidding war is a power move for sellers, but also leads to the potential for lying realtors and fraud.

Little late to the party but some thoughts as a Realtor - it's crazy in the Twin Cities too.

- Realtors are fiduciary's and can easily lose their license or be fined if found to be lying or committing fraud. Does it happen, yes - but this isn't commonplace.
- Yes, sellers have all the power right now. No seller should accept the first offer that comes in at list price. It's always in their best interest to wait multiple days and a Realtor who doesn't advise their client to do that is doing them a severe disservice. A listing agent owes allegiance to the seller, not the buyer.
- Your assertion that a full price offer should be automatically accepted is wrong. First off, the price is only 1 component of an offer. Financing, inspections, closing date, personal property and more go into an offer.
- It sounds like you are setting an offer deadline date. That's a bad idea in this market where sellers hold all the power. Your agent should advise against that.
- Your agent should be telling you how to use an Escalation Clause to make sure you are bidding confidently up to a price you are comfortable with. Example - I'll pay list price but will also beat all other offers by $2k up to a maximum of $X and seller must provide a copy of the next highest offer to validate the final price.
- Even if a listing agent does their best to price a property correctly the market is changing so quickly and there are so many buyers for nice houses that it's quite common to see many offers $50-100k+ over list price.

I'd encourage you to look at listings that have been on the market for 7+ days as those are either overpriced or need work and will have less competition. Or just keep at it - you'll eventually get one.

Good Luck!
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Cassie on May 12, 2021, 09:40:48 AM
We pick the offer most likely to close.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: APBioSpartan on May 12, 2021, 09:46:25 PM
I just want to rant. It seems to me that there is some strategy to pricing low. It puts the seller in control and gets the buys to waive appraisals and inspections. Itís raising home prices everywhere and there are no consequences to this strategy because they donít have to sell the house to you even if you offer asking price and they have no other offers! Forcing the sale if they have no other offers and they refuse to sell would make sellers price higher and the power would come back to the buyer. People donít waive appraisals and inspections when they offer under asking price.

We have offered on 6 homes in Colorado. We have offered above asking price on every house. On Wednesday we offered on a house $11k over asking price. It had just been listed, but the buyers wanted to wait until Monday to collect offers all weekend so they didnít accept our offer. Our offer expired, but I bet they told the other buyers ďwe have another offer above asking priceĒ. This is a white lie because our offer expired!

Also every house that we have offered on we offer on twice, once the original offer and again after our realtor hears about how many offers they have over asking price and ďI donít feel comfortable saying, but significantly higherĒ offers. Then the realtor says ďdo you want to offer again?Ē, but what if these other offers are made up? They donít show you the other offers and the winning offer is not required to buy the home or pay anything if they decline after winning. There could be some major fraud with this system! You go to jail for years for stealing $10k from a store, but I bet there are plenty of realtors who manipulate bidding wars to the tune of thousands and have no consequences.

Another strategy with pricing low is that if they donít get the bidding war that they want, sellers can relist at a higher price. Relisting higher makes the home seem desirable, like you had so much attention you had to relist higher! Instead of lowering the price which says ďwe are having trouble selling, you can offer less than askingĒ. So listing low and getting the bidding war is a power move for sellers, but also leads to the potential for lying realtors and fraud.

If youíre offering 11k over asking in Colorado, thatís likely your problem.  Homes here are going for 50-150k+ over asking
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Dicey on May 12, 2021, 11:02:45 PM
Hahaha! DH and I spent about an hour tonight poring through sales in our immediate area from the last 6 months. Amazing how much things are going for. The ONLY time anything goes for less than asking is if the property was on the market for more than two weeks, meaning it was insanely priced, a POS, or both. Anything that sells in less than a week (which is virtually everything) goes for significantly over asking. Significant, as in $100k or more, not $11k.

On one hand, you'd think it will crash. OTOH, building materials are so hard to come by that new housing starts are slow, meaning the supply deficit ain't going to get corrected any time soon. Egads!
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: JetBlast on May 24, 2021, 09:00:13 AM
I can only imagine how frustrating this market is on the buyer side right now.  Everything near me is snapped up within a couple days of listing and usually bid up. I donít know how a first time homeowner financing through FHA or the VA stands a chance. Thatís got to feel like being part of Lord Cardiganís light brigade as you make offers.

Soon to be ex and I listed our townhouse on Friday in a slow growing metro at what I thought was a fair price. In line with recent comps in our neighborhood. Definitely not a lowball price and would have been happy to just get that ask, but instead we got multiple offers above list with escalator clauses. The winner was 8.5% above list price, all cash, paying all costs except survey.

Iíd want no part of this market as a buyer and would be socking away cash to buy in a year or two if at all possible. This isnít a sustainable housing market and I feel very fortunate to be on the seller side right now.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Dicey on May 24, 2021, 09:19:02 AM
Yesterday, I got a ping from Redfin on a new listing. It caught my eye because it was listed for $3.2M, which is on the high side for my area. By the time I clicked it open, it was already pending. Two hours!!

BTW, the estimated PITI is $15k per month! Hard to imagine having the income to support that kind of payment. And that doesn't include utilities or maintenance. Eeks!
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: JetBlast on May 24, 2021, 09:32:33 AM
Yesterday, I got a ping from Redfin on a new listing. It caught my eye because it was listed for $3.2M, which is on the high side for my area. By the time I clicked it open, it was already pending. Two hours!!

BTW, the estimated PITI is $15k per month! Hard to imagine having the income to support that kind of payment. And that doesn't include utilities or maintenance. Eeks!

Thatís just nuts.

Iíd imagine most donít have the income to support it without rolling big money in from selling a previous home. I know thatís what my cousin and his wife did in the Bay Area this year. Made over a million selling near Corte Madera and put it into a fancier place in Tiburon.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Dicey on May 25, 2021, 06:59:57 AM
Yesterday, I got a ping from Redfin on a new listing. It caught my eye because it was listed for $3.2M, which is on the high side for my area. By the time I clicked it open, it was already pending. Two hours!!

BTW, the estimated PITI is $15k per month! Hard to imagine having the income to support that kind of payment. And that doesn't include utilities or maintenance. Eeks!

Thatís just nuts.

Iíd imagine most donít have the income to support it without rolling big money in from selling a previous home. I know thatís what my cousin and his wife did in the Bay Area this year. Made over a million selling near Corte Madera and put it into a fancier place in Tiburon.
$3.2M is much more of a Marin County or Silly Valley price than in my little corner of the East Bay.

I showed the listing to my walking partner and we discussed the possibilities. One plausible idea is that the seller had an interested party who was hesitating on the price. Seller put it on the open market, forcing the buyer to pony up.

My brother's just closing on a house in N. Phoenix. A common problem there is properties are selling for way over the appraised price. In addition to waiving inspections, buyers who aren't all cash are promising to cough up the difference, which stinks if you like big, long mortgages. My brother's one of those people. To get the house, he put 20% down plus the $100k difference between the winning bid and the appraisal. He's buying now so he can RE. They want a one story house in retirement and he wants to get a mortgage while he still has a regular paycheck. Happily, he's been through downward cycles before and can afford to ride it out if the market implodes.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Villanelle on May 26, 2021, 12:13:38 PM
I agree with a lot of posters that FOMO is driving up prices. There is a fear that inflation is rising and this will continue. If you don't buy now, you will be paying even more in 3 months.

The housing shortage is a bit surprising to me... where did these people come from? When you ask, people say California, but then why is there a shortage of homes in California too! Everyone who buys a house was living somewhere else before. There are more homes (139.64 million in 2019) than households (128.58 million in 2019) in the US so not much of a shortage, but possibly the percentage of vacant homes is higher. I know that there is some temporary situations of people occupying 2 homes right now. My sister bought a home last summer and renovated it while she lived in her rental. Our neighbor bought a house a month ago and the rental that they were living in needs some updates so is vacant now. My grandma owns two homes, but won't sell until she dies to avoid the capital gains (when you die, the home steps up to current values). The home is vacant.

I also think there is a rise in single adult households and singles buying homes. Maybe this increased the number of households, since it can't be attributed to immigration or a lowered death rate (US death rate increased 16% in 2020). Statistics show that many homeowners are the older generations.

I also read about the 18 year housing cycle... this theory that housing prices peak every 18 years on average... according to the article we will reach the peak in 2024... sounds about right! Although I wonder how the pandemic sped up or held back this cycle.

Unfortunately I can't wait for this housing market to crash because I have a family and time is money... can't spend 3 years without stability for our kids. We will keep trying to buy in this boom and just live there forever!!

Many people own more than one home.  Some even more than two.  If "homes" is just any apartment, condo, SFH, or other living structure, then subtract every lake, beach, or ski house that is used only for vacationing and every airbnb for starters, along with every snowbird summer or winter home.  And yes, also renovations, homes that are just mid-transaction (seller moved out and buyer hasn't yet moved in), and other similar situations.  All those equal a non-insignificant decrease in that comparison of home vs. households, and that's before vacancies from speculators. 

It's one of many reasons that so many people have Airbnb and similar situations--that takes homes that typically would be homes (as opposed to more traditional vacations homes) and removes them from the housing market. 

Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Villanelle on May 26, 2021, 12:14:23 PM
I agree with a lot of posters that FOMO is driving up prices. There is a fear that inflation is rising and this will continue. If you don't buy now, you will be paying even more in 3 months.

The housing shortage is a bit surprising to me... where did these people come from? When you ask, people say California, but then why is there a shortage of homes in California too! Everyone who buys a house was living somewhere else before. There are more homes (139.64 million in 2019) than households (128.58 million in 2019) in the US so not much of a shortage, but possibly the percentage of vacant homes is higher. I know that there is some temporary situations of people occupying 2 homes right now. My sister bought a home last summer and renovated it while she lived in her rental. Our neighbor bought a house a month ago and the rental that they were living in needs some updates so is vacant now. My grandma owns two homes, but won't sell until she dies to avoid the capital gains (when you die, the home steps up to current values). The home is vacant.

I also think there is a rise in single adult households and singles buying homes. Maybe this increased the number of households, since it can't be attributed to immigration or a lowered death rate (US death rate increased 16% in 2020). Statistics show that many homeowners are the older generations.

I also read about the 18 year housing cycle... this theory that housing prices peak every 18 years on average... according to the article we will reach the peak in 2024... sounds about right! Although I wonder how the pandemic sped up or held back this cycle.

Unfortunately I can't wait for this housing market to crash because I have a family and time is money... can't spend 3 years without stability for our kids. We will keep trying to buy in this boom and just live there forever!!

Many people own more than one home.  Some even more than two.  If "homes" is just any apartment, condo, SFH, or other living structure, then subtract every lake, beach, or ski house that is used only for vacationing and every airbnb for starters, along with every snowbird summer or winter home.  And yes, also renovations, homes that are just mid-transaction (seller moved out and buyer hasn't yet moved in), and other similar situations.  All those equal a non-insignificant decrease in that comparison of home vs. households, and that's before vacancies from speculators. 

It's one of many reasons that so many people have Airbnb and similar situations--that takes homes that typically would be homes (as opposed to more traditional vacations homes) and removes them from the housing market. 

Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Villanelle on May 26, 2021, 12:20:24 PM
We pick the offer most likely to close.

I'm in several FB groups for military families moving to our area.  So many military families *only* look at VA loans.  I can only ASSume that's because they have very little money to put down (a disaster waiting to happen for people who move every few years!), but it's almost as though they think they must use a VA loan, when in fact there are better deals if you are a well-positioned buyer.

But sellers know VA loans are a PITA, they require extra inspections (which can't be waived), and are just messier.  So you have people who have put in 2 dozen offers with competitive pricing, escalation clauses, waived everything that can be waived, offers to cover huge amounts if there's an appraisal gap, and they can't get anything accepted.  Why would a buyer take a VA loan with the extra hoops to jump through when they have 20 other offers from which to choose?  People don't seem to get that, and many of them seems to feel it is "discrimination" against military families.  When I point out that I'm sure they'd happily accept an offer from that same military family without a VA loan so no, it isn't discrimination against military families (which I'm not sure would be illegal anyway, as 'military' isn't a protected class), it goes over like a Trump flag at a Pride rally. 

They just don't get that, as a seller, you really want an offer that is going to make it to closing and in some cases, that worth a few thousand less on the sale even.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: jeromedawg on May 26, 2021, 01:10:48 PM
Everyone hears about the low-interest rates and the high cost of lumber being part of the housing supply problem.  But nobody mentions what shutting down the Southern border has done to create the labor shortage.  Building housing requires a lot of hard-working low skilled labor. 


ICE shut down immigration under Trump and it seems Biden has continued to keep immigrants out. 




Getting back to the crazy RE market conditions, I don't understand why the demand doesn't wane.  Why do so many people want to subject themselves to such a cruel market?  Where are the sellers planning to go?  Don't they realize that by selling they will become buyers?  The gains from their sale will just evaporate when they go shopping for a replacement.  So, my question is "Who's actually winning?" in this market?

In CA prop 19 passed last year, which allows those 55 and older to transfer the tax base of their primary home to a replacement anywhere in the state. So I think a number of people in that age range are capitalizing on it and upgrading to their dream homes, taking full advantage of their tax basis. I mean, in a place like CA, who *wouldn't* to retire early in the most desirable places (especially the coastal cities). I think this might be what's happening in my immediate area and part of what's contributing to the madness (aside from a lot of younger rich folk scooping up homes fast too). Folks who are well off in the 55+ range probably have TONS of money laying around for huge down payments or all cash and are willing to overpay well over asking especially because of the huge tax savings upgrading to a significantly nicer property in a nicer area.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: JetBlast on May 26, 2021, 09:13:30 PM
We pick the offer most likely to close.

I'm in several FB groups for military families moving to our area.  So many military families *only* look at VA loans.  I can only ASSume that's because they have very little money to put down (a disaster waiting to happen for people who move every few years!), but it's almost as though they think they must use a VA loan, when in fact there are better deals if you are a well-positioned buyer.

But sellers know VA loans are a PITA, they require extra inspections (which can't be waived), and are just messier.  So you have people who have put in 2 dozen offers with competitive pricing, escalation clauses, waived everything that can be waived, offers to cover huge amounts if there's an appraisal gap, and they can't get anything accepted.  Why would a buyer take a VA loan with the extra hoops to jump through when they have 20 other offers from which to choose?  People don't seem to get that, and many of them seems to feel it is "discrimination" against military families.  When I point out that I'm sure they'd happily accept an offer from that same military family without a VA loan so no, it isn't discrimination against military families (which I'm not sure would be illegal anyway, as 'military' isn't a protected class), it goes over like a Trump flag at a Pride rally. 

They just don't get that, as a seller, you really want an offer that is going to make it to closing and in some cases, that worth a few thousand less on the sale even.

This was a concern we had with FHA and VA loans when listing our townhouse.  With a buyer wanting to put 3.5% down we had no idea if they would be able and willing to cover the gap if the house didn't appraise by even a small amount.  Needless to say we were relieved that the high bid was also a cash offer.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Cassie on May 27, 2021, 11:52:47 AM
I didnít even consider the offers that were VA or FHA. We have a hot market and I would have lost the condo I wanted if I didnít close timely.  We never used a VA loan although we could have. People need to look at all the circumstances to decide.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: SndcxxJ on May 29, 2021, 09:51:34 PM
I tend to agree with the notion that I wish list price had some sort of relevance.  It would be a much more clear market for all involved if the list price was the hopeful price the seller wants to get, but would entertain all offers above or below list price.
However, here are two local practices that's hate:
1. A somewhat common practice of extremely large multifamily properties is to list the property with no price.  The list price will sometimes be referred to as "market derived".  It drives me crazy.  I have to do a bunch of research into a property to even determine if it is a property to even consider.
2. A very active realtor team seems like they list all of their new listings on Thursdays.  They list everything for $895,000, but they operate in an area where properties are commonly going for $1.2-$1.5M.  The list price has no relationship to the value of the properties listed, not even close.  They are smart, experienced, and know what they are doing but I find it annoying.

List price has no relevance.  The only thing that matters is to determine what you feel the property can sell for and offer that if you think it is a good buy for that price.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: secondcor521 on May 29, 2021, 10:13:22 PM
As a parenthetical comment, I've often wondered why it isn't more common practice for the sellers to get an appraisal and then use the appraised value as the list price.  Kinda like I've done with cars - look it up on KBB and then list it for that price.  Perhaps with some adjustments for how desperate one is as a seller, or if there are some things that the appraisal doesn't include (a new school being built nearby next year or something like that).

I'm sure there are reasons, but it's something I've thought of doing as a seller myself before for various reasons.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: omachi on May 30, 2021, 10:55:50 AM
As a parenthetical comment, I've often wondered why it isn't more common practice for the sellers to get an appraisal and then use the appraised value as the list price.  Kinda like I've done with cars - look it up on KBB and then list it for that price.  Perhaps with some adjustments for how desperate one is as a seller, or if there are some things that the appraisal doesn't include (a new school being built nearby next year or something like that).

I'm sure there are reasons, but it's something I've thought of doing as a seller myself before for various reasons.
Where is the value in an appraisal for the seller? In a normal market, what you describe is basically what happens. The listing realtor is going to do some comps, which is effectively the KBB look up, and things go fine from there. No sane buyer is going to trust the seller's appraisal anyway, so why pay for it? Maybe if you're desperate to attract attention quickly, and so give the buyer a little help?

In an overheated market, it seems like an even worse value proposition. I don't quite understand why people are behaving the way they are now, but it's clear they are. The realtors are still doing comps, know how to list at a price low enough that it attracts a bidding war, and the end result is an eye watering price that buyers are eager to pay. If buyers are paying cash and waiving inspections and appraisals, it seems to make even less sense for the seller to pay for that information and hand it to the buyer. No appraisal is clearly working for the seller, so why would they pay for one?

I'm curious. What are the reasons you've considered doing it for?
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: jeromedawg on May 30, 2021, 11:02:59 AM
As a parenthetical comment, I've often wondered why it isn't more common practice for the sellers to get an appraisal and then use the appraised value as the list price.  Kinda like I've done with cars - look it up on KBB and then list it for that price.  Perhaps with some adjustments for how desperate one is as a seller, or if there are some things that the appraisal doesn't include (a new school being built nearby next year or something like that).

I'm sure there are reasons, but it's something I've thought of doing as a seller myself before for various reasons.
Where is the value in an appraisal for the seller? In a normal market, what you describe is basically what happens. The listing realtor is going to do some comps, which is effectively the KBB look up, and things go fine from there. No sane buyer is going to trust the seller's appraisal anyway, so why pay for it? Maybe if you're desperate to attract attention quickly, and so give the buyer a little help?

In an overheated market, it seems like an even worse value proposition. I don't quite understand why people are behaving the way they are now, but it's clear they are. The realtors are still doing comps, know how to list at a price low enough that it attracts a bidding war, and the end result is an eye watering price that buyers are eager to pay. If buyers are paying cash and waiving inspections and appraisals, it seems to make even less sense for the seller to pay for that information and hand it to the buyer. No appraisal is clearly working for the seller, so why would they pay for one?

I'm curious. What are the reasons you've considered doing it for?

Agreed - basing listing price on the appraisal seems like giving greater way to potentially 'under-pricing' your place according to market value and what people are willing to pay. If you under-list too much you may not be able to maximize on that and could end up potentially selling for less than you could have gotten. I could see how an appraisal might make more sense when it's a buyer's market (since the seller might be more motivated to do more to make their place more appealing/marketable and thus might want to get an appraisal to 'justify' everything they did to update/upgrade their home) but not in a market like this. "Comps" are often just based on what other homes of similar size have been listing for by location and condition (and maybe Zillow/Redfin estimates) and if you slightly under-list you attract even more buyers who will drive the prices up more if your place is in great condition.  I haven't really heard of people (at least these days) getting their places appraised so they can list according to the appraised value.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: secondcor521 on May 30, 2021, 11:09:28 AM
As a parenthetical comment, I've often wondered why it isn't more common practice for the sellers to get an appraisal and then use the appraised value as the list price.  Kinda like I've done with cars - look it up on KBB and then list it for that price.  Perhaps with some adjustments for how desperate one is as a seller, or if there are some things that the appraisal doesn't include (a new school being built nearby next year or something like that).

I'm sure there are reasons, but it's something I've thought of doing as a seller myself before for various reasons.
Where is the value in an appraisal for the seller? In a normal market, what you describe is basically what happens. The listing realtor is going to do some comps, which is effectively the KBB look up, and things go fine from there. No sane buyer is going to trust the seller's appraisal anyway, so why pay for it? Maybe if you're desperate to attract attention quickly, and so give the buyer a little help?

In an overheated market, it seems like an even worse value proposition. I don't quite understand why people are behaving the way they are now, but it's clear they are. The realtors are still doing comps, know how to list at a price low enough that it attracts a bidding war, and the end result is an eye watering price that buyers are eager to pay. If buyers are paying cash and waiving inspections and appraisals, it seems to make even less sense for the seller to pay for that information and hand it to the buyer. No appraisal is clearly working for the seller, so why would they pay for one?

I'm curious. What are the reasons you've considered doing it for?

It was in a market a long long time ago and far far away from the here and now, and was to prevent the seller (me) from accepting an early low ball offer.  There are obviously other ways to avoid that error, and it's obviously not a problem in today's market.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: omachi on May 30, 2021, 01:24:48 PM
It was in a market a long long time ago and far far away from the here and now, and was to prevent the seller (me) from accepting an early low ball offer.  There are obviously other ways to avoid that error, and it's obviously not a problem in today's market.
Makes sense, and probably a rather good use of the money it took to get the appraisal. Being able to say that you know the value according to at least one appraiser sounds like a reasonable bargaining point when the market isn't great for sellers.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Michael in ABQ on May 31, 2021, 06:47:13 PM
As a parenthetical comment, I've often wondered why it isn't more common practice for the sellers to get an appraisal and then use the appraised value as the list price.  Kinda like I've done with cars - look it up on KBB and then list it for that price.  Perhaps with some adjustments for how desperate one is as a seller, or if there are some things that the appraisal doesn't include (a new school being built nearby next year or something like that).

I'm sure there are reasons, but it's something I've thought of doing as a seller myself before for various reasons.

Considering a typical appraisal might be $400-500 it seems like a worthwhile investment when you're about to pay a realtor thousands or tens of thousands of dollars. I used to be a commercial real estate appraiser and was active in a forum with mostly residential appraisers and the anecdotal evidence was very few buyers were will to spend a few hundred dollars for an unbiased opinion.

My guess is that the thousands of dollars a realtors 6% commissions represents isn't "real" money they have to pay out. It just comes out of the proceeds of the sale. Whereas writing a checking for ~$400 is an actual cost.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Aegishjalmur on June 01, 2021, 03:23:06 PM
As a parenthetical comment, I've often wondered why it isn't more common practice for the sellers to get an appraisal and then use the appraised value as the list price.  Kinda like I've done with cars - look it up on KBB and then list it for that price.  Perhaps with some adjustments for how desperate one is as a seller, or if there are some things that the appraisal doesn't include (a new school being built nearby next year or something like that).

I'm sure there are reasons, but it's something I've thought of doing as a seller myself before for various reasons.

Considering a typical appraisal might be $400-500 it seems like a worthwhile investment when you're about to pay a realtor thousands or tens of thousands of dollars. I used to be a commercial real estate appraiser and was active in a forum with mostly residential appraisers and the anecdotal evidence was very few buyers were will to spend a few hundred dollars for an unbiased opinion.

My guess is that the thousands of dollars a realtors 6% commissions represents isn't "real" money they have to pay out. It just comes out of the proceeds of the sale. Whereas writing a checking for ~$400 is an actual cost.

I don't see much point for the seller getting one done. When the purchaser applies for a mortgage, all the appraiser does is state the value is supported. 95% of all the purchase appraisals I reviewed had the value as equal to the sales price, rounded up to nearest hundred dollars. 4.99% showed less, and the rest showed a higher value. You can't convince me that all the houses were priced at their exact worth, the appraiser is only stating it's supported.
Title: Re: Not accepting offers at asking price should be illegal
Post by: Michael in ABQ on June 01, 2021, 07:51:40 PM
As a parenthetical comment, I've often wondered why it isn't more common practice for the sellers to get an appraisal and then use the appraised value as the list price.  Kinda like I've done with cars - look it up on KBB and then list it for that price.  Perhaps with some adjustments for how desperate one is as a seller, or if there are some things that the appraisal doesn't include (a new school being built nearby next year or something like that).

I'm sure there are reasons, but it's something I've thought of doing as a seller myself before for various reasons.

Considering a typical appraisal might be $400-500 it seems like a worthwhile investment when you're about to pay a realtor thousands or tens of thousands of dollars. I used to be a commercial real estate appraiser and was active in a forum with mostly residential appraisers and the anecdotal evidence was very few buyers were will to spend a few hundred dollars for an unbiased opinion.

My guess is that the thousands of dollars a realtors 6% commissions represents isn't "real" money they have to pay out. It just comes out of the proceeds of the sale. Whereas writing a checking for ~$400 is an actual cost.

I don't see much point for the seller getting one done. When the purchaser applies for a mortgage, all the appraiser does is state the value is supported. 95% of all the purchase appraisals I reviewed had the value as equal to the sales price, rounded up to nearest hundred dollars. 4.99% showed less, and the rest showed a higher value. You can't convince me that all the houses were priced at their exact worth, the appraiser is only stating it's supported.

If you have a range of values and the purchase price is in that range, then yes, most appraisers will conclude to that price. I had some appraisals for purchases come in above the purchase price and some come in below. I knew in the case of the latter I would potentially get some push back from the client (usually a lender) or some other party to the transaction. But at the end of the day if my value was supported then that was it. I had some clients that would not disclose the purchase price because they wanted to ensure there was no anchor bias in play. However, with commercial appraisals there's generally a lot wider range of values due to fewer transactions. With suburban homes there may be a dozen sales in the last six months with multiple exact model matches.