Author Topic: Considering being a landlord...first time  (Read 1662 times)

jeromedawg

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2956
  • Location: Orange County, CA
Considering being a landlord...first time
« on: July 31, 2019, 10:22:15 PM »
Hey all,

We are planning to move out of our current place (co-owned with my parents who live elsewhere) by year end and I have no prior experience renting to tenants. Initially, it's overwhelming trying to think of everything that would need to be done to get the ball rolling. But one thing I'm curious about is if you guys think using your realtor to help with finding a tenant is a good move versus trying to DIY it, especially if you've never done something like this before. Or if you think just going with property management would be a better thing to do. We will be moving to an area that's about half an hour south of where we're at now, so I'm thinking property management probably isn't necessary. My realtor, who is a good friend of ours and has been helping us in a prior home search, also helps fill rental units as well and said he charges $800 for complete service (which I believe includes getting the listing up, background checks, reference checks, credit score checks, the contract, etc)

As far as *why* we're doing this - besides not wanting to live in a bottom unit ever again, it's to guarantee entrance for my son into a public school in that area with a very good dual-immersion language program. He will be turning 5 towards the end of 2020. We can play the lottery but if we don't make it, I think we may regret it an awful lot. So we figure we will just bite the bullet to get him in... but instead of looking to buy a place straight-out in that area and going 100% all-in, we felt it might not be a bad idea just to rent a place down there temporarily to make sure it's a good fit before committing. That said, we want to rent our current place to help offset the rent we will be paying at the new place. The current property that we live in and are considering renting, for all intents and purposes, is paid off in full.


Anyway, just wanted to get some feedback and opinions. Or if anyone has any other related suggestions, ideas, or advice, feel free to chime in.


Thanks!
« Last Edit: July 31, 2019, 10:43:25 PM by jeromedawg »

A Fella from Stella

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #1 on: August 20, 2019, 01:58:30 PM »
Credit check, background check, no pets, and NO LEEWAY on the deposit. Anyone who wants leeway with the deposit is going to want leeway when they're late.

Consider paying the 10% to have a property manager handle it.

SwordGuy

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6023
  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #2 on: August 20, 2019, 04:54:54 PM »
Your pricing structure has to be able to support a property manager and their fees.   Why?  Because one day (maybe tomorrow after an illness or injury) you may not be able to do it yourself.

I suggest you start off the first year with a property management company.  Why?  Because you can get copies of their lease fees and other documents they hand to their tenants.   Copies of property inspection reports.   That's all valuable "how to run this business the right way" that you're paying a small fee for.  You can then use those documents as templates for your own documents if you take over that function and do it yourself.

Plus you'll know whether you want them to do the work for you in the future in case you need them to.

Your whole "my kid in school" explanation sounds rather iffy to me.  Sorry to be blunt, but there it is.     You either live in the school district or you don't.   Lying about it because you own property you are renting is wrong.  At the very least it's unethical and it's possible that it's illegal and you could end up in jail.

Why not figure out whether you need to stay or not, THEN buy a house outside the district if you don't have to continue to live in district?


FIRETeach

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2019, 05:37:51 AM »


Your whole "my kid in school" explanation sounds rather iffy to me.  Sorry to be blunt, but there it is.     You either live in the school district or you don't.   Lying about it because you own property you are renting is wrong.  At the very least it's unethical and it's possible that it's illegal and you could end up in jail.

Why not figure out whether you need to stay or not, THEN buy a house outside the district if you don't have to continue to live in district?

I may be wrong on this, but I interpreted this as the motive for them moving out of their current district and in to the other.  The current district does not have the immersion program and it is a pull-factor to move to the other district, for the better school.  I think it completely on the up & up, if they stay in their current home they may be able to enroll in the neighboring district, but they want to be sure and move in to that district. 

I have no advice on the landlord question, I clicked to see for myself what advice may have been given.

Freedomin5

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2204
  • Location: China
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2019, 06:02:58 AM »
We used our realtor, but we still vetted every potential client that came across the table.

Omy

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 355
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2019, 06:26:26 AM »
I'm a realtor. In 2010, we moved out of our house and into another 20 minutes away. It's quite easy to manage the property ourselves and we do so. In fact, we picked up a 2nd rental in May. It's 15 minutes away and we manage it ourselves as well.

Managing it yourself is pretty easy if you are local, handy, and if you have access to good contractors. Property managers tend to do the minimum for that 10%...and are often not very discriminating when a tenant asks for something to be fixed. I feel I can make a better assessment of whether an item must be fixed or is just cosmetic. And I can often fix it less expensively than the property manager's contractor can. I can change out the innards of the toilet tank in 20 minutes with an $8 part...the plumber that the property manager sends out will charge at least $150.

I have used realtors to find tenants (not myself because I don't want to hear any sad stories from potential tenants) - and I have found tenants myself. I recommend using a realtor the first time so you can understand their screening process and see all of the required forms and disclosures (as Swordguy mentioned).

The most important predictor of tenant behavior (in my opinion) is credit history. If they pay their bills on time, you will have fewer headaches. References are important (but not as reliable) since a landlord with a terrible tenant will say anything to get the bad tenant out of his property.

I've had 6 tenants in 9 years between the two properties. I knew 3 of them well (and checked their credit first) so I didn't feel the need to use a realtor. For the 3 tenants I didn't know, I had a realtor advertise and screen for me. Only one of these unknown tenants turned out bad...and I had my suspicions from the beginning but didn't listen to my gut. She always paid late, kept two messy dogs even though the lease specified no pets, and did $2000 worth of damage (we kept $1100 of her security deposit but should have kept more). I had decided to loosen my standards regarding credit history and that decision hurt a bit.

Overall it's been fine and it's nice to have $4k coming in every month as we retire. It feels good not to have everything invested in the stock market (though the stock market is easier than managing properties).

Another Reader

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5109
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2019, 06:37:38 AM »
You own a condo in Orange County.  Prices are the highest they have ever been.  There is no way you can achieve anywhere near 1 percent per month in rent.  The condo rules are onerous and tenants are notorious for not following HOA rules.  Why are you even considering this?

Your parents co-own this with you.  Would it damage them in some way to sell and give them back their money? 

We are at or near the peak of the real estate cycle.  It's unlikely you are going to miss out on significant appreciation if you sell.  You will free up the cash you will need for a down payment when prices drop.  In your shoes, I would sell and not look back. 

Mother Fussbudget

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 832
  • Age: 57
  • Location: Indianapolis, IN
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2019, 09:40:51 AM »
You own a condo in Orange County.  Prices are the highest they have ever been.  There is no way you can achieve anywhere near 1 percent per month in rent.  The condo rules are onerous and tenants are notorious for not following HOA rules.  Why are you even considering this?

Your parents co-own this with you.  Would it damage them in some way to sell and give them back their money? 

We are at or near the peak of the real estate cycle.  It's unlikely you are going to miss out on significant appreciation if you sell.  You will free up the cash you will need for a down payment when prices drop.  In your shoes, I would sell and not look back.

THIS is great advice. 

If you want to use real estate investing (REI) as a part of your overall FIRE strategy, there are a lot of great reading materials out there to give you more information.  Recommend reading some of the books on the recommended reading list before jumping into REI.  I would start with "Landlording on Autopilot" - download the Kindle sample from Amazon and see if it speaks to you.   Best of luck!  MFB

ecchastang

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 132
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2019, 09:49:01 AM »
You own a condo in Orange County.  Prices are the highest they have ever been.  There is no way you can achieve anywhere near 1 percent per month in rent.  The condo rules are onerous and tenants are notorious for not following HOA rules.  Why are you even considering this?

Your parents co-own this with you.  Would it damage them in some way to sell and give them back their money? 

We are at or near the peak of the real estate cycle.  It's unlikely you are going to miss out on significant appreciation if you sell.  You will free up the cash you will need for a down payment when prices drop.  In your shoes, I would sell and not look back.
This is solid advice.  I would add that rental laws in OC will always favor the tenant. 

Jon Bon

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 938
  • Location: Midwest
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2019, 10:10:43 AM »
You own a condo in Orange County.  Prices are the highest they have ever been.  There is no way you can achieve anywhere near 1 percent per month in rent.  The condo rules are onerous and tenants are notorious for not following HOA rules.  Why are you even considering this?

Your parents co-own this with you.  Would it damage them in some way to sell and give them back their money? 

We are at or near the peak of the real estate cycle.  It's unlikely you are going to miss out on significant appreciation if you sell.  You will free up the cash you will need for a down payment when prices drop.  In your shoes, I would sell and not look back.

+1000

Probably should post some numbers dawg. But I am pretty sure I already know what the answer is going to be....

jeromedawg

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2956
  • Location: Orange County, CA
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #10 on: August 23, 2019, 09:14:18 PM »
You own a condo in Orange County.  Prices are the highest they have ever been.  There is no way you can achieve anywhere near 1 percent per month in rent.  The condo rules are onerous and tenants are notorious for not following HOA rules.  Why are you even considering this?

Your parents co-own this with you.  Would it damage them in some way to sell and give them back their money? 

We are at or near the peak of the real estate cycle.  It's unlikely you are going to miss out on significant appreciation if you sell.  You will free up the cash you will need for a down payment when prices drop.  In your shoes, I would sell and not look back.

We bought at a peak as well. $523k for the condo. Currently the valuation is realistically around $575k and that's what my realtor would want to list at given the current condition - it could be higher but the furnishings and fixtures are quite dated. Other similar units in our community haven't been selling that quickly and if they have it's usually not for more than the current market estimate unless there are major upgrades. For my parents their strategy is to 1031 rollover their portion, versus outright selling and owing cap gains on it. We would likely rent for just a year and then sell at that point in time. This isn't a long-term strategy.


EDIT: I'm checking redfin right now looking at past sales and current listings. There's only one other listing and it's for a unit  with identical floor plan that's on the second floor. They are asking $670k for it and this listing has been up for 185 days. There is a pending 2/2 unit that is apparently being sold for $570k (was on the market for 83 days). In the past 6 months only 4 units have sold between $675k and $725k and they are all 3/3 townhome style units with two floors (these are most desirable) - the $675k unit as more original fixtures/furnishings like ours. The $725k has more update furnishings/fixtures, as anticipated. So given these numbers, *theoretically* we should be able to fetch somewhere between $570k and $670k. Redfin's estimate puts this at $622k and Zillow (thinks it's a 2/2) at $615k. Our realtor thinks that trying to list right now is not a great idea as the market slows down a lot going into December. He would much rather see the unit listed in the Spring time. All the units that sold in the past year (with the exception of the one that's still pending) have sold between March and July. The closest other I have is the unit directly across from us with a mirroring floor plan - that sold in December 2018 for $610k and has more upgrades than ours with some original furnishings/fixtures - this one was originally listed August of 2018 and went through several price changes (actually, increases) before becoming active under contract in October 2018. Many of the non-3/3 properties have taken a long time to sell - the market may be hot in OC but it feels pretty slow in our immediate neighborhood (one of the less desirable ones to live in around Irvine). Anyway that's about all I have for most recent 'market research'
« Last Edit: August 23, 2019, 09:36:31 PM by jeromedawg »

Another Reader

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5109
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2019, 09:31:51 PM »
You own a condo in Orange County.  Prices are the highest they have ever been.  There is no way you can achieve anywhere near 1 percent per month in rent.  The condo rules are onerous and tenants are notorious for not following HOA rules.  Why are you even considering this?

Your parents co-own this with you.  Would it damage them in some way to sell and give them back their money? 

We are at or near the peak of the real estate cycle.  It's unlikely you are going to miss out on significant appreciation if you sell.  You will free up the cash you will need for a down payment when prices drop.  In your shoes, I would sell and not look back.

We bought at a peak as well. $523k for the condo. Currently the valuation is realistically around $575k and that's what my realtor would want to list at given the current condition - it could be higher but the furnishings and fixtures are quite dated. Other similar units in our community haven't been selling that quickly and if they have it's usually not for more than the current market estimate unless there are major upgrades. For my parents their strategy is to 1031 rollover their portion, versus outright selling and owing cap gains on it. We would likely rent for just a year and then sell at that point in time. This isn't a long-term strategy.

I don't understand.  You don't particularly like this place.  Would you consider moving back?  Is that your reason to keep it?

If you sell it now, you aren't going to lose much money if any.  The market is weakening, what will you do if the value is down 10 percent in a year?

jeromedawg

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2956
  • Location: Orange County, CA
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2019, 09:44:54 PM »


Your whole "my kid in school" explanation sounds rather iffy to me.  Sorry to be blunt, but there it is.     You either live in the school district or you don't.   Lying about it because you own property you are renting is wrong.  At the very least it's unethical and it's possible that it's illegal and you could end up in jail.

Why not figure out whether you need to stay or not, THEN buy a house outside the district if you don't have to continue to live in district?

I may be wrong on this, but I interpreted this as the motive for them moving out of their current district and in to the other.  The current district does not have the immersion program and it is a pull-factor to move to the other district, for the better school.  I think it completely on the up & up, if they stay in their current home they may be able to enroll in the neighboring district, but they want to be sure and move in to that district. 

I have no advice on the landlord question, I clicked to see for myself what advice may have been given.

Correct, the goal is to get our kid into the other district to guarantee his entrance into the immersion program. The point of renting in the new location is to 'test the water' versus going all in, so to speak. If the program or location doesn't work out to our liking we can always pull out without having boxed ourselves in. To clarify: We are not renting our place and trying to continue claiming it as our primary residence - we are planning to move to City B and rent a place there (new primary residence) while renting out the condo in City A that we co-own with my parents.
I think the ultimate question comes down to if it's better to A) sell the condo asap, as Another Reader suggests, and pocket the money (but owe cap gains - this will be a bigger impact on my parents than it will us, since this was all 1031-based... so there's also depreciation recapture they have to contend with) and wait for the downturn to buy a new place low, or B) do another 1031... the whole 1031 thing is a bit complicated but in a sense it works in favor of my parents and for us - technically they rent their portion of the place out to us and to them we are tenants that would afford them the least amount of hassle. Also my parents would prefer not to be stuck with a lump sum of cash (they're in their retirement years and are trying to reduce whatever taxes they might owe year over year)
« Last Edit: August 23, 2019, 09:48:46 PM by jeromedawg »

jeromedawg

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2956
  • Location: Orange County, CA
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2019, 09:58:45 PM »
You own a condo in Orange County.  Prices are the highest they have ever been.  There is no way you can achieve anywhere near 1 percent per month in rent.  The condo rules are onerous and tenants are notorious for not following HOA rules.  Why are you even considering this?

Your parents co-own this with you.  Would it damage them in some way to sell and give them back their money? 

We are at or near the peak of the real estate cycle.  It's unlikely you are going to miss out on significant appreciation if you sell.  You will free up the cash you will need for a down payment when prices drop.  In your shoes, I would sell and not look back.

We bought at a peak as well. $523k for the condo. Currently the valuation is realistically around $575k and that's what my realtor would want to list at given the current condition - it could be higher but the furnishings and fixtures are quite dated. Other similar units in our community haven't been selling that quickly and if they have it's usually not for more than the current market estimate unless there are major upgrades. For my parents their strategy is to 1031 rollover their portion, versus outright selling and owing cap gains on it. We would likely rent for just a year and then sell at that point in time. This isn't a long-term strategy.

I don't understand.  You don't particularly like this place.  Would you consider moving back?  Is that your reason to keep it?

If you sell it now, you aren't going to lose much money if any.  The market is weakening, what will you do if the value is down 10 percent in a year?

I think moving back would be a last resort but yea, we'd like to get out of it either way. So if we moved into another place (whether in Irvine or elsewhere) it would be under the premise of doing it as another 1031 - my parents would 1031 their portion, we would sell our portion and purchase a slightly bigger place under the same co-ownership structure (my parents apply the funds from their 1031 and we apply our funds from the sale towards purchase of a new place equal or greater value)

If we sold this under the fact that it's a rental property for my parents originating from a 1031, I think there will be some major tax implications for them... They want to avoid all that
« Last Edit: August 23, 2019, 10:05:57 PM by jeromedawg »

Another Reader

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5109
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2019, 10:12:56 PM »
They rented their share to you and can prove that they collected market rent for their interest from you, right?  Why don't you sell the property, they exchange their portion, and you have a tax free gain on your share, since you used it as a primary residence?  Have you consulted a CPA about the tax consequences of a sale?

robartsd

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2616
  • Location: Sacramento, CA
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2019, 10:19:25 PM »
Do your parents basically view their portion as an early inheritance to you (expect to kick the tax can down the road until you inherit the stepped up basis)?

For you personally, it seems like sell is the best option; however, it also seems like you should have a bit of time (kid turns five in late 2020, so should start kindergarten about a year from now) that you can allow your parents to plan their exit strategy (buy you out, 1031 into another property, plan for the tax hit in 2020). Your proceeds should be sufficient to put a down payment on your next place without co-owing with parents when you decide where you want to buy again.

jeromedawg

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2956
  • Location: Orange County, CA
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2019, 10:36:41 PM »
They rented their share to you and can prove that they collected market rent for their interest from you, right?  Why don't you sell the property, they exchange their portion, and you have a tax free gain on your share, since you used it as a primary residence?  Have you consulted a CPA about the tax consequences of a sale?

I think it's all the depreciation recapture that will hit them. Also the place they originally 1031ed I actually don't recall how much they gained off it but I think it was in the ballpark of $200k of gains or so. I can bring it up with them but I think they've generally wanted to avoid outright selling due to the potential tax consequences... Not sure if they talked this option thru with their CPA or if it was even an option that was considered at the time
Edit: I misread... Thought you were suggesting to do an straight sale no exchange involved for my parents... in order for our gain to be tax free if we outright sold our portion and my parents 1031ed their portion, we would need to go buy another primary residence within 6 months using the proceeds of our portion... I believe that's per section 121. For my parents they would then be stuck with another rental property to acquire and then likely having to rent to tenants. Unless they do something like a 1031 Delaware trust which doesn't seem like such a great option.
Do your parents basically view their portion as an early inheritance to you (expect to kick the tax can down the road until you inherit the stepped up basis)?

For you personally, it seems like sell is the best option; however, it also seems like you should have a bit of time (kid turns five in late 2020, so should start kindergarten about a year from now) that you can allow your parents to plan their exit strategy (buy you out, 1031 into another property, plan for the tax hit in 2020). Your proceeds should be sufficient to put a down payment on your next place without co-owing with parents when you decide where you want to buy again.

This is pretty much what they want - to hold the property until they pass and can pass it down for us at the stepped up basis. For my parents and rental properties they've expressed that they actually want to downsize and not deal with tenants...the exception to that is if we can work out an arrangement where we are renting from them. They own two other rental properties in the Bay area and the heavily tenant favored laws have made it a nightmare for them to try to downsize. Originally they were talking about selling another property up there and doing a combined exchange into a single property that we would live in and co-own/rent but ran into issues such as the tenant having the right to stay 120 days upon giving notice. We were actually getting ready to list our condo a month ago until that roadblock came up. Currently the plan is to have my parents buy us out now and then we move - we have to move to the area and show primary residence by January of 2020, so we'll need to be residing in the area well before late 2020. Rents in the area we are moving to are not cheap by any means, which is why we were considering renting out the condo for supplemental cash flow in the short-term at least.
« Last Edit: August 24, 2019, 04:17:47 PM by jeromedawg »

macmoneysaver

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 26
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2019, 06:29:22 PM »
Your pricing structure has to be able to support a property manager and their fees.   Why?  Because one day (maybe tomorrow after an illness or injury) you may not be able to do it yourself.

Let me echo what @SwordGuy said, you must plan on the expenses for a property manager from the start.  Being in CA, I would highly recommend you find a good PM and you set sound criteria for things like minimum credit score (700 for example), ratio of earnings to rents (3x for example) and NO PRIOR EVICTIONS or PET violations.

Since you are in California, realize CA is VERY tenant friendly.  If you have any trouble with a tenant, you must follow the rules to the T.  Even if you do follow the rules, it can take 6-12 months to evict, and you will not be collecting rent during that time.  There are "professional tenants" who know the rules far better than a DIY landlord.

So: 1) screen tenants thoroughly, even if it costs your a few more weeks of no rent; and 2) find a good PM to help.

Ask your friend what their experience is with handling disputes w tenants and evictions in particular.

Note, I know this sounds like fear-mongering, and I don't mean it to be.  I live in CA and know several people who own multiple properties.  They still do it (if the numbers work).  Just make sure you go in with your eyes wide open.

Final note, personal residences typically do not make good rentals.  You know your "why" and appear to be good with just off-setting some expenses while you try out the new neighborhood.

Best to you whatever you choose.

jeromedawg

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2956
  • Location: Orange County, CA
Re: Considering being a landlord...first time
« Reply #18 on: September 01, 2019, 03:50:43 PM »
Your pricing structure has to be able to support a property manager and their fees.   Why?  Because one day (maybe tomorrow after an illness or injury) you may not be able to do it yourself.

Let me echo what @SwordGuy said, you must plan on the expenses for a property manager from the start.  Being in CA, I would highly recommend you find a good PM and you set sound criteria for things like minimum credit score (700 for example), ratio of earnings to rents (3x for example) and NO PRIOR EVICTIONS or PET violations.

Since you are in California, realize CA is VERY tenant friendly.  If you have any trouble with a tenant, you must follow the rules to the T.  Even if you do follow the rules, it can take 6-12 months to evict, and you will not be collecting rent during that time.  There are "professional tenants" who know the rules far better than a DIY landlord.

So: 1) screen tenants thoroughly, even if it costs your a few more weeks of no rent; and 2) find a good PM to help.

Ask your friend what their experience is with handling disputes w tenants and evictions in particular.

Note, I know this sounds like fear-mongering, and I don't mean it to be.  I live in CA and know several people who own multiple properties.  They still do it (if the numbers work).  Just make sure you go in with your eyes wide open.

Final note, personal residences typically do not make good rentals.  You know your "why" and appear to be good with just off-setting some expenses while you try out the new neighborhood.

Best to you whatever you choose.

Thanks! Very practical info that I'll have to consider.

In terms of the "why" - yea, I realize renting this place out isn't great from a standard investment perspective. But I really think our situation warrants consideration for it - I get the point about selling NOW but the whole 1031 situation and my parents desire to have 'easy tenants' doesn't seem to work with that... Sure, we could just have them buy us out and then they move on and do a 1031 exchange but then they will now be stuck looking for new tenants to rent the new place when they would rather have just continued having us co-own with them and us live in, pay them their portion of fair market rent and we more or less 'maintain' the place ourselves. I know I've complained about "strings" in the past (other thread/s here) but really that's a minor thing in the big picture since I wrote about that - the subsidization of rent is worth whatever "strings" there are since my parents are pretty hands-off as it is. So after a year or so of us renting in the new area and renting out the current property, my parents will consider doing a 1031 at point in time and we would go back in with them and put a downpayment, etc to 'resume' co-ownership with it being our primary residence.   
« Last Edit: September 01, 2019, 05:48:09 PM by jeromedawg »