Author Topic: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US  (Read 39464 times)

Samsam

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #50 on: August 01, 2013, 10:07:47 AM »
I hear North Carolina is nice and inexpensive.


NC is a nice place to live.  Our current whack-job legislature is hell-bent on fixing that, though.

I agree, I just moved to NC last year and it is beautiful!  There are mountains and beaches.  It hurts me to read the news every morning... NC looks to be going downhill :'(

Spork

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #51 on: August 01, 2013, 10:09:39 AM »

While specific forecasts may not be accurate and no single storm even can be said as "caused" by climate change, what we do know for certain is that storms will be more frequent, more intense, and less predictable.   It seems wise to include storm-resiliency in our considerations, along with tax rates and bikeability.  Or not.  It's up to you.

No, we don't.  And the trend for tornadoes is actually downward both for number of storms and for storm deaths* reference   You wouldn't know that from the news, but ... it's what the data says.

My point is: take deep breaths.  Every single place in the world has it's downside.  (A hilltop is going to be more susceptible to straight line winds and lightning, for example.)  IMO the greatest threat to "the climate change problem" is overstatement.  If you cry wolf (and are even a little wrong) enough times, you end up with people saying "meh".   That doesn't mean it's wrong, but it means they need to be much more careful in their statements.

*storm deaths is arguably not a viable statistic as building codes and medical response has gotten better over time.

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #52 on: August 01, 2013, 11:38:45 AM »
I will refuse to consider any location that is vulnerable to the effects of climate change.  Anywhere closer than 75 or 100 miles to the coastline is out.  Anywhere vulnerable to wildfires is out.  Anywhere in tornado alley is out.   All of these natural disasters will only become more extreme and more unpredictable in scope and duration over the rest of my lifetime.

I've survived two floods and will never again be cavalier about natural disasters.  Right now I live  about 75 miles from the coast and that is a little too close for my comfort.
Sounds like you live a very scary life carrying that "The End is Near" sandwich board around all day.

Fact:  The Mid-Atlantic region is experiencing a higher than global average of sea-level rise because not only are seas rising but also the tectonic plate we sit on is simultaneously sinking.  It has been well documented and even very conservative places such as Virginia Beach and Norfolk are beginning to discuss what parts of the city they should begin abandoning and what parts to prioritize saving.   

http://www.timesdispatch.com/news/state-regional/va-scientist-finds-rising-east-coast-sea-levels/article_b5f85984-ae97-59aa-b7dd-ed647adf4a09.html

http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2012-06-17/national/35459771_1_sea-level-rise-sea-levels-hampton-roads

Norfolk is one of the biggest Navy bases in the world.  Our military is spending a lot of energy/ time/ money right now on strategies for managing climate-driven risks.  If military leaders are thinking about it, I will too.  They're usually pretty well prepared when the shit hits the fan and that beats acting like an Ostrich any day.

from the article: "For his part, Boon said the rising rates of sea-level rise that he documented are likely caused by climate change, but he isn’t 100 percent convinced.  After all, he’s a skeptic."

There have been numerous cataclysmic predictions and they've generally missed their marks in the past.  That doesn't mean it isn't real.  That doesn't mean someone won't be right someday.  It just means what gets reported is extreme media fodder.  Yeah, if you lived on the beach, you might worry... but you might worry anyway because that's an extremely expensive bit of property that's likely to get wiped out by a storm anyway.

Severe ocean rise may very well happen... but I'm pretty sure I'll be dead when it does.  That doesn't mean "don't worry about it"... but it wouldn't make me move 100 miles away from the coast (if living near a coast was important to me... which it isn't).

As for tornadoes... again, there has been some media exaggeration.  From NOAA:

Quote
Does “global warming” cause tornadoes? No. Thunderstorms do. The harder question may be, “Will climate change influence tornado occurrence?” The best answer is: We don’t know. According to the National Science and Technology Council’s Scientific Assessment on Climate Change, “Trends in other extreme weather events that occur at small spatial scales–such as tornadoes, hail, lightning, and dust storms–cannot be determined at the present time due to insufficient evidence.” This is because tornadoes are short-fused weather, on the time scale of seconds and minutes, and a space scale of fractions of a mile across. In contrast, climate trends take many years, decades, or millennia, spanning vast areas of the globe. The numerous unknowns dwell in the vast gap between those time and space scales. Climate models cannot resolve tornadoes or individual thunderstorms. They can indicate broad-scale shifts in three of the four favorable ingredients for severe thunderstorms (moisture, instability and wind shear), but as any severe weather forecaster can attest, having some favorable factors in place doesn’t guarantee tornadoes. Our physical understanding indicates mixed signals–some ingredients may increase (instability), while others may decrease (shear), in a warmer world. The other key ingredient (storm-scale lift), and to varying extents moisture, instability and shear, depend mostly on day-to-day patterns, and often, even minute-to-minute local weather. Finally, tornado recordkeeping itself also has been prone to many errors and uncertainties, doesn’t exist for most of the world, and even in the U. S., only covers several decades in detailed form.
Spork, well said.

I'm not in ostrich mode, but I also am not completely convinced the bad things will happen as quickly and certainly as some folks assert.  As Spork said, I'm not worried about the day after tomorrow scenario that get some folks hyperventilating. 

Trulystashin, I'm sorry about your bad fortune with two floods.  With a house at the top of the hill, lightning strikes might be the new danger.

dragoncar

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #53 on: August 01, 2013, 01:58:40 PM »
My point is that so long as we consider tax rates, cost of housing/ food, and other factors, we should also consider climate-driven risks.   In the Mid-Atlantic region, coastal land loss due to sea level rise and sinking land is not a "forecast" or possibility.  It is happening now and should be one factor people consider in where they choose to live.  I have a friend who retired to New Orleans and that's pretty un-Mustachian.

As I noted before, I've survived two floods in May and September of '03.  It took me three years to recover, financially and otherwise.  For a long time, the mere sound of rain triggered anxiety attacks.  I will never forget the dank, rotting smell in the house I loved.  Or the backbreaking labor I did to rebuild after the first flood (yes, I was insured for flood but coverage is skimpy).  I still have tools that I salvaged that are covered in a primordial ooze I cannot seem to get off no matter how hard I clean.  It came darn close to destroying my life.

When I was finally ready to buy another house, I chose one at the top of a hill.   

While specific forecasts may not be accurate and no single storm even can be said as "caused" by climate change, what we do know for certain is that storms will be more frequent, more intense, and less predictable.   It seems wise to include storm-resiliency in our considerations, along with tax rates and bikeability.  Or not.  It's up to you.

It's one thing to pay top dollar for propert y that will sink.  It's another thing to rent a cheap place in NOLA or a shack by the sea or whatever.  If the price is right, and it will wash away in 50 years, I might still do it.

Eric

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #54 on: August 01, 2013, 03:49:35 PM »
I really like this discussion. I'm fond of trying to figure out the ideal place to retire.  It's not the easiest thing, given the volume to choose from.  You guys have raised some good points that I hadn't thought much about before.

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #55 on: August 01, 2013, 11:38:19 PM »
I love NC, and it is definitely in my top 10, but yes, the politicians (and the people who voted them In) are fucking nuts.

AlmostIndependent

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #56 on: August 02, 2013, 09:49:14 AM »
If you're into low taxes and cold weather you can't beat Alaska. Although I will go out on a limb and say that we rival any state in the union when it comes to electing politicians who are fucking nuts.

Spork

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #57 on: August 02, 2013, 10:36:04 AM »
If you're into low taxes and cold weather you can't beat Alaska. Although I will go out on a limb and say that we rival any state in the union when it comes to electing politicians who are fucking nuts.

Challenge accepted sir!  (Texas)

AlmostIndependent

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #58 on: August 02, 2013, 11:03:52 AM »
If you're into low taxes and cold weather you can't beat Alaska. Although I will go out on a limb and say that we rival any state in the union when it comes to electing politicians who are fucking nuts.

Challenge accepted sir!  (Texas)

We did inflict Sarah Palin on the rest of the nation. (Sorry)

backyardfeast

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #59 on: August 02, 2013, 11:15:07 AM »
OK, I'm in Canada, so I can't really contribute much to the discussion (a pet favorite topic of mine up here, though).  But I wanted to point out to the reader from RI who wants to be able to swim in the ocean 4 months a year, that unless you're headed to California, you'd better stick to the East Coast.  With no Gulf Stream, the Pacific is chilly year-round! (sadly).

On the climate change considerations, I don't know if all states have them, but here each provincial government has online resources that lay out how their research shows how their areas will be affected by climate change.  You can see areas expected to flood more often, experience more hurricanes, drought, etc.  It can be very enlightening!

Personally, I'm happy in the PNW, just not on low-lying territory (especially below sea-level, reclaimed, dyked areas).  Apart from the threat of "big one" earthquakes, and needing to continue to adapt to worsening droughts in the summer, I think this is going to be a good option.

At the risk of being inflammatory, I wouldn't go anywhere near the SW.  Climate change or not, there are interstate lawsuits going on NOW over water that no longer exists...check out William Debuys book, "A Great Aridness".

impaire

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #60 on: August 02, 2013, 05:32:44 PM »
OK, I'm in Canada, so I can't really contribute much to the discussion (a pet favorite topic of mine up here, though).  But I wanted to point out to the reader from RI who wants to be able to swim in the ocean 4 months a year, that unless you're headed to California, you'd better stick to the East Coast.  With no Gulf Stream, the Pacific is chilly year-round! (sadly).

I know... I still can't get the PNW out of my head, though (among other places). I'm ready to wear a goofy bodysuit :)

backyardfeast

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #61 on: August 02, 2013, 09:39:32 PM »
Ummm...sorry?  I guess the Gulf Stream is more complicated than I thought?  I was addressing the RI poster pretty directly, though, and the nice warm swimmable beaches which I envy greatly?  If I'm missing a cultural cue, my apologies...

(I have a husband from the Cdn maritimes who grew up swimming in the ocean, which I can't even wrap my head around.)

If you're talking about snow, storms, hurricanes, etc., I get it! :)

davisgang90

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #62 on: August 03, 2013, 04:57:02 AM »
OK, I'm in Canada, so I can't really contribute much to the discussion (a pet favorite topic of mine up here, though).  But I wanted to point out to the reader from RI who wants to be able to swim in the ocean 4 months a year, that unless you're headed to California, you'd better stick to the East Coast.  With no Gulf Stream, the Pacific is chilly year-round! (sadly).

On the climate change considerations, I don't know if all states have them, but here each provincial government has online resources that lay out how their research shows how their areas will be affected by climate change.  You can see areas expected to flood more often, experience more hurricanes, drought, etc.  It can be very enlightening!

Personally, I'm happy in the PNW, just not on low-lying territory (especially below sea-level, reclaimed, dyked areas).  Apart from the threat of "big one" earthquakes, and needing to continue to adapt to worsening droughts in the summer, I think this is going to be a good option.

At the risk of being inflammatory, I wouldn't go anywhere near the SW.  Climate change or not, there are interstate lawsuits going on NOW over water that no longer exists...check out William Debuys book, "A Great Aridness".


SHUT YOUR FILTHY WHORE MOUTH!!! Look, Canadians, All of us Americans's aren't accustom to the easy breeze of the Gulf Stream. Most of us, I''m sure, are trying to get out of that motherfucker. Please stop pretending that all American's are in the path of the Gulf Stream and love it.
Dude, There are plenty of decaf brands that are just as tasty.

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #63 on: August 03, 2013, 06:38:22 AM »
I was going for Ron Burgundy, and didn't pull it off AT ALL. Move along, nothing to see here...

davisgang90

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #64 on: August 03, 2013, 07:28:03 AM »
If you had worked Whale's Vagina into the quote I would have recognized right away.

footenote

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #65 on: August 03, 2013, 07:35:28 AM »
I was going for Ron Burgundy, and didn't pull it off AT ALL. Move along, nothing to see here...
Maybe you could create an alt MMM identity (RonBurgundy) for this purpose?

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #66 on: August 03, 2013, 07:58:19 AM »
My point is that so long as we consider tax rates, cost of housing/ food, and other factors, we should also consider climate-driven risks.   In the Mid-Atlantic region, coastal land loss due to sea level rise and sinking land is not a "forecast" or possibility.  It is happening now and should be one factor people consider in where they choose to live.  I have a friend who retired to New Orleans and that's pretty un-Mustachian.

As I noted before, I've survived two floods in May and September of '03.  It took me three years to recover, financially and otherwise.  For a long time, the mere sound of rain triggered anxiety attacks.  I will never forget the dank, rotting smell in the house I loved.  Or the backbreaking labor I did to rebuild after the first flood (yes, I was insured for flood but coverage is skimpy).  I still have tools that I salvaged that are covered in a primordial ooze I cannot seem to get off no matter how hard I clean.  It came darn close to destroying my life.

When I was finally ready to buy another house, I chose one at the top of a hill.   

While specific forecasts may not be accurate and no single storm even can be said as "caused" by climate change, what we do know for certain is that storms will be more frequent, more intense, and less predictable.   It seems wise to include storm-resiliency in our considerations, along with tax rates and bikeability.  Or not.  It's up to you.

This is one thing that is great about New Mexico.  We are  pretty safe from natural disasters here. No risk of hurricane (lol).  The risk of tornado is low, flooding is rare.  The greatest danger posed by nature here is lightning strike if you hike the mountains at the wrong time.  We do have forest fires in dry years but they don't usually get close to cities.  I lived in Houston for part of my life and I must say I don't miss dealing with mold, mildew, hurricanes, floods, humidity and gray skies.

backyardfeast

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #67 on: August 03, 2013, 09:35:32 AM »
Quote
I was going for Ron Burgundy, and didn't pull it off AT ALL. Move along, nothing to see here...

Awesome.  Thanks for explaining. :)

SnackDog

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #68 on: August 03, 2013, 10:49:11 AM »
Why limit yourself to the US? Plenty of great other countries - Canada, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Thailand, etc.   Taxes and healthcare costs can be much lower in these places, not to mention cost of living...

dragoncar

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #69 on: August 03, 2013, 12:19:04 PM »
Why limit yourself to the US? Plenty of great other countries - Canada, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Thailand, etc.   Taxes and healthcare costs can be much lower in these places, not to mention cost of living...

That's great and all but sometimes I think people ignore the real, social, familial, linguistic, cultural, and other costs associated with moving to another country.  Not that it can't work out but I know the list of places where the "savings" outweighs the "costs" is for me very small

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #70 on: August 03, 2013, 01:47:02 PM »
If you want city living on the cheap, Pittsburgh's weather is nothing like California's, but lovely old Victorians are very cheap (5000 sqft. brick mansion for the price of a California ranch house? Yep!), and the city swings well above its weight in terms of cultural amenities thanks to its many universities and foundations endowed by robber barons. There's a bike trail all the way to DC and there are nice little mountains nearby. Pretty much all the heavy industry left thirty years ago, so the air is in much better shape than it once was.

Colorado has mountains, dry weather, and open land unto the horizon, so it's unlikely to go up to the prices a land- (and dense-zoning-) starved place like California is.

Yes there is a TON of land in CO but... the land MOST people want to live on is actually quite limited, i.e. most people don't come here to live in the mountains, they come here to play in the mountains - actually living in the mountains comes with logistical challenges if your work is in the big city.  You can live in the mountains if you are OK being a seasonal worker, can work from anywhere, are functionally retired or have a profession that can otherwise accommodate remoteness. If you need or want a more conventional line of work, odds are you wind up in one of the front range population centers such as Denver/Boulder or CSprings (lots of great stuff going on in some other spots as well, such as Grand Junction, Durango, etc, just talking average new arrival here).  For the average new arrival, you're basically looking at living in a 25 - 50 mile wide strip of land running from Colorado Springs to Fort Collins.  So more limited than the CA coastline.  In fact, you should probably just move on out to CA without even THINKING about CO :)

Spork

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #71 on: August 03, 2013, 02:07:28 PM »
If you're into low taxes and cold weather you can't beat Alaska. Although I will go out on a limb and say that we rival any state in the union when it comes to electing politicians who are fucking nuts.

Challenge accepted sir!  (Texas)

We did inflict Sarah Palin on the rest of the nation. (Sorry)

I see your Sarah Paiin and up the ante to one Rick Perry and two George Bushes.  Your move.

Villanelle

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #72 on: August 03, 2013, 02:42:28 PM »
Why limit yourself to the US? Plenty of great other countries - Canada, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Thailand, etc.   Taxes and healthcare costs can be much lower in these places, not to mention cost of living...

That's great and all but sometimes I think people ignore the real, social, familial, linguistic, cultural, and other costs associated with moving to another country.  Not that it can't work out but I know the list of places where the "savings" outweighs the "costs" is for me very small

Yes.  I'm on my second consecutive expat home.  There have been a lot of wonderful experiences, but sometimes, it's just *hard*.  And that's with knowing that for us, it is temporary.  Family pressures, culture shock, language barriers--it's not all sipping margaritas (or Singha) on the beach. 

ch12

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #73 on: August 03, 2013, 04:06:13 PM »
Bloomington, Indiana

This is the most descriptive article I could find. http://www.designsponge.com/2013/01/bloomington-indiana-city-guide.html  The pics don't do it justice, especially since taken in the winter.  Spring, fall, and summer are very pretty.  If you're interested, I would suggest searching Google images.

+.75
I adore Bloomington, IN. I went to school there for four years and actually suggested it when we were all discussing ERE cities (back when I was more active on the ERE forums). It is completely affordable, far from the horrible flooding that will come when the oceans rise, full of interesting and intelligent people, etc.

One thing that I will say, though, is that I hated January and February. I walked almost everywhere and it was pure misery. I have cold urticaria and...it was bad. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cold-urticaria/DS01160

In every other month of the year, Bloomington is walkable and bikeable. It has the opera and ballet at the MAC, lots of parks, lots of free concerts due to Jacobs students, etc. There's a lot to do in Bloomington if you are so inclined. I just know that if I were to go back, I would have some sort of plan to flee during January and February (for instance, go to Ecuador. My family moaned about how terrible the winter was in February and I was like...yes, this weekend I went to a tropical beach (Canoa) and I am now completely brown).

Just my 2 cents on moving to a very low cost area with a small taste of expat life.

Quote
In Bloomington, you can walk to your favorite Burmese, Korean or Turkish restaurant, then head to the park for a free outdoor movie. And as you walk home late at night, you can actually see the stars. That’s not something you can say about many places.

EDIT: There was a TIME analysis of this very issue that recommended Bloomington.
Quote
Moving from Los Angeles to Bloomington, Ind., for example, you'd save 15% on groceries, 61% on housing, 8% on utilities, 14% on transportation and 13% on health care each year. A working person needs to earn only $47,505 a year to live there as well as they did for $75,000 a year in L.A.

and
Quote
In this example, I chose Bloomington because it is typical of the nation's many college towns (Indiana University) that are cheap to live in but also provide cultural, sporting and educational experiences on par with those of big cities. They may be especially appealing to anyone thinking about using their retirement years to take a few courses and pursue a second act in life.

http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1951190_1951189_1951179,00.html
« Last Edit: August 03, 2013, 04:08:04 PM by ch12 »

Undecided

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #74 on: August 03, 2013, 05:04:40 PM »

We did inflict Sarah Palin on the rest of the nation. (Sorry)

I see your Sarah Paiin and up the ante to one Rick Perry and two George Bushes.  Your move.

Adjusted for population, Palin/Alaska seems tough to beat, but, she didn't actually make the jump to national office like G.W. Bush did, so I'm not sure how I'd call it. I agree, though, that both states contribute a lot in this area.

The first George Bush shouldn't be lumped in with these other people, though.

Spork

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #75 on: August 03, 2013, 05:08:08 PM »

We did inflict Sarah Palin on the rest of the nation. (Sorry)

I see your Sarah Paiin and up the ante to one Rick Perry and two George Bushes.  Your move.

Adjusted for population, Palin/Alaska seems tough to beat, but, she didn't actually make the jump to national office like G.W. Bush did, so I'm not sure how I'd call it. I agree, though, that both states contribute a lot in this area.

The first George Bush shouldn't be lumped in with these other people, though.

You mean "read my lips, no new taxes... oh wait... sorry"  George Bush?

edit to add: yeah, I know, he's no "junior"... but he was the one that gave us Dan Quayle.  P-O-T-A-T-O-E.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2013, 05:10:22 PM by Spork »

oldtoyota

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #76 on: August 03, 2013, 05:14:31 PM »
I was about to ask this very question!

I have done some research on the following to narrow down the choices:

--Which states have NO income tax (Florida and NV are two);
--What are the tax rates for each state?
--What areas have weather than would not require large electricity bills?
--What areas are not too close to the coast? (I think damaging storms will increase over time.)

Some cities I came up with (not all meet all of the above criteria) include:

Pittsburgh (cheap but dreary weather)
a place I'd never heard of in Texas (will have to look it up again)
Fayetteville
Las Vegas

New York, I believe, had the highest tax rate (about $2K per year per person) so I would never, ever move there.

I am very interested in Florida but it's practically at sea level.

davisgang90

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #77 on: August 03, 2013, 05:14:59 PM »
Quayle looks like a Rhodes scholar compared to Joe Biden.  Just sayin.

davisgang90

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #78 on: August 03, 2013, 05:17:00 PM »
I was about to ask this very question!

I have done some research on the following to narrow down the choices:

--Which states have NO income tax (Florida and NV are two);
--What are the tax rates for each state?
--What areas have weather than would not require large electricity bills?
--What areas are not too close to the coast? (I think damaging storms will increase over time.)

Some cities I came up with (not all meet all of the above criteria) include:

Pittsburgh (cheap but dreary weather)
a place I'd never heard of in Texas (will have to look it up again)
Fayetteville
Las Vegas

New York, I believe, had the highest tax rate (about $2K per year per person) so I would never, ever move there.

I am very interested in Florida but it's practically at sea level.
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oldtoyota

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #79 on: August 03, 2013, 05:18:02 PM »
I hear North Carolina is nice and inexpensive.


NC is a nice place to live.  Our current whack-job legislature is hell-bent on fixing that, though.

Yeah. Isn't something strange happening with the gas tax? People who drive hybrids have to pay more or something? I can't quite recall, but I remember thinking it was backwards.


Spork

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #80 on: August 03, 2013, 05:32:20 PM »
Quayle looks like a Rhodes scholar compared to Joe Biden.  Just sayin.

Same guy, different party.

Spork

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #81 on: August 03, 2013, 05:37:45 PM »
I was about to ask this very question!

I have done some research on the following to narrow down the choices:

--Which states have NO income tax (Florida and NV are two);
--What are the tax rates for each state?
--What areas have weather than would not require large electricity bills?
--What areas are not too close to the coast? (I think damaging storms will increase over time.)


It's probably harder than that.  Texas has no income tax.  It has a 6.25 sales tax (but each city imposes a local tax to take it up to usually 8.25.  It has pretty low property values... but I think our property tax rates are a little high... and insurance is a little high.  And A/C is required in most of the state in the summer.

Some good data here: http://www.retirementliving.com/taxes-by-state ... but I haven't found a good compiled table to really compare it all side by side.  I am sure such a beast exists.

twbird18

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #82 on: August 03, 2013, 06:34:23 PM »
I, too, am a fan of NC.  Particularly the foothills.  It's pretty, there are things to do & its cheap.  While they do tend to have somewhat crazy political ideas, you generally can't beat the people for niceness.

If you don't care about having much to do or living near many people, southwest VA is an extra cheap place to live.  Places like Martinsville have a very low cost of living & cheap housing, but there is absolutely nothing to do there.  They have never really recovered from the loss of the furniture industry. 

Zaga

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #83 on: August 03, 2013, 06:35:42 PM »
Another vote for the Pittsburgh area.  I have no idea why people on the coasts overlook such a nice city so often, but they do.  I've lived here all my life, and a lot of the mustachian ideals are commonplace around here.  Cheap, but nice, houses - check.  Bike trails - check.  A strong second-hand economy - check.  People who don't look down on you for being frugal - check.  What's not to love!?

*Other than the previously mentioned 4-5 months straight of grey.  Take vitamin D in the winter!

davisgang90

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #84 on: August 03, 2013, 07:04:44 PM »
I, too, am a fan of NC.  Particularly the foothills.  It's pretty, there are things to do & its cheap.  While they do tend to have somewhat crazy political ideas, you generally can't beat the people for niceness.

If you don't care about having much to do or living near many people, southwest VA is an extra cheap place to live.  Places like Martinsville have a very low cost of living & cheap housing, but there is absolutely nothing to do there.  They have never really recovered from the loss of the furniture industry.

Blacksburg/Christiansburg/Roanoke are very nice with lots to do.  I'm a Hokie, so I'm a little biased.

arebelspy

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #85 on: August 03, 2013, 07:20:53 PM »
Another vote for the Pittsburgh area.  I have no idea why people on the coasts overlook such a nice city so often, but they do.  I've lived here all my life, and a lot of the mustachian ideals are commonplace around here.  Cheap, but nice, houses - check.  Bike trails - check.  A strong second-hand economy - check.  People who don't look down on you for being frugal - check.  What's not to love!?

*Other than the previously mentioned 4-5 months straight of grey.  Take vitamin D in the winter!

Most of my contact with Pittsburgh people have been Steelers fans, and it doesn't speak highly of your city.  :P

(I kid.. sort of. ;) )
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, spent some time traveling the world full time and are now settled with three kids.
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Zaga

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #86 on: August 03, 2013, 07:24:56 PM »
Another vote for the Pittsburgh area.  I have no idea why people on the coasts overlook such a nice city so often, but they do.  I've lived here all my life, and a lot of the mustachian ideals are commonplace around here.  Cheap, but nice, houses - check.  Bike trails - check.  A strong second-hand economy - check.  People who don't look down on you for being frugal - check.  What's not to love!?

*Other than the previously mentioned 4-5 months straight of grey.  Take vitamin D in the winter!

Most of my contact with Pittsburgh people have been Steelers fans, and it doesn't speak highly of your city.  :P

(I kid.. sort of. ;) )
:-P  As long as you're not a Browns fan or a Ravens fan we can get along just fine :-D

oldtoyota

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #87 on: August 03, 2013, 07:41:17 PM »
Here is some more info:

Taxes by State
http://www.retirementliving.com/taxes-by-state

States with Highest/Lowest Taxes
(It's from USA Today. Don't judge me. lol)
http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2012/10/28/state-taxes-states-highest-lowest/1654071/

Ah, Alaska (and SD) was another of the states I meant to mention in my previous post. Too cold for me, but the tax situation sounds great.

Nashville and Memphis were two other cities I uncovered in my research.




Another Reader

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #88 on: August 03, 2013, 07:56:19 PM »
One possibility is to move someplace with most of what you want and a reasonable climate most of the year.  In the icy winter or broiling summer, decamp to somewhere more hospitable.  Rent something somewhere more pleasant or travel during that season.  Arizona is packed with snowbirds from Canada and the upper Midwest in the winter doing exactly that.

ch12

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #89 on: August 03, 2013, 08:21:37 PM »
To everyone talking about NC
I just found this map from the HuffPo on the happiest cities. There's a cluster around the Boulder area and also Asheville, NC ranks as quite high.

Not a lot to do with cheap, but probably a lot to do with "nice"

Hamster

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #90 on: August 04, 2013, 12:24:48 AM »
I was about to ask this very question!

I have done some research on the following to narrow down the choices:

--Which states have NO income tax (Florida and NV are two);
--What are the tax rates for each state?
--What areas have weather than would not require large electricity bills?
--What areas are not too close to the coast? (I think damaging storms will increase over time.)

Some cities I came up with (not all meet all of the above criteria) include:

Pittsburgh (cheap but dreary weather)
a place I'd never heard of in Texas (will have to look it up again)
Fayetteville
Las Vegas

New York, I believe, had the highest tax rate (about $2K per year per person) so I would never, ever move there.

I am very interested in Florida but it's practically at sea level.
FWIW, if your reason for avoiding the coasts is severe weather, the West Coast has less severe weather than most of the US. The currents along the pacific are relatively cold, so you don't get hurricanes, no tornadoes, very rare thunderstorms, fewer windstorms than the rest of the US. Living in coastal Washington for a decade, I haven't seen a single storm of the same intensity that I saw basically every month when I was growing up in the Midwest. I would guess that every city you mentioned has more risk of severe weather than most of the maritime West Coast, certainly than the coastal Pacific NW. That said, I really miss Midwestern summer thunderstorms.

Kriegsspiel

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #91 on: August 11, 2013, 11:19:12 AM »

madgeylou

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #92 on: August 11, 2013, 12:56:37 PM »

shadowmoss

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #93 on: August 13, 2013, 12:21:43 PM »
Phoenix.  Cheaper housing set up specifically for retirees, just travel somewhere else in the summer, which is when most of the rest of the country is showing itself at its best.

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #94 on: August 16, 2013, 08:11:24 PM »
Does anyone have any opinion on Louisiana living? 

Kriegsspiel

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #95 on: August 16, 2013, 08:18:01 PM »
Blech. Sometimes hurricanes.

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #96 on: August 16, 2013, 10:07:58 PM »
I, too, am a fan of NC.  Particularly the foothills.  It's pretty, there are things to do & its cheap.  While they do tend to have somewhat crazy political ideas, you generally can't beat the people for niceness.

If you don't care about having much to do or living near many people, southwest VA is an extra cheap place to live.  Places like Martinsville have a very low cost of living & cheap housing, but there is absolutely nothing to do there.  They have never really recovered from the loss of the furniture industry.

Blacksburg/Christiansburg/Roanoke are very nice with lots to do.  I'm a Hokie, so I'm a little biased.

Roanoke is nice.  But I'm not a fan of the 800 lb gorilla of a health system there.  In fact, it's enough of a deterrent to keep me from living in the area.

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #97 on: August 18, 2013, 09:01:47 AM »
Has anyone spent time in U.P. Michigan?  I just spent a week in a beautiful house overlooking Lake Superior (near L'anse) with plenty of access to hiking, fishing, and pretty much anything you want nature related.  I did a real estate tour, and 200k will get you a great house with 20 acres of woods.  Obviously, not the greatest place for a year long residence, (unless you're an avid snowmobiler) but for a summer residence, it's on top of my list. 

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #98 on: August 29, 2013, 02:59:51 PM »
To everyone talking about NC
I just found this map from the HuffPo on the happiest cities. There's a cluster around the Boulder area and also Asheville, NC ranks as quite high.

Having grown up near Spokane (across the border, in Coeur d'Alene, ID) I refuse to believe that they're one of the happiest cities in the US.

mgreczyn

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Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #99 on: August 31, 2013, 11:21:12 PM »
What's with the oddly high number of shiftless youth wandering the streets of that town?  Spokane, I mean.  I run quite a bit, and I've been "heckled" while running by random teenage a-holes twice in roughly the last 20 years.  The first time was in high school. The second time was last year in Spokane. Damnedest thing.