Author Topic: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US  (Read 39466 times)

rob in cal

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 308
Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« on: July 25, 2013, 04:12:06 PM »
    At some point in time it may become possible for us to completely quit working and sell our California home and move to a cheaper place.  If the work environment was not a consideration, I'm wondering about what areas in the US have cheap housing or rental prices but are still attractive places to live.  By attractive I'm referring to both the physical landscape, and also the regional amenities available. I've heard of some people from California moving to Idaho, but it seems that houses there aren't much less than they are in my suburban Sacramento area. Anyway, I'd like to hear about peoples experiences or ideas on this.

Kriegsspiel

  • Guest
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2013, 06:34:44 PM »



Another Reader

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5109
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2013, 06:37:26 PM »
That's what Californians said to New Yorkers 50 years ago......

footenote

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 801
  • MMMing in MN
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2013, 06:40:51 PM »
I like the way Kriegsspiel thinks; please read the comments only of this blog post:
http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2013/07/03/you_should_move_to_minneapolis_lowest_unemployment_big_city_in_america.html

The greater Minneapolis-St. Paul area stinks (including our very low COL areas within a short drive of the metro). I mean, it's really, really awful. The winters are worse than arctic. You shouldn't even consider it.

Kriegsspiel

  • Guest
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2013, 08:14:14 PM »
I think a smarter strategy is focusing on ruling out places. Decrease the number of choices you have, then pick from among what's left.

Personally, I'd rule out coastal California, the NYC Megaregion, and the Pac NW as being too expensive.

Rule out the South for having nasty weather.

So I'm concentrating on the Rockies, the desert West, and the northern Midwest.

dailycycle

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 27
  • Location: Silicon Valley
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2013, 08:21:29 PM »
I wouldn't think Portland (OR) is too expensive.  But it is very sun-challenged.

rob in cal

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 308
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2013, 09:54:00 PM »
Hey, thats funny about the Colorado bumper sticker discouraging Californians.  In my case though, my Grandparents lived there much of their lives, my parents met there in Boulder no less, my Aunt's family lived there, my dad and his new family lived there after my parents divorced. On my wife's side her dad is from there and she has lots of relatives still there including a great aunt in Longmont, so I wonder if we could apply for some kind of family exemption if we tried to emigrate there.  All kidding aside, I do like the idea of eliminating options first and narrowing things down from there.

capital

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 451
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2013, 10:49:35 PM »
If you want city living on the cheap, Pittsburgh's weather is nothing like California's, but lovely old Victorians are very cheap (5000 sqft. brick mansion for the price of a California ranch house? Yep!), and the city swings well above its weight in terms of cultural amenities thanks to its many universities and foundations endowed by robber barons. There's a bike trail all the way to DC and there are nice little mountains nearby. Pretty much all the heavy industry left thirty years ago, so the air is in much better shape than it once was.

Colorado has mountains, dry weather, and open land unto the horizon, so it's unlikely to go up to the prices a land- (and dense-zoning-) starved place like California is.

Kriegsspiel

  • Guest
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2013, 05:51:38 AM »
If you want city living on the cheap, Pittsburgh's weather is nothing like California's, but lovely old Victorians are very cheap (5000 sqft. brick mansion for the price of a California ranch house? Yep!), and the city swings well above its weight in terms of cultural amenities thanks to its many universities and foundations endowed by robber barons. There's a bike trail all the way to DC and there are nice little mountains nearby. Pretty much all the heavy industry left thirty years ago, so the air is in much better shape than it once was.

Colorado has mountains, dry weather, and open land unto the horizon, so it's unlikely to go up to the prices a land- (and dense-zoning-) starved place like California is.

Pittsburgh FTW. I have been looking to get back there to start my real estate empire recently.

meadow lark

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4826
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #9 on: July 26, 2013, 05:54:10 AM »
I'm happy with New Mexico.  Housing isn't  cheap compared to other places, but it is a very pleasant place to live.  And I don't find it a materialistic place at all - no one else cares how nice your stuff is.  Something I didn't feel when I lived in San Francisco.

madgeylou

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2418
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #10 on: July 26, 2013, 07:31:26 AM »
pittsburgh is pretty cool ... but the winters are rough. i mean, not like saskatchawan-level rough. more like, it's gray for 4 straight months rough. around the end of march every year i find myself slightly losing my mind from it.

but it sure is pretty here, and cheap, and there's lots of fun stuff going on. and it's getting better all the time -- especially with our soon-to-be mayor, who is a huge advocate for biking and walking and public transit and green business.

and there are great services for seniors here. i would guess they're probably among the best in the country. lots of support to help old people keep on living at home, lots of senior centers and red hat groups and cheap transportation for the elderly. it's a very old city -- 40% of the population is over the age of 65 -- and they seem to be fairly well supported.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2013, 07:33:34 AM by madgeylou »

MissStache

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 710
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Washington, DC
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #11 on: July 26, 2013, 08:01:40 AM »
Can you be more specific about what you want?  When you say that you want it to be attractive, do you mean mountains, rolling hills, big sky, cute fishing village?  Do you want to be near water?  Is being close to a big city important, or would be OK in a more rural environment?

And what kind of weather are you looking for?  Can you handle a long, cold winter or would you prefer a warmer climate? 
« Last Edit: July 26, 2013, 11:55:18 AM by MissStache »

aaronpct

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 25
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Jacksonville, Florida
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #12 on: July 26, 2013, 08:13:26 AM »
I've been thinking about this as well, not so much as a place to retire but a place to move to that I would enhance my quality of life.   We are lucky in the US to have so many great natural and man-made places to live.  I've been making a list of all the things I want and its definitely a mix of crossing out states/cities I dont want to live and creating a list of cities/states I would like to live. 

Being that I've lived in Florida almost all my life, although I love the Beach I feel that the mountains are calling me.  With that in mind it pretty much crosses out any State/City that isnt close to the mountains on both sides of the US.

I have a little time before my SO finishes with her undergrad that she has committed to going back to get so that will help her with a career change.  But I have her commitment that we will move to follow my dream, once she reaches her's with school.  Yippee!


Spudd

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 215
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #13 on: July 26, 2013, 08:23:31 AM »
I hear North Carolina is nice and inexpensive.

You can try findyourspot.com as well.

Eric

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4061
  • Location: On my bike
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #14 on: July 26, 2013, 11:32:48 AM »
Make a list of what you'd like in a location.  You're bound to find many places to choose from in this vast land.  Mine goes something like this:

Bike friendly
Mediterranean climate
Near hiking and other outdoor activity
Cheap(er) housing / taxes
Medium sized city (50-150K)
College town

As such, I'm looking at Northern California to mid-Oregon.  Eugene seems nice.  Arcata is a possibility.  Medford/Ashland could work, etc.  The beauty of retirement though, is that if you get somewhere and decide you don't like it as much as you thought, well then you can just move again.  It's not like there's a job tying you down!

Undecided

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2013, 12:30:05 PM »
Make a list of what you'd like in a location.  You're bound to find many places to choose from in this vast land.  Mine goes something like this:

Mediterranean climate

Eugene seems nice.  Arcata is a possibility.  Medford/Ashland could work, etc.

Hah!

Rebecca Stapler

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 907
    • Stapler Confessions
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #16 on: July 26, 2013, 12:36:58 PM »
Two places that come to mind:

Flagstaff, AZ (hard to beat the setting, and friends would definitely visit b/c of the Grand Canyon!)
Rochester, NY (a bit blighted, but has a surprising amount of cultural activities for a small city, and outdoor activities)

Eric

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4061
  • Location: On my bike
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #17 on: July 26, 2013, 12:53:30 PM »
Make a list of what you'd like in a location.  You're bound to find many places to choose from in this vast land.  Mine goes something like this:

Mediterranean climate

Eugene seems nice.  Arcata is a possibility.  Medford/Ashland could work, etc.

Hah!

I don't get it.  Is there not a rainy & dry season?  Is there snow?  What am I missing?

Undecided

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1088
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #18 on: July 26, 2013, 06:53:40 PM »
Make a list of what you'd like in a location.  You're bound to find many places to choose from in this vast land.  Mine goes something like this:

Mediterranean climate

Eugene seems nice.  Arcata is a possibility.  Medford/Ashland could work, etc.

Hah!

I don't get it.  Is there not a rainy & dry season?  Is there snow?  What am I missing?

Sorry; Eugene might technically be a Mediterranean climate, but temperature-wise at the very bottom end; it is much, much colder than, e.g., the SF bay area, and you wouldn't be surprised to see snow in three or four months of the year, and have freezes 40 times in the winter. I have never heard it described as a Mediterranean climate and I don't think it is what most people mean by that. I'd call it Oceanic. The others are warmer and (often much) drier, though.

Hamster

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 623
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #19 on: July 27, 2013, 01:59:56 AM »
Make a list of what you'd like in a location.  You're bound to find many places to choose from in this vast land.  Mine goes something like this:

Bike friendly
Mediterranean climate
Near hiking and other outdoor activity
Cheap(er) housing / taxes
Medium sized city (50-150K)
College town

As such, I'm looking at Northern California to mid-Oregon.  Eugene seems nice.  Arcata is a possibility.  Medford/Ashland could work, etc.  The beauty of retirement though, is that if you get somewhere and decide you don't like it as much as you thought, well then you can just move again.  It's not like there's a job tying you down!

You could throw in Bellingham, WA. Warmer wetter winters and cooler drier summers than Eugene. Real estate in B'ham is more expensive than Eugene (still ok for the West Coast). Taxes are low, though - except gas and sales tax, but those should matter least to a mustachian...

AlmostIndependent

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 521
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Anchorage, AK
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #20 on: July 27, 2013, 09:42:15 AM »
I've been looking in the Vancouver, WA area. No income tax the real estate is semi-reasonable and you can shoot into OR for the tax free shopping when needed. Weather is less of a concern for me. Unless I move to Fairbanks I have now where to go but up :)

davisgang90

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1266
  • Location: Roanoke, VA
    • Photography by Rich Davis
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #21 on: July 28, 2013, 03:26:48 AM »
My wife and I have been tossing around various locations north of Seattle.  Anacortes, Whidbey, Mount Vernon, Bellingham.  Looking to do a family vacation out to that part of the country next year.

Beckyemerson

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 66
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #22 on: July 29, 2013, 07:54:55 PM »
I have lived in Texas, Arizona, North Carolina, Maryland, Virginia, Washington (state), Ohio and Georgia. My favorite was easily North Carolina judging on weather/ beauty of the land/ nice people. You can be close to the mountains or close to the beach. And either way you choose you are not far from the other if you have the hankering to visit. But my husband doesn't care for "hill billy hicks" as he refers to the people there so I don't think we will retire there.

chrismoneymaker

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #23 on: July 30, 2013, 07:30:14 AM »
I think the next issue of MONEY Magazine features the '50 Best Places to Live'.  You might be able to grab a few ideas from there too.

SnackDog

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1284
  • Location: Latin America
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #24 on: July 30, 2013, 07:34:48 AM »
Go for the smallest town you can manage. Avoid coastal areas and cities.

AlmostIndependent

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 521
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Anchorage, AK
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #25 on: July 30, 2013, 09:11:39 AM »
I'm also a big fan of the Austin area. Reasonable prices for real estate and it's a pretty cool city. Good food and good music.

HawkeyeNFO

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 295
  • Location: Moose Scrotum, Alberta
  • Retired at 44.....back to work at 45
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #26 on: July 30, 2013, 12:34:29 PM »
Pittsburgh does seem to have a lot going for it these days.  I've been trying to keep an eye on it for a while, although I haven't spent much time there. 

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8827
  • Registered member
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #27 on: July 30, 2013, 12:56:26 PM »
Ideally I would make a top 5 list and spend a year in each.  Less if its absolutely clear that I can't take the winters or get along with the people.  It's all well and good to say some town in South Carolina is one of the "best places to live" but some of us have to deal with racial and ideological concerns.

I will agree that Pittsburg may be one of the best choices for those who can tolerate cold weather.  Id live near a major campus and maybe take a part time job there to take advantage of their services.  I've also heard good things about Minneapolis too, but don't know how the college/cultural scene is.

ny.er

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 52
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #28 on: July 30, 2013, 03:11:30 PM »
I've been meaning to ask the same question :)  I'm hoping to visit some of the places suggested here.  My hubby and I will be looking for decent weather, bike/walking paths, and since we only want to move once, we also want to be able to walk every where when we ditch the car entirely. How about that Utopian community that MMM is planning?

Kriegsspiel

  • Guest
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #29 on: July 30, 2013, 04:18:00 PM »
I'm surprised that Pittsburgh is feeling the love. I get it, but still surprised. It's in my top 5. I was originally just dead set on moving back there, but now I'm looking at Columbus, Milwaukee, and Ft. Collins as a wildcard also.

Villanelle

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3106
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #30 on: July 30, 2013, 04:26:28 PM »
Las Vegas is on our short list for someday down the road. Low COL, no state income tax, and I find it ti be very beautiful.  Out near the gorgeous Red Rock Canyon area it really is spectacular.  My parents live there (after leaving SoCal upon retirement) and sitting on the back porch overlooking the city is stunning. 

Yes, it does get hot in the summer, but houses are built for that so it actually isn't miserable, even when it is 110+F. 

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8827
  • Registered member
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #31 on: July 30, 2013, 09:25:32 PM »
I'm surprised that Pittsburgh is feeling the love. I get it, but still surprised. It's in my top 5. I was originally just dead set on moving back there, but now I'm looking at Columbus, Milwaukee, and Ft. Collins as a wildcard also.

I liked ft Collins too...

impaire

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 241
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #32 on: July 30, 2013, 09:52:23 PM »
Go for the smallest town you can manage. Avoid coastal areas and cities.

Damn! Everything I like, ruled out!

[Seriously... I understand and I'm working on my small-town aversion. But not going coastal? If I can't go swim in salty water 4+ months out of the year, I ain't retiring there!]

ender

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4943
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #33 on: July 31, 2013, 02:12:50 PM »
Go for the smallest town you can manage. Avoid coastal areas and cities.

Damn! Everything I like, ruled out!

[Seriously... I understand and I'm working on my small-town aversion. But not going coastal? If I can't go swim in salty water 4+ months out of the year, I ain't retiring there!]

Just get a place with a pool and add salt?

;)

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8827
  • Registered member
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #34 on: July 31, 2013, 02:48:11 PM »
Go for the smallest town you can manage. Avoid coastal areas and cities.

Damn! Everything I like, ruled out!

[Seriously... I understand and I'm working on my small-town aversion. But not going coastal? If I can't go swim in salty water 4+ months out of the year, I ain't retiring there!]

Just get a place with a pool and add salt?

;)

Not sure if joking, but http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt_water_chlorination

TrulyStashin

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1030
  • Location: Mid-Sized Southern City
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #35 on: July 31, 2013, 02:48:49 PM »
I will refuse to consider any location that is vulnerable to the effects of climate change.  Anywhere closer than 75 or 100 miles to the coastline is out.  Anywhere vulnerable to wildfires is out.  Anywhere in tornado alley is out.   All of these natural disasters will only become more extreme and more unpredictable in scope and duration over the rest of my lifetime.

I've survived two floods and will never again be cavalier about natural disasters.  Right now I live  about 75 miles from the coast and that is a little too close for my comfort.

AlmostIndependent

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 521
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Anchorage, AK
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #36 on: July 31, 2013, 03:01:09 PM »
I will refuse to consider any location that is vulnerable to the effects of climate change.  Anywhere closer than 75 or 100 miles to the coastline is out.  Anywhere vulnerable to wildfires is out.  Anywhere in tornado alley is out.   All of these natural disasters will only become more extreme and more unpredictable in scope and duration over the rest of my lifetime.

I've survived two floods and will never again be cavalier about natural disasters.  Right now I live  about 75 miles from the coast and that is a little too close for my comfort.

I hear that Washington state is the least natural disaster prone state in the union.

TrulyStashin

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1030
  • Location: Mid-Sized Southern City
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #37 on: July 31, 2013, 03:05:27 PM »
I will refuse to consider any location that is vulnerable to the effects of climate change.  Anywhere closer than 75 or 100 miles to the coastline is out.  Anywhere vulnerable to wildfires is out.  Anywhere in tornado alley is out.   All of these natural disasters will only become more extreme and more unpredictable in scope and duration over the rest of my lifetime.

I've survived two floods and will never again be cavalier about natural disasters.  Right now I live  about 75 miles from the coast and that is a little too close for my comfort.

Add one more climate-driven liability -- water scarcity.  That pretty much eliminates the entire southwest. 

Eric

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4061
  • Location: On my bike
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #38 on: July 31, 2013, 04:11:32 PM »
I will refuse to consider any location that is vulnerable to the effects of climate change.  Anywhere closer than 75 or 100 miles to the coastline is out.  Anywhere vulnerable to wildfires is out.  Anywhere in tornado alley is out.   All of these natural disasters will only become more extreme and more unpredictable in scope and duration over the rest of my lifetime.

I've survived two floods and will never again be cavalier about natural disasters.  Right now I live  about 75 miles from the coast and that is a little too close for my comfort.

Okay, so no coast on either side of the country.  No wildfires, so pretty much all of the West is out.  No tornados, so pretty much all of the Midwest is out.  So what's left?  Appalachia?

AlmostIndependent

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 521
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Anchorage, AK
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #39 on: July 31, 2013, 04:43:43 PM »
So what's left?  Appalachia?

Some might consider hillbillies a natural disaster...

TrulyStashin

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1030
  • Location: Mid-Sized Southern City
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #40 on: July 31, 2013, 05:38:46 PM »
I will refuse to consider any location that is vulnerable to the effects of climate change.  Anywhere closer than 75 or 100 miles to the coastline is out.  Anywhere vulnerable to wildfires is out.  Anywhere in tornado alley is out.   All of these natural disasters will only become more extreme and more unpredictable in scope and duration over the rest of my lifetime.

I've survived two floods and will never again be cavalier about natural disasters.  Right now I live  about 75 miles from the coast and that is a little too close for my comfort.

Okay, so no coast on either side of the country.  No wildfires, so pretty much all of the West is out.  No tornados, so pretty much all of the Midwest is out.  So what's left?  Appalachia?

Asheville, NC is a beautiful little city in Appalachia. Knoxville and Chattanooga are pretty nice too.  ;)

There's still plenty of territory to consider.  The east coast states are large and there is a lot of non-coastal land in the Carolinas, Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania with some really wonderful low-cost places to live:  Raleigh/ Durham, Richmond, Charlottesville, and Charlotte come to mind immediately.  Pittsburgh has been mentioned many times here.  My point is to be aware of this factor and choose carefully because nothing destroys wealth faster than a natural disaster.   Except maybe divorce.

Villanelle

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3106
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #41 on: July 31, 2013, 05:43:46 PM »
Blizzards and hurricanes need to be factored in as well, if one is really going to try to avoid disasters.  Hell the PacNW has volcanos, even.

impaire

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 241
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #42 on: July 31, 2013, 07:23:31 PM »
Go for the smallest town you can manage. Avoid coastal areas and cities.

Damn! Everything I like, ruled out!

[Seriously... I understand and I'm working on my small-town aversion. But not going coastal? If I can't go swim in salty water 4+ months out of the year, I ain't retiring there!]

Just get a place with a pool and add salt?

;)

And with the margarita habit I plan on developing, I can order the salt in bulk! Genius!
« Last Edit: July 31, 2013, 10:28:02 PM by impaire »

pac_NW

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 155
  • Have the stamina to work on it until it's right
    • Take Next Steps
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #43 on: July 31, 2013, 07:52:42 PM »
Washington state!  A bargain compared to CA.  Yes, some cities in WA are expensive.  I live in Seattle however overall, it is a bargain compared to metro areas in CA.  Plus, no state income tax and this was a huge bump for us, which totally surprised us.  I did not move here for that reason - it was a bonus. Now, I believe states with no personal income tax are 10 baggers, to borrow a Peter Lynch term, over a lifetime.  You AE paying a fortune in state income to in CA. There are few and WA is the MOST progressive of them.  Think about your personal spending as a waterfall - where are you leaking personal savings?  State income tax is a giant percentage, especially I'm CA. Even if WA state has higher sales tax, you can control that with your overall spending. It is a big savings, no doubt.

davisgang90

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1266
  • Location: Roanoke, VA
    • Photography by Rich Davis
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #44 on: August 01, 2013, 03:47:48 AM »
I will refuse to consider any location that is vulnerable to the effects of climate change.  Anywhere closer than 75 or 100 miles to the coastline is out.  Anywhere vulnerable to wildfires is out.  Anywhere in tornado alley is out.   All of these natural disasters will only become more extreme and more unpredictable in scope and duration over the rest of my lifetime.

I've survived two floods and will never again be cavalier about natural disasters.  Right now I live  about 75 miles from the coast and that is a little too close for my comfort.
Sounds like you live a very scary life carrying that "The End is Near" sandwich board around all day.

TrulyStashin

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1030
  • Location: Mid-Sized Southern City
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #45 on: August 01, 2013, 07:29:28 AM »
I will refuse to consider any location that is vulnerable to the effects of climate change.  Anywhere closer than 75 or 100 miles to the coastline is out.  Anywhere vulnerable to wildfires is out.  Anywhere in tornado alley is out.   All of these natural disasters will only become more extreme and more unpredictable in scope and duration over the rest of my lifetime.

I've survived two floods and will never again be cavalier about natural disasters.  Right now I live  about 75 miles from the coast and that is a little too close for my comfort.
Sounds like you live a very scary life carrying that "The End is Near" sandwich board around all day.

Fact:  The Mid-Atlantic region is experiencing a higher than global average of sea-level rise because not only are seas rising but also the tectonic plate we sit on is simultaneously sinking.  It has been well documented and even very conservative places such as Virginia Beach and Norfolk are beginning to discuss what parts of the city they should begin abandoning and what parts to prioritize saving.   

http://www.timesdispatch.com/news/state-regional/va-scientist-finds-rising-east-coast-sea-levels/article_b5f85984-ae97-59aa-b7dd-ed647adf4a09.html

http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2012-06-17/national/35459771_1_sea-level-rise-sea-levels-hampton-roads

Norfolk is one of the biggest Navy bases in the world.  Our military is spending a lot of energy/ time/ money right now on strategies for managing climate-driven risks.  If military leaders are thinking about it, I will too.  They're usually pretty well prepared when the shit hits the fan and that beats acting like an Ostrich any day.   

AlmostIndependent

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 521
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Anchorage, AK
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #46 on: August 01, 2013, 08:28:16 AM »
They're usually pretty well prepared when the shit hits the fan...

You can't be talking about the U.S. military...it's one of the least prepared organizations I've ever been involved with.

Spork

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5753
    • Spork In The Eye
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #47 on: August 01, 2013, 08:53:58 AM »
I will refuse to consider any location that is vulnerable to the effects of climate change.  Anywhere closer than 75 or 100 miles to the coastline is out.  Anywhere vulnerable to wildfires is out.  Anywhere in tornado alley is out.   All of these natural disasters will only become more extreme and more unpredictable in scope and duration over the rest of my lifetime.

I've survived two floods and will never again be cavalier about natural disasters.  Right now I live  about 75 miles from the coast and that is a little too close for my comfort.
Sounds like you live a very scary life carrying that "The End is Near" sandwich board around all day.

Fact:  The Mid-Atlantic region is experiencing a higher than global average of sea-level rise because not only are seas rising but also the tectonic plate we sit on is simultaneously sinking.  It has been well documented and even very conservative places such as Virginia Beach and Norfolk are beginning to discuss what parts of the city they should begin abandoning and what parts to prioritize saving.   

http://www.timesdispatch.com/news/state-regional/va-scientist-finds-rising-east-coast-sea-levels/article_b5f85984-ae97-59aa-b7dd-ed647adf4a09.html

http://articles.washingtonpost.com/2012-06-17/national/35459771_1_sea-level-rise-sea-levels-hampton-roads

Norfolk is one of the biggest Navy bases in the world.  Our military is spending a lot of energy/ time/ money right now on strategies for managing climate-driven risks.  If military leaders are thinking about it, I will too.  They're usually pretty well prepared when the shit hits the fan and that beats acting like an Ostrich any day.

from the article: "For his part, Boon said the rising rates of sea-level rise that he documented are likely caused by climate change, but he isn’t 100 percent convinced.  After all, he’s a skeptic."

There have been numerous cataclysmic predictions and they've generally missed their marks in the past.  That doesn't mean it isn't real.  That doesn't mean someone won't be right someday.  It just means what gets reported is extreme media fodder.  Yeah, if you lived on the beach, you might worry... but you might worry anyway because that's an extremely expensive bit of property that's likely to get wiped out by a storm anyway.

Severe ocean rise may very well happen... but I'm pretty sure I'll be dead when it does.  That doesn't mean "don't worry about it"... but it wouldn't make me move 100 miles away from the coast (if living near a coast was important to me... which it isn't).

As for tornadoes... again, there has been some media exaggeration.  From NOAA:

Quote
Does “global warming” cause tornadoes? No. Thunderstorms do. The harder question may be, “Will climate change influence tornado occurrence?” The best answer is: We don’t know. According to the National Science and Technology Council’s Scientific Assessment on Climate Change, “Trends in other extreme weather events that occur at small spatial scales–such as tornadoes, hail, lightning, and dust storms–cannot be determined at the present time due to insufficient evidence.” This is because tornadoes are short-fused weather, on the time scale of seconds and minutes, and a space scale of fractions of a mile across. In contrast, climate trends take many years, decades, or millennia, spanning vast areas of the globe. The numerous unknowns dwell in the vast gap between those time and space scales. Climate models cannot resolve tornadoes or individual thunderstorms. They can indicate broad-scale shifts in three of the four favorable ingredients for severe thunderstorms (moisture, instability and wind shear), but as any severe weather forecaster can attest, having some favorable factors in place doesn’t guarantee tornadoes. Our physical understanding indicates mixed signals–some ingredients may increase (instability), while others may decrease (shear), in a warmer world. The other key ingredient (storm-scale lift), and to varying extents moisture, instability and shear, depend mostly on day-to-day patterns, and often, even minute-to-minute local weather. Finally, tornado recordkeeping itself also has been prone to many errors and uncertainties, doesn’t exist for most of the world, and even in the U. S., only covers several decades in detailed form.


TrulyStashin

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1030
  • Location: Mid-Sized Southern City
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #48 on: August 01, 2013, 09:44:13 AM »
My point is that so long as we consider tax rates, cost of housing/ food, and other factors, we should also consider climate-driven risks.   In the Mid-Atlantic region, coastal land loss due to sea level rise and sinking land is not a "forecast" or possibility.  It is happening now and should be one factor people consider in where they choose to live.  I have a friend who retired to New Orleans and that's pretty un-Mustachian.

As I noted before, I've survived two floods in May and September of '03.  It took me three years to recover, financially and otherwise.  For a long time, the mere sound of rain triggered anxiety attacks.  I will never forget the dank, rotting smell in the house I loved.  Or the backbreaking labor I did to rebuild after the first flood (yes, I was insured for flood but coverage is skimpy).  I still have tools that I salvaged that are covered in a primordial ooze I cannot seem to get off no matter how hard I clean.  It came darn close to destroying my life.

When I was finally ready to buy another house, I chose one at the top of a hill.   

While specific forecasts may not be accurate and no single storm even can be said as "caused" by climate change, what we do know for certain is that storms will be more frequent, more intense, and less predictable.   It seems wise to include storm-resiliency in our considerations, along with tax rates and bikeability.  Or not.  It's up to you.

SwordGuy

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5997
  • Location: Fayetteville, NC
Re: Cheap but nice places to retire to in US
« Reply #49 on: August 01, 2013, 09:54:38 AM »
I hear North Carolina is nice and inexpensive.


NC is a nice place to live.  Our current whack-job legislature is hell-bent on fixing that, though.