Author Topic: Buying a home in New Hampshire--is it a HCOL area?  (Read 977 times)

MVal

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Buying a home in New Hampshire--is it a HCOL area?
« on: June 19, 2018, 11:20:36 AM »
I'm curious about life in New Hampshire as I learn about the Free State Project. However, I live in a LCOL area in Kansas right now and I wonder what kind of sticker shock I might get trying to move to NH. Anyone live there and know about the home prices right now?

zeruel

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Re: Buying a home in New Hampshire--is it a HCOL area?
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2018, 02:19:01 PM »
    I'm from NH originally, although I have not lived there in a while, and I don't really know what you are used to in Kansas. Its not really high cost of living compared to what I am used to. You are looking at 200k-300k if you bought a 3 bedroom in the more desirable areas of Southern NH. It costs less the farther North you go; the Northern part of the state can feel quite remote.

    Some things to keep in mind:

    • Since there is no sales tax (except on a few specific things), or income tax, basically everything is funded through property tax. This results in some of the highest property tax rates in the country.
    • NH also has the highest electricity rates in the country.
    • Economic opportunities are not great, although there are some jobs in the Manchester and Nashua areas. If you end up working over the border in Massachusettes, you end up paying MA income taxes any way. So you may as well just live there and get some government services. Approximately 20 % of NH residents work in Massachusetts
« Last Edit: June 19, 2018, 02:25:53 PM by zeruel »

iris lily

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Re: Buying a home in New Hampshire--is it a HCOL area?
« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2018, 06:51:29 PM »
The Free State initiativs i terests me, too.

My friend recently retired, and having always wanted to live in New Englandís snow country, will be buying property in NH.

DH and I examined the idea of NH, but honestly, I dont want the winters. Still, there are many intriguing things about itó4 seasons, historic srchitecture, lack of urban societal problems. Probably the opiod issue makes up for the latter.

rdaneel0

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Re: Buying a home in New Hampshire--is it a HCOL area?
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2018, 07:02:18 PM »
It depends on where in NH, I'm going on Manchester area prices, and I'm not sure where you are in Kansas (if you're in Kansas City the sticker shock will be less extreme).

I consider NH pretty affordable for the Northeast, I don't live there but I stay on top of lots of real estate markets. In the area I'm referencing you can find decent 2 bedroom condos in safe areas for around $125k-$150k (maybe 800-1100 square feet). A house is more, it seems like nice but not fully updated/modern homes start around $225-$250k. I would also look into property taxes, I'm sure they are far higher than you're used to. 

pdxvandal

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Re: Buying a home in New Hampshire--is it a HCOL area?
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2018, 11:55:26 PM »
If you avoid the Seacoast, particularly the Portsmouth area, you'll be OK. An average house in Portsmouth nowadays seems to go for 500k-600k. It gets far cheaper 15-20 miles away inland.

I've lived in New England for about 16 months of my life. Historic, traditional place and a good spot to raise a family, but much prefer the West. Good luck.

Car Jack

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Re: Buying a home in New Hampshire--is it a HCOL area?
« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2018, 07:35:34 AM »
Lifelong Massachusetts resident here and I worked for 8 years commuting to southern NH.  It very much depends what specific town you're talking about.  Some towns (Amherst, New Boston, for example) are as expensive for housing as over the border in Mass, but property tax rates are way higher.  There's no sales or income tax in NH but other things are more expensive.  Moving to the middle of nowhere in far northern NH will get you the low cost in both property values and taxes, but you'll have to drive for 3 hours if you want to find a Wal*Mart.  To see property tax rates, type in the town and property tax rate.  You'll see variations of 10 to 1 over various towns.