Author Topic: Building fire code and month to month  (Read 2999 times)

JJsfr

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Building fire code and month to month
« on: October 20, 2014, 09:51:22 AM »
Hi,

Didn't know if this is the appropriate place to ask this, but we'll start here.

We are currently renting and our dryer just crapped out. Landlord ordered a new washer/dryer combo and had it delivered. The crew, who came to install it, said they couldn't install it because there was no vent. Turns out, there was a box on the end of the dryer hose catching whatever came out, but the dryer vented into the bathroom in which is stands.

Now, when I told him that they couldn't install it because there was no vent, he said something like "yeah, it's probably not up to code or whatever, but it's kind of a hassle to get a vent installed. Just use the box."

This flipped a switch in my head, and yep, sure enough, it's not up to code. I have two questions. First, is this something that should be addressed or fixed?

Second, our month has now swapped over to month to month and can be terminated with 30 days notice. I'm concerned that if I bring this up he'll say "sure, but you're going to need to move out in 30 days." This is where my second question would have gone, but it's something I suppose we'll have to deal with.

unpolloloco

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Re: Building fire code and month to month
« Reply #1 on: October 20, 2014, 02:34:51 PM »
Not sure if this is really a fire risk vs. a humidity/mold risk? I'd think the fire risk is only if things get clogged up (but I'm not an expert, so I'll leave that judgement call to the pros!).  The big issue here is that the dryer is venting out all of the water that comes out of your clothes directly into the bathroom, where there's no place for it to go (making the bathroom super humid all the time = more mold and other humidity damage).

JJsfr

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Re: Building fire code and month to month
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2014, 08:22:12 AM »
It has destroyed some African artwork we had in the room. It also steams up the room and adjacent room with super hot/moist air. Sounds like it's not that big of a deal.

RunningWithScissors

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Re: Building fire code and month to month
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2014, 11:20:33 AM »
It's a risk, not only for humidity, which it sounds like is already an issue, but also because lint can build up in the box.  Lint is highly flammable so if you choose to leave the set up as-is, then keep the exhaust line clean and even open up the box to vacuum it out, if possible.  My brother-in-law the fire investigator would probably show you the hundreds of videos showing house fires caused by dryer lint buildup, but you can google these if you're interested.

GrayGhost

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Re: Building fire code and month to month
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2014, 12:56:25 PM »
I'm concerned that if I bring this up he'll say "sure, but you're going to need to move out in 30 days."

That doesn't sound kosher to me. To boot out a paying tenant because they're filing a complaint when your shit is clearly against code? If your state is at all renter-friendly, I'd be surprised if that's legal. It definitely isn't in my home state.

arebelspy

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Re: Building fire code and month to month
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2014, 01:32:39 PM »
I'm concerned that if I bring this up he'll say "sure, but you're going to need to move out in 30 days."

That doesn't sound kosher to me. To boot out a paying tenant because they're filing a complaint when your shit is clearly against code? If your state is at all renter-friendly, I'd be surprised if that's legal. It definitely isn't in my home state.

It's absolutely legal in any state that has month-to-month tenancy with a no-fault notice for either party to notify the other one they're leaving (or need to leave).

If you're in the middle of a lease, sure, but the OP specifically said they're on month-to-month that can be terminated with 30-day notice.  What about the landlord saying "thanks for letting me know, oh, by the way, here's your 30 day notice - the house being vacant will give me a chance to fix that" is illegal?
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JJsfr

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Re: Building fire code and month to month
« Reply #6 on: October 22, 2014, 06:47:09 PM »
Pretty much a sticky situation as suspected. Guess the take home is to vent the room as much as possible while drying and to run the dryer only while home.

arebelspy

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Re: Building fire code and month to month
« Reply #7 on: October 22, 2014, 08:22:27 PM »
Talk to the landlord about it.  They may want to fix it, for liability purposes and reduced risk, if nothing else.  What makes you think they'll kick you out if you mention it?

Just talk reasonably, without demands, and feel them out.
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JJsfr

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Re: Building fire code and month to month
« Reply #8 on: October 23, 2014, 12:43:20 PM »
I spoke with him briefly this morning and he doesn't seem to inclined to addressing it. There have been no problems over the last decade, so why should there be?

Anyway, thanks for the tip.