Author Topic: Buffett's annual letter: What you can learn from my real estate investments  (Read 4078 times)

arebelspy

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http://fortune.com/2014/02/24/buffetts-annual-letter-what-you-can-learn-from-my-real-estate-investments/

From his shareholder letter earlier this year, this excerpt that was released before it came out talks about his real estate investments, and what one can learn from them.

It's a great read in which he advocates for long term investing - both in the real estate market, as well as the stock market.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, spent some time traveling the world full time and are now settled with three kids.
If you want to know more about us, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (rarely) blog at AdventuringAlong.com. Check out our Now page to see what we're up to currently.

Cheddar Stacker

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Good article, thanks for sharing.

+1

Good advice. My favorite part:

Quote
Following those rules, the “know-nothing” investor who both diversifies and keeps his costs minimal is virtually certain to get satisfactory results. Indeed, the unsophisticated investor who is realistic about his shortcomings is likely to obtain better long-term results than the knowledgeable professional who is blind to even a single weakness.

Hubris can be a powerful force. Always good to keep your eyes open to your weaknesses.

Fishingmn

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That was a very good article

former player

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Thanks

"Games are won by players who focus on the playing field — not by those whose eyes are glued to the scoreboard."

Yes.

tooqk4u22

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Market timing clearly works for the non-average investor.

Cwadda

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Good read. "Price is what you pay; value is what you get." I like that.

Must_Stash

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Thanks.  I've never read the Intelligent Investor.  Obviously time for a library trip.

jpo

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Market timing clearly works for the non-average investor.
Maybe there is some causation there... market timing leading to below-average investors? ;-)

asdfzxh

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http://fortune.com/2014/02/24/buffetts-annual-letter-what-you-can-learn-from-my-real-estate-investments/

From his shareholder letter earlier this year, this excerpt that was released before it came out talks about his real estate investments, and what one can learn from them.

It's a great read in which he advocates for long term investing - both in the real estate market, as well as the stock market.
wrong, and that's not wisse, it's not about having or not having guts

Proud Foot

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http://fortune.com/2014/02/24/buffetts-annual-letter-what-you-can-learn-from-my-real-estate-investments/

From his shareholder letter earlier this year, this excerpt that was released before it came out talks about his real estate investments, and what one can learn from them.

It's a great read in which he advocates for long term investing - both in the real estate market, as well as the stock market.
wrong, and that's not wisse, it's not about having or not having guts

Seeing as this thread and the linked article are over three years old could you explain what exactly is wrong and why it is not wise?