Author Topic: What books have changed your life?  (Read 82110 times)

tyrannostache

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #250 on: July 17, 2018, 09:32:37 AM »
Desert Solitaire, Edward Abbey.

Think of it as a kind of modern Walden. I read it when I was already hooked on the outdoors and minimalism, and it made me want more. I reread it every so often, as it reminds me about the things I value most. Simplicity. Wide open spaces. A few good friends. A cup of strong coffee on a cool morning with a stellar view.


whatupjeffy

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #251 on: July 18, 2018, 10:29:52 PM »
A lot. Besides books, I think reddit and internet articles have really influenced the way I think.

kpd905

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #252 on: July 19, 2018, 03:39:01 AM »
A lot. Besides books, I think reddit and internet articles have really influenced the way I think.

Care to share anything specific?

peregrine

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #253 on: July 19, 2018, 06:38:45 PM »
The Razor's Edge, by W. Somerset Maugham.

I read this is college at the age of 19 but I was too young to understand.  Most of it passed right over my head.

I re-read it this spring after the death of a close friend. I don't know how I decided on this of all books, but now, at the tender age of 46, I was able to get a lot of meaning from it. So much of the characters' struggles were struggles people still have today, and there was so much truth displayed in the characters' actions.

This book helped show me to what depth the eternal questions of life have always been around. The author expressed a lot of the unanswerable questions more eloquently than I'd ever seen them before, and for that I am grateful.

jpdx

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #254 on: August 01, 2018, 01:29:19 AM »
The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins allowed me to admit to myself that I didn't believe in god(s). This was a huge eye-opener and change my life for the better.

slow hand slow plan

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #255 on: August 01, 2018, 12:31:39 PM »
Desert Solitaire, Edward Abbey.

Think of it as a kind of modern Walden. I read it when I was already hooked on the outdoors and minimalism, and it made me want more. I reread it every so often, as it reminds me about the things I value most. Simplicity. Wide open spaces. A few good friends. A cup of strong coffee on a cool morning with a stellar view.

Agreed! That is an incredible book. also his other stories are all great; A Fools Progress, Monkey Wrench Gang, Collected Essays , Heyduke Lives...etc

Vertical Mode

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #256 on: August 02, 2018, 09:47:09 AM »
Just finished Man's Search for Meaning, by Viktor Frankl. Deeply moving stuff in the first part, drawn from his experiences in the concentration camps, but also very timely discussion about the "existential vacuum" one can feel when forced to create structure or define purpose for oneself (I'm not currently employed and the lack of structure is beginning to drive me stir-crazy).

I checked it out after several people in Tim Ferriss' Tools of Titans and Tribe of Mentors books recommended it. Absolutely worth reading.

Adam Zapple

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #257 on: August 05, 2018, 05:24:30 AM »
Just finished Man's Search for Meaning, by Viktor Frankl. Deeply moving stuff in the first part, drawn from his experiences in the concentration camps, but also very timely discussion about the "existential vacuum" one can feel when forced to create structure or define purpose for oneself (I'm not currently employed and the lack of structure is beginning to drive me stir-crazy).

I checked it out after several people in Tim Ferriss' Tools of Titans and Tribe of Mentors books recommended it. Absolutely worth reading.

@Vertical Mode I went through this during a long stint out of work with an injury.  Unfortunately, the existential crisis continued even when I returned to work.  I've found creating a strict morning routine like the one outlined in "Miracle Morning" by Hal Elrod to really be beneficial.  The book was just ok for me but the routine is solid and borrowed from several other sources on the subject.  It is slowly helping to shift my focus from the whole "what am I doing with my life" narrative in my head to enjoying the day-to-day and appreciating what I have.

Unique User

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #258 on: October 18, 2018, 08:27:29 AM »
The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy had a profound effect on my philosophy and understanding of life.

I would love your analysis. I have learned a lot from both books and movies alike. Anytime I have listed my insights a different but equality valuable interpretation was listed by someone else.

It's all there in the book!  It covers every sort of topic:

Intelligence
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For instance, on the planet Earth, man had always assumed that he was more intelligent than dolphins because he had achieved so much—the wheel, New York, wars and so on—whilst all the dolphins had ever done was muck about in the water having a good time. But conversely, the dolphins had always believed that they were far more intelligent than man—for precisely the same reasons.


Religion
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“Isn't it enough to see that a garden is beautiful without having to believe that there are fairies at the bottom of it too?”


The Value of Money
Quote
This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movement of small green pieces of paper, which was odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy.


The Value of Attentiveness
Quote
"You know," said Arthur, "it's at times like this, when I'm trapped in a Vogon airlock with a man from Betelgeuse, and about to die of asphyxiation in deep space that I really wish I'd listened to what my mother told me when I was young."
"Why, what did she tell you?"
"I don't know, I didn't listen."


Politics
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Anyone who is capable of getting themselves made President should on no account be allowed to do the job.

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The President of the Universe holds no real power. His sole purpose is to take attention away from where the power truly exists...


Philosophical study
Quote
“Perhaps I'm old and tired, but I always think that the chances of finding out what really is going on are so absurdly remote that the only thing to do is to say hang the sense of it and just keep yourself occupied.”

Quote
“Well, I mean, yes idealism, yes the dignity of pure research, yes the pursuit of truth in all its forms, but there comes a point I'm afraid where you begin to suspect that the entire multidimensional infinity of the Universe is almost certainly being run by a bunch of maniacs. And if it comes to a choice between spending yet another ten million years finding that out, and on the other hand just taking the money and running, then I for one could do with the exercise.”


Communication
Quote
“One of the things Ford Prefect had always found hardest to understand about human beings was their habit of continually stating and repeating the very very obvious, as in It's a nice day, or You're very tall, or Oh dear you seem to have fallen down a thirty-foot well, are you all right? At first Ford had formed a theory to account for this strange behaviour. If human beings don't keep exercising their lips, he thought, their mouths probably seize up. After a few months' consideration and observation he abandoned this theory in favour of a new one. If they don't keep on exercising their lips, he thought, their brains start working.”


The Value of Knowledge
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“What does it matter? Science has achieved some wonderful things, of course, but I'd far rather be happy than right any day.”


True Evil
Quote
"But Mr. Dent, the plans have been available in the local planning office for the last nine months."

"Oh yes, well, as soon as I heard I went straight round to see them, yesterday afternoon. You hadn't exactly gone out of your way to call attention to them, had you? I mean, like actually telling anybody or anything."

"But the plans were on display..."

"On display? I eventually had to go down to the cellar to find them."

"That's the display department."

"With a flashlight."

"Ah, well, the lights had probably gone."

"So had the stairs."

"But look, you found the notice didn't you?"

"Yes," said Arthur, "yes I did. It was on display in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying 'Beware of the Leopard.”

By far one of my favorite books of all time.  My family hates it when I reread the series because I always insist on reading select passages while snickering. 

Don't know if they were mentioned, but I've always loved Blue Highways, Travels with Charley and Paul Theroux's travel books, especially Riding the Iron Rooster.  They have influenced our future plans of selling everything and traveling around the US in an RV for a couple years. 

Generation X is a pretty superficial book, but it helped me see that "normal life" or what everyone at my high achieving, upper class university thought how life was supposed to go was not the only way which may explain why I didn't get my first "corporate" job until 2011 at age 42. 

adventurestache

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #259 on: October 25, 2018, 06:45:27 PM »
The Beautiful and Damned by Scott Fitzgerald changed my perspective of time when I first read it at 22. Through it I saw that people 100 years ago were not all that different from us today, and in some ways the world really hasn't changed much since then. It sounds kind of cheesy, but it changed younger me's perception of 100 years ago from "ancient history" to "recent history". It always makes me wonder how we'll look back at today 100 years from now!

Also, it changed my perception of Fitzgerald from "boring old author I was forced to read in high school" to "author who writes books I enjoy"!

JenniferW

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #260 on: October 30, 2018, 10:37:02 PM »
I'm a severely insulin resistant diabetic and the low carb / ketogenic / intermittent fasting lifestyle has been a blessing to me.  Blood sugar is normalized and have lost over 100 lbs and kept it off without any effort.

1) The Art & Science of Low Carbohydrate Living (Phinney & Volek)
2) Keto Clarity (Moore & Westman)
3) The Obesity Code (Fung)
4) The Complete Guide to Fasting (Fung)
5) The Diabetes Code (Fung)
6) Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution (Bernstein)
7) Cholesterol Clarity (Moore & Westman)
8) Blood Sugar 101 (Ruhl)

Regarding finance:  The Simple Path to Wealth (Collins)

TeamCoffee

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #261 on: December 02, 2018, 09:30:37 PM »
Meet the Frugalwoods
 - Something about how she writes and her story really resonated with me. My husband has tried for years to get me on the MMM/FIRE bandwagon, and it just didn’t stick.  I happened upon her blog and then book and BAM.  I’m on it.  This book was definitely a game changer.

I’m Proud if You
 - This is s book written by a friend of Fred Rogers (THE infamous Mr. Rogers).  Nothing else has quite impacted how I see life and my friends and family like this book.  Before, I always loved the idea of doing your best to be genuinely kind to everyone, but I failed. After reading this book, I was better able to dole out kindness to everyone, because of the insight provided into how Fred Rogers lived his life.

+1 for Obstacle is the Way and Ego is the Enemy.