Author Topic: What books have changed your life?  (Read 77901 times)

Adam Zapple

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #250 on: July 09, 2018, 03:59:16 PM »
Bumping this to keep it going

tyrannostache

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #251 on: July 17, 2018, 09:32:37 AM »
Desert Solitaire, Edward Abbey.

Think of it as a kind of modern Walden. I read it when I was already hooked on the outdoors and minimalism, and it made me want more. I reread it every so often, as it reminds me about the things I value most. Simplicity. Wide open spaces. A few good friends. A cup of strong coffee on a cool morning with a stellar view.


whatupjeffy

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #252 on: July 18, 2018, 10:29:52 PM »
A lot. Besides books, I think reddit and internet articles have really influenced the way I think.

kpd905

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #253 on: July 19, 2018, 03:39:01 AM »
A lot. Besides books, I think reddit and internet articles have really influenced the way I think.

Care to share anything specific?

peregrine

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #254 on: July 19, 2018, 06:38:45 PM »
The Razor's Edge, by W. Somerset Maugham.

I read this is college at the age of 19 but I was too young to understand.  Most of it passed right over my head.

I re-read it this spring after the death of a close friend. I don't know how I decided on this of all books, but now, at the tender age of 46, I was able to get a lot of meaning from it. So much of the characters' struggles were struggles people still have today, and there was so much truth displayed in the characters' actions.

This book helped show me to what depth the eternal questions of life have always been around. The author expressed a lot of the unanswerable questions more eloquently than I'd ever seen them before, and for that I am grateful.

jpdx

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #255 on: August 01, 2018, 01:29:19 AM »
The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins allowed me to admit to myself that I didn't believe in god(s). This was a huge eye-opener and change my life for the better.

slow hand slow plan

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #256 on: August 01, 2018, 12:31:39 PM »
Desert Solitaire, Edward Abbey.

Think of it as a kind of modern Walden. I read it when I was already hooked on the outdoors and minimalism, and it made me want more. I reread it every so often, as it reminds me about the things I value most. Simplicity. Wide open spaces. A few good friends. A cup of strong coffee on a cool morning with a stellar view.

Agreed! That is an incredible book. also his other stories are all great; A Fools Progress, Monkey Wrench Gang, Collected Essays , Heyduke Lives...etc

Vertical Mode

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #257 on: August 02, 2018, 09:47:09 AM »
Just finished Man's Search for Meaning, by Viktor Frankl. Deeply moving stuff in the first part, drawn from his experiences in the concentration camps, but also very timely discussion about the "existential vacuum" one can feel when forced to create structure or define purpose for oneself (I'm not currently employed and the lack of structure is beginning to drive me stir-crazy).

I checked it out after several people in Tim Ferriss' Tools of Titans and Tribe of Mentors books recommended it. Absolutely worth reading.

Adam Zapple

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Re: What books have changed your life?
« Reply #258 on: August 05, 2018, 05:24:30 AM »
Just finished Man's Search for Meaning, by Viktor Frankl. Deeply moving stuff in the first part, drawn from his experiences in the concentration camps, but also very timely discussion about the "existential vacuum" one can feel when forced to create structure or define purpose for oneself (I'm not currently employed and the lack of structure is beginning to drive me stir-crazy).

I checked it out after several people in Tim Ferriss' Tools of Titans and Tribe of Mentors books recommended it. Absolutely worth reading.

@Vertical Mode I went through this during a long stint out of work with an injury.  Unfortunately, the existential crisis continued even when I returned to work.  I've found creating a strict morning routine like the one outlined in "Miracle Morning" by Hal Elrod to really be beneficial.  The book was just ok for me but the routine is solid and borrowed from several other sources on the subject.  It is slowly helping to shift my focus from the whole "what am I doing with my life" narrative in my head to enjoying the day-to-day and appreciating what I have.