Author Topic: Sound Sensitivity Disorder  (Read 2095 times)

smoghat

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Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« on: November 24, 2018, 09:16:05 AM »
Over the last couple of years, I have come to realize that I am overly sensitive to sound. I think itís near disability levels.

We are at my wifeís parents for the holiday and itís too loud for me here. Both brothers in law are *really loud*, the parents are constantly making noise (whistling and so on), even the house makes noises (radiators, water hammers, grandfather clock). I had a job doing research and was asked to work in an open office and couldnít think at all. After FIRE, being at home has become harder since I am around when the laundry goes bonkers, when the dishwasher is on (itís near silent except my wife never plugs the drains), when the leaf blowers and chain saws come out, etc.

I think some of this is situational: with other families Iíve been to, itíd be just fine, but this one just happens to be very loud (and itís been 25 years so none of thatís going to change) and if I lived away from suburban lawns, I would at least be able to avoid the leaf blowers, but Iíve sunk a huge amount of effort into my house (I know, who cares) and my kids are in the school district (thatís more serious).

My therapist tells me to take mindfulness classes (I did, helped a little not much), I have noise cancelling headphones on now with music and am in the bedroom with the door shut, but that hardly is social.

Queue the jolly posts about how I just need to blast a noise synth at them (actually I got into eurorack to provide background sound in my office while I worked) because itís muffwiggler (add a few who will say this doesnít exist), but has anyone found any sort of therapy or book worthwhile?

I do go to a float tank once a week, itís pricey, but itís heaven.

joonifloofeefloo

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2018, 09:28:24 AM »
Right there with you!! (And I *am* designated disabled. This is considered part of a bigger profile in my case.)

My current home is silent and I go crazy with joy. The silence has been SO HEALING for me!

Before that, things were too hard. I spent so much of each day physically cringing, cowering into a ball when the noise would start up...  Yesterday I waited 45 minutes for my teen in one of his favourite spaces and I was quickly trembling with the sensory input. It seemed to bother no one else. The sound thing is physically exhausting; I just get profoundly drained by it.

I have awesome noise-cancelling headphones. I used to have to wear them many hours I was at home, because of sound-transfer from adjoining units, but now I only need them when the neighbouring complex mows or blows.
***Sleeping on my main floor carpet helps a lot.***
What I eat and drink makes a massive difference.
Physical pressure (e.g. squeezing my skull, having someone walk on my back, etc) helps a lot.
If I can guarantee enough hours of silence (as I finally can in my new home), I can cope with the sounds in the world.

Recently I learned there is an advantage to my sound-sensitivity: Although a full-on amateur, I'm able to make music quite well. I had never known that before.

lhamo

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2018, 10:28:20 AM »
Yes, this is a thing.  It's called misophonia.  I have a mild version of it, which is bad enough.

https://www.npr.org/2017/02/05/513532460/going-crazy-from-annoying-sounds-is-an-actual-medical-condition

smoghat

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #3 on: November 24, 2018, 10:57:07 AM »
Wow, thanks for posting. At least I donít feel alone about this. Looking forward to hearing more (yes, I realize itís a pun).

ysette9

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #4 on: November 24, 2018, 11:25:12 AM »
What an interesting post and I am so sorry to hear of your suffering. That sounds perpetually exhausting.

I am sensitive to noise but nowhere near like what you describe. My mother says that when she was pregnant with me at a loud party I got so upset inside her uterus that she had to go lie down in a back bedroom. As a baby I’d cry if a big truck pulled up next to us at a red light. I hate loud noises, especially abrupt loud noises to this day.

Separately I am introverted so I find the noise and bustle of people all the time to be wearing. Some is fine, but I really need my quiet space to rejuvenate. Out of curiosity, is it all noise or just “stressful” noise? Meaning, if you were alone in the forest and had the sound of birds and flowing water and scuttering creatures would that be troublesome also?

joonifloofeefloo

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #5 on: November 24, 2018, 11:52:50 AM »
...is it all noise or just ďstressfulĒ noise? Meaning, if you were alone in the forest and had the sound of birds and flowing water and scuttering creatures would that be troublesome also?

For me it's pretty much all sounds, including those that are supposed to be soothing. Ocean waves, friendly voices, chimes, birds, rain...

I adore some kinds (chirp of small birds, chimes) if I've had lots of silence and my nervous system is regulated. Ocean, wind, rain, etc, generally not.

LOVE the sound of snow :)
And aspen leaves in a light breeze.
And my chopping knife if there is no other sensory input.
And chickens! Always chickens.
A low soothing bass-ish voice is such a godsend to my nervous system that I've accidentally gotten into poor relationships just because it's so rare that I can bear a human voice enough hours.

Dollar Slice

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #6 on: November 24, 2018, 12:45:07 PM »
I have some level of sound sensitivity, too. Some single noises are enough to bother me (often machinery/engine noises or noises with a whining aspect, like drilling) and sometimes it's just being overwhelmed by too many competing noises (like being in a house full of loud talkers and TV and music and etc.). The effect is to feel sort of mentally/psychologically exhausted or harried, like the people making the noise are trying to drive you crazy on purpose and you feel sort of hunted down by it because noise is so hard to escape.

I have chronic migraines and I think it's related to that - I'm sensitive to certain kinds of light (bright, flickering, fluorescent, etc.) as well as certain kinds of sounds and they are all migraine triggers for me. I wear earplugs to sleep (and occasionally at home while awake if there is construction nearby or I'm just feeling fragile - or even if I'm on the subway by myself and feeling stressed). They help a lot, but of course you can't wear them at a party or something.

It's so hard to explain to people who don't have this kind of sensory problem what it's like, and I get a lot of people who think I'm just some super-picky diva type who insists on having my environment "just so" or I whine about it. It's so much worse than they can comprehend. I'm currently shutting myself in my apartment all weekend recovering from spending three days with family/traveling/etc. because it was all so overwhelming to my poor brain.

DreamFIRE

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #7 on: November 24, 2018, 05:26:36 PM »
I'm not bothered much by natural noises like wind, rain, ocean, birds, etc. I keep my windows closed, and I'm more bothered / distracted by the sound of trains (the low fequency rumble much more so than the whistle), barking dogs, thumping bass in passing cars, yelling/screeching kids, a basketball bouncing off the neighbor's driveway, an excessively loud condenser unit, gasoline engine mowers, etc.  I'm a half mile from the closest train, and it's still way too close.  At work, I'm fortunate to have my own office, so the only problem there is the guy that works one office over - through the wall behind me, I can hear him talking on the phone sometimes and his door slamming quite a few times each day (one of those heavy auto-closing fire doors).  Thank goodness I don't have to share an office anymore.

At home, if I have the TV or stereo playing, that masks out outside sounds pretty well, except the next door neighbors mowing, particularly on the side nearest me.

If I'm around other people or out in public, noises don't bother me as much as when I'm distracted in my own home of office alone.

This topic comes up from time to time.

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/off-topic/suburban-noise-pollution/
« Last Edit: November 29, 2018, 06:40:38 PM by DreamFIRE »

John Galt incarnate!

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #8 on: November 25, 2018, 11:00:22 AM »
I enjoy the  quietude of a bucolic home.

As I have posted  in another thread, I could not bear the incessant din of life in a city or suburb.

During the summer my home (located ~35 miles from Yosemite Park)  was  in a  brush-clearing zone.

The work went on for months.

I HATED the buzz of the chainsaws and the thump and clang of the trucks.

Happily, it's quiet again  now that the clearing is finished.

Having lived where it's quiet  I've definitely become more sensitive to sound.

John Galt incarnate!

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #9 on: November 25, 2018, 11:28:54 AM »
I'm not bothered much by natural noises like wind, rain, ocean, birds, etc.


Same here.

The fauna of my neighborhood includes coyotes, foxes, crows, doves, woodpeckers, quail, and owls.

I know the sound of each.

The squirrels cluck and on occasion, whinny just like a horse!

The swish of the pine trees in my backyard is one of my favorite sounds.

I also like the whistling wind of a winter storm.

smoghat

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #10 on: November 25, 2018, 05:57:29 PM »
Separately I am introverted so I find the noise and bustle of people all the time to be wearing. Some is fine, but I really need my quiet space to rejuvenate. Out of curiosity, is it all noise or just ďstressfulĒ noise? Meaning, if you were alone in the forest and had the sound of birds and flowing water and scuttering creatures would that be troublesome also?

The first time I really recall it being a problem is the sound of birds if Iíd stayed up all night. But generally speaking nature isnít a problem. In the forest, Iíd be just fine. I also donít really mind traffic noises, I used to live on a very busy street (Wilshire Boulevard in LA) and it was fine.

Today I was going to decompress after Thanksgiving at the in laws. It was crazy loud and the house is so badly laid out (I used to work in architecture, it bugged me to no end that they didnít want me to give my input... and now of course their house is terrible) that thereís no place of refuge for me. This morning I was listening to some quiet music and my neighborís boyfriend started up a gas powered leaf blower. She knows very well that leaf blowers bother me and is sympathetic, but this guy, I think, is into it as a sign of being macho. My blood pressure rose sky high.

A while back I was at a house in the countryside. I was talking to the owners and I suddenly stopped. I realized that when we werenít talking, it was silent. Bliss.

mcluhan

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #11 on: November 26, 2018, 06:20:01 PM »
I can't stand the sound of dogs barking, I mean for long periods of time. As I've gotten older I have a hard time tuning it out.

Bird In Hand

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #12 on: November 29, 2018, 08:19:11 AM »
I've had what is now called misophonia since I was a child.  My biggest triggers are noises people make with their mouths/noses -- chewing, crunching, coughing, sniffling, loud breathing, tongue clucking, swallowing, air escaping through the nose while talking, etc.  Also very difficult: dogs barking endlessly, a neighbor using a chainsaw, people talking in the background when I'm trying to concentrate, and multiple conversations (and/or other sounds) going on in the same space simultaneously.

Everyone in my life who matters to me (family) understands that sometimes I just need to leave the room to preserve my sanity.  Or that if I occasionally get inexplicably irritable, it's likely because I can't escape and the sounds are driving me crazy.  Even though my family is accommodating, it's still a relief to meet someone else who suffers from this, who can understand what it's like.

Linda_Norway

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #13 on: December 04, 2018, 07:36:03 AM »
Noise pollution is something you get used to. As there is more and more noise pollution, many people have gotten used to it and now hardly know any better.

I am so lucky (by my own choice) that my house used to be in a very quiet area with little traffic noise. When we bought our current house, we ended up buying a house in the same small area, because it was the only place we didn't hear the traffics roads. I even hear those roads on many places deep in the local forest.

I am a little sensitive to sound. When my husband drives the car, he usually turns on the radio. When I drive it after him, I always turn the radio off. But I think for me, it is more the stress that the sounds cause, then the actual discomfort. When I am very stressed for other reasons, loud sounds make it so much worse.

Best thing I know is walking in a forest or on a mountain on a quiet day in a remote area. We have a cabin in such a place and it is really nice to be there. Although there is occasionally sound from the shooting range, the church bell, tractors doing stuff, cross motors. But as the place is very remote, this is not very frequent.

At home it is the barking of the neighbouring dog that is the worse.

joonifloofeefloo

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #14 on: December 04, 2018, 07:56:13 AM »
Quote
Noise pollution is something you get used to.

Lots of us donít.

oldladystache

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2018, 08:16:27 AM »
Does the noise you make bother you?

TartanTallulah

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2018, 11:20:35 PM »
I'm sensitive to sounds of a particular pitch and volume, to the degree that I experience loud whistling and operatic soprano singing as physical pain. Three of my children are also affected to varying degrees. When she was very young, one of them destroyed her school classroom because another child was sniffing repetitively.

I'm worse when stressed. When working, I always knew I was  having a particularly bad day if I couldn't cope with having the car radio on, and long meetings were a problem as two of my colleagues had voices I found difficult to listen to - one loud and shrill, one with a whining inflection - and I'd sometimes just have to make an excuse and leave.

joonifloofeefloo

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2018, 11:36:51 PM »
Does the noise you make bother you?

[Are you asking the OP, or everyone with sound sensitivity?]

smoghat

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2018, 01:18:24 AM »
As the OP:

No. The noise I make doesnít bother me.

That said, I try to avoid making noises that bother other people.
For years I had a manual push mower. I finally gave in and bought an electric one since the manual one just couldnít cut as evenly (notwithstanding what the purists say about them) and couldnít cope with grass that had grown high after weíd been on vacation. All of my neighbors have lawn mowers (one inexplicably has a riding mower for a lawn hardly bigger than mine) and all of them are gas. They are much louder.

My sound sensitivity is related to stress. When I am under stress, it makes me more stressed. When Iím not under stress, it induces stress. Thereís no way I can be sitting in my living room and hear gas powered leaf blowers and go, ah, bliss.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 01:20:19 AM by smoghat »

Linda_Norway

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2018, 01:55:28 AM »
Quote
Noise pollution is something you many people get used to.

Lots of us don’t.

I agree, I don't get used to it, too. But lots of people do, unfortunately. Therefore there is too little protest against the general noise pollution.

oldladystache

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2018, 02:02:29 AM »
Does the noise you make bother you?

[Are you asking the OP, or everyone with sound sensitivity?]
Everyone. Just trying to understand.

joonifloofeefloo

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2018, 05:24:17 AM »
Yeah, the sounds I make can bother me. I make weirdly little sound. I live like a rabbit, generally. They do a big squeak or thump when stressed, but otherwise are soft-footed and silent. I do make music, too, but when I do an off note or other unintended sound, I have the same response of pain and cringe. If I talk ďtoo muchĒ the sound of my voice feels very grating on me. If I bang a dish or pot unexpectedly, itís the same as if someone else does.

One

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2018, 08:43:51 AM »
I wear musicians ear plugs if the sounds are too annoying, especially at the movies. They have filters that allow the sounds but not at full volume. It's hard to believe that in school bands most of the kids don't wear ear plugs, probably doing long term hearing damage.

DreamFIRE

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2018, 05:20:19 PM »

Any sounds that I make don't really bother me at all.  There may be sounds coming from equipment that I'm using that bother me, mostly due to loud volume, but I would use earplugs for that.  But it's not like I'm distracting myself the way outside noises do that are out of my control.

I have some of those musician's earplugs also - don't use them that often.  Simply having earplugs in my ears bothers me, so I mostly use them for loud environments to protect my hearing rather than trying to tone down distracting noises.  Sometimes earplugs make it worse for me due to some tinnitus that is filtered out by environmental sounds that becomes noticeable when using plugs, plus earplugs can make those low frequency sounds even more noticeable as they filter mid and high frequencies while very low frequencies penetrate through anything, like the rumbling of the freight train and subwoofers thumping in cars, which seem worse when the higher frequencies are filtered out.

SunnyDays

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #24 on: December 06, 2018, 05:18:16 PM »
Noise has always bothered me to some extent, but I find it getting worse with age (57) and, ironically, the less noise I'm exposed to, the more it bothers me when I am exposed.  I used to work in an open area with lots of cubicles, and the noise was annoying and made it hard to concentrate, but the worst thing was meetings.  Most of them were with women (I'm female too), so maybe it was the pitch of their voices, but after awhile, my head just felt like it was vibrating.  Voices are definitely the biggest issue, even my own starts to make my head vibrate if I have to talk too much.  This includes speaking voices on TV or radio, with singing or music bothering me much less.  (The weather people on TV drive me nuts, because they talk a mile a minute and never take a breath!  I have to mute them.)  I'm also sensitive to other things, like bright light and some tactile sensations.  There's a book called "The Highly Sensitive Person - How to Thrive When the World Overwhelms You" by Elaine Aron.  I've found it describes me pretty well.

Freedomin5

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #25 on: December 06, 2018, 09:09:56 PM »
I didn't even know this was thing. No wonder people thought I was crazy when I was younger and would have to leave the room or would complain if:

- The teacher wrote on the chalkboard the wrong way and the chalk squeaked against the board
- Someone in the room was holding a balloon - that horrible rubbing sound of fingers against the balloon makes my blood run cold
- Someone popped a balloon
- There were fireworks in the distance
- Someone turned on a vacuum cleaner
- Someone put the lid on a pot too loudly
- Someone kept sniffing
- Someone was using a mechanical pencil and the lead was squeaking against the paper
- Someone chewed their food too loudly or chewed with their mouth open, making a noise
- Someone typed too loudly on the keyboard
- There were too many people talking at the same time -- I spent my lunch hours in the library during high school

I also thought it was normal to be able to hear every single word someone was saying from the other side of the room when talking at a normal volume. Bright lights and too much movement also bother me -- I hate going to the movies, and 3D movies make me nauseous.

I don't know if I like pathologizing what I have though. In some ways, being hyper-sensitive has worked out well for me. I think part of the reason why I do so well in my job is because I notice and take in more information than the typical person. Sure, I have to work around it sometimes (like spending at least one-two days per week sitting at home in the dark without interacting with anyone or keeping earbuds on at all times while outside or dealing with migraines or constantly asking DD to blow her nose rather than just sniffing all the time), but it doesn't really keep me from achieving what I want to do.
« Last Edit: December 06, 2018, 09:13:34 PM by Freedomin5 »

joonifloofeefloo

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #26 on: December 06, 2018, 10:08:24 PM »
^ Yes, I don't consider mine a disorder. Am I sensitive to sounds? Yep. Is it disordered? No. I have to work around it in many environments, but it's also helpful and wonderful.

LibrarianFuzz

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #27 on: December 07, 2018, 02:14:35 PM »
This is a real thing. Some guy started a website for help and support for fellow sufferers. Please see: https://www.allergictosound.com

You may also consider that you could be on the spectrum. Many, many adults are unaware that they have Aspergers or other symptoms of autism, as they are otherwise so high functioning except in a few particular areas, such as sensory processing.

lhamo

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #28 on: December 08, 2018, 09:13:29 PM »
Yes, I think these various types of hypersensitivity were probably highly adaptive at one point in human evolution, but in our highly stimulating noisy and artificially illuminated urban environments it is easy to be overwhelmed.

Salim

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #29 on: December 09, 2018, 06:21:44 AM »
@smoghat and all the other sufferers, I am very sorry about the trouble you have with noise. I have a different version of noise problem, and it is torture. I was always a person who loved silence, the kind where I could sit quietly and hear the soft ticking of the kitchen clock.

My stressful job gave me cause to grind my teeth. I tried all kinds of things to stop the grinding, because it broke teeth. The last attempt was using a biofeedback device. The user straps a band around the head and over the forehead, and trains during the day to open the jaw and relax whenever a high-pitched tone sounds, prompted by grinding or tensing. After a few days, the user wears the device only at night and the jaw relaxation happens naturally during sleep.

I was very excited about less grinding, but then an awful thing happened: the device caused me to have tinnitus. I called the inventor and he said it was a possible outcome. I put the device in a drawer and later threw it in the trash.

The noise in my head got progressively louder. Itís like a constant loud dentist drill noise and I experience it more in the main part of my head than my ears. It never goes away, but sometimes, especially if Iíve eaten lightly for a couple of meals, it gets a little softer.

I asked a nutritionist if any foods could help and she said no, but emotions might affect it. That is not true for me, the part about emotions. I can never escape the torture, 24/7, and it has been going on for years. The things that help a little are pleasant ambiant noise like birdsongs and my HEPA air filter, distraction, and occasional medication to make me sleepy and help me care less about the problem. Loud noises outside my head make it worse. During the first few months of the constant loud noise, I thought I might go insane. Fortunately, as a retiree now, a happier lifestyle supports better balance in my life, which helps me cope.

SnackDog

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #30 on: December 09, 2018, 07:39:34 AM »
It is a question of threshold and mental training.  If you want to learn to put up with outrageous noise levels, you sort of have to be exposed to it more and train your brain to accept it. Or stuff cotton in your ears. I think as we age hearing fades which confuses the brain and makes chaotic noise (think Christmas party) hard to digest.

DreamFIRE

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #31 on: December 09, 2018, 08:28:35 AM »
It is a question of threshold and mental training.  If you want to learn to put up with outrageous noise levels, you sort of have to be exposed to it more and train your brain to accept it.

Nope.  I've lived a half mile from train tracks for about 17 years, with trains passing by regularly, and it's still just as distracting as it ever was.  Same thing with barking dogs and thumping subwoofers in passing cars.

Quote
Or stuff cotton in your ears. I think as we age hearing fades which confuses the brain and makes chaotic noise (think Christmas party) hard to digest.

Nope.  Putting anything in the ears, whether cotton, musicians earplugs, or regular earplugs, actually makes the problem worse in many cases as I mentioned a few posts up:

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/post-fire/sound-sensitivity-disorder/msg2221849/#msg2221849

joonifloofeefloo

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #32 on: December 09, 2018, 09:10:56 AM »
Salim, that sounds AWFUL!!!!!!!!!! Iím so sorry!!!

SnackDog, your ideas have been untue in my case too.

pbkmaine

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #33 on: December 09, 2018, 09:30:30 AM »
White noise helps me, particularly in sleeping. It needs to be the white noise closest to the ambient sound. As part of my job, I traveled constantly. When I was in a city, I would use “city” white noise. If I had a loud air conditioner, I used “air conditioner” white noise. If it was a hotel near a highway, I used “highway” white noise. Somehow the closest sounding white noise smoothes out the sound around me.

In our bedroom in Florida we have a room air conditioner, since we like to sleep slightly cooler than the temperature the house is kept at. It’s very quiet, but seems to muffle house noises, like mechanical systems and restless cats.

Salim

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #34 on: December 09, 2018, 09:35:40 AM »
Salim, that sounds AWFUL!!!!!!!!!! I’m so sorry!!!

Jooni, I am sorry for your troubles with sound, too! When I’m around loud noise now, I cover my ears and want to run away (sometimes I do run away), which may be somewhat similar to your reaction. Like you, I love to study, do research, and make art. All those things are good distractions that make my life so much better and can help me stop noticing the noise.

Does it help others deal with unpleasant noise (inside or outside the body) to be in the “zone” or some kind of zen state that comes with concentration?
« Last Edit: December 09, 2018, 09:48:09 AM by Salim »

joonifloofeefloo

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #35 on: December 09, 2018, 09:46:06 AM »
Salim, I donít feel I suffer. i.e., I do suffer upon too much noise, but four of the last five years Iíve had a beautiful life when it comes to sound (silent housing), so it hasnít generally been an issue. For over 40 years I tried all the things to be able to handle sound and silent housing was the only thing that worked. (The soft, external, NC earphones are excellent when Iím stuck with it outside the home, though.)

To have the sound *inside* oneís body like youíre having, oy!!

I spend a lot of time in the zone, but can only get or stay there if things stay quiet. Once a sound starts up, itís over :(

Salim

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #36 on: December 09, 2018, 10:01:25 AM »
Jooni, I am very glad you found a quiet, happy place to live. I think you would like where I live, too, out in the country. I am far away, but you are welcome to visit if you are ever in the area :-)

@pbkmaine, white noise can be very helpful to me, too. I like birdsongs, Gregorian chants, my air cleaner (that seems funny!), podcasts, NPR, and sometimes just TV shows turned down low in the background.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2018, 05:38:09 PM by Salim »

o2bfree

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #37 on: December 11, 2018, 04:47:07 PM »
I have mild misophonia --mouth sounds drive me nuts! Especially crunching. The sound of someone munching a bag of chips at work can make my blood boil. Meditation practice helps a lot, that is when I keep up on it.

I recently learned that there's a gene associated with misophonia! 23andme's DNA tests look for it. I got a DNA analysis for myself and my mom for Christmas, and it'll be interesting to see if I have this gene.

https://www.23andme.com/topics/traits/misophonia/

23andMe researchers have identified one genetic marker associated with feeling rage at the sound of other people chewing. This genetic marker is located near the TENM2 gene, which is involved in brain development. Keep in mind that the genetic marker associated with this trait is just one piece of the puzzle, and that non-genetic factors also play a role.

GreenSheep

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #38 on: December 11, 2018, 06:30:49 PM »
I was always a person who loved silence, the kind where I could sit quietly and hear the soft ticking of the kitchen clock.

This is interesting to me because although I don't have this experience at nearly the level others are mentioning, I do love silence. No background music at home, no loud restaurants, etc. But ticking clocks!! Nooo!!! I once removed a ticking clock from the wall of my workplace because it was so irritating. To each his/her own, I suppose.

ysette9

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #39 on: December 12, 2018, 02:13:31 PM »
I was always a person who loved silence, the kind where I could sit quietly and hear the soft ticking of the kitchen clock.

This is interesting to me because although I don't have this experience at nearly the level others are mentioning, I do love silence. No background music at home, no loud restaurants, etc. But ticking clocks!! Nooo!!! I once removed a ticking clock from the wall of my workplace because it was so irritating. To each his/her own, I suppose.
This reminds me that as a kid we had a cheap-o Kmart wall clock in our room. I told my mother it made way too much noise ticking and I had trouble falling asleep at night. She took it back and got another that was just as loud. I ended up taking the battery out.

Now I suffer through a husband who normally snores ridiculously loudly, except he got a CPAP at my strong insistence. It helps a lot but he will occasionally whistle and hiss instead from the blowing air.
At least we didn’t have to get separate bedrooms.

smoghat

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Re: Sound Sensitivity Disorder
« Reply #40 on: December 13, 2018, 09:08:09 PM »
I was always a person who loved silence, the kind where I could sit quietly and hear the soft ticking of the kitchen clock.

This is interesting to me because although I don't have this experience at nearly the level others are mentioning, I do love silence. No background music at home, no loud restaurants, etc. But ticking clocks!! Nooo!!! I once removed a ticking clock from the wall of my workplace because it was so irritating. To each his/her own, I suppose.

Ticking clocks were s nightmare to me since I was small. I also canít stand clocks that chime. Church bells are ok, grandfather clocks are not.