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General Discussion => Post-FIRE => Topic started by: Tanuki on August 02, 2015, 11:06:12 PM

Title: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Tanuki on August 02, 2015, 11:06:12 PM
I am 34 years old and retired/ taking an extended career break starting in Feb 2015, but I'm not sure if I like it or not. I'm not quite sure why. I have enough passive income to live on (about CAD$18,000 a year) but its not a whole lot, so I can't live 'normally' on it, so that might be the problem. Or perhaps I actually don't like being retired very much.

I can't seem to settle down and keep worrying about the future. This year was an experiment to see if I could live off my passive income (before I was living on about $28,000 so I wasn't sure if it was even possible), but so far it looks like I AM able to. However,there are lots of things I would want to do if I had more money (like enrol in a university course, or live in a more exciting (and therefore more expensive) place.

My life is nice, but its a bit dull, I can't decide if I like it or not - I love not having to get up early, reading lots of books, educating myself by reading text books etc. However, I find myself wishing I could do other things that I can't afford on my current income. Its a hell of a lot better than my previous two years where I really hated my job and started to get depressed, but I don't feel fulfilled either.

I've started looking into various jobs online that I could apply for, but nothing is really grabbing me, I think because I don't HAVE to do it. I imagine myself doing them, and some aspects seem appealing, but I also think about all the crappy things about having a job like having to get up early every day, doing boring admin, dealing with idiots etc and I just get put off. I would say that even if someone has a great job that they love there is probably about a third of it that is a bit shit, and the other two thirds are awesome. I just keep thinking about the crap third (or lets be honest, probably a much larger percentage) and I get put off because its not imperative - I can survive without a job, so why bother?

I think I feel my life lacks purpose and I don't know what to aim for. Most women my age would be mothers by now, but I've never been interested in that and I think I'm going to remain child free.

I'm concerned that I've put all this focus into FI and now that I'm here the lack of motive to do anything difficult is actually not very good for me. Has anyone else had a similar experience to me?
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: englyn on August 02, 2015, 11:36:22 PM
I think you are me two years from now.

I'm currently looking around to see if there is some work I would find fulfilling that I can do part time. I'm not overly motivated by helping people or leaving any kind of legacy, so that doesn't help.

My biggest motivation is learning stuff. It sounds like you are similar. Would it be worth it to work part time or start some kind of your own business in order to have enough money to go to university? On your current funds, could you afford university part time, study a few different things, see what piques your interest? Maybe a technical college and learn something practical?
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: limeandpepper on August 03, 2015, 12:38:43 AM
However,there are lots of things I would want to do if I had more money (like enrol in a university course, or live in a more exciting (and therefore more expensive) place.

There are quite a few places that are exciting and aren't more expensive. In fact, they might even be cheaper. Problem solved! Of course, what is "exciting" can be subjective. :)
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: concealed stache on August 03, 2015, 01:25:19 AM
I'm concerned that I've put all this focus into FI and now that I'm here the lack of motive to do anything difficult is actually not very good for me. Has anyone else had a similar experience to me?

This really resonates with me... I am on the verge of being done, probably going to wait until year end due to a few special circumstances, but wondering if focusing so much on straightening out my passive income could have robbed me of the chance to rediscover some interest in my job. As luck would have it, I'll likely have enough income to travel and do what I want, but at the same time, there is a lot of cool stuff going on in the world and the vast majority of it is being done by people working together in teams - i.e. companies or agencies. I hope that I don't end up just in my own little narrow world with many years (hopefully) left to live (I'm also in my early 30s).
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Exflyboy on August 03, 2015, 04:22:52 AM
On the face of it you have done what everybody in the "real" world accuses us of.. I.e retiring on a meager amount of money so now your life is miserable.

Well OK not miserable.. but "dull". According to the 4% rule you have about $450kCDN net worth.. Do you own your house?

What I'm getting at is you have locked yourself into a lifestyle which does not allow you to go splash out on a new hobby or some expensive travel every now and then. Remember also we don't know what the future holds (rampant inflation for example) and you have a LONG period of retirement.

My advice would be to take whatever time you need to decompress.. then go find a fulfilling job.

Get your NW up to $800 to $1M then have another go.

"Retirement" could also mean working part (or even full) time if that's what you need to be fulfilled.

Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: 2Birds1Stone on August 03, 2015, 07:01:41 AM
I can't believe that you are unable to find something fun to do in exchange for play money.......If $$ wasn't a factor, I could think of dozens of cool jobs to try for play money.

Check out http://www.coolworks.com/

Think about what you enjoy doing without pay, and find a way to get paid to do it. It really isn't that hard.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: forummm on August 03, 2015, 07:26:33 AM
What would you rather be doing? Does that pay you? If not, what does it cost?
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: KCM5 on August 03, 2015, 07:35:24 AM
I'm pretty sure I could travel full time on 18k/yr. Have you thought about doing that?

If I were you I'd make a change - move and find a part time job to make up for living expense changes or buy a plane ticket to Iceland or something. Do you have family/friends where you live? That makes a big difference.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Villanelle on August 03, 2015, 07:49:39 AM
If money were no object, what would you spend your time doing?  How would your days go, in a perfect world?  What are you good at?

Also, how much more money do you think you need to feel less constrained?  Does it need to be the full 28k you had, or would something in the middle ($23k) be enough?

If there was no job that really appealed to me and it was just a matter of wanting an additional $5-8k per year, I'd probably find a part time gig.  If there was nothing I was passionate about that I could monetize to get there (and remember, tons of things can make money, especially when you don't need a ton), I'd just pick a gig doing something at a place that had a cool vibe, or one that might help drive down other expenses (something that offers a discount on stuff you already buy).  But first, look at your skills and interests and see if there isn't a way to turn one or more of them in to a paying gig. 

Even if 1/3 is crap, you are only doing it part time.  Likely very part time, since you money needs aren't great.  That makes it a lot more palatable, IMO.  As for "why bother", that's something only you can answer, but it seems to me like the answer might be "because you are unhappy, and tutoring kids for two hours/doing very basic handy work for elderly people for a couple hours/whatever will buy you the ability to do things you believe will make you happier."  Look at that and see if it is worth it then. 

Also, look into volunteering for that sense of purpose.  You mentioned enjoying reading.  You could contact senior centers in your area and see if they see value in having someone come in and read for an hour twice a week.  Or see if your local library has programs for reading to adults or children.

For online jobs, have you checked out tutor.com (and probably other online tutoring sites)?  If you are educated, that might be a good work-from-home gig for part time.  When I looked in to it a few years ago, they especially wanted people with essentially STEM knowledge, though they take tutors in all areas. 
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Neustache on August 03, 2015, 08:38:38 AM
I'm a SAHM so this may not be relevant...but I was really bad at staying at home until just a year ago or two.

I wasn't socializing, at all.  So now we regularly have people over for dinner or tea.  I get to see my favorite people and it doesn't much (maybe a couple dollars for the extra servings).

I'm starting community college in the fall - all online.  I'll take geology and physics and I'm quite excited about both.  Cost is about $1200 for both classes. 

I volunteered last year with my local school district 1 hour a week.  This made me feel like I was contributing and I plan on doing this for the next couple of years.

My husband and I hike once a week now.  Cheap and fun.

This year, I will also get involved with fundraising for a not for profit that I like. 

The key for me was to 1. get more social interaction 2. feel like I was needed (beyond fetching drinks/food/toys for my kids).

Anyways, just thought I'd throw that out there. 
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Thinkum on August 03, 2015, 09:09:54 AM
I read a book recently and the main thing I took away from it is that you need to have a plan before you retire. Not a financial one, but a plan for how you're going to spend your time. This is the most important thing, just as important as saving and investing. The reason of course is because without happiness, what is the point? That lack of purpose you feel is exactly what he wrote about. I would find a cause you believe in and volunteer. This can increase that sense of purpose exponentially. Also, get some hobbies if you don't have any already. Ride your bike on trails/mountains/city streets, run, jog, do yoga, basically some sort of physical exercise. It was said you need 2-3 passions to have that sense of purpose, the more, the better.

If you are mostly set up, then why not get a PT job to get that extra cash you seem to want? The beauty is that you can quit anytime you want. Or even get some short-term work, then go on extended vacation, come back, get another job, rinse and repeat.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Jon_Snow on August 03, 2015, 09:15:42 AM
I'm not sure I'd like FIRE either if I had just enough to "live on".

Money isn't everything, but having enough so that I wouldn't be prevented from doing pretty much everything that I want to do was a top priority. I think aspiring FIRE'ees would be wise to listen to the OP here...there is a danger in pulling the FIRE ripcord ASAP. You don't necessarily have to "oversave" (I probably did), but I think considerable "buffer" in the stache is a good idea.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: regulator on August 03, 2015, 09:25:29 AM
There is nothing wrong with picking up a job or two.  Try something you always wanted to but never had the opportunity.  After all, you don't really need the money so you can start at entry level and kick it to the curb if it does not pan out.  Alternatively, find a gig that involves what you really enjoy doing from your former career.  I fell into a lucrative, but extremely dull contract job after 8 months off.  When the contract ends, I will look for something involving doing credit analysis, which is what I liked doing best in my former career.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Gone Fishing on August 03, 2015, 09:35:39 AM
Lots of good advice already.  I hope it helps!  If you have accress to some dirt, give vegetable gardening a go.  Done right, you should be able to get started for less than $50, and should be able to offset the expenses plus some.  Musical instruments and languages are also time but not cash intensive.

We are projecting a 25% increase in spending in FIRE, just to make sure we can do the things we want on all those "Saturdays".
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Threshkin on August 03, 2015, 09:41:54 AM
FI does not require RE.  It just enables it.  If you are not content in RE you can go back to work!  The difference is that you have the luxury of picking the job you like and doing it on your own terms. 

It's your life, do what you want to do.  Don't let the retirement police stand in your way.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Cpa Cat on August 03, 2015, 09:43:55 AM
My husband and I struggled with feelings insecure in our early retirement. Even though we had "enough," we were constantly worried about spending money or running out of money.

I decided to remain a part-time CPA in FIRE. But I don't mind that my business is on track to grow to full time for ~1/4 of the year. Most of what I hated about being "at work" went away when I became my own boss.

There's nothing wrong with taking on seasonal jobs, part time, or even full time jobs for extra income.I have to admit, that Coolworks website looks like an awesome way to pick up a little extra cash while visiting some new places.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: 3Mer on August 03, 2015, 10:02:44 AM
I like that you're being honest with yourself.  If you keep doing that, you will likely find the appropriate change to make.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: radram on August 03, 2015, 10:17:38 AM
New to FIRE myself.  We have planned for 'extra' to do fun stuff, but I still relate to the 'what now' portion of your post.  Being in the first month, I am committed to not jumping into anything (turned down 3 pt jobs so far).  I want to wait and see what the down time of winter in Wisconsin is before tackling anything new.

I also like the FI vs RE comment made by threshing.  I sort of figured that will be me, whether it be a regular pt job or more rental properties.

Since the OP loves learning and does not need the paper associated with higher learning, how about some free college courses?  There are now hundreds to choose from, many from great institutions.  Here is a partial list

http://www.openculture.com/freeonlinecourses

Thank you for the post and your openness.  It is good to see I am not alone.

Radram

Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: forummm on August 03, 2015, 10:22:21 AM
I'm not sure I'd like FIRE either if I had just enough to "live on".

Money isn't everything, but having enough so that I wouldn't be prevented from doing pretty much everything that I want to do was a top priority. I think aspiring FIRE'ees would be wise to listen to the OP here...there is a danger in pulling the FIRE ripcord ASAP. You don't necessarily have to "oversave" (I probably did), but I think considerable "buffer" in the stache is a good idea.

This is what I was thinking, and what I was getting at with my questions upthread. We're getting close to where we could sustain our life on very minimal spending. Which is great from a security standpoint--yay, we won't starve if we should both be unable to work! But we are choosing to do more than that very minimal level of spending in our future. Probably a higher COL area, more traveling, kids, etc. So we're going to keep working for longer than is needed to get to minimal FI. It sounds like you're in a place, OP, where you might want more than minimal FI. And you have the time and ability to keep earning to put yourself at a higher than minimal FI if you want to do that. What you've earned now is the freedom to work at whatever job you want and to do that part time if that interests you.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: limeandpepper on August 03, 2015, 10:24:08 AM
Are you sure that you're just not lonely?

+1

I'm pretty sure I could travel full time on 18k/yr.

+1

I think quite a few of us on this forum can have a happy life at 18k/year. Of course there are also those who need more, and that's fine. But I don't think the money is necessarily the reason why the OP isn't happy. It doesn't sound like she was very happy when she was working, either.

Seems like the problem is more about feeling lost rather than not having enough money.

I don't know what to aim for.

I'd get out there and do something. Volunteering, playing music, writing, photography, dance classes, martial arts, etc. Surely there are things that pique your interest at least a little bit. You don't have to know that it's something that you'll love for sure. Sometimes you have to try different things (and maybe give it a few chances) before getting into the groove of it.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Financial.Velociraptor on August 03, 2015, 11:40:08 AM
Tanuki,

I think it is different strokes for different folks.  I retired without a plan for my time and adjusted just fine. 

This is *your* life.  You don't have to let anyone's expectations of whether you should work/not work/work half-time/whatever get in your way.  You could for example work 12 hours a week as a waiter.  You'd meet and talk with people, get out of the house, and make some mad money for going to movies or renting kayaks or whatever the "thing" is you feel is missing.  Don't feel cornered into any kind of all or nothing scenario.  The beauty of your position is you have options you didn't have before.

Be happy.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: AZDude on August 03, 2015, 11:51:44 AM
$18k a year is plenty if you own your home already. If still paying mortgage/rent, then its probably not much fun. I would look for an easy p/t job that where you can earn some fun money. The best news is that you do not have to worry about the bullshit, because you have f-u money already.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: sixup on August 03, 2015, 01:00:33 PM
Maybe try this book. http://www.amazon.com/The-Joy-Not-Working-Overworked/dp/1580085520

Fun read with some good ideas.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: zephyr911 on August 03, 2015, 01:04:55 PM
This makes me so sad! I could be 100% free and probably still wouldn't have time for all the exploration and experimentation I want to do in life.

If FIRE isn't inspiring to you, and you wish you had more money, go back to work! Nothing fills me with ideas for how to spend my spare time like NOT HAVING ANY! While you're working, spend your breaks making a bucket list... then quit your job a year later with a few grand more in annual passive income, and get your ass moving!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Bikeguy on August 03, 2015, 01:17:19 PM
I'm pretty sure I could travel full time on 18k/yr. Have you thought about doing that?

If I were you I'd make a change - move and find a part time job to make up for living expense changes or buy a plane ticket to Iceland or something. Do you have family/friends where you live? That makes a big difference.
Drew and Carrie on travelisfree.com travel on 20K a year for both of them. All food, shelter,  transportation is included.  They document every cent on their website.  I met these two and they are awesome and for real.

I am FI, have a relatively cool job, and am waiting to "retire" when something grabs me as worth doing.  No way I'm sitting at home. Not my thing.   Looks like you tried it and it's missing something.   Time to change something.

I love this website.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Cassie on August 03, 2015, 01:27:33 PM
I would either go back to work p. t. or f.t. YOu do not have enough $ to have the life you want. It doesn't matter if some people think it is plenty-it is not for you & it wouldn't be for me either. If you have a skill that will translate to consult you might want to consider that. That is what my hubby & I do & it fills the $ need as well as the time, ability to use our brains, etc needs & as someone else mentioned working for yourself is a lot more fun then working for someone else.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: englyn on August 03, 2015, 09:24:36 PM

I am FI, have a relatively cool job, and am waiting to "retire" when something grabs me as worth doing.  No way I'm sitting at home. Not my thing.   Looks like you tried it and it's missing something.   Time to change something.

I love this website.


Nice!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Tanuki on August 03, 2015, 10:37:47 PM
Thank you everyone for all the responses, somehow it's really helped me to put things in perspective. After reflecting on this I do realise that it's not just ER that is making me feel lost as many people rightly intuited. There are other restrictions on my life as well as money and these restrictions are probably more important really than the fact that I don't have a large enough income.

I'm in a weird situation out here at the moment as I'm renovating a farmhouse that my partner and I own in the absolute middle of nowhere. I'm enjoying the project most of the time, but when I want to escape and do something different there is nothing to do! There really are no jobs to be had around here except for farming! I guess I'm a bit too isolated and have gone a bit too extreme.

We're planning to leave the farmhouse when winter sets in as there is really extreme winter here and we don't particularly wish to be around to witness it. I'll just have to make sure that wherever we move to is a bit more normal and has options like getting part time work or joining groups where I get to meet other human beings!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: markbike528CBX on August 03, 2015, 11:04:19 PM
I read a book recently and the main thing I took away from it is that you need to have a plan before you retire. Not a financial one, but a plan for how you're going to spend your time. .............. It was said you need 2-3 passions to have that sense of purpose, the more, the better. ............

I think I read that book recently, but can't remember the title, as I don't have my "read books list" handy.  suggestions on the title?

I can't visualize how I'd spend ~50% of my waking hours.
I don't despise my job, even with recent 75% layoffs.
The firecalc etc numbers look ok so I could FIRE tomorow, if i had a plan/passions.

net: I think I'd be in the same boat as the  OP, except older.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: soccerluvof4 on August 04, 2015, 06:02:10 AM
My wife and I went through this/still are a bit despite having 4 kids home from school. We retired April 3rd and though were very busy there is 3-4 hours a day i feel like there is something we both could do part time and get paid for. We made the decision to see whats out there and also for reasons you said. If you like books maybe you could put get a job at a library. Just push yourself a little harder to make a conscious decision to try and find something 20 hrs a week doing something you like and getting paid. If it doesn't work out walk away. That is the benefit of the position your in. You can just say forget it!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Thinkum on August 04, 2015, 06:16:25 AM

I think I read that book recently, but can't remember the title, as I don't have my "read books list" handy.  suggestions on the title?

I can't visualize how I'd spend ~50% of my waking hours.
I don't despise my job, even with recent 75% layoffs.
The firecalc etc numbers look ok so I could FIRE tomorow, if i had a plan/passions.

net: I think I'd be in the same boat as the  OP, except older.

The title of the book is You Can Retire Sooner Than You Think by Wes Moss. I got it at the library.

I sort of struggle with this issue myself. However, I tried volunteering as well as learning to play a musical instrument. I'm slowly starting to find things to do with my time, the real struggle for me is finding the motivation/drive to overcome the mental hurdles. Basically, pushing myself to just "do" and not think about doing.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Cassie on August 04, 2015, 01:26:49 PM
Even at ages 53 & 58 we did not like f.t. retirement. Now we both consult p.t. in our fields.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Trudie on August 04, 2015, 02:20:28 PM
I highly recommend the book "How To Retire Wild, Happy and Free" by Ernie Zielinski.  It addresses ways in which to spend your time in retirement.  It doesn't stress the financial aspect so much.

I think what others have posted here about having a plan for who you're going to spend your time with and how you're going to engage your mind, body, and soul are important attributes.

To be candid, I think too much is written on financial preparation for retirement.  It's so important to look at it holistically, especially if you are relocating and establishing new social ties.  As my husband and I ponder a move from Iowa to Colorado in about 5-7 years we're talking a lot about how we will connect with new people, have social outlets, and get to know a new place.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: RosieTR on August 04, 2015, 08:14:10 PM
A couple ideas, since you have internet but are otherwise isolated til sometime in the fall. First, start researching potential places to move to: COL, the community, etc. Check out the meetups in a few candidate places, the newspaper goings-on, etc. Try emailing the Chamber of Commerce, librarians, and other such. Follow the towns on Twitter. Post here to see if anyone is from there/lives there now to get the down low.

As well, think back to what you enjoyed when you were about 8 years old. You probably still enjoy some aspect to whatever those were: playing the Play Doh? Maybe you could order a small amount of clay to work, or try carving or some other 3D art. Nothing could keep you indoors as a kid? Observe the flora and fauna around your current home, and see if you can ID edible weeds, interesting species of insects, etc. Or, search for fruit that doesn't appear "owned" and glean it.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Kaspian on August 05, 2015, 11:16:08 AM
There's no place to hide or run away from yourself.  I'm afraid more money, more exciting living locale would prove just as mundane after a short time if you change your current living situation.  Many people who find themselves depressed think, "Things would be better only if ___."  When the thing actually happens they're momentarily happy but inevitably slowly slide back to their previous emotional state.  As some said above, you may need a fundamental personality shift to happen somehow--it could be a part-time job, volunteering, or something like a moment of revelation/awe to inspire you onwards. 
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Cassie on August 06, 2015, 10:00:48 AM
Some people are not cut out for rural living-just too isolated. Location can make a big difference in how a person feels if it is not right for them.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Neustache on August 06, 2015, 03:57:07 PM
Or make sure you invite people to stay with you for visits.  That's what folks in the country in Victorian periods did to have entertainment....if Jane Austen is accurate in her books, at least.   Having people stay for a week, and then having that invitation reciprocated, was the entertainment in the country.  Seems like things would be nicer if that was the culture again....less feelings of isolation. 

Plus having someone visit (and stay with you) means (if you are like me) you have a ton of projects to finish up before they get there, then the stay itself, then the cleaning/getting back to normal after.  Would take a solid 3 weeks of time and if you like them, it'd be enjoyable!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: southern granny on August 06, 2015, 04:59:58 PM
I don't know your feelings on religion, but we joined a new church a few years ago and it is amazing how much happier and more fulfilled we are now.  We began working in the soup kitchen once a week and have begun to socialize with some of the other volunteers.  We are even thinking of joining some of them in a bowling league.  The sermons are uplifting and the people are so friendly and really seem to care about each other. 
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: mpcharles on August 12, 2015, 03:12:16 AM
You need some sort of meaningful hard toil in your life. Our bodies were built for it.

Sent from my ASUS_Z00AD using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: DavidAnnArbor on August 18, 2015, 09:05:27 PM
I do love smaller cities that abutt beautiful rural and wilderness areas. Maybe the OP needs to move someplace like that where you can have the best of both worlds right next to each other.

That's why I like Ann Arbor
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Bikeguy on August 18, 2015, 09:11:00 PM
I do love smaller cities that abutt beautiful rural and wilderness areas. Maybe the OP needs to move someplace like that where you can have the best of both worlds right next to each other.

That's why I like Ann Arbor
+1 for Ann Arbor.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: 3okirb on August 18, 2015, 09:11:49 PM
I haven't had time to read the whole thread, but wanted to mention that may universities will let you audit classes for free.  If you're just interested in the knowledge, that could be a good way to get it.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Zx on August 18, 2015, 11:09:34 PM
You know Jeremy and Winnie from Go Curry Cracker go around to different countries and live well on very little. Perhaps your exciting times could be in some other nations and adventures therein? They were living in a swank house in Mexico on about 1400 per month.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: mandy_2002 on August 21, 2015, 09:45:03 AM
I'm not sure how education scholarships work in Canada, but with your very low passive income, could you qualify for aid to go back to school? I think in the US non retirement savings negatively impact your "need calculation," but checking that out may give you a few options.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: RootofGood on August 21, 2015, 04:03:44 PM
Now that you mention the part about living way out in the countryside, I kind of get it.  Not tons of stuff to do like there is in the city or on the edge of a city.  I'd go bonkers too and hate my ER if I lived waaaaaay out in the middle of nowhere.  I'm a homebody but like to go out occasionally or at least have folks over.  And that wouldn't happen nearly as often if it were a long drive to reach me (or for me to reach others!). 

Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: NoNonsenseLandlord on September 05, 2015, 08:39:12 PM
If all I had to live on was $18k, I would not consider myself FI.  That is below poverty status, and you could be on welfare and make more.

Get a $50K plus number before you call yourself FI.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: smiller257 on September 06, 2015, 06:20:42 AM
When I first retired, I felt some uneasiness about it too. I wrote a blog about what I learned in 3 years of retirement: https://webetripping.wordpress.com/2015/07/15/after-3-years-of-early-retirement-5-things-ive-learned/, it talks about the emotional side of retirement.

I fully understand the worry about running out of money too. How I reconciled it was to figure out what I could do as a "side hustle" to bring in some more cash while still enjoying the freedom of working when I want and not working when I don't want to. For me it was blogging and app development. For you, it might be something different (my wife creates jewelry for example).

I am sure there are some things you put off during your working years because you did not have the time but would love to do them. If you can find a way to earn money from doing it, you accomplish being more fulfilled while also earning some extra cash.

Best of luck!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: arebelspy on November 02, 2015, 07:02:52 AM
If your WR/passive income doesn't provide you enough to live the life you want, go increase your stach until it does.

Happiness/fulfillment is the end goal, not being unemployed.  Living without working can be a fine thing, but it's not an end in and of itself, and if it's making you unhappy, stop!  :)
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Landslave on November 02, 2015, 05:05:49 PM
Spartana said:  "That's me!! I love the country and small towns and think they are beautiful, but living in one, especially as a single person, would pretty much be the death of me. While I would hate to live in a huge cities (LA, NY, Chicago) I do love smaller cities that abutt beautiful rural and wilderness areas. Maybe the OP needs to move someplace like that where you can have the best of both worlds right next to each other."

  We have a condo on the Northside of Chicago.  It is 500sf, and is cute as a button.  It cost us $123,000 last year, and is worth about $160,000 now.  The taxes are about $2000 and the monthly HOA is $183 which includes cooking gas, cold and hot water, maintenance man, and heat.  It is a great place because it is across the street from Lincoln Park and the zoo.  A bus stop with 5 bus lines is 240 feet from our door, transit passes are less than car insurance per month and the buses come to our stop every 90 seconds during rush hour.  The lakeshore parks are expansive and give us plenty of space for "splendor in the grass" and Chicago is a WONDERFUL summer destination.  Our homestead is and will remain in St. Petersburg, Florida, but we like the snowbird lifestyle.  We are looking to FIRE in a few yrs and will relish chasing summer where ever it goes.  Chicago is a GREAT town.  And because we are next to the park we see bunnies, cayotes, foxes, and many types of birds.  There is the zoo, nature museum, conservatory, and zoo farm in the park.  And there is a 17 mile long lakeshore trail for exercise.  Winter sucks, but not the summer! 
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: dess1313 on November 02, 2015, 06:01:50 PM
sounds like trying to live so minimally is good, BUT you need to enjoy it.  Start a side job or start researching what you want to do, make a plan.  Its amazing how fulfilling part time work is.  It would give you freedom, AND the extra money to have fun with. as well as building your stash higher for the next FIRE attempt.  That might be enough to get you out of this slump. 
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Exflyboy on November 03, 2015, 03:06:16 PM
Yes PT work IS fun.. I really like my hobby job, we have at least 75 times expenses saved but that doesn't I CAN'T work.. but heck if my boss pisses me off.. I won't be there the next day..:)
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: BPA on November 03, 2015, 03:23:55 PM
If all I had to live on was $18k, I would not consider myself FI.  That is below poverty status, and you could be on welfare and make more.

Get a $50K plus number before you call yourself FI.

Well, that's arbitrary and unnecessary considering the OP enjoyed life on $28k/year.  Also, MMM himself did not have that much when he retired.


OP: Is part of the problem that your partner might not want to move?  I'm facing something similar with mine.  I'm burning out of my career and would love to move to another locale eventually, but he wants to stay here. 

Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: FloridaDad on November 04, 2015, 08:00:20 PM
This is my first post on MMM, I have been lurking and reading for a few months. My story is very similar to the OP, except that it all happened about 2.5 years ago, so I think I can add some perspective.

I was 49 years old and had been at the same megacorp for 15 years, and had steadily moved up the ranks until I was made a director in my last position. I actually did not want the director role as I liked being a manager, but I was picked and I really had no right of refusal other than to quit. That all happened in late 2005. I started my new director role in early 2006 and did well until 2012 for the most part, although the stress and anxiety of the job was wearing me out. My "C" level boss retired in early 2012 and my peer got the job. He made my and everyone's life a living hell immediately. He was a madman actually, causing so much stress that several people went out on disability, 1 woman who was younger than I died in her sleep (I believe this was at least partially because of work stress) and I then witnessed another co-worker have a stroke in the middle of a contentious meeting.

I made a great deal of money, but with kids in college, I also paid full price for all things college and I paid as much to the federal government alone in taxes as I earn in salary today.

I suffered with anxiety and my health was really poor. Fortunately, I had an OK start to FI with the following:

250K in pension which I took as a lump sum when I left, which I ten rolled into a deferred income annuity (the pension I could buy for myself was better than what the company was offering)
600K in 401K which I rolled into an IRA
100K in brokerage savings earmarked for college
200K in equity in my primary home
75K in equity in our vacation home in FL (which will soon become our permanent home)

So, I quit my job after I found a similar position at a university in the Philly area. However, the new job came with a 2 hour one way commute, so at the last minute I took a very low paying position with a friend's non profit. I spent 2 years at this job living through PTSD. The madman C level person was fired 4 months after I left, and although a few folks asked about me coming back, I knew I was done. I had no gas left in the tank. I was 49 and I felt tired and just wrecked. I also went through a guilt stage which was composed with an overwhelming feeling of guilt that Dad and Hubby was not the corporate all star anymore. My wife has a job that she loves working at the local school, so we had health benefits covered, and my small salary was paying most of the bills. However, working for a small non profit was not for me as we were always going month to month not knowing if donations would keep us open. Another type of stress.

After 2 years, we made our next big decision when I accepted a position at a university in Florida that is close to where our vacation home is. My wife and youngest are still in my original state of PA as my youngest is graduating high school in 2017. The good news is that my son goes to the same school I work at, so we are making the split family situation work for now.

I really like my new job in the .edu space. Universities move slowly, are typically more political, but the stress level is 10% of what I used to have. My salary is still only about half of what I used to make, but my son gets freee tuitiion and I also increased my financial aid package for my daughter by 20K as a result of my job downsizing.

I use the word downsizing when I talk with others about my job situation. Just as a house can get to be too much, so can jobs. I downsized to get away from the madness. I was very successful in my old life, but I was never happy. My wife, out of the blue after 6 months told me one evening that "It was so nice to have her husband back". I'm not ashamed to admit that I cried when I heard that.

I learned a great deal about myself through this journey. I have social anxiety and do not do well in meetings. I am much better at working with small teams on very technical projects and am back in my comfort zone. My new unversity wanted to make me a director, and I respectfully told them no way. My self-discovery taught me that I actually went up at least one too many levels in my career, as I was chasing the money as well as the ego.

I consider myself FI today and my financial picture has improved somewhat through the acquisition of a rental property. Homes in rural Florida are cheap, and the rental market is strong. Most importantly, with an annual tax bill of $500, the passive income seems like a good strategy. I think I am going to grow that number to 5 houses to create most of my retirement income.

I am actually planning on full retirement in 2017 when my youngest graduates. She will get the basic state college education (Florida is an exceptionally great value) and I will thank God that I made it. It is not easy being separated from loved ones, but our weird situation is working 7 months into our 2 year plan.

My advice to the OP is to not wait for life or deals or companies. The megacorp I worked for outsourced my entire former department, and I am so happy I did not have to live through all of that stress 2 years later. I would also suggest looking at .EDU employers, the pace is slower and the salaries are lower, but I started with 26 days of vacation, 10 days of sick time, and 15 university holidays. That's like being retired already! My retirement stash would have been more if I had stayed, but the true cost of that in personal health is just not worth it.

Lastly, here is your litmus test. If, on Sunday evening, you have an unbearable sense of dread for Monday, OR if on Friday you have such euphoria that you made another week; these are your queues to make a change.

FloridaDad

Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: BPA on November 05, 2015, 05:50:32 AM
Fantastic first post, Floridadad!

Welcome to the forums (or at least posting on them).

I found your post rather inspirational because I am burning out of my current career and am thinking that doing graduate work and TAing (I'm a teacher and love the actual teaching part of my job) might not be my next step.  I wouldn't need to earn much money fortunately.

Sorry to the OP for the hijack.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: DavidAnnArbor on November 05, 2015, 08:07:07 AM
Thank you Florida Dad for writing such a moving account about what you went through.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Financial.Velociraptor on November 05, 2015, 09:08:10 AM
Thanks Florida Dad.  I never made director (and would likely never have at the old megacorp that has decided I was not a "golden child") but I think I can relate.  I was making pretty decent money but it wasn't making me happy.  A lot of people don't understand why I went FIRE leaving literally millions in future compensation on the table.  I can't understand why they can't see I'm happier.

Best of luck in the .edu space.  Sounds like the right fit.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: MrsPete on November 06, 2015, 12:03:57 PM
What I'm hearing you say is that you retired too soon -- before you had adequate resources.  And I agree with you:  I don't have any desire to retire and live an austere life void of hobbies, etc.  I want to be able to do what I want to do. 

The answer is simple:  Go back to work.  You're still young, and you have plenty of time to retire later, better prepared. 
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Shane on November 08, 2015, 10:51:38 AM
OP:

ポンポコポンポコポンポコ!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Zx on January 07, 2016, 12:20:28 PM
This is my first post on MMM, I have been lurking and reading for a few months. My story is very similar to the OP, except that it all happened about 2.5 years ago, so I think I can add some perspective.

I was 49 years old and had been at the same megacorp for 15 years, and had steadily moved up the ranks until I was made a director in my last position. I actually did not want the director role as I liked being a manager, but I was picked and I really had no right of refusal other than to quit. That all happened in late 2005. I started my new director role in early 2006 and did well until 2012 for the most part, although the stress and anxiety of the job was wearing me out. My "C" level boss retired in early 2012 and my peer got the job. He made my and everyone's life a living hell immediately. He was a madman actually, causing so much stress that several people went out on disability, 1 woman who was younger than I died in her sleep (I believe this was at least partially because of work stress) and I then witnessed another co-worker have a stroke in the middle of a contentious meeting.

I made a great deal of money, but with kids in college, I also paid full price for all things college and I paid as much to the federal government alone in taxes as I earn in salary today.

I suffered with anxiety and my health was really poor. Fortunately, I had an OK start to FI with the following:

250K in pension which I took as a lump sum when I left, which I ten rolled into a deferred income annuity (the pension I could buy for myself was better than what the company was offering)
600K in 401K which I rolled into an IRA
100K in brokerage savings earmarked for college
200K in equity in my primary home
75K in equity in our vacation home in FL (which will soon become our permanent home)

So, I quit my job after I found a similar position at a university in the Philly area. However, the new job came with a 2 hour one way commute, so at the last minute I took a very low paying position with a friend's non profit. I spent 2 years at this job living through PTSD. The madman C level person was fired 4 months after I left, and although a few folks asked about me coming back, I knew I was done. I had no gas left in the tank. I was 49 and I felt tired and just wrecked. I also went through a guilt stage which was composed with an overwhelming feeling of guilt that Dad and Hubby was not the corporate all star anymore. My wife has a job that she loves working at the local school, so we had health benefits covered, and my small salary was paying most of the bills. However, working for a small non profit was not for me as we were always going month to month not knowing if donations would keep us open. Another type of stress.

After 2 years, we made our next big decision when I accepted a position at a university in Florida that is close to where our vacation home is. My wife and youngest are still in my original state of PA as my youngest is graduating high school in 2017. The good news is that my son goes to the same school I work at, so we are making the split family situation work for now.

I really like my new job in the .edu space. Universities move slowly, are typically more political, but the stress level is 10% of what I used to have. My salary is still only about half of what I used to make, but my son gets freee tuitiion and I also increased my financial aid package for my daughter by 20K as a result of my job downsizing.

I use the word downsizing when I talk with others about my job situation. Just as a house can get to be too much, so can jobs. I downsized to get away from the madness. I was very successful in my old life, but I was never happy. My wife, out of the blue after 6 months told me one evening that "It was so nice to have her husband back". I'm not ashamed to admit that I cried when I heard that.

I learned a great deal about myself through this journey. I have social anxiety and do not do well in meetings. I am much better at working with small teams on very technical projects and am back in my comfort zone. My new unversity wanted to make me a director, and I respectfully told them no way. My self-discovery taught me that I actually went up at least one too many levels in my career, as I was chasing the money as well as the ego.

I consider myself FI today and my financial picture has improved somewhat through the acquisition of a rental property. Homes in rural Florida are cheap, and the rental market is strong. Most importantly, with an annual tax bill of $500, the passive income seems like a good strategy. I think I am going to grow that number to 5 houses to create most of my retirement income.

I am actually planning on full retirement in 2017 when my youngest graduates. She will get the basic state college education (Florida is an exceptionally great value) and I will thank God that I made it. It is not easy being separated from loved ones, but our weird situation is working 7 months into our 2 year plan.

My advice to the OP is to not wait for life or deals or companies. The megacorp I worked for outsourced my entire former department, and I am so happy I did not have to live through all of that stress 2 years later. I would also suggest looking at .EDU employers, the pace is slower and the salaries are lower, but I started with 26 days of vacation, 10 days of sick time, and 15 university holidays. That's like being retired already! My retirement stash would have been more if I had stayed, but the true cost of that in personal health is just not worth it.

Lastly, here is your litmus test. If, on Sunday evening, you have an unbearable sense of dread for Monday, OR if on Friday you have such euphoria that you made another week; these are your queues to make a change.

FloridaDad

Great post and great read.

I have Sunday Night Phobia bad...it's about an 8 out of 10 normally. Every other night it's about a 6.

AND I have Friday euphoria, too. I also have minor quitting time euphoria. Each day is truly an ordeal.

In my situation, though, I can either downsize my stress and work till I'm 85 or I can stay here and retire in 10 years, as I can't make even half of what I make here anyplace else. At least as far as employment income.

I consider myself in a state of suspended animation, with moments of terror and moments of euphoria coming and going. I guess you just have to want it bad enough, and I do. But it will not break my heart to say goodbye when I win the lottery.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: thriftyc on January 07, 2016, 05:06:54 PM
We are planning to FIRE very soon (within the next month or two) on about 1 Million NW CDN. ($300 house plus 700k invested) It will be my wife and I plus 3 kids.  I will be looking at FIRE as a journey where both my wife and I will be taking on fun PT work as we see fit.  Also going to try to start a business on the side.   These activities will keep us busy plus earn enough safety margin for peace of mind - but on OUR terms.
My suggestion is to remain flexible - remembering that you are in a great position to afford flexible options in your life without the risk of ending up on the street.   A great place to be!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: soccerluvof4 on January 08, 2016, 06:57:15 AM
Floridadad great post! The Sunday night Friday night was right on the spot! In fact when you layed it out I realized yet again how glad I am that i dont feel that way anymore but instead forget often what day of the week it even is!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Zx on January 08, 2016, 09:28:19 AM
I often feel like that Billy Joel song "Goodnight Saigon", though my misery isn't Vietnam (thank God) but only this job.

"We met as soulmates on Paris Island. We left as inmates in an asylum."

The first sentence is when I first started this job. The last sentence is pretty much any time after the first month here! But it's Friday now, and the mini-euphoria is kicking in. I just have to gut out the next 6 hours!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Dan_Breakfree on January 08, 2016, 01:59:59 PM
Lastly, here is your litmus test. If, on Sunday evening, you have an unbearable sense of dread for Monday, OR if on Friday you have such euphoria that you made another week; these are your queues to make a change.

Great post! But mostly serious question, does anyone not feel this way who's living corporate life??
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Threshkin on January 08, 2016, 02:09:22 PM
Lastly, here is your litmus test. If, on Sunday evening, you have an unbearable sense of dread for Monday, OR if on Friday you have such euphoria that you made another week; these are your queues to make a change.

Great post! But mostly serious question, does anyone not feel this way who's living corporate life??

Not at all.  Having a corporate job does not require you to dread going to work.

Here are two maxims everyone should follow:


These two philosophies have served me well for years, both at work and in personal life.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Miss Prim on January 28, 2016, 03:26:13 PM
I do love smaller cities that abutt beautiful rural and wilderness areas. Maybe the OP needs to move someplace like that where you can have the best of both worlds right next to each other.

That's why I like Ann Arbor

Hi Dave from Ann Arbor.  I live outside of Ann Arbor and I love it too!  So much to do, yet I have over 4 acres of land and grow most of my own food and have chickens for eggs and grow batches of meat chickens when I need more.  You can kind of be in the country, but so close to shopping, restaurants, free concerts, museums, etc.  The only thing is the cost of housing is high.  But, we built years ago, so we could afford it then.  I couldn't afford to buy my own house now!

                                                                              Miss Prim
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Dicey on January 28, 2016, 06:01:39 PM
I thought I had commented on this thread, but I don't see anything, so I have no idea why it popped up just now...

My instant thought is that it's not "FIRE" that you're unsure of, it's only the "RE" part. Break a problem in half and it's twice as easy to solve. I suspect there have been a lot of good suggestions given, so take your time and explore the mustachian advice here. I imagine that after a period of adjustment, you'll take to it just fine. And once you've achieved FI (The hard part, let's face it.), who really cares if you're retired or not? If you really hate it, you can go out and try something totally different, anywhere! You can do almost anything without regard for remuneration, because you don't need the money. Such freedom!  Is it possible that you just don't realize (yet) just what an awesome position that is to be in? You can do this!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Tanuki on February 24, 2016, 06:09:11 AM
Well, I went back to work full time and Iím much happier than I was. I definitely do need more passive income to live the kind of life I want to, and Iím really enjoying having the non-passive income right now. Having said that, I donít regret my trial 9 months AT ALL.
1.    I was feeling really burnt out at work and I had to leave for my mental health. If I had gone straight into another job I would probably have felt burnt out there too, so 9 months off made me feel more enthusiastic about working.
2.   I found out that I can survive on my $18K. Itís a bit of a boring life, but now I know for sure that it can be done and this gives me a huge feeling of security.
3.    I know that if I start hating my new job again, I can leave. This makes me so much more relaxed at work.
I think going forward I will look for part time work, but this job came up at the right time and Iím not too bothered by working full time for now (itís only been 5 months).
I still have the goal to retire early, but I might do it in a more relaxed manner. Iím still young, so perhaps I can have some more time off to go traveling and do other things that I want to do, and not worry too much about reaching FI as soon as possible. Mini-retirements before the big ER.
I donít regret all the saving it took me to get to my current passive income at all though. When I look at others around me at work they seemed so trapped and I feel free.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: arebelspy on February 24, 2016, 06:18:59 AM
I loved every part of that post.

I'm glad you discovered what did, and didn't work for you. I'm glad you enjoyed your time off. I'm glad you found work that is providing satisfaction, while still feeling free enough to leave it if something changes.

If only all of us had as much self-awareness as you!

Thanks for following up. :)
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Financial.Velociraptor on February 24, 2016, 06:51:49 AM
Way to go Tanuki.  Living life on your terms instead of the Man's!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Stasher on February 24, 2016, 07:03:11 AM
I loved every part of that post.

I'm glad you discovered what did, and didn't work for you. I'm glad you enjoyed your time off. I'm glad you found work that is providing satisfaction, while still feeling free enough to leave it if something changes.

If only all of us had as much self-awareness as you!

Thanks for following up. :)

Exactly ....

Treat it as a break of self discovery for both yourself as a person and for your financial systems.
Best wishes as you move forward and look forward to seeing another update if you are able to increase your savings substantially while back at work.
Cheers
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: limeandpepper on February 24, 2016, 07:07:03 AM
Great to hear such a positive update, it sounds like you're very much on the right track! I'm also moving towards FI in a more leisurely manner and I like the idea of mini retirements. I took one a couple of years ago, and hope to take another maybe in another couple of years. Like you, after having time off work, I don't mind going back to work again, particularly if it's part-time.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Mr. Green on February 24, 2016, 07:49:46 AM
As someone on the cusp of quitting his job, stories like these inspire me. It reminds me that once you hit FI, literally anything is possible and that excites me to no end. The OP can make whatever choice he wants. Every door in front of him can be opened without dread and the lack thereof means all new endeavors can feel as exciting as a kid feels opening a present. What an awesome place in life to be.
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: Cookie78 on February 24, 2016, 09:34:40 AM
As someone on the cusp of quitting his job, stories like these inspire me. It reminds me that once you hit FI, literally anything is possible and that excites me to no end. The OP can make whatever choice he wants. Every door in front of him can be opened without dread and the lack thereof means all new endeavors can feel as exciting as a kid feels opening a present. What an awesome place in life to be.

I feel exactly the same way!  (Except for some reason I had assumed OP was female) So exciting. So many possibilities!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: RootofGood on February 24, 2016, 01:11:39 PM
Congrats Tanuki!  Another example of a person that quit working without a job lined up but had no problem going back to work (in spite of the stock market being down). 
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: soccerluvof4 on February 25, 2016, 12:00:30 PM
Well, I went back to work full time and Iím much happier than I was. I definitely do need more passive income to live the kind of life I want to, and Iím really enjoying having the non-passive income right now. Having said that, I donít regret my trial 9 months AT ALL.
1.    I was feeling really burnt out at work and I had to leave for my mental health. If I had gone straight into another job I would probably have felt burnt out there too, so 9 months off made me feel more enthusiastic about working.
2.   I found out that I can survive on my $18K. Itís a bit of a boring life, but now I know for sure that it can be done and this gives me a huge feeling of security.
3.    I know that if I start hating my new job again, I can leave. This makes me so much more relaxed at work.
I think going forward I will look for part time work, but this job came up at the right time and Iím not too bothered by working full time for now (itís only been 5 months).
I still have the goal to retire early, but I might do it in a more relaxed manner. Iím still young, so perhaps I can have some more time off to go traveling and do other things that I want to do, and not worry too much about reaching FI as soon as possible. Mini-retirements before the big ER.
I donít regret all the saving it took me to get to my current passive income at all though. When I look at others around me at work they seemed so trapped and I feel free.





Thats awesome and is another case that just confirms the flexibility being FI can bring. Kudos!
Title: Re: Not sure if I like FIRE
Post by: jim555 on February 25, 2016, 02:53:40 PM
The first year I FIREd I had to keep running the spreadsheets to be sure about things.  It is a big deal to get used to no constant pay check.  I finally see the numbers will work, and math works, so I should be OK.