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General Discussion => Post-FIRE => Topic started by: Gone Fishing on October 06, 2015, 11:50:33 AM

Title: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Gone Fishing on October 06, 2015, 11:50:33 AM
I'm finding that it is difficult to stay motivated with the end in sight...
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last months?
Post by: Fishindude on October 06, 2015, 11:52:13 AM
Me too.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last months?
Post by: Playing with Fire UK on October 06, 2015, 12:07:31 PM
Just for clarity: do you mean effort at work or motivation in savings rate? And how close to the end?
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last months?
Post by: Gone Fishing on October 06, 2015, 12:14:33 PM
Just for clarity: do you mean effort at work or motivation in savings rate? And how close to the end?

Sorry for the lack of clarity.  Let's say your last 6 months at work.  Title amended to reflect.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Exflyboy on October 06, 2015, 12:22:52 PM
Hardest thing ever.

Thankfully I went into work like Jan 2nd and I only had to work another few days.. I thought I was going to be stuck there till April/May.

So between the time I decided I was done and  leaving was about a month or so.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Jon_Snow on October 06, 2015, 12:24:19 PM
Had no choice but to "finish strong". Starting to dog it in my old job would risk death or at least a serious maiming. Gave er' hell right till I left the job site for the last time.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: steveo on October 06, 2015, 03:05:11 PM
I've got at least 5 years to go and I'm struggling already.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: BPA on October 06, 2015, 04:19:51 PM
I've got two and a half months to go and I am mostly "finishing strong" in that I'm as dedicated to my students as ever, but I've taken two sick days to avoid PD Day bullshit. 

When my son was trying to convince me not to quit, he said, "You don't have to be such a good teacher.  Just half ass it."  Uh no.  I care too much about my students for that.  As for PD...
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: pbkmaine on October 06, 2015, 04:24:14 PM
I gave my firm a long lead time, so for the last quarter I was mostly handing off clients. I went to meetings to introduce and credentialize her and then sat back and watched her do an excellent job. I was on the road a lot, but it was low stress.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: redbird on October 06, 2015, 04:39:12 PM
Coast. I gave my office 6 months' notice even. I didn't have to, but wanted to get it over with.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Financial.Velociraptor on October 06, 2015, 05:03:32 PM
Coast.  My main complaint in the last 9 months was there wasn't enough to do.  I spent a lot of time "looking busy" for a management team that felt it mattered.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: dude on October 07, 2015, 07:03:54 AM
SIX MONTHS???!!  Holy shit, I've got 3.5 years to go and I'm already on cruise control!  That's partly because, after 18 years of doing this shit, I know what's important and what's bullshit (hint: 95% of it is bullshit), and I can do the 5% pretty much in my sleep.  I'm doing enough not to be a burden on my co-workers, who also happen to be my subordinates. But for sure my motivation is pretty low at this point.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Gone Fishing on October 07, 2015, 07:16:33 AM
I've got two and a half months to go and I am mostly "finishing strong" in that I'm as dedicated to my students as ever, but I've taken two sick days to avoid PD Day bullshit. 

When my son was trying to convince me not to quit, he said, "You don't have to be such a good teacher.  Just half ass it."  Uh no.  I care too much about my students for that.  As for PD...

PD?
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: terran on October 07, 2015, 07:29:15 AM
I've got two and a half months to go and I am mostly "finishing strong" in that I'm as dedicated to my students as ever, but I've taken two sick days to avoid PD Day bullshit. 

When my son was trying to convince me not to quit, he said, "You don't have to be such a good teacher.  Just half ass it."  Uh no.  I care too much about my students for that.  As for PD...

PD?

Probably Professional Development. I think it is called different things in different districts (I've heard staff days too), but some days when the kids are off, the teachers are still required to come in.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Mr. Green on October 07, 2015, 07:40:47 AM
I'm in total coast mode, trying to hang on for another 77 weeks but I'm dying. The boredom and and "looking busy" is just sucking the life out of me. I could bail in 37 weeks and that seems more appealing by the day. I don't know how people make it for extended periods like this. What do you do, surf the internet all day? Take lots of breaks? Ugh.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: flyingaway on October 07, 2015, 10:53:28 AM
I don't know when I will quit as I only work two half days a week. But I have lost motivations in my work. I spend a lot of time on my garden.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Metta on October 07, 2015, 11:05:01 AM
In the last couple of years my workplace has gotten pretty crummy. (Morale is pretty low for everyone.) I'm hanging on until I can officially retire and get the retirement health and travel benefits, which as of today is just 1 year and 24 days away. I'm having incredible difficulty motivating myself to work.  I'm normally a high energy, positive person who loves working but that is no longer part of my personality. I could probably be that person again in another job and I expect to return to my normal self once I've retired and am working for myself. But for now... meh!

I spend a portion of my time everyday running the numbers to reassure myself that this is temporary and that I will soon be done. And another portion of each day is spent preparing for my future life. So far the numbers are my friends. They whisper to me that I could leave today. I am FI. I could be RE. Today. But I've committed to my husband to get the time in to receive those benefits that will make our extended future so much better. So here I am. Coasting. Praying. Running my numbers and hearing their sweet whispers.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: YK-Phil on October 07, 2015, 11:18:55 AM
I have been riding the wave since I was let go at my old job in March 2007. My reputation as a no-BS, incorruptible (or so they think, I was never handed a thick envelope under the table...) environmental scientist has preceded me and allowed me to coast along without having to do much, if nothing at all. But there might be some big changes very soon, as I just learned today that a couple of very senior executives on my board have been let go, and this usually means some big changes at my level. But whatever happens will be a blessing in disguise, not a crash landing, as I have been in a one-more-year mode -and terribly bored at work, for quite some time, and I was ready to pull the plug this coming spring.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Trudie on October 07, 2015, 11:31:35 AM
I have about five years left and I feel like I'm coasting, but it's a struggle some days.

In defense of "coasting"... let me just say that I still take great care to get my job done as required, and the longer I'm in it I also continue to try to go overboard communicating professionally with the huge number of parties that I work with.  A good portion of my job (as an accountant) is bullshit, and the longer I'm in it I've also realized what's material and what isn't.  I've definitely re-prioritized what I futz around with, and stuff that's less material will only get futzed with quarterly or annually -- so this judgement has made me more efficient at work.  So, I think what's perceived as "coasting" sometimes really has more to do with the fact that you've mastered huge chunks of a repetitive job and you're quite competent at it.  I try to look at it like the company is benefiting from my experience and reliability which has been garnered over a long period of time.  I'm starting to document key aspects of my job in "real time" so that in a few years I can hopefully have a clean exit.  This has been an eye-opener, because I remember learning aspects of the job that used to be much more time-consuming and difficult.  Now as I document them I'm aware that I have learned a lot, and that a monkey couldn't do my job.  I hope to be helpful to the next person, but I won't go overboard and hand it to them on a platter when I leave either.  My analogy is that it's like teaching someone to make spaghetti:  I can teach them what "al dente" means and how to make a good fresh sauce, but if I have to tell them to take out the pan and boil water then that's their problem.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: regulator on October 07, 2015, 12:50:55 PM
A bit of both.  In the last 3 to 6 months before I left I knew I was leaving but did not give more than 2 weeks notice.  I stopped doing all the bullcrap busy work, continuing ed, looking busy, etc.  I came in when I felt like it and left early when I felt like it.  However, I also had a specific slate of things I wanted to accomplish and knowledge I wanted to pass on so that the program I had set up could be continued and so that I wasn't leaving my coworkers in the lurch.  So I spent a fair amount of time and effort getting things sorted out and tying up loose ends, I did a bunch of brain dumps for coworkers who wanted to learn what I could pass on, and I gave a list of specialty resources and access codes to those who would have to pick up the pieces when I left.  When I finally gave noticed it was about all done and I left on good terms and had things done to my satisfaction as an ethical professional.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: BPA on October 07, 2015, 02:06:34 PM
I've got two and a half months to go and I am mostly "finishing strong" in that I'm as dedicated to my students as ever, but I've taken two sick days to avoid PD Day bullshit. 

When my son was trying to convince me not to quit, he said, "You don't have to be such a good teacher.  Just half ass it."  Uh no.  I care too much about my students for that.  As for PD...

PD?

Probably Professional Development. I think it is called different things in different districts (I've heard staff days too), but some days when the kids are off, the teachers are still required to come in.

That's right!  The  bane of my existence.  Initiatives I don't agree with pushed by people I have little respect for.  Not the reason I got into teaching.  In our most recent collective agreement, we were granted one more PD Day a year.  We all groaned.  That's not what we wanted: time away from the kids to do more bullshit.   Argh.

72 more days.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: 3Mer on October 07, 2015, 03:32:24 PM
I've got at least 5 years to go and I'm struggling already.
+1
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: steveo on October 07, 2015, 11:08:19 PM
I've got at least 5 years to go and I'm struggling already.
+1

We should have a thread on how to bludge and still get paid. Today I went to work for 3 hours, left to go the gym and then went home. I've answered some emails and pinged a couple of people.

I should feel bad. It'd really suck if they paid me a retrenchment package.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: rob/d on October 08, 2015, 01:04:03 AM
 It's funny really, i finished with a wimper rather than a bang .
 I only had a few months left to finish by my calcs at 51ish  and broke my arm , had 8 weeks off work , came back and just couldn't hack it .
Told my boss straight up that i have  had enough and he offered me up to a years sabatical , which i have  took.
 No fireworks or leaving party . No tears .
 Up to the busted arm i was still at 110% effort but the pressure was building still , got back to work and realised i'd  got " get it done itus ". 
 Some things happen for a reason ?

 I already know i am not going back !
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Ozstache on October 08, 2015, 03:11:35 AM
We should have a thread on how to bludge and still get paid.
There is one. See http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/the-art-of-not-working-at-work/ (http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/the-art-of-not-working-at-work/)
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: steveo on October 08, 2015, 03:57:56 AM
Thanks for the link
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Playing with Fire UK on October 08, 2015, 08:45:25 AM
(Not FIREd, so talking about leaving jobs in general)

When I was working for a boss from hell in a job that was making me ill, I was coasting before I'd even found a new job. I didn't respect her, the company wasn't all that, and no-one was having to pick up my slack (stuff didn't get done, but no-one suffered). I gave my four weeks notice the week before a massive event when I'd already booked three weeks' holiday. I explained she could either have no hand over or the event collapse and she should pick one. When she offered to give me two weeks' pay in exchange for working an extra week after the holiday to hand over I laughed in her face. I deleted some of the work I had done from the shared drive and my laptop because I knew it would be a pain to do again and I already had my reference letter. Good times, looking back I think I would have worked even less (and I was seriously slacking, I planned my entire wedding in work hours).

When I was leaving the Air Force I spent about six months responding to bullshit task requests with 'Nope, what are they gonna do, fire me?' And also breaking the intention of my contract by working a second job (it wasn't the letter because I was working for free in exchange for a massive sign on bonus the day after I became a civilian). I'd do the same again.

However when the funding ran out for the place I was volunteering for, I was working hard, every hour, bringing extra work home so that we could do as much as possible before the programme was culled. Again, I'd do the same thing because I'm really proud of what we achieved in that time.

When I get offered dull-sounding training or networking I only attend if I think it'll make or save me money in the next decade. (I'm including free drinks in money saved).

@Mr Green, I'd think about all the things that you can do while sitting in your chair, and looking at a first glance like work. Start a blog? Listen to podcasts, research cool places you'd like to travel. If possible try to make it productive on some level as spending the day wasting time really drags. Do you know anyone with a personal project that could use some remote assistance with? Are there any side hustles you could run from your desk without getting caught breaking your contract?
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Deo on October 14, 2015, 12:18:33 PM
Wow, I have to say that I'm shocked by this thread. I'm amazed that so many people hold their employers in such low esteem.

I like to be "badass" in everything I do, and will give it my 100% up to the very last minute.

I supposed I'm very fortunate in that I like and respect everyone at my company who is in a more senior position than I.  It's probably a good thing too, as I'm only 30 and probably have another 14 years before reaching financial independence.

Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Mr. Green on October 14, 2015, 12:39:54 PM
Wow, I have to say that I'm shocked by this thread. I'm amazed that so many people hold their employers in such low esteem.

I like to be "badass" in everything I do, and will give it my 100% up to the very last minute.

I supposed I'm very fortunate in that I like and respect everyone at my company who is in a more senior position than I.  It's probably a good thing too, as I'm only 30 and probably have another 14 years before reaching financial independence.
It's a two way street. I would love to give 100% all the time. However, I have learned that giving 100% in a sub-par environment where the people around you are not the right people for the job and nothing is done about it because the employer just don't know how grow people is a great way to become angry and bitter. This is where the "money vs. satisfaction" internal dialogue begins for many people.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Mr Money Mutton Chops on October 14, 2015, 01:54:06 PM
Wow, I have to say that I'm shocked by this thread. I'm amazed that so many people hold their employers in such low esteem.

I wish I could say this surprised me.... But it really doesn't. Lots of people shouldn't be bosses.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: regulator on October 14, 2015, 01:55:47 PM
Wow, I have to say that I'm shocked by this thread. I'm amazed that so many people hold their employers in such low esteem.

I like to be "badass" in everything I do, and will give it my 100% up to the very last minute.

I supposed I'm very fortunate in that I like and respect everyone at my company who is in a more senior position than I.  It's probably a good thing too, as I'm only 30 and probably have another 14 years before reaching financial independence.
It's a two way street. I would love to give 100% all the time. However, I have learned that giving 100% in a sub-par environment where the people around you are not the right people for the job and nothing is done about it because the employer just don't know how grow people is a great way to become angry and bitter. This is where the "money vs. satisfaction" internal dialogue begins for many people.

Definitely.  I have also had a number of jobs where the reward for working hard, caring deeply, and going the extra mile was mostly more work.  I am not dumb enough to be suckered by that kind of deal more than once.  In my last cube job they did an employee survey every two years.  The last one I was around for had record low numbers in a number of areas, so management held a bunch of conference calls to try to address some of it and hear puissant concerns.  I knew I had FU money so I spoke up to the effect that there was literally no incentive to do anything but the minimum and even small monetary rewards would make a huge difference.  The decision maker literally could not understand what I was talking about.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: ShortInSeattle on October 14, 2015, 02:42:38 PM
I think there is a difference between being emotionally invested and doing a good job.

I think it's fine not to be emotionally invested at the end, but one should still do their job to a high standard and not saddle their team with a mess or unhappy customers.

I can see how motivation would wane, but hopefully your interest in being excellent does not.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: regulator on October 14, 2015, 03:01:39 PM
I think there is a difference between being emotionally invested and doing a good job.

I think it's fine not to be emotionally invested at the end, but one should still do their job to a high standard and not saddle their team with a mess or unhappy customers.

I can see how motivation would wane, but hopefully your interest in being excellent does not.

At least for me, there is usually a big gap between "gets the job done well" and "giving my all."  An employer only gets the latter from me if they treat me well and incent me.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Mr. Green on October 14, 2015, 06:51:49 PM
Wow, I have to say that I'm shocked by this thread. I'm amazed that so many people hold their employers in such low esteem.

I like to be "badass" in everything I do, and will give it my 100% up to the very last minute.

I supposed I'm very fortunate in that I like and respect everyone at my company who is in a more senior position than I.  It's probably a good thing too, as I'm only 30 and probably have another 14 years before reaching financial independence.
It's a two way street. I would love to give 100% all the time. However, I have learned that giving 100% in a sub-par environment where the people around you are not the right people for the job and nothing is done about it because the employer just don't know how grow people is a great way to become angry and bitter. This is where the "money vs. satisfaction" internal dialogue begins for many people.

Definitely.  I have also had a number of jobs where the reward for working hard, caring deeply, and going the extra mile was mostly more work.  I am not dumb enough to be suckered by that kind of deal more than once.  In my last cube job they did an employee survey every two years.  The last one I was around for had record low numbers in a number of areas, so management held a bunch of conference calls to try to address some of it and hear puissant concerns.  I knew I had FU money so I spoke up to the effect that there was literally no incentive to do anything but the minimum and even small monetary rewards would make a huge difference.  The decision maker literally could not understand what I was talking about.
Totally had a flashback to Office Space where Peter is meeting with the Bobs. That movie was pure genius. We all laughed our asses off while, the entire time, it was mocking our actual lives (some of us anyway).
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: MsRichLife on October 14, 2015, 11:59:00 PM
Just gave my HR department a heads up today that I plan to leave in about 8 months time. I'm being so transparent about it so as to ensure they can find someone to replace me because I don't want my staff to suffer through the transition.

It's a crazy busy job, so I can't coast but I desperately want to. I'm burning out which is making my decision to leave all the easier.

Interestingly enough, the HR manager asked what I need to stay. Part time? Another location? 'Tell me and I'll try to make it happen'.

I don't think there is anything they could offer to make me stay at this stage. It seems like something has finally clicked in my brain and I'm finally on my way to FIRE at 39.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Ozstache on October 15, 2015, 03:37:50 AM
Totally had a flashback to Office Space where Peter is meeting with the Bobs. That movie was pure genius. We all laughed our asses off while, the entire time, it was mocking our actual lives (some of us anyway).
You've piqued my interest in this movie, so I have added it to my watch list on Netflix. Thanks!
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: happy on October 15, 2015, 04:00:53 AM
Just gave my HR department a heads up today that I plan to leave in about 8 months time. I'm being so transparent about it so as to ensure they can find someone to replace me because I don't want my staff to suffer through the transition.

It's a crazy busy job, so I can't coast but I desperately want to. I'm burning out which is making my decision to leave all the easier.

Interestingly enough, the HR manager asked what I need to stay. Part time? Another location? 'Tell me and I'll try to make it happen'.

I don't think there is anything they could offer to make me stay at this stage. It seems like something has finally clicked in my brain and I'm finally on my way to FIRE at 39.

Congrats on making the decision. I was wondering when you'd pull the plug.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Ozstache on October 15, 2015, 04:29:44 AM
Just gave my HR department a heads up today that I plan to leave in about 8 months time. I'm being so transparent about it so as to ensure they can find someone to replace me because I don't want my staff to suffer through the transition.

It's a crazy busy job, so I can't coast but I desperately want to. I'm burning out which is making my decision to leave all the easier.

Interestingly enough, the HR manager asked what I need to stay. Part time? Another location? 'Tell me and I'll try to make it happen'.

I don't think there is anything they could offer to make me stay at this stage. It seems like something has finally clicked in my brain and I'm finally on my way to FIRE at 39.
With you not posting here, or on your blog, very much over the last few months, I was beginning to think you were loving your new job so much that you had stamped your FIRE out! Good to hear you are pulling the pin and proceeding as filed.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: MsRichLife on October 15, 2015, 05:29:22 AM
Just gave my HR department a heads up today that I plan to leave in about 8 months time. I'm being so transparent about it so as to ensure they can find someone to replace me because I don't want my staff to suffer through the transition.

It's a crazy busy job, so I can't coast but I desperately want to. I'm burning out which is making my decision to leave all the easier.

Interestingly enough, the HR manager asked what I need to stay. Part time? Another location? 'Tell me and I'll try to make it happen'.

I don't think there is anything they could offer to make me stay at this stage. It seems like something has finally clicked in my brain and I'm finally on my way to FIRE at 39.
With you not posting here, or on your blog, very much over the last few months, I was beginning to think you were loving your new job so much that you had stamped your FIRE out! Good to hear you are pulling the pin and proceeding as filed.

Nope. Just too darn busy! Work is consuming my life and I'm not really enjoying that aspect of it. Attended a seminar last week and it's confirmed I'm ready to go. Now I just need to work through all the paperwork!
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: TomTX on October 15, 2015, 05:41:35 AM
I've got at least 5 years to go and I'm struggling already.

Ha. I'm planning on hanging on til I can pull a partial pension (and full medical) in 11.5 years.

Motivation is sometimes an issue, but it gets easier when I take a day off using the PTO I keep accumulating on the books. Personal life has been stressful (not MrsTX or toddlerTX thankfully) - taking a full week at Thanksgiving, two at Christmas.

I get my work done and more. I guess I'm still enthusiastic. I'm definitely enthusiastic about the actual work - it makes a difference, I'm good at it. I am often less than enthusiastic about some co-workers, bullshit policies and training, etc.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Greystache on October 15, 2015, 08:20:07 AM
I gave 6 months notice that I was quitting. I tried to maintain high standards until the end.  My duties where going to be divided among three different employees, two of which were new to our department, so I spent a lot of the last two months training my replacements.  I must have done a good job because they only called me at home 3 times after I quit (or maybe my job wasn't that important after all). It also helped that I retired at the end of the year.  The last couple weeks around Xmas are pretty slow with lots of people burning up their remaining PTO before the end of the year.  On my last day, there was almost nobody left to say goodbye to. Towards the end, I did spend a lot of time going over my spreadsheets and getting my finances, health insurance, etc.in order. I did take a lot of pleasure every time I completed some bullshit task for the last time ever.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Mr. Green on October 15, 2015, 08:45:01 AM
Totally had a flashback to Office Space where Peter is meeting with the Bobs. That movie was pure genius. We all laughed our asses off while, the entire time, it was mocking our actual lives (some of us anyway).
You've piqued my interest in this movie, so I have added it to my watch list on Netflix. Thanks!
You are in for a treat!
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Ozstache on October 15, 2015, 02:11:04 PM
Totally had a flashback to Office Space where Peter is meeting with the Bobs. That movie was pure genius. We all laughed our asses off while, the entire time, it was mocking our actual lives (some of us anyway).
You've piqued my interest in this movie, so I have added it to my watch list on Netflix. Thanks!
You are in for a treat!
Just finished watching it. I couldn't stop laughing in the first half of the movie in particular at the piss the movie was taking out of the office environment, especially those TPS reports. The bane of my existence in my last job before FIRE was having to put together a weekly report for my big boss that I knew he never read but that didn't stop my direct boss endlessly fretting over the production and formatting of said useless report each week. I can totally relate to the TPS report with cover sheet saga and thankfully never have to suffer it again!
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: regulator on October 15, 2015, 03:15:08 PM
Totally had a flashback to Office Space where Peter is meeting with the Bobs. That movie was pure genius. We all laughed our asses off while, the entire time, it was mocking our actual lives (some of us anyway).
You've piqued my interest in this movie, so I have added it to my watch list on Netflix. Thanks!
You are in for a treat!
Just finished watching it. I couldn't stop laughing in the first half of the movie in particular at the piss the movie was taking out of the office environment, especially those TPS reports. The bane of my existence in my last job before FIRE was having to put together a weekly report for my big boss that I knew he never read but that didn't stop my direct boss endlessly fretting over the production and formatting of said useless report each week. I can totally relate to the TPS report with cover sheet saga and thankfully never have to suffer it again!

Just in case you didn't get the memo...

http://www.chrisglass.com/journal/downloads/TPSreport.pdf
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Ozstache on October 15, 2015, 03:51:03 PM

Just in case you didn't get the memo...

http://www.chrisglass.com/journal/downloads/TPSreport.pdf

Lol. Arrrrrrgh!!
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Metta on October 16, 2015, 11:42:42 AM
Wow, I have to say that I'm shocked by this thread. I'm amazed that so many people hold their employers in such low esteem.

I like to be "badass" in everything I do, and will give it my 100% up to the very last minute.

I supposed I'm very fortunate in that I like and respect everyone at my company who is in a more senior position than I.  It's probably a good thing too, as I'm only 30 and probably have another 14 years before reaching financial independence.

Things change in life. Employers change. We change. Everything changes. This is why having FU money is so critical. Most people want to feel passionate about their work. They don't want to be unhappy or work for people they don't respect. But sometimes that happens.

As it turns out, giving 100% to my job would actually require 100 hour weeks for no extra pay. I've reduced down to a 40 hour week and do good work while I'm there. I don't need to give over my whole life to my job.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: smiller257 on October 17, 2015, 07:44:57 AM
Yeah, I found that I coasted those last 6 months. I was too busy thinking about all the things I was going to do once I finished working.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: DoubleDown on October 18, 2015, 09:13:03 AM
Coasted, and definitely lacking in motivation for the job.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: googily on October 18, 2015, 08:40:22 PM
I'm coasting, but there hasn't ever really been enough for me to do in this job for most of the past 20 years. But they value me very highly for what I do, so i just have become very adept at killing time at my desk. I kind of see "coasting" not as letting the work suffer at all, but just not caring about whether a boss might think you aren't doing enough, and not stressing about any part of your day. What's the worst that could happen, after all? If they decided to fire me I'd be thrilled. :)
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: opnfld on October 19, 2015, 10:57:27 AM
I wish they would fire me.  4-7 months to go - nearly zero motivation.  All the cracks are starting to show.

Until recently, I harbored a misconception that FI would turn me into a SWAMI, but my candid remarks in meetings have had the opposite effect.  I was recently asked to tone it down.  I guess I'll downshift now and coast.  This unpleasant surprise is making me count the days in near desperation.  I expected FI to have a calming effect, but I find myself experiencing impatience, agitation, and even resentment (not good, i know).  I'm trying to stick it out until we relocate at the end of the school year, but could be sooner.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Playing with Fire UK on October 20, 2015, 01:20:13 AM
Wow, I have to say that I'm shocked by this thread. I'm amazed that so many people hold their employers in such low esteem.

I like to be "badass" in everything I do, and will give it my 100% up to the very last minute.

I supposed I'm very fortunate in that I like and respect everyone at my company who is in a more senior position than I.  It's probably a good thing too, as I'm only 30 and probably have another 14 years before reaching financial independence.
It's a two way street. I would love to give 100% all the time. However, I have learned that giving 100% in a sub-par environment where the people around you are not the right people for the job and nothing is done about it because the employer just don't know how grow people is a great way to become angry and bitter. This is where the "money vs. satisfaction" internal dialogue begins for many people.

Agreed. I'm of the opinion that if something is worth doing it's worth doing well; however 75% of my work is simply not worth doing. There are even some things that I'm asked to do that are positively harmful to our clients or the wider world, why would I give 100% effort to these if I don't care about losing my job?
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Rollin on October 20, 2015, 06:32:12 AM
Until recently, I harbored a misconception that FI would turn me into a SWAMI, but my candid remarks in meetings have had the opposite effect.  I was recently asked to tone it down.  I guess I'll downshift now and coast.  This unpleasant surprise is making me count the days in near desperation. I expected FI to have a calming effect, but I find myself experiencing impatience, agitation, and even resentment (not good, i know).  I'm trying to stick it out until we relocate at the end of the school year, but could be sooner.

Me too.  I guess I have suppressed it all for the last 30 years.  Of late, I have little tolerance for petite BS.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: DoubleDown on October 23, 2015, 10:16:40 AM
I wish they would fire me.  4-7 months to go - nearly zero motivation.  All the cracks are starting to show.

Until recently, I harbored a misconception that FI would turn me into a SWAMI, but my candid remarks in meetings have had the opposite effect.  I was recently asked to tone it down.  I guess I'll downshift now and coast.  This unpleasant surprise is making me count the days in near desperation.  I expected FI to have a calming effect, but I find myself experiencing impatience, agitation, and even resentment (not good, i know).  I'm trying to stick it out until we relocate at the end of the school year, but could be sooner.

You're not alone. I was a real high achiever for the bulk of my career, but at the end it was a real chore for me just to show up knowing that I was so close to being free. Just like you, I knew the cracks were starting to show and I'm sure some executives were wondering what happened to the go-getter they used to count on. Even though I knew it would happen, it was a little hard accepting that my reputation was changing. On the other hand, it was easy to accept since I knew I would have the last laugh when I quit at 47! Still though, I felt like I was just scraping by to get through those final months with zero motivation.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: G-dog on October 24, 2015, 07:21:23 AM
Until recently, I harbored a misconception that FI would turn me into a SWAMI, but my candid remarks in meetings have had the opposite effect.  I was recently asked to tone it down.  I guess I'll downshift now and coast.  This unpleasant surprise is making me count the days in near desperation. I expected FI to have a calming effect, but I find myself experiencing impatience, agitation, and even resentment (not good, i know).  I'm trying to stick it out until we relocate at the end of the school year, but could be sooner.

Me too.  I guess I have suppressed it all for the last 30 years.  Of late, I have little tolerance for petite BS.

Me also, but I had always been outspoken. I actually became quite audacious and for the last 6 months I skipped EVERY BS meeting. I skipped all general update meetings, etc. unless the meeting was specific to a project I was working on, I would not go. It was wonderful! I highly recommend this.
This, of course, depends somewhat on knowing how your boss may react, and how you will respond if they bring it up.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: G-dog on October 24, 2015, 10:16:01 AM
I think I did a bit of both.

I totally lost motivation for some things - group meetings (skipped all of the in 2015!), surveys, committees, group socials, and those types of things.

I focussed on MY projects and tried to hunker down and get as much done as possible. My job had very defined deadlines (legal work) set by the government agency. I made sure I stayed on top of the deadlines, and even worked ahead. This was part of my 'don't leave messes for others to clean up' personal policy.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: StetsTerhune on October 24, 2015, 10:55:57 AM
I wish they would fire me.  4-7 months to go - nearly zero motivation.  All the cracks are starting to show.

Until recently, I harbored a misconception that FI would turn me into a SWAMI, but my candid remarks in meetings have had the opposite effect.  I was recently asked to tone it down.  I guess I'll downshift now and coast.  This unpleasant surprise is making me count the days in near desperation.  I expected FI to have a calming effect, but I find myself experiencing impatience, agitation, and even resentment (not good, i know).  I'm trying to stick it out until we relocate at the end of the school year, but could be sooner.

Wow. This. I could have written this, every part of it. And the closer I get the worse it gets.

It doesn't help that everyone I talk to about it (among the few people I've told I'm retiring) respond with "well you'll be done in 6 months, so what do you care?"
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: libertarian4321 on October 25, 2015, 02:43:29 AM
I've found that 3-4 hours of effort is usually enough to accomplish as much as my co-workers can do all day- because most of them are illogical, disorganized, easily distracted dip sticks who spend most of their time chasing their tales (e.g. working frantically, but never really accomplishing anything).  I've never understood how they can look so harried and overworked all the time, yet at the end of the day get no more done than I do, when I've spent half my afternoon at ESPN.com or reading celebrity gossip at TMZ.

So I work 3-4 hours, and screw off the rest of the day- BSing with co-workers, surfing the net, staring out the window, sleeping, etc.

Been doing it for decades.

So I think I'll go with "coast."



Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Mr. Green on October 27, 2015, 08:23:31 AM
I've found that 3-4 hours of effort is usually enough to accomplish as much as my co-workers can do all day- because most of them are illogical, disorganized, easily distracted dip sticks who spend most of their time chasing their tales (e.g. working frantically, but never really accomplishing anything).  I've never understood how they can look so harried and overworked all the time, yet at the end of the day get no more done than I do, when I've spent half my afternoon at ESPN.com or reading celebrity gossip at TMZ.

So I work 3-4 hours, and screw off the rest of the day- BSing with co-workers, surfing the net, staring out the window, sleeping, etc.

Been doing it for decades.

So I think I'll go with "coast."
That's sweet that you have an office environment that will allow you to accomplish that. I have an open office with desk partitions no higher than my waist so it wouldn't be but 2 or 3 weeks before someone was fired for that because everyone would know that person was screwing off half the day. Somehow I don't think the argument of equal production to my co-workers would save me from the axe, though that would be nice!
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: manonfire1007 on October 27, 2015, 07:43:37 PM
This thread has left me sad. I know human nature but I expected better from seasoned "workers".

Not having gone through the process, I need to remind myself to be less judgmental.
That said (here comes the judgmental part):
1 I used to think that a boss who fired someone close to retirement was cold and ungrateful. From what I see here, that boss may be smart. I am a boss and my eye will be on it with employees close to being done.
2. I feel that I owe my employer my best effort all of the time that he pays me. Purposely not being productive during work time smells a lot like time stealing. Not cool. You hurt the company that employs your coworkers i.e. Those you leave behind.

 I have 17 years to go. Maybe that colors my response, but I think enough of my work ethic to expect more of myself than that.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Ozstache on October 27, 2015, 08:20:00 PM
This thread has left me sad. I know human nature but I expected better from seasoned "workers".
I don't think people are as unproductive as they may appear to you in this thread. It's more that they gone from being super-productive to now just doing the minimum required to be productive ie. even at their "laziest", they are no less productive than the average comparative schmo around them.

Speaking from my own experience, I reckon I could easily have been twice as productive as my comparable co-workers when I was working. However, I found that the return on such productive investment was quite poor, as all such high productivity seemed to get me was more work because I was seen as highly capable. I soon learned to cog that back to about 20% extra productivity whereby I was still marked in the highest category for advancement purposes, still got paid the same but wasn't burning myself out.

On my final run to FIRE, I cogged it back even further to just the baseline productivity, which meant I could coast for 50% of the time I was at work. Now, you might see this as ripping off the company as I was only being 50% productive to MY capacity whereas I, and my bosses, saw it as me being 100% effective to the EXPECTED capacity. The real issue I see is that there was actually a disincentive to do more. If I had been paid twice as much and/or promoted twice as fast for me to operate to capacity, I would have done it. Ironically, I reckon that would have had me FIREing in half the time too! :)
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: StetsTerhune on October 28, 2015, 05:21:24 AM
I don't think people are as unproductive as they may appear to you in this thread. It's more that they gone from being super-productive to now just doing the minimum required to be productive ie. even at their "laziest", they are no less productive than the average comparative schmo around them.

Yes, thanks for the defense, Oz. I get pretty annoyed by anyone moralizing about what anyone "owes" theiremployer. If I owe them my best, then they must owe me a salary that is connected to the value I create for the company.

My first 4 managers all told me some variation of "you're the best employee I've ever had work for me" during an annual review. What did that get me? Usually something like a 4% raise instead of a 3% raise. Our promotions are based on defined criteria that are unrelated to job performance. So after years of this, I'd guess I make about 10% more than the average person who started around the same time as me. The point is, the company doesn't live up to its side of the bargain, so as far as I'm concerned I have no moral obligation to them.

Despite that, I'm still an above good employee (at least according to my most recent performance review). I'm certainly not in the "best employee ever" category anymore, but if I can still be considered good with 10ish hours a week of work then I'm not going to lose any sleep over it.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Mr. Green on October 28, 2015, 06:06:53 AM
This thread has left me sad. I know human nature but I expected better from seasoned "workers".

Not having gone through the process, I need to remind myself to be less judgmental.
That said (here comes the judgmental part):
1 I used to think that a boss who fired someone close to retirement was cold and ungrateful. From what I see here, that boss may be smart. I am a boss and my eye will be on it with employees close to being done.
2. I feel that I owe my employer my best effort all of the time that he pays me. Purposely not being productive during work time smells a lot like time stealing. Not cool. You hurt the company that employs your coworkers i.e. Those you leave behind.

 I have 17 years to go. Maybe that colors my response, but I think enough of my work ethic to expect more of myself than that.
There's another side to this coin though. Suppose Mr. Superstar decides to turn in his best effort every day and, in the process, makes all his other coworkers look like asshats? That's probably not going to work out too well for him either. I've actually heard of unionized places where a guy like that will have an "accident," courtesy of all the people he was pissing off because they'll take their job security over him making everyone look bad. Personally, I think if an employer has no system in place to reward a superstar for his exceptional performance then he should be allowed to work his 4 hours and go home, while still getting paid for 8, as long as his productivity matches the rest of the office. That alone would be an incentive because if I saw Bob go home at noon I'd strive to go home early too, which in turn would raise overall productivity and, as a result, cut back how early Mr. Superstar is allowed to go home because the rest of the office is producing more.

Offices all around the world can thank me for that incentive plan by sending me 1% of their increased revenue. ;)
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: manonfire1007 on October 28, 2015, 07:46:44 AM
This thread has left me sad. I know human nature but I expected better from seasoned "workers".
I don't think people are as unproductive as they may appear to you in this thread. It's more that they gone from being super-productive to now just doing the minimum required to be productive ie. even at their "laziest", they are no less productive than the average comparative schmo around them.

Speaking from my own experience, I reckon I could easily have been twice as productive as my comparable co-workers when I was working. However, I found that the return on such productive investment was quite poor, as all such high productivity seemed to get me was more work because I was seen as highly capable. I soon learned to cog that back to about 20% extra productivity whereby I was still marked in the highest category for advancement purposes, still got paid the same but wasn't burning myself out.

On my final run to FIRE, I cogged it back even further to just the baseline productivity, which meant I could coast for 50% of the time I was at work. Now, you might see this as ripping off the company as I was only being 50% productive to MY capacity whereas I, and my bosses, saw it as me being 100% effective to the EXPECTED capacity. The real issue I see is that there was actually a disincentive to do more. If I had been paid twice as much and/or promoted twice as fast for me to operate to capacity, I would have done it. Ironically, I reckon that would have had me FIREing in half the time too! :)

Point well made. I guess I've just been fortunate enough to be in an organization where talent is seen, promoted, and paid. My starting 6 figure salary has gone up 2.5x plus. Who knows, maybe if I'm moving up, maybe their eye for talent isn't so good...
Perfect it isn't, but it has been great for me.

From a managerial side, this has reminded me that human nature is to slack when possible and take initiative and keep people productive or move them out on my timetable.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: G-dog on October 28, 2015, 07:56:11 AM
Thanks Oz for that great explanation.

For the manager - I think there are some real gems here on how you can behave to keep getting the best from your employees. Treat them with real respect, acknowledge and reward their efforts (it is NOT just the money), build a culture of collaboration and support (not competition, sniping, and backstabbing). There will always be a few that won't respond to this, but I think it is a few.

I know that had my managers and employer treated me as above - I would still be working there! And probably happily.

So please also flip the script when you see or hear of folks 'coasting' on the job - ask yourself how their manager has failed them, not just why they are stealing from the company.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: regulator on October 28, 2015, 09:29:04 AM
This thread has left me sad. I know human nature but I expected better from seasoned "workers".
I don't think people are as unproductive as they may appear to you in this thread. It's more that they gone from being super-productive to now just doing the minimum required to be productive ie. even at their "laziest", they are no less productive than the average comparative schmo around them.

Speaking from my own experience, I reckon I could easily have been twice as productive as my comparable co-workers when I was working. However, I found that the return on such productive investment was quite poor, as all such high productivity seemed to get me was more work because I was seen as highly capable. I soon learned to cog that back to about 20% extra productivity whereby I was still marked in the highest category for advancement purposes, still got paid the same but wasn't burning myself out.

On my final run to FIRE, I cogged it back even further to just the baseline productivity, which meant I could coast for 50% of the time I was at work. Now, you might see this as ripping off the company as I was only being 50% productive to MY capacity whereas I, and my bosses, saw it as me being 100% effective to the EXPECTED capacity. The real issue I see is that there was actually a disincentive to do more. If I had been paid twice as much and/or promoted twice as fast for me to operate to capacity, I would have done it. Ironically, I reckon that would have had me FIREing in half the time too! :)

Point well made. I guess I've just been fortunate enough to be in an organization where talent is seen, promoted, and paid. My starting 6 figure salary has gone up 2.5x plus. Who knows, maybe if I'm moving up, maybe their eye for talent isn't so good...
Perfect it isn't, but it has been great for me.

From a managerial side, this has reminded me that human nature is to slack when possible and take initiative and keep people productive or move them out on my timetable.

Wrong lesson, grasshopper.  Yep, there will always be useless slackers you inherit or mistakenly hire.  But if you have a bright, high-performing employee who is not engaged, the problem is generally not with the worker.  Look in the mirror and look around you at your fellow managers and overlords.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: steveo on October 28, 2015, 02:11:37 PM
not just why they are stealing from the company.

Who says it is stealing. I have worked extremely hard in my job.  I'm also good at my job. There are lots of people that aren't good at their jobs and I can probably work a lot less and be a lot more productive. To add to that I don't play games. Some people spend their whole careers playing games. How does that help the company.

Playing games to me is not focussing on the work but looking at everything as an opportunity to create drama or posture oneself for promotion.

I work in IT as a project manager. There was a guy recently in my team who wasn't focussed on delivering an IT solution. He was focussed on trying to ensure that he was aligned with the architects (he was a solution designer) and that all issues were raised to every person possible. He was great at pointing out problems and causing drama but terrible at actually coming up with a solution. I was working extremely hard to manage all the issues that he raised. On top of that he was fighting with another person in my team and I had to get involved to mediate the situation. So I was recently working way too hard (there were other problems) and how much of that work was adding value to my company ? I think none at all.

Now that guy is gone (thank god) and I'm working a lot less but its constructive work. Yesterday I worked for about 6 hours but I tested our solution and found an important bug. That is adding value.

There is so much work that happens that adds no value to a company. Its pretty easy to focus on the constructive stuff and do it a lot quicker than 8 hours per day.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: G-dog on October 28, 2015, 03:36:20 PM
not just why they are stealing from the company.

Who says it is stealing. I have worked extremely hard in my job.  I'm also good at my job. There are lots of people that aren't good at their jobs and I can probably work a lot less and be a lot more productive. To add to that I don't play games. Some people spend their whole careers playing games. How does that help the company.

Playing games to me is not focussing on the work but looking at everything as an opportunity to create drama or posture oneself for promotion.

I work in IT as a project manager. There was a guy recently in my team who wasn't focussed on delivering an IT solution. He was focussed on trying to ensure that he was aligned with the architects (he was a solution designer) and that all issues were raised to every person possible. He was great at pointing out problems and causing drama but terrible at actually coming up with a solution. I was working extremely hard to manage all the issues that he raised. On top of that he was fighting with another person in my team and I had to get involved to mediate the situation. So I was recently working way too hard (there were other problems) and how much of that work was adding value to my company ? I think none at all.

Now that guy is gone (thank god) and I'm working a lot less but its constructive work. Yesterday I worked for about 6 hours but I tested our solution and found an important bug. That is adding value.

There is so much work that happens that adds no value to a company. Its pretty easy to focus on the constructive stuff and do it a lot quicker than 8 hours per day.

I was referring back to manonfire's post, which Oz was responding to (I didn't quote everyone for space- here is the post:
Manonfire1007
"This thread has left me sad. I know human nature but I expected better from seasoned "workers".

Not having gone through the process, I need to remind myself to be less judgmental.
That said (here comes the judgmental part):
1 I used to think that a boss who fired someone close to retirement was cold and ungrateful. From what I see here, that boss may be smart. I am a boss and my eye will be on it with employees close to being done.
2. I feel that I owe my employer my best effort all of the time that he pays me. Purposely not being productive during work time smells a lot like time stealing. Not cool. You hurt the company that employs your coworkers i.e. Those you leave behind.

 I have 17 years to go. Maybe that colors my response, but I think enough of my work ethic to expect more of myself than that."
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Ozstache on October 28, 2015, 04:16:56 PM
For the manager - I think there are some real gems here on how you can behave to keep getting the best from your employees. Treat them with real respect, acknowledge and reward their efforts (it is NOT just the money), build a culture of collaboration and support (not competition, sniping, and backstabbing). There will always be a few that won't respond to this, but I think it is a few.

As an example of this, I had a guy working for me that was an outstanding performer, easily outputting the combined productivity of the rest of the team. Not wishing to lose this, and only having limited reward capability within our organisation's HR rules, I told him early on how good I thought he was and asked him what I could do for him to keep him performing that way. He told me that he really wanted to get promoted, despite me advising him to be careful of what he wished for because it just may come true! He was also getting his house built and wanted to be able to be home at times to supervise some of the more delicate parts of construction.

So I cut a deal with him - keep performing the way you are and you can take whatever time off you need to get your house built to your desires, which was more than HR policy allowed, and I will write you an annual performance report that will make the HR department weep with joy at your awesomeness and I will shield you from as much distracting bureaucratic admin handed down from above as possible. Fast forward a year and his house was built to his satisfaction, he got the promotion he wanted and I got the continued high performance I needed from him to get our project done well, which in turn made me look good. Had anyone negotiated a similar deal before I decided to cog back my performance to normal parameters, I would have snapped it up too, but it was not to be. Nonetheless, I am pleased I had the opportunity to tap into the great potential I saw in others by working with what they actually wanted, not what the system thought they wanted and was constrained in its ability to provide at a commensurate level to the performance being displayed. 
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: manonfire1007 on October 28, 2015, 07:46:58 PM
There is a lot of good feedback from those further down the track than me. In the managerial role, I like the idea of looking for and rewarding talent with items outside the box. Thanks for the benefit of your experience.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Ozstache on October 29, 2015, 04:30:00 AM
No worries!
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: dude on October 29, 2015, 07:45:09 AM
I've found that 3-4 hours of effort is usually enough to accomplish as much as my co-workers can do all day- because most of them are illogical, disorganized, easily distracted dip sticks who spend most of their time chasing their tales (e.g. working frantically, but never really accomplishing anything).  I've never understood how they can look so harried and overworked all the time, yet at the end of the day get no more done than I do, when I've spent half my afternoon at ESPN.com or reading celebrity gossip at TMZ.

So I work 3-4 hours, and screw off the rest of the day- BSing with co-workers, surfing the net, staring out the window, sleeping, etc.

Been doing it for decades.

So I think I'll go with "coast."

HAHAHA! Hilarious (and perhaps a little too familiar)! Thanks for the laugh!
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: DoubleDown on October 29, 2015, 10:07:38 AM
From a managerial side, this has reminded me that human nature is to slack when possible and take initiative and keep people productive or move them out on my timetable.

Food for thought from my own experience (including as a now-retired manager): It seems you are seeing intentional and wanton slacking as the only explanation here. Keep in mind that some of this "coasting" is not intentional but just the inevitable progression of life and lack of motivation for that work after a long career (you already touched on/acknowledged this when you said you might see things differently in the future, so kudos to you on that). And that is indeed a legitimate explanation IMO. I would liken it to expecting a 50-year old to run races just as they did in their 20's or early 30's. They aren't intentionally going slower, they just may not have the same drive, motivation, or ability to do that any more. Hey may indeed be giving their best effort -- it's just that their best effort is no longer as good as before.

In my case, I wasn't intentionally slacking -- I just did not have the same drive for the work as I used to, particularly with the finish line so close. I was trying to be motivated and put in "110%" but just wasn't possible for me. Considering I gave them 18 over-achieving years, I think they could "suffer" 6 months of just-adequate work.

I say cut those soon-to-be retired folks a little slack (ha, some pun). Yes, it is not the most efficient arrangement for the employer, but I recommend empathy. Instead of having your eye on them as likely slackers so you can deal with them or fire them, recognize it as the milestone they've achieved and deserve. All of us may hit various times in our work career where a little flexibility or going easy on the employee is appreciated (death in the family, problems at home, child care issues, problems with coworkers, etc.). It would be a shame to go hard on those people adding to their difficulties, and you might appreciate the same consideration in the future for some as-yet-unknown reason.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: dude on October 29, 2015, 01:31:47 PM
From a managerial side, this has reminded me that human nature is to slack when possible and take initiative and keep people productive or move them out on my timetable.

Food for thought from my own experience (including as a now-retired manager): It seems you are seeing intentional and wanton slacking as the only explanation here. Keep in mind that some of this "coasting" is not intentional but just the inevitable progression of life and lack of motivation for that work after a long career (you already touched on/acknowledged this when you said you might see things differently in the future, so kudos to you on that). And that is indeed a legitimate explanation IMO. I would liken it to expecting a 50-year old to run races just as they did in their 20's or early 30's. They aren't intentionally going slower, they just may not have the same drive, motivation, or ability to do that any more. Hey may indeed be giving their best effort -- it's just that their best effort is no longer as good as before.

In my case, I wasn't intentionally slacking -- I just did not have the same drive for the work as I used to, particularly with the finish line so close. I was trying to be motivated and put in "110%" but just wasn't possible for me. Considering I gave them 18 over-achieving years, I think they could "suffer" 6 months of just-adequate work.

I say cut those soon-to-be retired folks a little slack (ha, some pun). Yes, it is not the most efficient arrangement for the employer, but I recommend empathy. Instead of having your eye on them as likely slackers so you can deal with them or fire them, recognize it as the milestone they've achieved and deserve. All of us may hit various times in our work career where a little flexibility or going easy on the employee is appreciated (death in the family, problems at home, child care issues, problems with coworkers, etc.). It would be a shame to go hard on those people adding to their difficulties, and you might appreciate the same consideration in the future for some as-yet-unknown reason.

In other words, karma can be a real bitch.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: steveo on October 29, 2015, 02:06:28 PM
I'll add that I'm a manager and I tell my staff to take it easy in the right situations. I've got a guy who I was checking up on his work hours because he was working too much. He worked 24 hours straight (with breaks I suppose) twice when I was monitoring and I had to tell him to stop it. Now we have a good working relationship - he can turn up and leave whenever he wants. I've got another guy who doesn't have a lot of work on. I told him just make sure that you are charging and do whatever you want.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: BPA on October 30, 2015, 08:07:01 AM
my candid remarks in meetings have had the opposite effect.  I was recently asked to tone it down. 

This is happening to me right now. 

The funny thing is that I'm speaking on behalf of a lot of people. 
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Daisy on October 30, 2015, 09:00:59 AM
I coast in the things that don't matter and finish strong in the things that do.

Of course I am making my own decisions on what matters and what doesn't so my managers may disagree.
Title: Re: Did you "finish strong" or "coast" through your last 6 months of work?
Post by: Playing with Fire UK on November 02, 2015, 03:09:53 AM
http://sexhealthmoneydeath.com/2015/10/28/the-no-1-sign-you-are-about-to-be-fired-2/ (http://sexhealthmoneydeath.com/2015/10/28/the-no-1-sign-you-are-about-to-be-fired-2/)

Has a fun take on this.