Author Topic: Guitarists.. how did you learn?  (Read 4210 times)

GuitarStv

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #50 on: September 14, 2021, 11:58:42 AM »
what's a good source for guitar tabs? i looked at 'ultimate guitar tabs' website for some chords i couldn't figure out by ear but they didn't seem right either.

They're usually not right!  Use tabs as a guide to get started on a song, and then use your ears (and the actual song) to correct the parts that don't seem quite right.

megaschnauzer

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #51 on: September 14, 2021, 12:02:31 PM »
what's a good source for guitar tabs? i looked at 'ultimate guitar tabs' website for some chords i couldn't figure out by ear but they didn't seem right either.

They're usually not right!  Use tabs as a guide to get started on a song, and then use your ears (and the actual song) to correct the parts that don't seem quite right.

i usually do it the other way around. i can generally figure the basic chords but sometimes one or two chords will elude me and i'm stuck. also figuring out the more complex chords. any steely dan generally loses mi in about 30 seconds.

Samuel

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #52 on: September 14, 2021, 12:08:14 PM »
what's a good source for guitar tabs? i looked at 'ultimate guitar tabs' website for some chords i couldn't figure out by ear but they didn't seem right either.

They're usually not right!  Use tabs as a guide to get started on a song, and then use your ears (and the actual song) to correct the parts that don't seem quite right.

Yeah, tabs usually get you 80% of the way there but you always have to tweak them. Also pay close attention to the info at the top to know if they're in standard tuning, played with a capo, or if the original was recorded a half step down, etc.

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #53 on: September 14, 2021, 07:30:00 PM »
What guitarstv said above. A proper setup will make any guitar SO much better to play. The basics of truss rod adjustment on all guitars and intonation adjustments at the bridge are pretty easy to get to 90% with a good digital tuner and some patience. Iíve made a lot of cheap out of whack guitars become much more playable and sound better in just a few minutes of adjustment. Most people are afraid of making these adjustments, but as long as you make a series of small adjustments, itís pretty hard to go too far off track and pays big dividends. I think learning to do your own setups is one of the most mustachian things you can do in the world of guitars. Taylor has a bunch of cheat sheets that you can download and there are a bunch of other online resources to learn how to do it. A lot of these adjustments should be done any time you change the gauge of strings, etc. as that changes the total tension on the neck. That first twist of a truss rod is a bit nerve inducing, especially if a bit crusty and it makes some creaky noises, but it is totally worth it.

daverobev

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #54 on: September 15, 2021, 01:07:37 AM »
What guitarstv said above. A proper setup will make any guitar SO much better to play. The basics of truss rod adjustment on all guitars and intonation adjustments at the bridge are pretty easy to get to 90% with a good digital tuner and some patience. Iíve made a lot of cheap out of whack guitars become much more playable and sound better in just a few minutes of adjustment. Most people are afraid of making these adjustments, but as long as you make a series of small adjustments, itís pretty hard to go too far off track and pays big dividends. I think learning to do your own setups is one of the most mustachian things you can do in the world of guitars. Taylor has a bunch of cheat sheets that you can download and there are a bunch of other online resources to learn how to do it. A lot of these adjustments should be done any time you change the gauge of strings, etc. as that changes the total tension on the neck. That first twist of a truss rod is a bit nerve inducing, especially if a bit crusty and it makes some creaky noises, but it is totally worth it.

Can you please point me to the absolute first step of doing this? All I've done so far is tune the thing with a phone.

2Cent

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #55 on: September 15, 2021, 01:15:22 AM »
what's a good source for guitar tabs? i looked at 'ultimate guitar tabs' website for some chords i couldn't figure out by ear but they didn't seem right either. i was looking at the free site so maybe the paid version is better.

i've been watching the rick beato youtube channel and i see he does all kinds of music lessons but i'm not sure if that's the direction i want to go just yet. right now i'm at the 'drinking wine and strumming along' phase of my musical development.
I like https://www.songsterr.com. But don't make the mistake of learning difficult songs note by note. It will get you there with persistence, but also ruin the song for you. And afterwards if you want to play any other song you have to start again from scratch. Better first learn the basics(chords, scales, picking/strumming, etc) Then you can understand how these notes are part of a structure and you can learn to play in a way that transfers to other songs. You can then pick up new songs in a day to a few days depending on the complexity.

pecunia

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #56 on: September 15, 2021, 05:00:05 AM »
What guitarstv said above. A proper setup will make any guitar SO much better to play. The basics of truss rod adjustment on all guitars and intonation adjustments at the bridge are pretty easy to get to 90% with a good digital tuner and some patience. Iíve made a lot of cheap out of whack guitars become much more playable and sound better in just a few minutes of adjustment. Most people are afraid of making these adjustments, but as long as you make a series of small adjustments, itís pretty hard to go too far off track and pays big dividends. I think learning to do your own setups is one of the most mustachian things you can do in the world of guitars. Taylor has a bunch of cheat sheets that you can download and there are a bunch of other online resources to learn how to do it. A lot of these adjustments should be done any time you change the gauge of strings, etc. as that changes the total tension on the neck. That first twist of a truss rod is a bit nerve inducing, especially if a bit crusty and it makes some creaky noises, but it is totally worth it.

Can you please point me to the absolute first step of doing this? All I've done so far is tune the thing with a phone.

Here's a link to adjusting the truss rod:

https://www.google.com/search?q=Basic+Truss+Rod+Adjustment&sxsrf=AOaemvKQnkjjTaGzc4D3IrtiYin9G_9flQ%3A1631703090157&source=hp&ei=MtBBYcaQB8XVtAbg5ajoDA&iflsig=ALs-wAMAAAAAYUHeQgrrG5ciMqN9pmIwBi4yWdxCpfNR&oq=Basic+Truss+Rod+Adjustment&gs_lcp=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&sclient=gws-wiz&ved=0ahUKEwjG8cLY54DzAhXFKs0KHeAyCs0Q4dUDCAk&uact=5#kpvalbx=_R9BBYcDUCdmUtAarvIjoAQ17

If that link doesn't work, just search for truss rod adjustments.

This is put out by Stew Mac.  They sell expensive luthier tools.  You may need an Allen wrench to make the adjustment.

daverobev

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #57 on: September 15, 2021, 06:20:04 AM »
All right, the neck seems straight enough. Now I'm going to look at how high the strings should be away from the neck.

For the record, my hands are probably normalish sized manhands, if anything with slender fingers so this should be doable for me... the only thing is that I have soft skin, and it's taking a while for my fingertips to toughen up.

Car Jack

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #58 on: September 15, 2021, 07:08:10 AM »
If you really want your guitar to be properly setup, look on tdpri for Ron Kirn's "book".  I learned from him and for a time was buying, modifying, setting up guitars as a hobby.  I did everything on a very low budget.  I went to a counter top installation company and asked them if I could go through their dumpster.  I found a great piece of marble to use for leveling frets.  I used the adhesive and sandpaper Ron recommended.  The feeler gauges and scale are used to set string height and relief (bend of the neck).  In short, here's what I've done many, many times.  It's not for everyone.

1: Remove the neck.  (Remember I was mostly doing strats and teles).
2: Remove the low e and b tuners.
3: Remove the nut.  Use some low heat from something like a dryer if needed.

You should build a jig.  It would hold the heel of the neck down....screwed to the jig.  On the tuner end, I use sanding sponges as they won't harm the finish and are stiff enough to hold the neck in place.

4: Screw the neck to the jig.  Don't put the sponges at the other end yet.
5: Adjust the neck with the truss rod to make it perfectly straight.

I use 2 things to make sure it's straight.  First, a carpenter square.  This relies on the frets, so it's only my first shot.  Next, I have a straight edge that's 21 inches long.  I've notched out for frets to sit inside the notches.  Note that a Les Paul scale simply omits the first fret of a strat scale, so you don't need more than one of these.  I use this to make sure the fretboard itself is level.  Use something like a piece of paper to be sure it's straight.  The cheaper the guitar, the harder it is or impossible.  If you need more relief (bow) in 3 places and less in 3 other places, don't be concerned.  Especially with junk like Squiers, the fretboard will never be flat, so you need to just work with the frets.

6: Put the jig on a work bench.  I clamp it down, then put the sponges under where the nut was.  This holds the whole neck very flat.  Some people even put rags under the rest of the neck to keep it from moving at all.  I only did this with really expensive stuff or if I was doing someone else's guitar.

7:  Now it's time to level.  First mark the frets.  Take a black dry erase market and color the tops of all the frets.  You now take your marble 25+ inch with sandpaper and sand along the length of the neck.  Rock the tool from the bass side to the treble side.  This gives you sanding along the entire fret length.  Oh...I used 100 grit sandpaper.  I've seen other grits used, but this looks good to me.  After 5 or 6 times, look carefully at the frets wrt the marker.  You'll see very low frets because they will still have all the marks.  Well worn frets from strings digging in will become obvious.  Your goal is to remove all the low spots.  So low frets are at least touched and string marks are gone.  With a really badly worn set of frets, you might compromise and get most of the string marks and leave just a little.  I always remember that it is actually possible to play a guitar without frets.  So I never am concerned that the frets will get too low.  I also prefer lower (vintage frets) on older Mexican strats to newer medium jumbo that from memory, started maybe around 2000 or so.

8: The frets are now level along the entire fretboard.  Yay!  Next, you need to crown them.  This is putting the round profile back on them, which also centers the note on the fret when the string is pressed.  There are several ways to do this and I actually find the harder way easier.  The "easy" way is to get a fret file which has a handle and typically 3 different profile rounded concave files.  Filing with this puts the proper curve in.  I find it difficult to do this smoothly.  I use a triangle file and do multiple angles and just keep careful watch on the fret.  Stay away from the top of the fret as that's already perfect.  Of course, before you do any filing, use painters tape to protect the fretboard.  Once the profile is set, do the same thing by hand with 3 grits of sandpaper.  100, 300'ish and 1000'ish.  This removes the file and sand scratches.  Finally, use fine steel wool to polish the fret.  It should now look brand new.  Now, you want to get rid of any protruding frets that'll feel sharp.  This can be done with a flat file.  You file down the length of the neck and like with the tops, rock up, so you get the small curve meeting the fret top.  Both sides, of course.  When done, make sure you didn't create sharp edges and lightly file if needed.

An optional thing I always do is to round the wood between the frets.  This gives the neck a well worn feel and is amazingly better feeling than a squared off edge.  Use sandpaper and a sanding sponge edge and pay attention and stop often.  You're just looking to remove the sharp edge at the edge of the neck.  The cheaper the guitar (say a Squier), the more square it's going to be and the more work you'll have to do.  Pay close attention and take off less material than you want to.  You can always take off more.  You want to keep the profile of the finished product consistent down the fretboard.  When you're done, clean to top of the fretboard.

Another optional thing I always do is to sand the back of the neck.  You know how people talk about Music Man necks and anything EVH is bare wood?  Well, it's not.  It's just well sanded.  Just take some 300 or 400 grit by hand and sand the entire back of the neck.  Feel how smooth and easy to move it becomes.  If you really want that Music Man feel, get a bottle of tru oil.  It's a gunstock protector.  Put a small amount on a paper towel and rub it onto the back of the sanded neck.  Wait 45 seconds and wipe it off with a clean paper towel.  Do it again.  Wait overnight and now use any good car wax and wax the back of the neck.  You now have the feel of a $3000 guitar.

Bolt everything back together.  Use graphite (I use an actual pencil) and "write" into the nut slots.  Put some kind of goop under the string tree(s) of a guitar that has them.  Then use graphite on the saddles.  All this is to allow the strings to move when they need to move.  I've heard seasoned guitarists who don't do this at a gig and you hear them tune between songs and there's that sudden "ping".  Yah....the string was bound up and then suddenly moves.  Their guitar will never stay in tune and yours will.

I found this was a fun hobby and that I could make any guitar play better.  It takes some guts to sand away at frets, so it's a good idea to start with cheap craigslist guitars.  But I'll warn you that Squiers take at least an hour or 2 longer than a Mexican strat because they're that bad.  Oh, and throw those Squier pickups in the trash.  They hurt my ears.

GuitarStv

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #59 on: September 15, 2021, 07:16:28 AM »
the only thing is that I have soft skin, and it's taking a while for my fingertips to toughen up.

What gauge strings are you playing?  Lighter strings are a little easier on the hands, so going down a gauge might be something to consider.

As far as fingertips, soreness and pain is OK and can be ignored.  You want to stop when you get blisters though - playing through blisters will just rip the tough layer of skin you've been building away and expose soft delicate skin below.  Not to mention it hurts.

Most beginners have far more finger discomfort because they tend to apply too much pressure on the strings.  A good exercise to do is take a few minutes every time you start playing guitar and fret a note with a finger.  Then lighten up the pressure until it just starts to buzz.  Apply just a hair more pressure, and you're at the optimum that your hand needs to be squeezing to get the note to sound out.  Any more than this and you're only pulling the strings out of tune and hurting your hand.  Do this with each finger while fretting a couple times, and try doing it while holding some chords as well.  It'll help you relax a bit more while playing which will increase your speed as well as lessen fretting discomfort.

Multiple shorter sessions also tend to be better for toughening up the fingers than fewer longer sessions.

pecunia

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #60 on: September 15, 2021, 08:23:06 AM »
If you really want your guitar to be properly setup, look on tdpri for Ron Kirn's "book".  I learned from him and for a time was buying, modifying, setting up guitars as a hobby.  I did everything on a very low budget.  I went to a counter top installation company and asked them if I could go through their dumpster.  I found a great piece of marble to use for leveling frets.  I used the adhesive and sandpaper Ron recommended.  The feeler gauges and scale are used to set string height and relief (bend of the neck).  In short, here's what I've done many, many times.  It's not for everyone.

1: Remove the neck.  (Remember I was mostly doing strats and teles).
2: Remove the low e and b tuners.
3: Remove the nut.  Use some low heat from something like a dryer if needed.

You should build a jig.  It would hold the heel of the neck down....screwed to the jig.  On the tuner end, I use sanding sponges as they won't harm the finish and are stiff enough to hold the neck in place.

4: Screw the neck to the jig.  Don't put the sponges at the other end yet.
5: Adjust the neck with the truss rod to make it perfectly straight.

I use 2 things to make sure it's straight.  First, a carpenter square.  This relies on the frets, so it's only my first shot.  Next, I have a straight edge that's 21 inches long.  I've notched out for frets to sit inside the notches.  Note that a Les Paul scale simply omits the first fret of a strat scale, so you don't need more than one of these.  I use this to make sure the fretboard itself is level.  Use something like a piece of paper to be sure it's straight.  The cheaper the guitar, the harder it is or impossible.  If you need more relief (bow) in 3 places and less in 3 other places, don't be concerned.  Especially with junk like Squiers, the fretboard will never be flat, so you need to just work with the frets.

6: Put the jig on a work bench.  I clamp it down, then put the sponges under where the nut was.  This holds the whole neck very flat.  Some people even put rags under the rest of the neck to keep it from moving at all.  I only did this with really expensive stuff or if I was doing someone else's guitar.

7:  Now it's time to level.  First mark the frets.  Take a black dry erase market and color the tops of all the frets.  You now take your marble 25+ inch with sandpaper and sand along the length of the neck.  Rock the tool from the bass side to the treble side.  This gives you sanding along the entire fret length.  Oh...I used 100 grit sandpaper.  I've seen other grits used, but this looks good to me.  After 5 or 6 times, look carefully at the frets wrt the marker.  You'll see very low frets because they will still have all the marks.  Well worn frets from strings digging in will become obvious.  Your goal is to remove all the low spots.  So low frets are at least touched and string marks are gone.  With a really badly worn set of frets, you might compromise and get most of the string marks and leave just a little.  I always remember that it is actually possible to play a guitar without frets.  So I never am concerned that the frets will get too low.  I also prefer lower (vintage frets) on older Mexican strats to newer medium jumbo that from memory, started maybe around 2000 or so.

8: The frets are now level along the entire fretboard.  Yay!  Next, you need to crown them.  This is putting the round profile back on them, which also centers the note on the fret when the string is pressed.  There are several ways to do this and I actually find the harder way easier.  The "easy" way is to get a fret file which has a handle and typically 3 different profile rounded concave files.  Filing with this puts the proper curve in.  I find it difficult to do this smoothly.  I use a triangle file and do multiple angles and just keep careful watch on the fret.  Stay away from the top of the fret as that's already perfect.  Of course, before you do any filing, use painters tape to protect the fretboard.  Once the profile is set, do the same thing by hand with 3 grits of sandpaper.  100, 300'ish and 1000'ish.  This removes the file and sand scratches.  Finally, use fine steel wool to polish the fret.  It should now look brand new.  Now, you want to get rid of any protruding frets that'll feel sharp.  This can be done with a flat file.  You file down the length of the neck and like with the tops, rock up, so you get the small curve meeting the fret top.  Both sides, of course.  When done, make sure you didn't create sharp edges and lightly file if needed.

An optional thing I always do is to round the wood between the frets.  This gives the neck a well worn feel and is amazingly better feeling than a squared off edge.  Use sandpaper and a sanding sponge edge and pay attention and stop often.  You're just looking to remove the sharp edge at the edge of the neck.  The cheaper the guitar (say a Squier), the more square it's going to be and the more work you'll have to do.  Pay close attention and take off less material than you want to.  You can always take off more.  You want to keep the profile of the finished product consistent down the fretboard.  When you're done, clean to top of the fretboard.

Another optional thing I always do is to sand the back of the neck.  You know how people talk about Music Man necks and anything EVH is bare wood?  Well, it's not.  It's just well sanded.  Just take some 300 or 400 grit by hand and sand the entire back of the neck.  Feel how smooth and easy to move it becomes.  If you really want that Music Man feel, get a bottle of tru oil.  It's a gunstock protector.  Put a small amount on a paper towel and rub it onto the back of the sanded neck.  Wait 45 seconds and wipe it off with a clean paper towel.  Do it again.  Wait overnight and now use any good car wax and wax the back of the neck.  You now have the feel of a $3000 guitar.

Bolt everything back together.  Use graphite (I use an actual pencil) and "write" into the nut slots.  Put some kind of goop under the string tree(s) of a guitar that has them.  Then use graphite on the saddles.  All this is to allow the strings to move when they need to move.  I've heard seasoned guitarists who don't do this at a gig and you hear them tune between songs and there's that sudden "ping".  Yah....the string was bound up and then suddenly moves.  Their guitar will never stay in tune and yours will.

I found this was a fun hobby and that I could make any guitar play better.  It takes some guts to sand away at frets, so it's a good idea to start with cheap craigslist guitars.  But I'll warn you that Squiers take at least an hour or 2 longer than a Mexican strat because they're that bad.  Oh, and throw those Squier pickups in the trash.  They hurt my ears.

Great description - One thing I have a bit of trouble with is the intonation.  It's good enough on my kit guitars, but not perfect.  It's the one with the tune o matic bridge that seems a bit off.  It's an SG knock off and I wonder if it's just the way the guitar is designed.

I've spent too much time tinkering with the stuff and not enough learning to play.

GuitarStv

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #61 on: September 15, 2021, 08:55:23 AM »
I've done my own setups, re-fretted guitars, levelled and  and built a few from scratch . . . it's all doable.  Honestly though, I'd strongly recommend that if someone is learning to play they just take their instrument in to a luthier and get it set up properly.  It's probably going to cost a little under a hundred bucks, but is worth it.  A decent setup will make a guitar easier to play and as long as you're not changing string gauges too often you'll be good for several years after a setup.

The goal is to learn to play . . . not become a guitar tech, right?  After a few years of playing, when you start to get some experience under your belt and you figure out what kind of setup your playing needs (the way that you play will impact the kind of setup you want . . . ) then it makes more sense to learn to tweak this stuff.  But you'll be doing it from a player's perspective where you know if a tweak that is made is actually better or not.  As a noob it's very easy to make changes for the worse so I wouldn't recommend messing around with it all that much.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #62 on: September 15, 2021, 09:33:22 AM »
I've done my own setups, re-fretted guitars, levelled and  and built a few from scratch . . . it's all doable.  Honestly though, I'd strongly recommend that if someone is learning to play they just take their instrument in to a luthier and get it set up properly.  It's probably going to cost a little under a hundred bucks, but is worth it.  A decent setup will make a guitar easier to play and as long as you're not changing string gauges too often you'll be good for several years after a setup.

The goal is to learn to play . . . not become a guitar tech, right?  After a few years of playing, when you start to get some experience under your belt and you figure out what kind of setup your playing needs (the way that you play will impact the kind of setup you want . . . ) then it makes more sense to learn to tweak this stuff.  But you'll be doing it from a player's perspective where you know if a tweak that is made is actually better or not.  As a noob it's very easy to make changes for the worse so I wouldn't recommend messing around with it all that much.

This.  I took my mandolin into the music store where I took my lessons, and it sounded so much better after he was finished with it.

pecunia

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #63 on: September 15, 2021, 02:18:18 PM »
I've done my own setups, re-fretted guitars, levelled and  and built a few from scratch . . . it's all doable.  Honestly though, I'd strongly recommend that if someone is learning to play they just take their instrument in to a luthier and get it set up properly.  It's probably going to cost a little under a hundred bucks, but is worth it.  A decent setup will make a guitar easier to play and as long as you're not changing string gauges too often you'll be good for several years after a setup.

The goal is to learn to play . . . not become a guitar tech, right?  After a few years of playing, when you start to get some experience under your belt and you figure out what kind of setup your playing needs (the way that you play will impact the kind of setup you want . . . ) then it makes more sense to learn to tweak this stuff.  But you'll be doing it from a player's perspective where you know if a tweak that is made is actually better or not.  As a noob it's very easy to make changes for the worse so I wouldn't recommend messing around with it all that much.

Guilty as charged.  However, i built a bass guitar and gave it to my nephew for Christmas.  I think he liked it a lot more than if I had played him a few tunes.  I was gone all week when i was working so building them when I got home on every other weekend worked pretty well.  I don't think it will hurt me in my learning.

megaschnauzer

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #64 on: September 16, 2021, 06:24:37 AM »
so i'm pretty good at picking out basic chords in a song, i guess 'cowboy chords' and minor and 7th chords. it gets more difficult to figure out the more complex chords i guess because the changes are more subtle. i can hear the difference between a minor chord and a minor 7th chord when i'm playing by myself but when i'm playing along with a song i have a hard time telling the difference. to my ear either chord works. maybe one slightly better than the other but maybe not. and when it comes to really complex chords i'm at a loss. i guess this is where training my ear to hear correctly comes into play. for me it's hard to pick out the information for the chords in the mix of the music.

blue_green_sparks

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Re: Guitarists.. how did you learn?
« Reply #65 on: September 16, 2021, 08:04:50 AM »
I don't play guitar, but I am good to have around because I play bass and keyboards. I started on piano but from the very beginning bandmates suggested I learn bass guitar and left hand bass on keys so that "we can make more money", LOL. Even though I have played in original and cover bands for 40 years; yet I doubt I have made dollar one....however I really enjoy it. I have been out of action except for songwriting because of the virus...I do have my priorities.